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literacy lesson compare and contrast.rtf

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									Grade 4/5 Literacy Lesson
Writing – Text Forms (Compare and Contrast) Entire lesson and activity suitable for both grades
Description: Students will learn about the types of things they can compare and contrast. First
we will brainstorm the concept, come up with a workable definition of compare and contrast
followed by a read aloud, and a shared comparing and contrasting places activity.
Overall Expectation – Grade 4                      Overall Expectation – Grade 5
1. generate, gather, and organize ideas and                1. generate, gather, and organize ideas and
information to write for an intended purpose and           information to write for an intended purpose and
audience;                                                  audience;
2. draft and revise their writing, using a variety of      2. draft and revise their writing, using a variety of
informational, literary, and graphic forms and stylistic   informational, literary, and graphic forms and stylistic
elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;         elements appropriate for the purpose and audience;
Specific Expectation – Grade 4                             Specific Expectations – Grade 5
Organizing Ideas                                           Organizing Ideas
1.5 identify and order main ideas and supporting           1.5 identify and order main ideas and supporting
details and group them into units that could be used to    details and group them into units that could be used to
develop a                                                  develop several linked paragraphs, using a variety of
summary, using a variety of graphic and                    strategies.
organizational patterns                                    Form
Form                                                       2.1 write longer and more complex texts using a
2.1 write more complex texts using a variety of forms      variety of forms
Groupings:                                                 Approaches: Brainstorming, Read Aloud,
Whole class, partners                                      Predicting, Modelled & Shared Writing, Graphic
                                                           Organizer
Materials Needed                                           Assessment and Evaluation
Chart paper, markers, copy of the book, pictures of        For this introductory lesson, assessment will be
urban and rural settings                                   observation and anecdotal notes. Teacher will
                                                           circulate while students are talking and generating
                                                           their own lists.
Lesson:
   1. Gather students on the carpet. Review carpet rules. Ask students if they have seen brand new
       construction going on. Ask them what land looked like before construction. Show pictures of
       rural and urban settings and ask students to discuss with their elbow partner (in 30 cm. voices)
       what they see and make note of similarities and differences. Allow 2 minutes. Gather feedback –
       post pictures on chart paper and write student observations. Review what they’ve brainstormed
       and tell them that what they have just done is a form called compare and contrast. Generate a
       definition on the chart paper – chart 1.
   2. Show them the book Where Once There was a Wood by Denise Fleming, and ask them if they
       could finish the title by adding ..and now there is… what would it be? (prediction)
   3. Read the book aloud.
   4. Discuss their predictions and ask how this book is related to the pictures shown earlier.
   5. On fresh chart (Chart 1 - see sample below) review definition of compare and contrast. Tell
       students this is a skill they will be using in their own writing after we look at how the author used
       comparison and contrast.
   6. Model. Ask students to remember the details from the book of the wood, meadow and creek.
       Record student responses.
   7. Show students last two pages of book (neighbourhood). Mention that the description is different
       from the rest of the places.
   8. Have students give descriptive details about the neighbourhood. Record on chart.
   9. Have students look at the descriptions for each area and think about thinks that are similar and
       things that are different. Turn to elbow partner and discuss what you think/observed. (1 minute).
       Ask for and record student responses. (Chart 2 will be saved for a future activity)
   10. Partner activity. Have students return to desks and work with a partner (person on their right at
       their group table). Think of four or five places you find interesting. Choose two of those places
       you and your partner can compare and contrast. Make a list on ½ piece of chart paper, of specific
       details which describe these places. Try to have a list of 5 – 7 details for each place.
   11. Share. Ask students to share details and post list on board. Have audience comment about which
       details are effective and ask for more specific information if details are too general. Make any
       additions/changes to partner charts.
   12. Discuss as a whole group whether or not they can spot any similarities or differences between
       places chosen.
   13. This activity/lesson would continue for another day or two as students practice determining
       similarities and differences. We will practice compare and contrast for people, time, objects, etc.
       We will also be using the class generated chart to write (Shared Writing) a compare and contrast
       paragraph – followed by students writing their own paragraphs from their own lists. This lesson
       will also lead into likely a Social Studies lesson – comparing and contrasting ancient villages,
       political systems, provinces, climates etc. (will also work for science)


Note: A lot of practice, both guided and independent will be needed before this writing strategy
can effectively be used in social studies or science. I would suggest that this be done early in
the year, well before you are ready to do any assessment activities for a 4/5 social studies or
science unit. Once the concept is fairly secure, student exemplars and co-created rubrics can
be posted on the walls. I’ve done this activity with a Grade 6 class in Science (Biodiversity unit)
and believe me a lot of practice is needed before it can be applied effectively. It is also really
important that you show students all the different types of things that you can apply this strategy
to – things, people, places, objects, animals, numbers,-(fractions, decimals, rations, prices in
grocery flyers, etc). That way it is easier to transfer the knowledge across curriculum areas and
in their own lives.
                       Where Once There Was a Wood by Denise Fleming
                                        Chart 1
               Comparison                                       Contrast
Likeness between two or more items          Differences between two or more items
                  Where Once There Was a Wood by Denise Fleming
                                   Chart 2
        Wood, meadow, creek                            Neighbourhood

-   Lots of plants and animals             -   Houses
-   Flowers and bushes                     -   Lawns
-   Minnows                                -   Streets
-                                          -

								
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