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					THE

GUIDE TO

SAVE BIODIVERSITY

www.countdown2010.net

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Foreword
Dear Partner, Supporter and Ambassador of Countdown 2010, This Countdown 2010 Guide is designed to help you to get active around the 2010 biodiversity target and to bring your organisation and its activities under the banner of the Countdown 2010 initiative: Let’s join forces on our common goal, let’s work together to save biodiversity by 2010! The environmental movement has many different scientific and institutional approaches to biodiversity that it sometimes sounds like an orchestra playing three concerts at the same time. As long as we describe the world in so many ways, it is for many in the public domain either confusing, disheartening or simply incapacitating. I believe that the 2010 biodiversity target provides us with a unique opportunity to rethink how we can unify the purpose of all our different conservation activities in a way that allows society to see the common objective under which there are different ways of working. So, here is a major challenge to our community: how do we rationalize the many voices, the many different research entry points that we have in biodiversity, and bundle them in a way that the rest of society can relate to – not as an orchestra of hundreds of different voices, but as a chorus of people and institutions – different and diverse – but with messages and answers that the rest of society can understand? No doubt there have been many mass movements, relatively small groups campaigning on a wide range of issues, but humanity has only occasionally really acted collectively. What is needed now is a “majority movement”, since governments alone will not be able to achieve the 2010 biodiversity target signed by their Heads of States. They will have to lead but also need to be led in order to take a “giant leap for mankind” in order to reverse the trends of biodiversity loss and to set humanity on a more sustainable path. Whether you are already well underway or just getting started, we hope this Guide will provide you with more ideas for action and information on the 2010 biodiversity target. Turn these pages, identify your entry points and join the growing movement around the 2010 biodiversity target! We wish you all the best with your work towards 2010. Best regards,

Sebastian Winkler Head of Countdown 2010

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Table of Contents
Countdown 2010 Guide ........................................................................................................................................................................ 1 Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Info .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Why Countdown 2010? ..................................................................................................................................................................... 5 What is the 2010 biodiversity target?................................................................................................................................................. 5 Can the 2010 biodiversity target be met? .......................................................................................................................................... 6 What needs to happen?..................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Goals and Objectives ........................................................................................................................................................................ 7 Structure of Countdown 2010 ............................................................................................................................................................ 8 The role of individual partners ........................................................................................................................................................... 8 The Partners’ Assembly..................................................................................................................................................................... 9 The Advisory Board ......................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Ambassadors................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Secretariat ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Assessment Tools ........................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Communication Tools ...................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Resources ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Facts on Biodiversity........................................................................................................................................................................ 15 Glossary .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 Key documents................................................................................................................................................................................ 19 List of Countdown 2010 Partners .................................................................................................................................................... 20 Countdown 2010 Factsheet............................................................................................................................................................. 23 Countdown 2010 Declaration .......................................................................................................................................................... 25

Info
This publication is available from: Countdown 2010 Secretariat IUCN - The World Conservation Union Regional Office for Europe (ROfE) Boulevard Louis Schmidt 64 1040 Brussels Belgium Tel: +32 (0)2 739 03 20 Fax: +32 (0)2 732 94 99 Email: info @ countdown2010.net

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Why Countdown 2010?
When Heads of State committed themselves at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development to ‘achieve by 2010 a significant reduction in the current rate of loss of biological diversity’, this ambitious target was lauded as an historic step into the right direction. Several scientific reports have since confirmed the gravity of the situation: The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment found nearly two thirds of ecosystem services worldwide in decline, the IUCN Red List now covers more than 16.000 endangered species and the average abundance of species has declined by 40% in only thirty years. The Global Biodiversity Outlook consequentially concluded that reaching the 2010 biodiversity target would require unprecedented additional efforts at national, regional and global levels. In Europe, more than 100 partners ranging from national to local governments, from non-governmental organisations to businesses have started to take up this challenge. They have created Countdown 2010, a powerful network of active partners working together to reach the 2010 biodiversity target. Each partner commits extra efforts towards the 2010 biodiversity target. Acting together, they create a joint momentum to save biodiversity. The Countdown 2010 Secretariat – hosted by the IUCN Regional Office for Europe – facilitates and encourages action, promotes the importance of the 2010 biodiversity target and assesses progress towards 2010.

What is the 2010 biodiversity target?
More than one decade after the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the recognition of biodiversity loss has gained high political profile both at global, national and regional levels. This has resulted in ambitious commitments for action by heads of states, initiated in 2001 in the European Union. While at global level, the target is ‘to achieve a significant reduction of the current rate of biodiversity loss’, the one addressed at EU and pan-European level, is even more ambitious as to ‘halt the loss of biodiversity’. Important dates and events are:

conservation of biodiversity; the sustainable use of its components; and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from genetic resources.

4 September 2002, Johannesburg, South Africa: the achievement by 2010 of a significant reduction in the current rate of loss of biological diversity The UN World Summit on Sustainable Development, held to increase efforts to reverse environmental degradation and combat poverty, identified the critical role of biodiversity and endorsed the 2010 biodiversity target.

23 May 2003, Kiev, Ukraine: reinforce our objective to halt the loss of biological diversity at all levels by the year 2010 Environment Ministers and Heads of delegation from 51 countries in the UNECE region adopted the Kiev Resolution on Biodiversity at the fifth Ministerial Conference “Environment for Europe” and defined objectives to achieve the 2010 biodiversity target.

16 June 2001, Gothenburg, Sweden: biodiversity decline should be halted with the aim of reaching this objective by 2010 Under the Swedish Presidency, Heads of State of the European Union agreed on the EU strategy for sustainable development. Mentioned for the first time, the 2010 biodiversity target became one of its headline objectives for managing and conserving natural resources.

22 May 2006, Brussels, Belgium: to deliver the 2010 biodiversity target and put biodiversity on course to recovery The European Commission’s Communication on “Halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010 – and beyond” operationalises the 2010 biodiversity target with ten priority objectives and a detailed action plan containing more than 150 concrete and measurable action points with shared responsibility between Member States and the European Community.

19 April 2002, The Hague, the Netherlands: to achieve by 2010 a significant reduction of the current rate of biodiversity loss The 188 parties of the Convention on Biological Diversity made the 2010 biodiversity target the key mission to achieve their objectives: the

Halting the loss of biodiversity is central to RSPB’s mission. We supported the Countdown 2010 initiative from the beginning because it gave a much-needed higher profile for this goal and rallied many more organisations behind achieving it. Alistair Gammell, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, United Kingdom 5

Can the 2010 biodiversity target be met?
The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment concludes that it is possible to achieve a reduction in the rate of biodiversity loss for certain components of biodiversity and in certain regions within that time frame – with appropriate actions as a prerequisite. It is thus our responsibility to make this happen. However, a reduction in the overall rate of biodiversity loss is unlikely to be achieved by 2010. Indeed, current trends show no sign of a slowdown of biodiversity loss, and direct drivers of loss such as land use change and climate change are expected to increase further. Moreover, it can take many years for institutions to take actions and for the positive and negative impacts of human actions on biodiversity and ecosystems to become apparent. By 2010, it is thus crucial to have all necessary structures in place to halt the loss of nature. 2010 will also be the milestone to review progress on the target and define follow-up work. Since changes take place over different time frames, longer-term goals and targets say, for 2050 - are needed to guide policy and actions, in addition to shortterm targets.

What needs to happen?
The 2010 biodiversity target is just around the corner. There’s an emerging consensus about what needs to be done to save biodiversity within the next years: 1. Species and ecosystems need space to develop and recover. At least 10% of all ecosystem types should be under protection to maintain nature and natural landscapes. Without biodiversity there will be no agriculture. Farming practices should not jeopardize species survival: improving farmland diversity and reducing the usage of pesticides and fertiliser are key efforts to saving biodiversity. Organic agriculture practices can serve as an example in many areas. 75% of all fisheries are fully exploited or over-fished. Species like cod, haddock and halibut are already threatened. If we do not move towards sustainable use, there will be no fish left for our grandchildren. Roads, factories and housing destroy habitats for animals and plants. If urban and rural development continues to ignore nature, our surroundings will be dominated by concrete and pollution. 5. Climate change is considered to be the greatest challenge for humanity. With changing conditions, ecosystems and habitats will change as well. It is an obligation to fight climate change and make sure that species can migrate or adapt to new surroundings. If you release a species outside its usual habitat, it might simply die. In other cases, the so-called alien invasive species have thrived and destroyed local flora and fauna. As you never know how things turn out, reducing these invasions is crucial. Biodiversity is the foundation for sustainable development. Its ecosystem services provide the basis for all economic activity. Biodiversity concerns need thus be integrated into all areas of policymaking. Measures include market incentives, development assistance, biodiversity-friendly trade and international governance processes.

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Since the adoption of the Convention on Biological Diversity in 1992, most countries have developed National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans. These plans outline specific measures to reach the objectives of the convention and, more recently, the 2010 biodiversity target. All National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans can be found at www.biodiv.org/reports.

90% of Flemish biodiversity is present in Limburg, and every fourth species is found nowhere else. Thus, Limburg faces a particular challenge in halting the loss of biodiversity. The province takes species conservation very seriously. We aim to save our endemic species and improve their environment, build public support and create a nicer and more diverse environment for the people in Limburg. Limburg is committed to contribute to the efforts of all the partners to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2010. The Countdown begins… Frank Smeets, Deputee of Nature and Environment, Province of Limburg, Belgium 6

Goals and Objectives
Countdown 2010 was launched at the stakeholder conference "Sustaining Livelihoods and Biodiversity: Attaining the 2010 Target in the European Biodiversity Strategy” in Malahide, Ireland in 2004. This conference resulted in the Message of Malahide which today forms the foundation of the European Commission’s Biodiversity Communication. Since its creation, Countdown 2010 works towards the following goals and objectives: Goal All European governments and members of civil society, at every level, have taken the necessary actions to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2010 Objectives • Gain maximum public attention across Europe for the challenge of saving biodiversity by 2010; • Encourage and support the full implementation of all the existing binding international commitments and necessary actions to save biodiversity; • Demonstrate clearly what progress Europe makes in meeting the 2010 tiodiversity target. Principles • Sound science: all Countdown 2010 work is underpinned by sound science and/or relevant practical conservation experience and is carried out to the highest possible standard. • Transparency: Countdown 2010 is committed to the principle of transparency in process and decision making. It ensures public access to information, while respecting individual privacy and institutional confidentiality, as appropriate. • Subsidiarity: the Countdown 2010 Secretariat works at the most appropriate level (local, national, regional, multi-regional) and it undertakes only those Countdown 2010 activities that partners are unable to. • Autonomy: Countdown 2010 is an independent alliance. It is governed by the will of its partners through the institutional mechanisms in place (Advisory Board and Partners’ Assembly).

Countdown 2010 Organisation Chart

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Structure of Countdown 2010
Countdown 2010 is a strategic alliance with a minimum amount of bureaucratic structure and processes and a clear timeline to 2010. It operates through a highly decentralised system of partnerships, relying on existing environmental fora, local Agenda 21processes and IUCN national committees for the implementation of activities aimed at saving biodiversity. Though mainly active in Europe, Countdown 2010 is currently expanding its activities to other regions of the world. A broader Countdown 2010 Partners’ Assembly meets annually to review the overall direction of Countdown 2010. In its implementation, Countdown 2010 is guided by a core Advisory Board. The day-to-day work of the initiative lies with the Secretariat.

The role of individual partners
As a partner of Countdown 2010, you are Countdown 2010. It is the actions of all organisations involved that will generate the momentum to reach the 2010 biodiversity target. The 2010 biodiversity target provides a unique opportunity, both in its ambition and in the diversity of issues it touches upon. But just as biodiversity in itself depends on the variety of ecosystems, of species and genes, the success of Countdown 2010 rests to a large extent on the diversity of its partners and their work. Our claim is broad and simple, providing the space for organisations to continue their work with the tools and issues that are closest to their own core capacity and objectives. Zoos might focus on environmental education, Forestry enterprises on how to reduce their own impact on biodiversity, and some nongovernmental organisations will campaign for better implementation of nature legislation in Europe. Even if your core competencies are not linked to nature conservation, there is plenty of room for your organisation to do the same – we just ask that you tie in your usual activities and possibly more under the Countdown 2010 banner. Public institutions of all kinds, from national, regional and local governments and municipalities to international business and local NGOs, are joining the Countdown 2010 network. Aside from linking your organization with other similar organizations by becoming part of the growing network, partners also enjoy: • The usage of a persuasive communications platform, useful for not only spreading knowledge of the 2010 biodiversity target, but also for your own efforts. • Links to Countdown 2010 Partner initiatives in other countries, regions and cities. • The benefits of the many projects that the Countdown 2010 Secretariat is undertaking, such as “Mainstreaming Biodiversity into Regional and Local Action Planning”. • The support and usage of the Countdown 2010 Assessment Tools, as applicable. • Access and support to other Countdown 2010 products, including best practice examples. Partnership Procedure Partnership of Countdown 2010 is open to governments, local authorities, civil society, and private sector organizations which demonstrate a clear commitment to contribute toward the achievement of the 2010 biodiversity target. To join Countdown 2010, partners are requested to undersign the Countdown 2010 declaration stating its own specific commitments and the endorsement of Countdown 2010 principles and objectives. The declaration asks three steps from your organisation: 1. Support the 2010 biodiversity target; Encourage European decision makers to take action; Commit yourself to reducing biodiversity loss.

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The Partners’ Assembly
As all organisations are different, Countdown 2010 has no one-size-fits-all recipe how you can reduce biodiversity loss within the capacity of your organisation. However, we encourage you to define some specific commitments for your organisation. These commitments will be public, and the best projects will be featured on the website and in print. On the bottom of this page are some ideas for Countdown 2010 activities in your organisation. Participation All partners are expected to actively promote the alliance and contribute with actions towards reaching the 2010 biodiversity target. Partners will have the opportunity to participate in two different structures, according to their specific interest, core business or mandate: 1. National Countdown 2010 Hubs, gathering all the partners under the same banner. Where possible, the National Hub will correspond to already existing IUCN National Committees – or other existing fora. Partners’ Assembly as the annual meeting of the entire network. These structures are meant to facilitate the exchange of information among participants, the discussion of hot issues, and the identification of synergies, with the view of undertaking joint actions. Each structure will designate a focal point in order to ensure an adequate connection with the Countdown 2010 Secretariat. In particular, the national focal points will help in translating and adapting the communication material produced by the Countdown 2010 Secretariat to the national context and monitoring progress towards 2010 with the Countdown 2010 Assessment Tool. Business Countdown 2010’s business and biodiversity programme provides a networking platform beyond business associations and allows for showcasing positive examples in private sector contributions towards the 2010 biodiversity target through new environmentally friendly products, etc. Its partners show their commitment to Countdown 2010 and exchange experiences with similar sections of their industry for joint action. A broader Partners’ Assembly meets periodically to review the overall direction of Countdown 2010. All partners of Countdown 2010 are cordially invited to contribute. Since its first meeting in February 2004, the Partners’ Assembly performs the following functions: • presents ideas for themes for the attention of the Advisory Board and Secretariat; • serves as a forum for all partners of Countdown 2010, bringing together different types of stakeholders; • identifies other matters that require the attention of the Advisory Board and the Secretariat; • proposes some of its members to join the Advisory Board. It is not compulsory for partners of Countdown 2010 to attend the Partners’ Assembly. If they do so, partners are generally required to meet all the expenses of their attendance. Those partners that are unable to attend meetings will be encouraged to participate actively through other channels of communication.

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Suggestions for organisations’ commitments Contribute to Countdown 2010 1. Tell everyone that you've joined Countdown 2010: Place an article in your newsletter, issue a media release, use the logo on your homepage or in publications. Encourage your members and partners to join as well: Ask them personally, bring the issue up in meetings, refer to Countdown 2010 in your presentations. Tell us about your activities: Send us links, articles and newsletters on Countdown 2010 and let us know what you are up to. Take part in Countdown 2010: Come to meetings of the Partners’ Assembly, contribute your expertise to thematic working groups or link up with others in your national platform. Take action to save biodiversity 1. Is there a Biodiversity Strategy for the area you are working in? If yes: Does it have holes? What are the greatest obstacles for its implementation? What can you do to help overcome them? Maybe you even want to apply the Countdown 2010 Assessment Tool and find out how your area is doing in respect to Biodiversity? You might be communicating with a lot of people through your work. How can you make them aware of the importance of biodiversity? Can they take action towards the 2010 Biodiversity Target? Why don't you look at the ecological footprint of your organisation and take steps to reduce it? 9

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The Advisory Board
Countdown 2010 is guided by a core Advisory Board, whose members are appointed by the Secretariat, based on proposals from the Partners’ Assembly. The Advisory Board performs the following functions: • give strategic guidance to the Secretariat and oversee the achievement of the programme; • provide evaluation and quality control; • decide on themes to be promoted during each EU Presidency; • identify future Countdown 2010 activities; • advise and assist the Secretariat on communication and on financial aspects; • when requested by the Secretariat, decide on the use of the Countdown 2010 logo for activities by Countdown partners and other organizations; • revoke the partnership status of organizations that no longer meet partnership criteria or have misused the Countdown logo; • serve as ambassadors for Countdown 2010. Members of the Advisory Board (other than rotating representatives) serve for one year in their personal capacity and may be invited by the Secretariat to serve for further terms. The numbers of members may change if instrumental in the achievement of the Countdown 2010 goal. The first Advisory Board meeting took place in April 2004 in Brussels and since then meets regularly 2-3 times a year. Members are expected to attend all its meetings, at their own expense.

Members of the Countdown 2010 Advisory Board Alistair Gammell (Chair) Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, United Kingdom Sue Collins English Nature, United Kingdom Graham Bennett Syzygy Consulting, The Netherlands Elroy Bos World Conservation Union (IUCN), Switzerland Carlos Martin-Novella Ministerio de Medio Ambiente, Spain

Rob Maessen Province of Noord-Brabant, the Netherlands Georg Schwede WWF International, Switzerland

Sylvi Ofstad Samstag Ministry of the Environment, Norway

Despina Symons European Bureau for Conservation & Development, Belgium Presidency of the EU Rotating Seat 10

Rob Wolters European Centre for Nature Conservation, the Netherlands

European Commission Rotating Seat

Ambassadors
Countdown 2010 Ambassadors are an esteemed group of influential decision makers coming from any sector and level, working in any country or from an international scope, who can demonstrate their commitment to the 2010 biodiversity target. In their personal capacity, they will act to help reduce, or stop altogether, the loss of biodiversity. List of ambassadors (October 2006): • Aldo Cosentino, Italian Ministry of the Environment • Achim Steiner, United Nations Environment Programme Partners are encouraged to propose additional ambassadors.

Secretariat
A small Secretariat is responsible for the management and coordination of this decentralised system. At its first meeting in February 2004, the Partners’ Assembly requested the IUCN Regional Office for Europe (ROfE) to host the Countdown 2010 Secretariat. In its action, the Secretariat applies the principle of subsidiarity: it only undertakes those activities that the partners are not able to undertake by themselves. It profiles and builds on existing initiatives and products, adding value through communication, facilitation, coordination and profiling the work of its partners. The Secretariat therefore seeks to involve as many organizations and to form as many strategic partnerships as possible in order to achieve the objectives of Countdown 2010. The Secretariat performs the following functions: • provide overall day-to-day coordination of Countdown 2010; • undertake financial and human resource administration of the initiative; • strive to increase the number of participating organizations throughout Europe; • keep an updated database on partners and project implemented under Countdown 2010 umbrella; • invite participating organizations to become members of the Advisory Board; • communicate intensively with partners to build their understanding and ownership of Countdown 2010; • promote long- and short-term secondments of staff and interns from partners to the Secretariat; • develop and implement the communications and media strategy; • help prepare events; organize ad-hoc conference and workshop on Countdown 2010 issues; • authorise use of the Countdown 2010 logo for fundraising purposes. Contact Countdown 2010 Secretariat IUCN - The World Conservation Union Regional Office for Europe (ROfE) Boulevard Louis Schmidt 64 1040 Brussels Belgium Tel: +32 (0)2 739 03 20 Fax: +32 (0)2 732 94 99 Email: info @ countdown2010.net

It is a governments’ responsibility to fulfil their promise to save biodiversity by 2010. But we, the conservation community, can help them succeed in their efforts. Our efforts clearly show society that behind our overarching message there is hard evidence to support our claims. In the end, people can argue about ideas, but they cannot argue with reality. Achim Steiner, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme 11

Assessment Tools
The Countdown 2010 Assessment Tool will provide a quick and inexpensive means to demonstrate clearly what progress countries have made towards implementing the existing binding international commitments in relation to the 2010 biodiversity target. It focuses on responses and aims to encourage and remind countries of the urgency to increase their efforts in translating the target into action. The Countdown 2010 Secretariat is also planning to adapt the tool for regional and local usage. The first workshop to develop the methodology was hosted by the European Environment Agency in December 2005 in Copenhagen. One of the outcomes of that meeting was the decision to develop the tool at two levels; a rapid Readiness Assessment and a more detailed Comprehensive Assessment. The Readiness Assessment is simple to execute, yet capable of producing clear conclusions about the extent to which each country has taken certain basic steps (i.e. public statement on the 2010 biodiversity target, insertion of 2010 in the National Biodiversity Strategies etc.), since the adoption of the target by their governments. It is primarily a desk study intended to be usable by Countdown 2010 partners. In principle the relevant information should be readily available, either through public documents or through interviews with government officials. The Comprehensive Assessment is a much more detailed evaluation of a government’s (planned and ongoing) activities at a sectoral level. Each sector will have approximately ten specific questions, in a logical framework format, providing a more targeted view of policy responses to pressures and the commitments made within international fora. With both tools, the work will not be performed in isolation from within the secretariat, but in collaboration. In the case of the Readiness Assessment Tool, the results will be verified with a member of the government to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the assessment. For the Comprehensive Assessment Tool, data collection would be interactive from the start of the process via a collaborative process with governments and partners.

Countdown 2010 Website

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Communication Tools
Website The website countdown2010.net contains general information about the initiative and the 2010 biodiversity target and assembles latest news from partners and policy processes. We also link to relevant studies and reports on biodiversity and related issues. Please let us know if you would like to contribute. Newsletters The Countdown 2010 Newsletter appears bi-monthly and is sent by email to more than 800 individual Countdown 2010 supporters. To subscribe, go to countdown2010.net/update. Guidelines for logo use The Countdown 2010 Logo (see image) can be used by its partners in accordance with the goals and objectives of the initiative. The logo is a registered trade mark and all rights to its use can be withdrawn by the Countdown 2010 Secretariat. It cannot be used for fundraising activities and commercial purposes without receiving prior written consent from the Countdown 2010 Secretariat. Please inform the Countdown Secretariat each time the logo is used and send copies of publications produced with the logo. The Secretariat is also happy to provide you with a higher resolution or vector file. Links on the logo should go to www.countdown2010.net.

Countdown 2010 Newsletter – Table of Contents
September 2006 April 2006 • 2010 @ the Convention on Biological Diversity • 4th Biodiversity in Europe Conference • Making development cooperation work for biodiversity • Working together to save biodiversity in the Caucasus • Study warns of drastic biodiversity loss • Focus on... SVS/BirdLife Switzerland January 2006 • Editorial: About Countdown 2010 and its latest developments June 2006 • The EU’s Biodiversity Communication launched on International Biodiversity Day • Observations from Green Week 2006 - Biodiversity is Life! • Plan - Act - Review: Countdown 2010 and Assessment • Steering ahead. Partners of Countdown 2010 meet in Brussels • Do it yourself! Include the 2010 biodiversity target in the MDGs • Focus on... Georgian Centre for the Conservation of Wildlife • Measuring progress: The Countdown 2010 Assessment Toolkit • Become a Partner now: Sign the Declaration to save biodiversity by 2010! • Have your say: Contribute to the Consultation on the European Commission’s Biodiversity Communication • Act globally: The 2010 biodiversity target and the rest of the world • Act locally: Local governments joining the Countdown 2010 alliance - the example of Tilburg • Countdown 2010: Four Challenges for Four Years

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Feature on Biodiversity and Development Biodiversity in European Development Cooperation A decisive moment in the history of the 2010 biodiversity target Countdown 2010 going global? Neither fish nor fowl: Biodiversity's treasures in danger Do it yourself... Get your country to join Countdown 2010 Focus on... Black Country Living Landscape Welcome to new staff!

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Promoting Countdown 2010 The Countdown 2010 Secretariat has produced some material to introduce the initiative. Copies can be ordered via email at info@countdown2010.net. We would like to offer these materials in other languages as well. Can you help us translating them?

Countdown 2010 Factsheet 2 pages, A4, English

Countdown 2010 Declaration 2 pages, A4, English

Countdown 2010 Brochure 16 pages, 14,8 x 14,8 cm, English

Also available: Stickers (A7, A3) • Pins • Lanyards • Fruit bears • Roll-up displays For terms and conditions please contact the Countdown 2010 Secretariat.

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Resources
Facts on Biodiversity
The following pages are based on a summary of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment: Ecosystems and Human Well-being: Biodiversity Synthesis. The Millennium Assessment was launched by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan in 2001 to provide scientific information concerning the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being and options for responding to those changes. It involved over 1300 scientists from 95 countries and a partnership among several international organizations, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, UN Convention to Combat Desertification, Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, Convention on Migratory Species, five UN agencies, the World Bank, and IUCN. The Biodiversity Synthesis Report, one of the main products of this work, responds to requests for information received through the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and provides an overview of the links between the state of our ecosystems and the biodiversity they contain. The full report is available at: www.millenniumassessment.org Biodiversity: What is it, where is it, and why is it important? Biodiversity is the measure of the number, variety and variability of living organisms. It includes diversity within species, between species, and among ecosystems. The concept also covers how this diversity changes from one location to another and over time. Indicators such as the number of species in a given area can help in monitoring certain aspects of biodiversity. Biodiversity is everywhere, both on land and in water. It includes all organisms, from microscopic bacteria to more complex plants and animals. Current inventories of species, though useful, remain incomplete and insufficient for providing an accurate picture of the extent and distribution of all components of biodiversity. Based on present knowledge of how biodiversity changes over time, rough estimates can be made of the rates at which species become extinct. Ecosystem services are the benefits people obtain from ecosystems. Biodiversity plays an important role in the way ecosystems function and in the many services they provide. Services include nutrient and water cycling, soil formation and retention, resistance against invasive species, pollination of plants, regulation of climate, as well as pest and pollution control by ecosystems. For ecosystem services it matters which species are abundant as well as how many species are present.

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Why is biodiversity loss a concern? Biodiversity provides many key benefits to humans that go beyond the mere provision of raw materials. Biodiversity loss has negative effects on several aspects of human well-being, such as food security, vulnerability to natural disasters, energy security, and access to clean water and raw materials. It also affects human health, social relations, and freedom of choice. Society tends to have various competing goals, many of which depend on biodiversity. When humans modify an ecosystem to improve a service it provides, this generally also results in changes to other ecosystem services. For example, actions to increase food production can lead to reduced water availability for other uses. As a result of such trade-offs, many services have been degraded, for instance fisheries, water supply, and protection against natural hazards. In the long term, the value of services lost may greatly exceed the short-term economic benefits that are gained from transforming ecosystems. Unlike goods bought and sold in markets, many ecosystem services are not traded in markets for readily observable prices. This means that the importance of biodiversity and natural processes in providing benefits to humans is ignored by financial markets. New methods are being used to assign monetary values to benefits such as recreation or clean drinking water. Degradation of ecosystem services could be significantly slowed down or reversed if the full economic value of these services were taken into account in decision-making.

Over the last century, some people have benefited from the conversion of natural ecosystems and an increase in international trade, but other people have suffered from the consequences of biodiversity losses and from restricted access to resources they depend upon. Changes in ecosystems are harming many of the world’s poorest people, who are the least able to adjust to these changes. What are the current trends in biodiversity? Virtually all of Earth’s ecosystems have been dramatically transformed through human actions and ecosystems continue to be converted for agricultural and other uses. The current loss of biodiversity and the related changes in the environment are now faster than ever before in human history and there is no sign of this process slowing down. Many animal and plant populations have declined in numbers, geographical spread, or both. Species extinction is a natural part of Earth’s history. Human activity has increased the extinction rate by at least 100 times compared to the natural rate. Comparing different types of measurements of biodiversity loss is not simple. The rate of change in one aspect of biodiversity, such as loss of species richness, does not necessarily reflect the change in another, such as habitat loss. Moreover, some aspects of biodiversity loss are not easily measured, for instance the fact that the same species are increasingly found at different locations on the planet and that overall biodiversity is decreasing.

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What factors lead to biodiversity loss? Biodiversity is declining rapidly due to factors such as land use change, climate change, invasive species, overexploitation, and pollution. Such natural or human-induced factors – referred to as drivers – tend to interact and amplify each other. While changes in biodiversity are more clearly linked to direct drivers such as habitat loss, they are also linked to indirect drivers that are at the root of many changes in ecosystems. The main indirect drivers are changes in human population, economic activity, and technology, as well as socio-political and cultural factors. Different direct drivers have been critically important in different ecosystems over the past 50 years. For example, in terrestrial ecosystems, the main driver has been land cover change such as the conversion of forest to agriculture. In marine systems, however, fishing, and particularly overfishing, have been the main drivers of biodiversity loss. Overall, the main factors directly driving biodiversity loss are: habitat change, such as fragmentation of forests; invasive alien species that establish and spread outside their normal distribution; overexploitation of natural resources; and pollution, particularly by excessive fertilizer use leading to excessive levels of nutrients in soil and water.

Recent changes in climate have already had significant impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems in certain regions. As climate change will become more severe, the harmful impacts on ecosystem services are expected to outweigh possible benefits, such as a longer growing season, in most regions of the world. Climate change is expected to exacerbate risks of extinctions, floods, droughts, population declines, and disease outbreaks. Many drivers affecting biodiversity are stronger today than they were in the past and are also occurring together. Because exposure to one threat often makes a species more susceptible to another, multiple threats may have unexpectedly dramatic impacts on biodiversity. Drivers of extinction range from local to global in scope and from immediate to long-term in their effects. For example, the extinction of species due to habitat loss can be rapid for some species, while it may take hundreds of years for others. How might biodiversity change in the future under various plausible scenarios? The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment developed four plausible scenarios to explore the future of biodiversity and human well-being until 2050 and beyond. The different scenarios are based on either increased globalization or increased regionalization, and an either reactive or proactive way of addressing environmental issues.

Overall, in all four scenarios, agricultural land will expand and forest cover will shrink, particularly in developing countries. This will lead to a continuing decline in local and global biodiversity, mainly as a result of habitat loss. More proactive approaches to the environment will be more successful in slowing these trends. Aquatic biodiversity and specific fish populations are expected to decline due to factors such as excessive levels of nutrients, overharvesting, invasion by alien species, and pollution. Human well-being will be affected by biodiversity loss both directly and indirectly. Direct effects include an increased risk of sudden environmental changes such as fisheries collapses, floods, droughts, wildfires, and disease. Changes will also affect human wellbeing indirectly, for instance in the form of conflicts due to scarcer food and water resources. Though the average income per person is projected to rise in all scenarios, this can mask increased inequity for instance in terms of food security. Major decisions will have to address trade-offs between competing goals, for instance between agricultural production and water quality, or between water use and aquatic biodiversity. Policies that conserve more biodiversity are also promoting higher overall human well-being by preserving multiple benefits obtained from ecosystems.

As an internationally operating forest enterprise it is an obligation for us to use our resources in a sustainable manner. We devote a lot of effort to protect and conserve biodiversity. Thus we support Countdown 2010 with numerous projects such as promoting dead wood deposits, protecting longhorn beetles and wood grouses and connecting habitats in our forests. Georg Erlacher, Board Director Österreichische Bundesforste 17

What actions can be taken to conserve biodiversity? Informing all of society about the benefits of conserving biodiversity, and explicitly considering trade-offs between different options in an integrated way, helps maximize the benefits to society. Ecosystem restoration is generally far more expensive than protecting the original ecosystem, but is becoming increasingly important as more areas become degraded. To be conserved, biodiversity must be integrated into the agriculture, fishery, and forestry sectors. These sectors are directly dependent on biodiversity and affect it directly. The private sector can make significant contributions, for example by adopting certain agricultural practices. Many companies now show greater corporate responsibility and are preparing their own biodiversity action plans.

Strong institutions at all levels are essential to support biodiversity conservation and the sustainable use of ecosystems. International agreements need to include enforcement measures and take into account impacts on biodiversity and possible synergies with other agreements. Most direct actions to halt or reduce biodiversity loss need to be taken at local or national level. Suitable laws and policies developed by central governments can enable local levels of government to provide incentives for sustainable resource management. Market tools, such as direct payments for ecosystem services or transfers of ownership rights to private individuals, can provide economic incentives to conserve biodiversity and to use ecosystem services sustainably. Prevention and early intervention have proven to be the most successful and cost-effective way of tackling invasive species. Once an invasive species has become established, its control and particularly its eradication through the use of chemicals or through the introduction of other species is not necessarily effective and is extremely difficult and costly.

Direct and indirect drivers of biodiversity loss must be addressed to better protect biodiversity and ecosystem services. Possible actions include eliminating harmful subsidies, promoting sustainable intensification of agriculture, adapting to climate change, limiting the increase in nutrient levels in soil and water, assessing the full economic value of ecosystem services, and increasing the transparency of decision making processes. Protected areas are an essential part of conservation programs, but they are not sufficient by themselves to protect the full range of biodiversity and can be difficult to enforce. To be successful, sites for protected areas need to be carefully chosen, ensuring that all regional ecosystems are well represented, and the areas need to be well designed and effectively managed.

What individuals can do to save biodiversity • Take public transportation, bike, walk, or carpool to work at least one day a week. • Buy food, preferably organic food - vegetables, fruits, dairy, eggs, and meat - from a farmer’s market at least one day a week. • Eat sustainably harvested seafood and farmed fish that is herbivorous, like catfish, tilapia, and shellfish. Avoid farmed carnivorous fish like salmon and shrimp. • Install at least one compact fluorescent light bulb in your home - it will save roughly 30 EUR in electricity and replacement bulb costs each year, and reduce carbon emissions more than 300 kilograms. • Turn off lights in empty rooms. • Lower the thermostat by at least 1 °C in winter. • Stop using herbicides and pesticides on your lawn. • Learn the environmental positions of all those who represent you in government and support those candidates who have the best records and the best platforms. • Tell everyone at home, school, place of worship, and work about what you are doing to conserve biodiversity and ask them to join you. • Above all, do not waste - reduce your consumption, buy only what you really need, and re-use and re-cycle whatever and whenever you can. 18

Glossary
Alien species An alien species is a species introduced outside its normal distribution. Invasive alien species are alien species whose establishment and spread modify ecosystems, habitats, or species. Biodiversity Biodiversity is a contraction of biological diversity. Biodiversity reflects the number, variety and variability of living organisms. It includes diversity within species (genetic diversity), between species (species diversity), and between ecosystems (ecosystem diversity). Drivers (of ecosystem change) Any natural or human-induced factor that directly or indirectly causes a change in an ecosystem. Ecosystem(s) An ecological unit made up of a complex system of interactions between living communities (plants, animal, fungi, and microorganisms) and the environment they live in. Ecosystems have no fixed boundaries; a single lake, a watershed, or an entire region could be considered an ecosystem. Ecosystem services The benefits people obtain from ecosystems. These include provisioning services such as food and water; regulating services such as flood and disease control; cultural services such as spiritual, recreational, and cultural benefits; and supporting services such as nutrient cycling that maintain the conditions for life on Earth. Habitat change Change in the local environmental conditions in which a particular organism lives. Habitat change can occur naturally through droughts, disease, fire, hurricanes, mudslides, volcanoes, earthquakes, slight increases or decreases in seasonal temperature or precipitation, etc. However, it is generally induced by human activities such as land use change and physical modification of rivers or water withdrawal from rivers. Land cover The physical coverage of land, usually expressed in terms of vegetation cover or lack of it. The human use of a piece of land for a certain purpose (such as irrigated agriculture or recreation) influences land cover.

Key documents
Biodiversity Communication. In: European Commission (2006). Halting the loss of biodiversity by 2010 – and beyond. COM(2006) 216. Available from eur-lex.europa.eu Ecological Footprint. In: WWF International (2005). Europe 2005: The Ecological Footprint. Available from www.footprintnetwork.org Global Biodiversity Outlook. In: Convention on Biological Diversity (2006). Global Biodiversity Outlook 2. Available from www.biodiv.org/gbo2 Kiev Resolution. In: UN Economic Commission for Europe Committee on Environmental Policy (2003). Declaration by the Environment Ministers at the Fifth Ministerial Conference "Environment for Europe", Kiev, Ukraine, 21-23 May 2003. ECE/CEP/94/Rev.1. Available from www.unece.org/env/proceedings Living Planet Index. In: WWF (2004). Living Planet Report. Available from www.panda.org/news_facts/publications/ general/livingplanet/index.cfm Message from Malahide. In: Duke, Guy (ed.) (2005). Biodiversity and the EU – Sustaining Life, Sustaining Livelihoods. Conference Report for the Malahide Stakeholder Conference. Available from ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/biodive rsity/index_en.htm Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. In: Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005). Ecosystems and Human Wellbeing: Biodiversity Synthesis. Available from www.millenniumassessment.org Red List. In: IUCN (2006). Red List of Threatened Species. Available from www.iucnredlist.org SOER 2005. In: EEA (2005). The European Environment - State and Outlook 2005. Available from eea.europa.eu/highlights/200511221152 48

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List of Countdown 2010 Partners
Last updated: October 2006 In Europe, more than 100 partners ranging from national to local governments, from non-governmental organisations to businesses spanning the breadth and depth of Europe from Iceland to Vladivostok have joined Countdown 2010. They have created a powerful network of active partners working together to reach the 2010 biodiversity target. Each partners commits to dedicate extra effort into action towards the 2010 biodiversity target. Acting together, they create a joint momentum around the target. The European Countdown 2010 Secretariat – hosted by the IUCN Regional Office for Europe – promotes the importance of the 2010 biodiversity target, facilitates and encourages action and assesses progress towards 2010. A few details on our partners: • 6 National Governments: Finland, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, and the United Kingdom; 8 Regional and Local Governments: Belgium, France, Italy, the Netherlands and Spain; • • • 4 Academic Institutions: Armenia, Estonia, Italy and Switzerland; 17 Aquariums, Museums, Parks and Zoos: Austria, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Slovakia, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom; And over 70 NGOs all types, across Europe, from local grassroots associations to international organizations covering the spectrum of environmental activities and beyond.

•

Organisation Ministero dell Ambiente y della Tutela del Territorio Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione Ambientale della Sicilia Aiki shin shin kai Aikido Federation of Georgia Allwetterzoo Muenster An Taisce ARKive Armenian Society for the Protection of Birds Asociacion Reforesta Association for Farmers Rights Defense, AFRD Association of Local Government Ecologists Associazione Olduvai Onlus Austrian Federal Forests Enterprise Avalon Azerbaijan Ornithological Society Azerbaijan Society for the Protection of Animals BIAZA (British & Irish Association of Zoos & Aquariums) Biotechnology Center of Georgia BIOTICA Ecological Society Bristol Zoo Gardens Butterfly Conservation Europe California Institute of Public Affairs CEEWEB Center for Ecological-Noosphere studies, National Academy of Science City of Tilburg Conseil Regional d'Ile-de-France

City Roma Palermo Tbilisi Münster

Yerevan Tbilisi Bristol Milano Purkersdorf Wommels Baku London Tbilisi Chisinau Wageningen Sacramento, California Yerevan Tilburg Paris

Country Italy Italy Georgia Germany Ireland United Kingdom Armenia Spain Georgia United Kingdom Italy Austria The Netherlands Azerbaijan Georgia United Kingdom Georgia Moldova United Kingdom The Netherlands United States Hungary Armenia The Netherlands France

Type Organisation Government Local Government NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO Business NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO Local Government Local Government 20

Organisation Countryside Council for Wales DEPANA (Lliga per a la Defensa del Patrimoni Natural) Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) Deutsche Wildtier Stiftung (German Wildlife Foundation) Dipartimento Interateneo Territorio-Politecnico di Torino Earthmind Earthwatch Institute (Europe) EBCD ECNC-European Centre for Nature Conservation Ecologic Eco-Schools International Coordination English Nature Ente Parco Nazionale dell' Arcipelago di la Maddalena Environment Information & Sustainable Development Centre "Rio" Environmental Education Center "Zapovedniks" Estonian Environmental Protection Institute Europarc Federation European Commission European Environmental Bureau Excmo. Cabildo Insular De La Palma

City Barcelona Hamburg Torino Oxford Tilburg, Berlin Lisboa Peterborough Lamaddalena, Sardinia Tbilisi Moscow Tartu Brussels Brussels Santa Cruz de La Palma (Islas Canarias) Roma Newbury Venezia Barcelona Madrid Madrid El Astillero Tbilisi Telavi Winchester Baku Freiburg

Country United Kingdom Spain United Kingdom Germany Italy Switzerland United Kingdom Belgium The Netherlands Germany Portugal United Kingdom Italy Georgia Russia Estonia Germany Belgium Belgium Spain

Type Organisation NGO Government NGO Academia NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO Academia NGO Government NGO Local Government

Federparchi Fieldfare - International Ecological Development Forum per la Laguna Fundació Natura Fundacion Biodiversidad Fundacion de Iniciativas Locales Fundación Naturaleza y Hombre Georgian Center for Conservation of Wildlife Georgian Society of Nature Friends Hampshire County Council Humanitarian, Social-Ecological Agency "SANIYA" ICLEI European Secretariat IFOAM Institute for European Environmental Policy Intercooperation International Council for Game and Wildlife Conservation (CIC) IUCN Regional Office for Europe Kosken Kartano - Koskis Gård La Palma World Biosphere Reserve Insular Consortium

Bern Brussels Santa Cruz de La Palma (Islas Canarias) Fiumicino (RM) Roma

Italy United Kingdom Italy Spain Spain Spain Spain Georgia Georgia United Kingdom Azerbaijan Germany Belgium United Kingdom Switzerland Hungary Belgium Finland Spain

NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO Local Government NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO IGO State NGO

Lega Navale Italiana Legambiente

Italy Italy

NGO NGO 21

Organisation Liga para a Protecao da Natureza Ministério do Ambiente, Ordenamento do Território e Desenvolvimento Regional National Park Hoge Kempen National Park Tatra National Park Thayatal Nature and Tierpark Goldau Netherlands Society for the Protection of Birds (VBN) Norwegian Ministry of Environment Parco Naturale Adamello Brenta Parco Nazionale delle Cinque Terre Planta Europa Plantlife International PRAXIS Pro Natura Professional and Entrepreneurial Orientation Union Provincie Limburg Belgium Provincie Noord-Brabant Quercus - Associaçáo Nacional de Consevaçáo da Natureza REC Caucasus Red Life Regional Landschap Lage Kempen Royal Society for the Protection of Birds Schweizer Vogelschutz SVS/Birdlife Switzerland SEO/Birdlife Swedish Ministry for Sustainable Development Swedish Museum of Natural History Swiss Biodiversity Forum Syzygy TERRITORIOS VIVOS ASSOCIATION The Wilderness Foundation The wildlife trust for Birmingham and the black country Tidy Northern Ireland Vermigrand Earthworm Farm WAZA - The World Association of Zoos and Aquaria Wildscreen World Poultry Science Association, Georgian Branch WWF International WWF Italy WWF Switzerland Zoo Basel Zoo Landau in der Pfalz Zoo Zürich

City Lisboa Genk Tatranská Štrba 75 Goldau Zeist Strembo Riomaggiore Wiltshire Wiltshire Serres Basel Yerevan Genk s-Hertogenbosch Ourém Tbilisi Sevilla Zonhoven Bedfordshire Zürich Madrid Stockholm Stockholm Bern Nijmegen Madrid Birmingham Absdorf Harbourside; Bristol

Country Portugal Portugal Belgium Slovakia Austria Switzerland The Netherlands Norway Italy Italy United Kingdom United Kingdom Greece Switzerland Armenia Belgium The Netherlands Portugal Georgia Spain Belgium United Kingdom Switzerland Spain Sweden Sweden Switzerland The Netherlands Spain United Kingdom United Kingdom United Kingdom Austria Switzerland United Kingdom Georgia Germany Italy Switzerland Switzerland Germany Switzerland

Type Organisation NGO Government NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO Government NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO Local Government Local Government NGO NGO NGO Local Government NGO NGO International Government Government Agency Academia NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO NGO

Roma Zürich Landau Zürich

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Biodiversity is essential, and it is in danger

Governments have promised to

save biodiversity by 2010
The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment found nearly two thirds of ecosystem services worldwide in decline, the IUCN Red List covers more than 16.000 endangered species and the average abundance of species has declined by 40% in only thirty years. The Global Biodiversity Outlook concluded that reaching the 2010 biodiversity target would require ‘unprecedented additional efforts at national, regional and global levels’. In Europe, more than 100 partners ranging from national to local governments, from nongovernmental organisations to businesses have started to take up this challenge. They have created Countdown 2010, a powerful network of active partners working together to tackle the causes of biodiversity loss. Each partner commits additional efforts towards the 2010 biodiversity target. Acting together, they create a joint momentum to save biodiversity. The Countdown 2010 Secretariat – hosted by the World Conservation Union’s Regional Office for Europe – facilitates and encourages action, promotes the importance of the 2010 biodiversity target and assesses progress towards 2010.

It is time to move from words to action

Governments have promised to save biodiversity by 2010
While 2010 is inexorably coming closer, there are seven priority areas to halt the loss of biodiversity within the next couple of years.

Biodiversity is essential, and it is in danger
When Heads of State committed to ‘achieve by 2010 a significant reduction in the current rate of loss of biological diversity’ at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development, this ambitious 2010 biodiversity target was lauded as a historic step into the right direction. Since then, several scientific reports have confirmed the gravity of the situation:

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No time to lose for biodiversity
1. Species and ecosystems need space to develop and recover. At least 10% of all ecosystem types should be under protection to maintain nature and natural landscapes. 2. Without biodiversity there will be no agriculture. Farming practices should not jeopardize species survival: Improving farmland diversity and reducing the usage of pesticides and fertiliser are key to saving biodiversity. Organic agriculture practices can serve as an example in many areas. 3. 75% of all fisheries are fully exploited or overfished. Species like cod, haddock and halibut are already threatened. If we do not move towards sustainable use, there will be no fish left for our grandchildren. 4. Roads, factories and housing destroy habitats for animals and plants. If urban and rural development continues to ignore nature, our surroundings might soon be dominated by concrete and pollution. 5. Climate change is considered to be the greatest challenge for humanity. With changing conditions, ecosystems and habitats will change as well. It is an obligation to fight climate change and make sure that species can migrate or adapt to new surroundings. 6. If you release a species outside its usual habitat, it might simply die. In other cases, the so-called ‘alien invasive species’ have thrived and destroyed local flora and fauna. As you never know how things turn out, reducing these invasions is crucial. 7. Biodiversity is the foundation for sustainable development. Its ecosystem services provide the basis for all economic activity. Biodiversity concerns need thus be integrated into all areas of policymaking. Measures include market incentives, development assistance, biodiversity-friendly trade and international governance processes. Biodiversity loss impacts core aspects of human well-being, including food security, vulnerability to natural disasters, energy security, and access to clean water and raw materials. It also affects human health, social relations, and freedom of choice. It is thus in humanity’s own interest to ensure the survival of species and ecosystems. biodiversity target with the tools and issues that are closest to their own core aims and objectives. To join the alliance, partners undersign a declaration stating their extra efforts and an endorsement of Countdown 2010’s principles and objectives. The declaration asks three steps from each organization: 1. Support the 2010 biodiversity target; 2. Encourage decision makers to take action; 3. Commit yourself to reducing biodiversity loss.

It is time to move from words to action
All these ideas are not new. In fact, they mirror demands for which many organisations have campaigned for decades. The political legitimacy of the 2010 biodiversity target now provides a strong joint umbrella to drive this agenda forward. While it is the responsibility of governments to fulfill the 2010 biodiversity target, the political reality shows that it takes not only committed politicians and officials but also an engaged and informed public to use this opportunity. The claim of Countdown 2010 is broad and simple, providing the space for organisations to focus their work on the 2010

Engage, join in and help us make it happen
With a powerful network of active partners, Countdown 2010 and its partners can hold governments accountable to: provide sufficient space for nature, use their natural resources in a sustainable manner and consistently reduce pollution. Together, we can make a quantum leap for biodiversity. Visit countdown2010.net for more information or call us at +32 2 739 0320 to find out how to join!

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Countdown 2010 Declaration
Biodiversity - the weB of life on earth - is essential to the quality of human well-Being, and it is a crucial element in sustaining the social, economic and spiritual dimension of all societies worldwide. yet, Biodiversity continues to decline. political commitments have Been made to stop this trend By 2010. further steps need to Be taken to honour this commitment and to translate it into action. We the undersigned will take every practical opportunity to:
Support the commitments to halt or significantly reduce the current rate of biodiversity loss by 2010, made by: • World Environment Ministers in the Hague Ministerial Declaration of the Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity in the Netherlands 2002; • World Heads of State in the Plan of Implementation at the United Nations World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg, South Africa in 2002; • World Heads of State in the United Nations World Summit Outcome in New York 2005; • a number of biodiversity related conventions and regional processes since 2001. Encourage decision makers at all levels, in both the public and the private sector, to contribute to these commitments and to: • Increase public awareness and participation for biodiversity conservation, including the promotion of exemplary activities towards the 2010 biodiversity target; • Better integrate biodiversity considerations into all relevant sectors of public policy and economy; • Undertake serious efforts to adapt human activities to the needs of natural systems; • Support the development of suitable monitoring and indicator tools to assess the state of biodiversity in Europe. Commit ourselves to encourage and assist decision makers and societies in achieving the 2010 biodiversity target, notably through: • Actively promoting Countdown 2010 to focus attention and mobilise resources for achieving the 2010 biodiversity target; • Significantly reducing our own impact on biodiversity. In particular, we will:
Please use this space to describe your specific contribution to the above commitments. Use a separate page if needed.

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Goals and Principles
By signing the countdown 2010 declaration, an organisation Becomes a partner of countdown 2010. partnership is open to organisations from all sectors and levels that can demonstrate their commitment to the 2010 Biodiversity target.
Overarching goal: That all governments and members of civil society, at every level, have taken the necessary actions to halt or significantly reduce the loss of biodiversity by 2010. Objectives: • Encourage and support the full implementation of all the existing binding international commitments and necessary actions to save biodiversity; • Demonstrate clearly what progress countries are making in meeting the 2010 biodiversity target; • Gain maximum public attention for the challenge of saving biodiversity by 2010. Principles: • Science based: all Countdown 2010 work will be underpinned by sound science and/or relevant practical conservation experience and will be carried out to the highest possible standard. • Transparency: Countdown 2010 is committed to the principle of transparency in process and decision making. It will ensure public access to information, while respecting individual privacy and institutional confidentiality, as appropriate. • Subsidiarity: the Countdown 2010 Secretariat will work at the most appropriate level (local, national, regional, multiregional) and it will only undertake those Countdown 2010 activities that partners are unable to undertake. • Autonomy: Countdown 2010 is an independent alliance. It is governed by the will of its partners through the institutional mechanisms in place (Advisory Board and Partners’ Assembly).
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Please fill in this form to sign the Countdown 2010 declaration and send it to the Countdown 2010 Secretariat: Name of organisation: ........................................................................................................................................................................ Signature:......................................................... Date: ....................................................................................................................... Name / Position: ................................................................................................................................................................................. Details of main contact person for Countdown 2010 activities: Name / Position: ................................................................................................................................................................................. Address: ............................................................................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ Tel: ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... Fax: .................................................................................................................................................................................................... Email: .................................................................................................................................................................................................

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