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Island A

VIEWS: 2 PAGES: 5

									                                  The Federation of the Isles
         There are four islands, A, B, C and D. These are self-sufficient and constitute the entire world.

Island A
         Island A has a population of 200. 60 of these are of school-going age. There is one school on the
island, with 7 teachers. Each teacher can teach a maximum of 10 students. There is a bank on island A, which
opens on Tuesdays and Thursdays only. There is a hotel on island A, with accommodation for 200. All rooms
sleep two and cost £30 per night. The hotel is operated by Great Island Hotels. There is one shop, operated by
Tesco (Island) Ltd., selling potatoes and carrots, which is the staple diet of the islanders. The Tesco store is
adjacent to the harbour, and goods are off -loaded directly from the ferry into the storeroom.
         Transport facilities on island A consist of a harbour and an airport. The airport is open only on
weekdays. There is one circular bus route in operation on the island, serving the harbour, the airport, the bank,
the school, the hotel and the bus station.
         Island A has the only TV transmitter in the world.

1999/2000
         Island A is grassland, surrounded by beaches.
         The Industry on island A is seaweed cultivation and processing.
         Seaweed harvesting is labour intensive employing 50 people. It’s an all year round activity; 500 tons
are harvested per year. Harvested seaweed is transported from collection points by truck to the harbour.
         50 tons are used per year in seaweed baths for the tourist trade. The seaweed baths generate £ 0.2m
annually in tourist revenue.
         400 tons of fertiliser is shipped to the co-op on Island B.
         Seaweed is also used to manufacture medicines, employing 20 people and using 50 tons of seaweed
generating £2m. The output from the seaweed farms and Medicine factory is transferred to the Co-op on island
B, by ferry. The medicine is transferred by air to the hospital on island D.



Island B
          Island B has a population of 80. 15 of these are of school-going age. There is a bank on island B, which
opens on Wednesdays and Fridays only. There is a hospital on island B which has 50 beds. It specialises in
cardiac and neurological complaints, and also has an A&E dept. The hospital has one ambulance which is on
call 24 hours a day. There is one shop, operated by Tesco (Island) Ltd., selling potatoes and carrots, which is the
staple diet of the islanders.
         Island B has 10 holiday chalets, each accommodating 6 people, at £60 per night. These are operated by
Great Island Hotels, and are linked to the reservation system in the hotel on island A.
          Transport facilities on island B consist of a harbour, a bridge to island C and a tunnel to island D. There
is one circular bus route in operation on the island, serving the harbour, the bank, the school and the bus station.
There are also routes from the bus station to islands C and D..

1999/2000
         Island B is mountainous with a rocky coastline.
         The Industries on island B are the Co-op, employing 100 people and forestry employing 10.
         The Forestry business has 400 acres planted with coniferous trees. Twenty acres are harvested to
produce 400 tons of trees per annum. Harvested forest is replanted each year. 5 people are employed in the
harvesting process and 5 people are employed in replanting. 100 tons of firewood are produced yearly and sent
to the Co-op.
         300 tons of felled trees go to the sawmill. 10 people are employed in the sawmill, producing 150 tons
of timber, which is transferred by truck to the Co-op. From the Co-op it is transported by truck to the furniture
factory on
Island D.


Island C
          Island C has a population of 100. 30 of these are of school-going age. There is one school on the island,
with 5 teachers. Each teacher can teach a maximum of 10 students. There is a bank on island C, which opens
every weekday, There is one shop, operated by Tesco (Island) Ltd., selling potatoes and carrots, which is the
staple diet of the islanders.
         Transport facilities on island C consist of a bridge to island B. There is one circular bus route in
operation on the island, serving the bridge, the bank, the school and the bus station. Another route operates
across the bridge to island B.
         Island C has a broadcast radio transmitter.

1999/2000
          Island C has 400 acres of arable land; the main crops are potatoes, carrots, rotated with barley. The
island is sheltered by a tree line 1 km wide by 20 km long. Planting must be kept 0.5 km away from the edge of
the tree line.
         There is one farm owned by John Cartel, employing 10 people.
         This farms produces 50 tons of potatoes, 10 tons of carrots, 40 tons of barley.
         5 tons of potatoes, 1 ton of carrots and 4 tons of barley are used to produce seed for the following
year.
          All root crops are sent to the Co-op by truck. Barley, used for the production of flour, is brought to the
local flourmill by tractor.
         The mill employs 5 people, producing 15 tons of flour. The flour is transported to the co-op by truck.
         Island C uses 120 tons of seaweed fertiliser from the Co-op per year.
         20 local people travel by bus to work at the Co-op on island B.



Island D
          Island D has a population of 400. 20 of these are of school-going age. There is one school on the
island, with 3 teachers. Each teacher can teach a maximum of 10 students. There is a bank on island D, which
opens on Mondays only. There is a hospital with 100 beds, specialising in geriatrics and maternity. There is one
shop, operated by Tesco (Island) Ltd., selling potatoes and carrots, which is the staple diet of the islanders. All
the vegetables on sale in Tesco (Island) branches are grown (organically) by Tom and Margaret Jones, on island
D. Tom makes deliveries to the Tesco (Island) stores on islands B,C and D using his truck, and loads deliveries
for island A onto the ferry at island B.


         Transport facilities on island D consist of an airport, and a tunnel to island B The airport is open only
on weekdays. There is one circular bus route in operation on the island, serving the airport, the bank, the school,
the hospital and the bus station. There is also bus route between the bus station and island B.

1999/2000
         Island D has 600 acres under tillage with rocky coastline.
         The main crops are potatoes, carrots, rotated with fallow land every four years.
         There is one farm owned by Tom Jones, employing 100 people.
         This farms produces 100 tons of potatoes, 20 tons of carrots. 10 tons of potatoes and 2 tons of carrots
are used to produce seed. Island D uses 280 tons of seaweed fertiliser from the Co-op per year. This produce is
transported by truck to the Co-op.
        30 people are employed in the furniture factory, producing £0.5m of furniture.
        The furniture is transported by truck to the Tesco outlets.
        50 local people travel by bus to work at the Co-op on Island B.



Telecommunications
         Every home, hospital, bank, school, hotel etc. has a connection to the inter-island telecommunications
network. The inter-island network consists of fibre-optic links between islands B and C, and B and D (along the
tunnels and bridges), and RF links between A and B, and A and D. These inter-island links each have a capacity
equivalent to 30 simultaneous telephone calls. These entire network can accommodate voice and data
communications. In addition, a mobile telephone network is in operation, and users can use their handsets on
any of the four islands, but not on the ferry or the aircraft.
        Every home has a radio and TV set.

Banking System
         The Banking System is operated by Allied Island Banks (AIB). Customers may open an account at any
branch. Details of their account are maintained at that branch only. However, customers may make lodgements,
withdrawals and may check their balance in any of the four branches. The branches use the inter-island
communications network to exchange account information. In the event that a bank is isolated due to a
communications failure, it can only process transactions on local accounts.

1999/2000
Co-op
         The Co-op receives produce from the islands, and distributes goods on demand to the Tesco outlets and
hospitals.
        The Co-op makes payments electronically every Saturday to the producers' bank accounts.
        Orders can be placed seven days a week, but are only processed on Mondays and Wednesdays.
        The Co-op owns a fleet of trucks and the ferry.



Great Island Hotels Reservation System
         Reservations may only be made by phoning the central reservation system in the hotel on island A. In
the event of a telecommunications failure between islands A and B, reservations may not be made for the
chalets on island B.
Schools
         All schools teach a common curriculum. If there are not enough student places on a particular island,
then students must travel to another island for their education.

Hospitals
          Both hospitals, in addition to their specialities, also treat general patients. If one hospital is full, general
patients can be treated at the other. However, speciality complaints may only be treated at the appropriate
hospital. Patients are admitted into the hospitals, and each patient occupies a bed. After admission, patients are
either cured or killed. Either way, they occupy a bed for a certain period, after which the bed is available for use
by another patient.

Transport
         The aircraft can operate in winds up to force 10, while the ferry can operate in winds up to force 6. In
addition, the aircraft can operate only in good visibility (>2km), while the ferry is equipped with radar and
navigation aids, and can operate in low visibility (>20m). Air and sea schedules may be interrupted, if
necessary, in order to transfer patients to hospitals in emergencies. A single aircraft operates the route between
islands A and D, while a single ferry operates the route between A and B.
         The ferry can accommodate 50 and operates an hourly round-trip schedule, leaving island A on the
hour, and island B on the half-hour. The aircraft can accommodate 20 and also operates an hourly round-trip
schedules, leaving island A on the hour and island D on the half-hour.
         The bus system is operated by Coras Iompair Islands (CII) . Its main base is on island B, where it
maintains one spare bus and a mechanic. It also maintains a spare bus and a mechanic on island A. All buses
accommodate 50 and on the circular routes, operate a half hourly schedule. On the B-D inter-island route, the
bus leaves island B on the hour, and island D on the half-hour. On the B-C inter-island route, the bus leaves
island C on the hour and island B on the half-hour. There is one bus on each bus route.

1999/2000
         There is a fleet of 15 trucks in the Co-op's depot, operated by a crew of 10 drivers. Each truck's
capacity is 1 ton. After hauling 10 tons they require maintenance which lasts 5 days.
         The ferry has a capacity of 2 trucks, and 50 people. The ferry capacity is reduced to 1 truck where
gale force 5 is exceeded. The ferry operates 320 days of the year before it requires maintenance.
        Firewood is collected from the sawmill on Wednesdays, and transported by truck to the co-op. Timber
is collected from the sawmill on Mondays and Thursdays and brought to the co-op.
         Seaweed is transported by ferry, from harbour A to the co-op on Mondays and Tuesdays.
         Tractors are used by the farmers to sow, fertilise and harvest crops, and transport barley grain to the
mill. They are also used in the forest to bring felled trees to the sawmill.
         The aircraft is used for 4 hourly medicine drops to island D and to transport medical staff and patients
island A's hospital. The aircraft is used to transport 20 workers per day for the seaweed baths during the 6 th to
the 9th month inclusive. The aircraft is also used to transport 30 seasonal seaweed harvesters during harvesting
peaks from the 8th to the 12th month inclusive.



Acknowledgements
        The original concept of the Federation of the Isles is due to Dr. Mícheál Mac an Airchinnigh, who also
provided an outline of the original map.
         The first set of requirements were produced as a group project by the students taking CS605 at the
N.U.I., Maynooth, in the academic year 1998/1999...
1999/2000
        The 1999/2000 delta requirements on “Vegetation” were produced as a group project by the students
taking CS605 at the N.U.I., Maynooth, in the academic year 1999/2000: Padraig Macklin, Damian Tierney,
Jianming Zou, Phil Bourke, Paul O'Connor, Pat Brady.

								
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