Service Unit Ceremonies

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					AWARDS, BRIDGING, CEREMONIES, RECOGNITIONS & MORE



         Service Unit Ceremonies
                                      & Recognitions




                                                                       2011




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      GIRL SCOUTS DIAMONDS   OF   ARKANSAS, OKLAHOMA                AND     TEXAS
                                    Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
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Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Contents
ADULT RECOGNITIONS ............................................................................................................................................................... 5
CEREMONIES ................................................................................................................................................................................. 6
   A GIRL SCOUT TRADITION .................................................................................................................................................................. 6
   SERVICE UNIT CEREMONY PROVISIONS............................................................................................................................................... 6
   SERVICE UNIT RECOGNITION CHAIR .................................................................................................................................................. 6
   CEREMONY BASICS ................................................................................................................................................................................ 7
   CEREMONY TIPS .................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
CREATE YOUR OWN CEREMONY.................................................................................................................................................. 9
CREATE YOUR OWN CEREMONY.................................................................................................................................................. 9
   THEME.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9
   PLAN .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
   EXECUTE ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
   SAMPLE CEREMONY OUTLINE ...................................................................................................................................................... 10
FLAG CEREMONIES .................................................................................................................................................................... 11
   STANDARD FLAG CEREMONY ........................................................................................................................................................ 12
     CALLING DIRECTIONS............................................................................................................................................................. 12
     CLOSING FLAG CEREMONY ..................................................................................................................................................... 12
DAISY PETALS CEREMONY ...................................................................................................................................................... 14
BROWNIE FLY-UP ...................................................................................................................................................................... 15
CEREMONY I ............................................................................................................................................................................... 15
BROWNIE FLY-UP ...................................................................................................................................................................... 16
CEREMONY II ............................................................................................................................................................................. 16
PAPER DOLL CEREMONY ........................................................................................................................................................... 17
BADGE CEREMONY ...................................................................................................................................................................... 18
   BADGE CEREMONY OPTION I: .................................................................................................................................................... 19
   BADGE CEREMONY OPTION II: ................................................................................................................................................. 19
BRIDGING CEREMONY ............................................................................................................................................................... 22
   DAISY TO BROWNIE BRIDGING ................................................................................................................................................. 22
   BROWNIE TO JUNIOR BRIDGING ............................................................................................................................................... 22
   JUNIOR TO CADETTE BRIDGING ............................................................................................................................................... 23
   CADETTE TO SENIOR BRIDGING ............................................................................................................................................... 25
   AMBASSADOR TO ADULT BRIDGING .......................................................................................................................................... 29
   SAMPLE AMBASSADOR TO ADULT SCRIPT ............................................................................................................................... 30
BRONZE, SILVER, .................................................................................................................................................................... 33
AND GOLD CEREMONY ............................................................................................................................................................... 33
ADULT CEREMONY ...................................................................................................................................................................... 35
INVESTITURE CEREMONY ......................................................................................................................................................... 35
   INVESTITURE CEREMONY BASICS ............................................................................................................................................ 35
   SIMPLE INVESTITURE CEREMONY....................................................................................................................................................... 36
   TRADITIONAL CANDELIGHT........................................................................................................................................................ 36 3
   INVESTITURE/REDEDICATION CEREMONY ............................................................................................................................. 36
   FLOWERS OF FRIENDSHIP INVESTITURE/REDEDICATION ............................................................................................... 37


                                                                                                        Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
     Main Part of Ceremony ..................................................................................................................................................... 38
   DAISY GIRL SCOUT INVESTITURE .................................................................................................................................................... 38
   BROWNIE INVESTITURE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 39
   BROWNIE POND INVESTITURE ............................................................................................................................................................ 41
   BROWNIE'S GOLD WALK ..................................................................................................................................................................... 42
ADULT INVESTITURE/ ............................................................................................................................................................. 43
REDEDICATION CEREMONY ...................................................................................................................................................... 43
RECOGNITION SUGGESTIONS .................................................................................................................................................. 44
   THANK YOU’S ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
   “JUST FOR FUN” TAGLINES ............................................................................................................................................................. 45
   10 THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT GIVING RECOGNITIONS1 ............................................................................................................ 46
SAMPLE READINGS .................................................................................................................................................................... 47
   GIRL SCOUT WORDS OF WISDOM ............................................................................................................................................... 47
   POETRY ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 48
   FAMOUS QUOTES .................................................................................................................................................................................. 56
SAMPLE CERTIFICATE TEMPLATES ...................................................................................................................................... 58
   ROOKIE OF THE YEAR ........................................................................................................................................................................ 58
   LEADER OF THE YEAR ........................................................................................................................................................................ 58
   VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR................................................................................................................................................................... 58
   CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION ....................................................................................................................................................... 58
LETTERS OF ENDORSEMENT .................................................................................................................................................... 63




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                                                                                                      Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                Adult Recognitions
These awards can be purchased by the Service Unit, and awarded at Service Unit Recognition Ceremonies.

GSUSA Numeral Guard 5 years-15 years
GSUSA years of Service 5 years-15 years
Service Unit Rookie of the Year
Service Unit Leader of the Year
Service Unit Volunteer of the Year
Community Participation Thank You
Citizenship in Girl Scouting Certificate
GSUSA Volunteer Service Pins

These awards will be purchased by the Council, and can be awarded at Service Unit Recognition Ceremonies.

GSUSA Volunteer Achievement Award
GSUSA White Mentoring Key
GSUSA Black Executive Key
GSUSA Gold Diversity Key
GSUSA Silver Community Cultivation Key
GSUSA Copper Fund Development Key
GSUSA Leadership Development Pin
GSUSA Leadership Development Leaves – Green, Silver, Gold
Governor’s Volunteer of Excellence Award
Presidential Volunteer Service Award

These awards will be purchased by the Council, and will be awarded at the annual Council Recognition Ceremony.

GSUSA Numeral Guard 20 years and above
GSUSA years of Service 20 years and above
GSUSA Honor Pin
GSUSA Outstanding Leader
GSUSA Outstanding Volunteer
GSUSA Appreciation Pin
GSUSA Platinum Service Award
GSUSA Thanks Badge
GSUSA Thanks Badge II
Diamond Rookie of the Year
Diamond Leader of the Year
Diamond Volunteer of the Year
Myra Vinson Award
Sally Sharpe Award
Diamonds Service Unit President’s Award


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                                                            Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                                     Ceremonies
A Girl Scout Tradition
From the earliest times, women, men, and children have held ceremonies to celebrate numerous events such as changes of
seasons, births, victories, or deaths. In modern times, often our ceremonies and traditions bind us together as a family or
group. Ceremonies can bring meaning to life experiences and offer a means of self-expression.

From the very beginning, Girl Scout ceremonies have been observed to reinforce values, pass on traditions, and give life to
the beliefs set down in the Promise and Law by highlighting accomplishments that illustrate a Girl Scout belief.
Ceremonies also reinforce the Girl Scout heritage by reminding us of the contributions made by the women who nurtured
the Movement in its infancy and began so many of its traditions. These special rituals form a framework for today’s actions
and provide inspiration for the future.

The rich Girl Scout heritage of strong traditional values should be cherished and preserved. Many of the unique
characteristics of our program are passed on from generation to generation-through beautiful and precious ceremonies.
Use them frequently. They have a special meaning in Girl Scouting.


Service Unit Ceremony Provisions
Girl Scouts also have ceremonies to mark special events throughout the year. Like other ceremonies, Girl Scout
ceremonies can be planned on a grand scale to celebrate major transitions (such as awards, bridging, investitures, and
end-of-year activities). Alternatively, they can be planned on a smaller scale to celebrate frequent occurrences (such as the
beginning or ending of a meeting, a campout, friendship, etc.).

Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas provides a wide range of ceremony ideas, outlines, information, and helpful
hints

The Council provides a majority of the Adult Recognitions available for presentation at Service Unit Recognition
Ceremonies, and at the Council Recognition Ceremony.

In order to provide Adult recognitions for a Service Unit Recognition Ceremony, Service Units will need to provide Adult
Development with the date of their planned ceremony. Please allow 4 weeks prior to the ceremony for ordering and delivery
of awards.

Once the awards are ordered, the Service Unit Recognition Chair may obtain the awards from their Membership Marketing
Specialist.

Service Unit Recognition Chair
The Service Unit Recognition Chair distributes information about recognitions at the beginning of the membership year.

The Service Unit Recognition Chair makes the determination for awards in the Service Unit. They should review all
nominations and applications for earned and checklist recognitions. If a decision is made to nominate an individual for           6
an award requiring Council approval, all requirements listed in that section, including deadlines must be adhered to.


                                                               Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
The Service Unit Recognition Chair will determine which community businesses, organizations, or individuals will be
recognized by the Service Unit and make appropriate arrangements to award and deliver the recognitions.

The Service Unit Recognition Chair fills out the order form for certificates, patches/pins, Years of Service and
Numeral Guards, including payment and recipients’ names. Orders are due to the Council Recognition Review Committee
no later than February 15th at 5:00pm.

The Service Unit Recognition Chair works together with the Service Unit to plan their Service Unit Recognition Event for
distribution of recognitions.


Ceremony Basics
No matter what kind of ceremony you plan – whether very simple or quite elaborate – planning is essential for the ceremony
to be meaningful. While there are few hard and fast rules for planning ceremonies, basically, each one has these four
parts:

THEME:           Selecting an appropriate theme can make the ceremony more
                         meaningful

OPENING:                 Can be used to welcome guests, tell the purpose of the ceremony,
                         and/or set the mood for the occasion

MAIN PART:               Focuses on the reason you have gathered people together; could
                         include things like poems, songs, choral readings, candle lighting, etc.

CLOSING:                 Summarizes and gives closure to the ceremony; could include a
                         friendship circle, good-byes, Thank-You’s to special guests, or closing songs

Not every ceremony needs to have the same format. In addition, most of the ceremonies in this booklet are not complete
from beginning to end. Adapt them to meet the particular needs of your troop. Hopefully, these ceremonies will be only
starting points to stimulate the thought process to create new material.

It is not recommended that you use these ceremonies exactly as written. These ceremonies can and should be adapted to
the size of your group or participants. Reading parts can be split up to accommodate more readers or combined for fewer
readers.

All ceremonies can be presented in a very simple fashion for private troop use, or they can be made more elaborate with
decorations, invitations, and special features to include invited guests.

Substitute your own ideas for readings, props, songs, or decorations to make your ceremonies truly individualized and
special.


Ceremony Tips
Combine ceremonies. An investiture or bridging may also include a flag ceremony and a Scout’s Own. Most of the
ceremonies in this booklet may easily and naturally be combined with any others. Awards may also be presented at                   7
rededication or bridging ceremonies. Special Thank-You’s to guests, consultants or sponsors may be included on almost
any occasion.

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Split up speaking roles for large groups, or combine speaking parts for small groups.

Substitute girls’ own words and ideas for the ones printed here, when possible.

Create visuals, use props, and decorate around a theme. Carry through with your theme when making invitations. Props
such as flowers, candles, bridges, flags, etc. add an element of fun to ceremonies and make them more attractive.

Plan some rehearsal time.

Any time you include themes of a spiritual nature in a ceremony, take special care that any references to God or to religion
in general do not offend or exclude anyone in your troop or any of your guests or observers.




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                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
  Create Your Own Ceremony
Girls should be involved in the ceremony planning!


THEME
Choose a theme that matters:
        About something they can see – miracles of nature, the river, the sea, much more

        About something they are doing – a group working on international friendship may choose an international theme;
        a group working on a citizenship badge might use citizenship as a theme, etc.

        About common ideas – knowing myself, being a friend, serving others, the Girl Scout Promise and Law, the Girl
        Scout motto, etc.

Explore the possibilities of your theme:
        You might use symbols that stand for other things – abstractions discussed in ceremonies may be easier for girls to
        understand if they can relate the theme to things that are simple and familiar. Symbols might include a handshake
        – friendship, welcome, etc.; bridge or archway – crossing to something new; eagle – courage; feather, pebble, tree,
        water – nature. How else might you symbolize your theme? Pull in lots of ideas from the group on this discussion.
        An effective ceremony has just one central thought that says something and communicates a clear message.

Express yourself in your ceremony:
            Do you want to use words in the form of poems, stories, choral readings, plays, songs, etc?
            Do the troops want to set up display tables with their activities for the year?
            Do the girls want to have a handout with special troop information and award listings?
            Do the girls want to communicate without words, through music, silence, touch, pictures, dance, pantomime,
            atmosphere, symbolism, etc?


PLAN
Plan the ceremony:
        What is the purpose of the ceremony?
        Where will the ceremony take place?
        When will it be? How long will it last?
        Who will attend? Do we send invitations?
        What should be worn?
        What is the sequence of the ceremony? In what order will everything be done?
        Who will do each part?
        What equipment, props, or decorations are needed? Who will bring them? Where will they go?
        Is everyone participating? Does everyone know what to do? When will we rehearse?
        Is the ceremony loud enough to be heard?
        Is it simple enough to be understood?                                                                                       9
        Is it interesting enough?
        Does it make everyone a participant?


                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
EXECUTE
Carry out the ceremony:
        Allow plenty of time for set up.
        Ensure all awards are present and arranged in order.
        Girls should be in uniform.
        All materials should be readily available.



SAMPLE CEREMONY OUTLINE
I.      Call to Order & Welcome (approx 2 min)
            a. Allow time for guests to sign in and be seated

II.     Opening Flag Ceremony (approx 5 min):

III.    Introductions (approx 5 min): Of special guests, community partners, Council staff, etc

IV.     Guest Speaker (3-5 min):

V.      Presentation of Girl Awards

            a. Level, IP, and Journey Awards
                  i.    Begin with Daisy and let each troop leader present their awards, then proceed to higher levels.
            b. Bronze, Silver, and Gold by level
            c. Graduating Seniors
                  i.    Bridge Seniors to Adults

VI.     Bridge levels backward

VII.    Presentation of Adult Awards

            a. Community Partner Awards
            b. Service Unit Awards
            c. Council Awards

VIII.   Closing Remarks and Invitation for Refreshments

IX.     Closing Ceremony

X.      Kapers




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                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                   Flag Ceremonies
FLAG BEARER:       The person who carries the flag – one per flag when more than one flag is used. Hold the staff at a
                   slight angle in front of the body, or hold the folded flag in front of the body at waist level. If not in
                   uniform, the flag bearer may wear a          red sash over the right shoulder tied on the left side at
                   the waist in a square knot. The flag bearer stands silent and at attention throughout the ceremony
                   and does not repeat the Pledge of Allegiance nor sing the National Anthem.


COLOR GUARD:       They guard the honor of the flag and watch to see that the flag does not touch the ground. They
                   stand behind the flag bearer. Any number may be used, but two per flag is the traditional number.
                   If not in uniform, the color guard may wear a red sash around the waist, tied on the left side in a
                   square knot. The color guards stand silent and at attention throughout the ceremony and do not
                   repeat the Pledge of Allegiance nor sing the National Anthem.


SCOUT-IN-CHARGE:
“CALLER”           The designated Girl Scout who “calls out” parts of the ceremony. She stands in front and to one
                   side of the circle or at the front and to one side of the congregation.


SALUTE WHEN:
                       1. The moment the flag passes in front of you in a parade
                       2. When a flag is retreated in a parade
                       3. From the moment the flag starts to be lowered from a flagpole until the moment it is
                          completely unattached
                       4. When saying the Pledge of Allegiance and/or during the National Anthem
                       5. Do not salute when other flags are presented




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                                                           Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
STANDARD FLAG CEREMONY
CALLING DIRECTIONS

ORAL DIRECTIONS:                                                EXPLANATION:

(OPENING CEREMONY)

1.     “Please stand for the Presentation of Colors.”   Used before flag enters the room or
                                                               before the flag enters the ceremonial
                                                               circle.

2.     “Girl Scouts, Attention.”                        All stand at attention, tall and straight.

3.     “Color Guard, Attention.”                                Color Guard stands at attention.

4.     “Color Guard, Advance.”                          Color Guard advance to the flagpole,
                                                                flag stand or podium.

5.     “Color Guard, Post the Colors.”                  Color Guard post or raise the flag, or
                                                                stand and face audience if flag will not
                                                                be left in stand.

6.     “Color Guard, Salute the Colors.”                        Color Guard taps leg twice, taps heart
                                                                once, tap leg once.

7.     “Girl Scouts, the Flag of your Country.          Audience recites the Pledge of
       Pledge Allegiance.”                                     Allegiance.

8.     “Please join us in singing __________.”          Optional

9.     “We will now say the Girl Scout Promise.”        Audience gives the Girl Scout sign and
                                                               repeats the Promise.

10.    “Color Guard, Retreat.”                          Color Guard retreat to original position.

11.    “Color Guard, Dismissed.
       Girl Scouts, Dismissed.”

CLOSING FLAG CEREMONY

Repeat directions #1-4 above.

5.     “Please join us in singing, “Taps”.                      This is a traditional closing song for a
                                                                Flag ceremony, but others can be
                                                                substituted.

6.     “Color Guard, Retire the Colors.”                The flag is slowly lowered or removed                                   12
                                                                 from its stand. If the flag is removed
                                                                 from a flagpole, it should also be

                                                             Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                                       properly folded by the Color Guard.

Repeat directions 9 and 10 above.




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                                    Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
            DAISY PETALS CEREMONY
Cut out pieces of a daisy flower as indicated in the ceremony. While the ceremony takes place, girls can put the flower
together.

Leader #1:      Juliette Gordon Low, nicknamed Daisy, was the founder of Girl Scouting here in the United States in 1912.
                Since that time, millions of girls just like you have made the Promise and followed the Law. The Promise
                and Law are basic to our belief in Girl Scouting.
Leader #2:      What is the Girl Scout Law? It is a rule every girl should use as a guideline to daily living. It is not always
                easy to know what the right thing to do is, but if you try to remember what the Law stands for, you will be a
                stronger person. The Girl Scout Law is the key to happy Scouting and living.
Leader #1:      Just as a flower lives and grows, so does a girl. Everything she does in life helps her make up her own mind
                and values to confront the world around her to make it a better place to live.
Leader #2:      Let us watch the flower grow and see what makes it develop. Begin with the stem of the flower. This stem
                carries water and life to the flower. Without this stem, there could be no life for this plant. In this instance,
                let us have the stem stand for the Girl Scout Promise – the lifeline of our organization.
Girl #1:        Next, we have the petals. This is the beauty of this plant. Each petal stands for one element of the Law.
                Think about the meaning of each. A Girl Scout does her best…
Girl #2:        to be honest. You should be as just as you can be. Do not lie, cheat, or steal. As Benjamin Franklin said,
                “Honesty is the best policy”, and this is a good rule to follow even today.
Girl #3:        to be fair. This is conforming to established rules. Fair implies eliminating your own feelings, prejudices,
                and desires to achieve a balance between conflicting interests.
Girl #4:        to be considerate and caring. Make yourself useful whenever and wherever you see a chance to help.
                Helping is service. When Girl Scouts provide service, they accept no reward for the help they give others.
Girl #5:        to be responsible for what I say and do. The old phrase, “it takes more muscles to frown than to smile” is a
                good rule to remember. Try to appear pleasant, agreeable, and full of good spirits. Put on a happy face.
Girl #6:        to be courageous and strong. This means to try new things and do the right thing.
Girl #7:        to respect authority. Authority means power or knowledge. Respecting authority means we respect what
                others have to say.
Girl #8:        to show respect for others and myself. Each girl must decide for herself how she can best fulfill this
                important vow.
Girl #9:        to use resources wisely. This means we do our best to conserve and preserve the resources and beauty
                around us.
Girl #10:       to be a sister to every Girl Scout. We are tied together as sisters because each of us is a member of Girl
                Scouting. We are sisters to Girl Guides and Girl Scouts all over the world. We are working for the same
                purpose.
Girl #11:       to make the world a better place. We do our part to beautify the world, to treat it and its gifts with care and
                respect.
Girl #12:       One leaf for this flower represents our motto, “Be Prepared”.
Girl #13:       And one leaf represents our slogan, “Do a Good Turn Daily”.
All:            Sing, “Girl Scouts Together”




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                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                         BROWNIE FLY-UP
                           CEREMONY I
We recommend using daisy flowers for this ceremony, but other flowers or candles could be substituted. Each Brownie will
take a flower from the vase or light a candle as she says her part.

Junior #1       These flowers represent the spirit of Girl Scouting.
All:            I will do my best.
Brownie #1      To be honest and fair
Junior #2       This means that we can be counted on to live up to our Promise and to be fair to our troop, our leader, our
                homes, our school, our community and our friends.
Brownie #2      To be friendly and helpful.
Junior #3       This means that you will be friendly and polite and consider others.
Brownie #3      To be considerate and caring
Junior #4       A Girl Scout is ready and willing to help others.
Brownie #4      To be courageous and strong.
Junior #5       A Girl Scout will try to do things to the best of her ability.
Brownie #5      To be responsible for what I say and do
Junior #6       Know what I say and own up to the consequences of my words and actions.
Brownie #6      To show respect for others and myself
Junior #7       This important part means that you will show concern for your own development as well as for the well-
                being of others.
Brownie #7      To respect authority
Junior #8       When a Girl Scout respects authority; she will be responsive to those in authority by being cooperative and
                following directions.
Brownie #8      To use resources wisely
Junior #9       This means you will not waste your time, skills, ability, natural resources, or the work of others.
Brownie #9      To make the world a better place
Junior #10      Girl Scouts will help the world become a better place in which to live.
Brownie #10     To be a sister to every Girl Scout
Junior #11      Being a sister means that you are friends with Girl Scouts all over the world.
All:            (Recite the Girl Scout Promise.)
Junior Girl Scouts then pin the wings on the “flying-up” Brownie Girl Scouts and give the Girl Scout sign and handshake. All 15
girls form a Friendship Circle and sing a song.


                                                                   Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                           BROWNIE FLY-UP
                            CEREMONY II
Have a “bridge” of some sort – crepe paper streamers, stepping stones of cardboard, an archway covered with paper
flowers, or a real bridge in the outdoors. The Junior Girl Scout troop should stand on one side of the bridge, the Brownie Girl
Scout troop should stand on the other side.

Brownie Leader:          Since this is the last time that you will be together as Brownie Girl Scouts, I would like you to sing
                         “The Brownie Smile Song.”

All Brownies:            Sing “The Brownie Smile Song.”

Brownie Leader:          The time has come for you to take wings and fly-up to Junior Girl Scouts. I have enjoyed having you
                         in my troop for the past years. We have had much fun together, learning new songs and games,
                         going on hikes, (whatever is appropriate here). I hope that when you think of your years together
                         you will remember them with much pleasure. I would like for each flying-up Brownie to tell what
                         she has enjoyed most about being a Brownie.

Each Brownie “Fly-Up” tells what she enjoyed most.

Brownie Leader:          Since you have been a registered Brownie Girl Scout, you are entitled to wear the Brownie Wings
                         on the sash of your Junior uniform. It gives me great pleasure to present them to you. I hope you
                         wear them proudly. (Leader presents wings to each “Fly-Up.”)

All Brownies:            (As each “Fly-Up” gets her wings…) Now it’s time to say goodbye, break the ring, and out you fly.

“Fly-Ups” break out of the Brownie Circle to cross the bridge. Each one is met on the bridge by a Junior Girl Scout who
takes her to the circle of the new Junior troop.

Junior Leader:           As Junior Girl Scouts, you will continue to try your best to live by the Girl Scout Law. It should be a
                         daily reminder of how you should act at home, at school, in your community, and wherever you are.
                         This Law is an important part of the Promise, which you will now say.

As the Junior Girl Scout leader calls each “Fly-Up”, the girl steps forward and says the Promise. The Junior leader pins her
with the Junior Girl Scout pin and gives her the Girl Scout handshake.

All Girls:                        Sing, “Whene’er You Make A Promise.”




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                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
               Paper Doll Ceremony
This could be used as an invitation to this bridging ceremony: As an
invitation, or expanded to a large table centerpiece, this idea clearly
conveys the meaning of bridging from one level of Girl Scouting to the
next.

Cut a piece of construction paper into a rectangle 5" x 9". Fold paper in
thirds (ends folded toward center). Trace pattern on front of paper, and
cut as indicated, leaving doll attached at arms, skirt and shoes. Open up
dolls.

Write message on center doll. Different colors of construction paper can
be used for the different levels:

Brown for Brownies
Green for Juniors
Blue for Cadettes

For centerpiece, enlarge pattern on poster board, cutting 4 paper dolls to
form a square when opened to stand.

As each Girl Scout says her verse, she stretches out her hand to the next Girl Scout to speak, until all the girls are linked like
paper dolls across the front of the room. Verses may be split if you have more than seven girls bridging. Girls who do not
have speaking parts could also stand up with hands linked like paper dolls

             Take my hand in friendship                                       Take my hand in thanking
             I give to you this day                                           Our leader and our guide
             Remember all the good times                                      With sincere appreciation
             We had along the way                                             For standing by our side

             Take my hand in helping                                          Take my hand in eagerness
             Other people that we know                                        To be an older scout
             The more we give to others                                       We're proud to be bridging
             The more that we will grow                                       Is what we're going to shout

             Take my hand in learning                                         So take my hand to follow
             To camp on nature's ground Enjoying trails and                   New scouting paths in sight
             campfires                                                        We'll join hands with each other
             With new friends that we have found                              And in friendship we'll unite

             Take my hand in giving                                           (In unison):
             Our knowledge of true scouts                                     We give our hands in promise
             To girls we meet and talk to                                     To hold our country dear
             Who have so many doubts                                          And abide by the Girl Scout Law                        17
                                                                              Each day throughout the year


                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                             BADGE CEREMONY
Display girls’ projects from the year around the room for parents and friends to admire. This will help keep guests and girls
occupied as people are arriving.

Have each girl’s badges or patches in an attractive container or pinned to a ribbon with the girl’s name on it.

BE CREATIVE! Encourage leaders to investigate ideas for attractive presentations.

Open the Court of Awards with a flag ceremony. Have the girls standing in a horseshoe facing the audience of parents and
friends.

Leader:      Welcome to our Court of Awards ceremony. If everyone could please find his or her seat, we will begin our
             ceremony with a flag ceremony.

Leader:      Thank you, girls. And thank you all for joining us tonight to share in recognizing these girls for all their hard
             work in earning the awards they will be receiving. Each girl needs inspiration and guidance in learning and
             growing, in Girl Scouting, and in other aspects of her life. Many times, it is the every day encouragement and
             help from you, as parents, grandparents, and friends that each girl relies on. We, the leaders, realize the time
             and effort you invest in their lives. Your investment is what makes their participation in Girl Scouting possible,
             and for that, we thank you. The adult volunteers who work with the girls are also invested in their growth, and
             believe in what the Girl Scout Program brings to them. We are all very proud of the accomplishments of this
             group of ladies.

Three candles are placed on the table. (OR) if you do not choose to use candles, you can place a vase of artificial flowers on
the table, with three girls or adults, chosen in advance, are given one flower each.

This candle that I light is a symbol of our Girl Scout slogan: "Do a good turn daily".

A Girl Scout's greatest desire is to serve.

(ALTERNATE WORDING, IF NOT USING CANDLES)

This flower is a symbol of our Girl Scout Slogan: “Do a good turn daily”. A Girl Scout's greatest desire is to serve.

May the light of the second candle shine as a symbol of our Girl Scout Motto: "Be Prepared" Through our work to earn Girl
Scout recognitions, we learn the skills needed to be prepared for many situations.

(ALTERNATE WORDING, IF NOT USING CANDLES)

May the beauty of the second flower serve as a symbol of our Girl Scout Motto: "Be Prepared" Through our work to earn Girl
Scout recognitions, we learn the skills needed to be prepared for many situations.

May the light of the third candle shine as a symbol of our Girl Scout Promise, a pledge we strive to live by daily.
                                                                                                                                    18
(ALTERNATE WORDING, IF NOT USING CANDLES)


                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
May the third flower bloom as a symbol of our Girl Scout Promise, a pledge we strive to live by daily.

Please stand & join us in reciting the Girl Scout Promise. Please join us in singing ___________, have the words copied in
advance for each participant. (Optional)

BADGE CEREMONY OPTION I:
Write each letter of the word “badges” on a piece of cardboard and on the reverse side write the explanation for that letter
for the girls to read.

The six chosen to chosen to hold the letter should be lined up at the front with their cards. (You can have girls, leaders, or
parents do this part)



#1:     B stands for badges to be given today. What is a badge? It is an outward sign of inner accomplishments. The
        scrap of colored material is not nearly as important as the job that was done to earn it.

#2:     A stands for awards given at the Court of Awards. Here we are not rewarded for the badge itself, but for what the
        badge represents – new knowledge, new skills, and new opportunities.

#3:     D stands for deeds. Good deeds to be done now and in the future for family, friends, and community. Good deeds
        done with the knowledge learned by earning badges.

#4:     G is the Girl in Girl Scouts. The earning of badges shows growth as an individual.

#5:     E stands for the energy and eagerness necessary to earn badges. Badges do not come easily and should not, or
        their value would be small. Badges must present challenges and accomplishment.

#6:     S stands for many things: service to others, self-development, and self-respect. Self-respect comes from setting
        high goals and striving to achieve them.

Leader #1:       Aim your thinking and acting toward the good things in life; you will develop character, you will be able to
                 take pride in yourself, and you will enjoy a sense of well-being and accomplishment.

Leader #2:

                 Ceremonies are an important tradition in Girl Scouting. The ceremonies may vary in size, appearance, and
                 meaning, but they satisfy a fundamental human desire for recognition, and instill a sense of self-worth and
                 pride in their accomplishments. Each (badge, patch, Try-It) has several requirements. Each girl has
                 accomplished some of these requirements by herself, and some of the requirements have involved working
                 with other girls on a common project. These activities have helped the girls learn new skills or develop new
                 interests. It is with great pride that we present these awards today and recognize these girls for their hard
                 work.


                                                                                                                                    19
BADGE CEREMONY OPTION II:

                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
In advance, make 8 ½ X 11 cards with each letter. You can print the wording on the back of each card so that the
participants hold up the cards for the audience & can read off the back. The twelve chosen to chosen to hold the letter
should be lined up at the front with their cards. (You can have girls, leaders, or parents do this part)

                                                  The Spelling of Girl Scouting


             G                is for the Gracious way we all proclaim our birth


             I                points up the Ideas shared and those we'd like unearthed


             R                is for Respect we have for every race and creed


             L                is for our Loyalty to promises we heed




             S                is for Sincerity of deed and word and mind


             C                is for the Countless ways in which these are combined


             O                is Obligation that we owe to fellow man


             U                means that it's You who must be first to lend a hand


             T                is for the Teamwork which has evidenced our growth


             I                is for Integrity which backs the Girl Scout oath


             N                is for the Noble way we remember days of old


             G                is for the Grateful thanks for efforts toward our goal


                            Each of these is Girl Scouting - What work! What fun! What pride!
                                 To recall with admiration - And seek with greater stride

Leader #2:                                                                                                                         20




                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                 Ceremonies are an important tradition in Girl Scouting. The ceremonies may vary in size, appearance, and
                 meaning, but they satisfy a fundamental human desire for recognition, and instill a sense of self-worth and
                 pride in their accomplishments. Each (badge, patch, Try-It) has several requirements. Each girl has
                 accomplished some of these requirements by herself, and some of the requirements have involved working
                 with other girls on a common project. These activities have helped the girls learn new skills or develop new
                 interests. It is with great pride that we present these awards today and recognize these girls for their hard
                 work.

Speaker:  We now invite ________ (Leader’s Name), Leader of ____ (Daisy, Brownie, etc.) ______________, Troop
Number _________________ to present their troops awards.

Troop Leader: Presents all girls with their awards, EXCEPT for Bronze/Silver/Gold

Leader can say a few words about the troop, special activities, service projects etc., if time allows

I present the following awards to ______. (Name badges, patches, etc.)

Repeat for each girl.

Speaker:         Invites next troop and process continues until all troops have presented their awards.

Repeat for each girl.

Speaker:         Invites Troops awarding the Bronze Award, one at a time to pin girls

                 (Script for Pinning attached)

Speaker:         Continues with Silver, then Gold

Speaker:         Invites graduating Seniors and their leaders to come forward.

Leaders should introduce girls and give a short description of the girl’s accomplishments and future endeavors. We also
recommend you invite girls to share something about their Girl Scout experience (what they have gained, a fond memory, a
special ceremony, an exciting adventure, etc.) Process continues until all girls are introduced. In addition, it is
recommended that you invite parents to stand & be recognized.

Speaker:         Speaking directly to group of graduating Seniors: “At this time, we would like to invite you to join us in a
new and exciting opportunity in Girl Scouting, as an adult Girl Scout Volunteer. Our hope for you is that you may go out into
the world; make it a better place, and make a path for yourself that will lead you to everything you want out of life. Along
that path, remember your Girl Scout journeys, and share your achievements with the young girls in your community, as we
all did for you.

_____________________________________, please join us in the world of Adult Girl Scouting.

Repeat until all graduating Seniors have bridged. Recommend you have the girls’ Leaders welcome them to Adult Girl
Scouting. Parents could also join, IF they are registered Girl Scouts.

                                                                                                                                    21




                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                    BRIDGING CEREMONY
DAISY TO BROWNIE BRIDGING
  Say the Girl Scout Promise together, leader could read the Girl Scout Law. Have each girl tell what was her favorite part of
  Daisy Girl Scouts and what she looks forward to as a Brownie Girl Scout, have each girl walk across the bridge. Give each
  girl an Ending Certificate, a Membership Star, and blue disc, and a Brownie Girl Scout pin (you may want to wait until the
  beginning of next year to give the girl her Brownie Pin). Greet each girl with a Girl Scout handshake. Sing the "Brownie
  Smile Song".


BROWNIE TO JUNIOR BRIDGING
A Brownie Girl Scout "flies up" to Junior Girl Scouting in the spring, and receives her Brownie Wings. If possible, have your
fly-up ceremony with a Junior troop in your Service Unit. Often all age groups of Girl Scouts are involved, including the
parents.

Needs: Order your Brownie Wings ahead of time, also your Girl Scout pins and Membership Stars and green disc if you plan
to present them now. Brown construction paper, cut to represent stones, or paper bags cut the same way. Write a Girl
Scout Law on each one. Refreshments (optional)

The Brownie Girl Scouts sit on one side of the room in a Brownie Ring, and the Junior Girl Scouts sit in a horseshoe (always
make the open end toward the audience) on the other side of the room. Place your Stepping Stones between the two
groups and tape them down to the floor.

Everyone sings "Girl Scouts Together", found in the Girl Scout Pocket Songbook (or others)

Brownie Leader: You have been a Brownie and you have earned your wings of sunlight gold. Now you are ready for Junior
Girl Scouts, new adventures you have been told. (The girls all stand)

Brownie Leader: I would like to present my Brownie Girl Scouts their wings; they are ready to fly-up to the next level of Girl
Scouting. As I call your name, would you please come forward? (As they come forward, pin on their wings).

Junior Leader: Each step of Junior Girl Scouting can be filled with fun and adventure. As a troop, we would like to welcome
you.

The Brownies walk on the stepping-stones and enter the horseshoe. With the Brownies facing the Juniors, the Girl Scout
Sign is made and the girls recite the Girl Scout Promise.

Have the Brownies and Juniors face one another, and walk forward to the stepping-stone with the first Girl Scout Law           22
printed on it and have the two girls say the Law. Now the next pair of girls come and stands on Law #2; continue until all the
Laws are said. If there are not enough girls in the two troops, they may have to do this as single girls instead of in pairs.

                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Junior Leader: With the help of (Brownie Leader's Name), we would like to present our new Juniors with the Girl Scout
membership pin. (Pin on Girl Scout Pins). At this time, you may also wish to give the girls their Membership Stars and
green disc.

Junior Leader: Junior Girl Scouts you will be for a few short years. Make the most of each day that goes by, be cheerful and
helpful and do a good turn daily, and greet each Girl Scout with a Hi!

JUNIOR TO CADETTE BRIDGING
Junior Girl Scouts form a horseshoe at one end of the bridge, while Cadette Girl Scouts form a horseshoe on the other. Each
Junior Girl Scout is presented with a candle while she is still on the "Junior" side of the bridge. One by one, each bridging
Junior walks to the center of the bridge, escorted by her leader. When they reach the center of the bridge, they are met by
an experienced Cadette Girl Scout. The ceremony then proceeds in the following manner:

Leader: May I present Junior Girl Scout _______________, who is eager to accept the challenge of Cadette Girl Scouting.

Cadette Girl Scout: I, _______________, challenge you, ________________, to serve your younger sister Girl Scouts,
your community, and your country, as we have served you. If you accept this challenge, I will light your candle in respect,
that you will live your challenge to the fullest. Do you accept this challenge?

Bridging Junior: I will accept this challenge.

(Upon accepting the challenge, the Cadette will light the bridging Junior's candle)

Leader: (name of new Cadette GS), would you please recite the Girl Scout Promise

New Cadette: Recites the Promise

Cadette leader and girls congratulate the new Cadette Girl Scout and welcome her to Cadette Girl Scouting. The same
procedure is repeated until all girls are bridged.

ALTERNATE JUNIOR TO CADETTE BRIDGING

All are standing in horseshoe formations. All repeat the Girl Scout promise.

Leader: (a poem)

                                           The trail of Scouting winds wide and long
                                          From Brownies and Beanies and sit-upons
                                         To campouts and Juniors and Badges to earn
                                               So much to do, so much to learn
                                           Then over the bridge and on the Cadettes
                                                                                                                                   23
                                        With memories and pleasures we'll never forget
                                           Now (girl's names), Scouts tried and true


                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                                          Cross over the bridge, we give them to you
                                               A gift of a girl is a precious thing
                                            Take care and great joy they will bring.

Junior leader presents each girl with Bridge to Cadettes patch and a candle with a silk daisy attached. Cadettes cross over
the bridge. After all girl are in the horseshoe:

Leader: The daisy symbolizes your dedication to the Girl Scout Movement, which was started by our founder, Juliette
Gordon Low, and began in our country on March 12, 1912. Juliette Low's nickname was Daisy. You are following her
example, as you become a unique and caring influence in today and tomorrow's world.

Have on table - 1 candle for each world color (red, orange, yellow, blue, and purple) and a green candle representing Girl
Scouting. In addition, need one whiter candle with a daisy.

Have Cadettes light appropriate candles and read the following scripts:

While lighting white candle w/daisy - (this candle is used to light all other colors) The light of Cadettes I share with you as
you explore the Girl Scout World through Interest Projects, Service, Career Exploration, and leadership opportunities.

While lighting the red candle: The red candle stands for the World of Well-Being, which helps young women understand
themselves, their values, needs, emotions, and strengths, while also being aware of what it takes to be physically fit.

While lighting the orange candle: The orange candle stands for the World of Today and Tomorrow, which lets a young
woman look into the how's and whys of things, to solve problems and to recognize the ways their present interests can
build toward future ones.

While lighting the yellow candle: The yellow candle stands for the World of the Out-of-Doors. Explorations in this world can
help a young woman to enjoy and appreciate her natural environment and to take action to protect and preserve her world
and environment.

While lighting the blue candle: The blue candle stands for the World of People. This world can help a young woman to build
pride in her own heritage, while appreciating the uniqueness of each culture and the common theme of all peoples.

While lighting the purple candle: The purple candle stands for the World of the Arts. To develop a personal taste and
appreciation for the many art forms and things of beauty in the world around them.

After each Color of the Worlds candle is lit, light the green candle saying: From the light of the Five Worlds, may your Girl
Scout world ever grow. Then, each girl takes her white candle and lights it from the green one.

Leader: From the Girl Scout Worlds, take your light into the world and let it shine forth with love and knowledge.


                                                                                                                                     24




                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
CADETTE TO SENIOR BRIDGING
You are about to enter another phase of Girl Scouting. You will find yourself leaving behind your childish enthusiasm and
entering a world of new experiences where you will gain an understanding of your own self worth and individuality. As you
accept more responsibility, you will experience a growth in your knowledge, abilities, and judgments. In these tools place
your new enthusiasm for the future - use them wisely.

Leader: _______________, are you willing to accept the challenges and responsibilities of a Cadette (Senior) in Girl
Scouts?

Cadette (Senior) response: I am

Leader: As you say the challenges, light the candles before you as a symbol of this acceptance.

(You could use different colored candles to correspond to the different worlds: Red for #1, blue for #2, orange for #3,
purple for #4, yellow for #5, white for #6, green for #7, and silver or gold for #8)

The Challenge of Cadette Scouting:

            1. I challenge myself to a greater understanding of the World of Well Being
            2. I challenge myself to better serve the World of People
            3. I challenge myself to accept the changing World of Today and Tomorrow
            4. I challenge myself to have a better insight and appreciation of the World of the Arts
            5. I challenge myself to understand and preserve the World of the Out-of-Doors
            6. I challenge myself to learn leadership and give service
            7. I challenge myself to accept and live the challenge of being a Girl Scout (or challenge of living the Promise
               and Law)
            8. I challenge myself to achieve the highest award as a Cadette (Senior), the silver award (the Gold Award.

Cadettes should be in a horseshoe on one side of the bridge, and a Senior or Seniors on the other side of the bridge. After
the Cadettes cross the bridge and are met and given the Girl Scout handshake by the Senior Scout(s), they should then
form a horseshoe with the Senior(s).

Leader: "When you are a Senior Scout, your life is filled with action. In addition to group activities, Seniors have many
individual opportunities coming their way. You can take part in special events and activities planned by Seniors for Seniors.
You can be a delegate or a member of the Council board and help plan council activities. You may be selected for one of
the many Wider Opportunities open to Girl Scouts each year. In addition, you can now begin work on the Gold Leadership
Award and the Gold Award, the highest award in Girl Scouts. We invite you to get involved!"

Need eight white candles in holders. New Seniors may alternate lighting candles and saying the parts of the following
pledge:

I pledge as a Senior Scout to:                                                                                                     25

            1. Uphold the highest ideals of womanhood as expressed in the Promise and Law

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
            2. Be thoughtful and considerate and assume my share of responsibility in the activities of my troop
            3. Be a better citizen of my community and prepare myself for the duties and responsibilities of adult
               citizenship in a democracy
            4. Realize my deep commitment to volunteer my services wherever and whenever needed
            5. Keep myself healthy and the world around me as safe as I can make it
            6. Seek new knowledge and the skill to use it
            7. Increase my knowledge and understanding of the peoples of the world toward the goal of peace
            8. Prepare myself for the future

Return to horseshoe

Leader: As you begin your Senior journey to the Gold Award - we give you a gold key to help you unlock the doors to the Five
Worlds of Girl Scouting. Keys have quite a history. They were first used back in Biblical times. They were quite large and
made of wood; they were carried as a sign of prestige. We hope that you will carry your key as proudly as the first keys were
carried - and that this key will open many doors and worlds in your Senior years of Scouting. Welcome to Senior Scouts.

The speaking parts can be split up into a few more parts if you have more girls available. This ceremony can be adapted to
bridge girls into Adult Scouting with a few wording changes.

Senior Scout Speaker: Tonight we Seniors celebrate with the Cadettes who are ready to bridge into Senior Girl Scouting. It
is our aim during this evening to see that you have a glimpse into the different options of the Senior Girl Scouting program
and that we can get to know each other. We know that you have prepared yourselves well and will want to use your
experiences to extend your knowledge and to explore new interests. We know too, that you will adhere to the belief in the
Girl Scout Promise and Law, which underlies the activities in the Senior Program. May we all repeat the Girl Scout Promise
and Law together?

Senior Scout: There are so many worlds to explore! There is the World of Yourself, partly known, but still full of mysteries
and surprises. There is the World of People, like you and unlike you, girls and boys, men and women, little children and
senior citizens. There is the World of the Out-of-Doors, and there are the worlds of laughter and beauty, career, and growing
up to be a woman.

Speaker: It now gives us much pleasure to present you with a gift to represent your bridging from Cadettes to Seniors. As
your name is called, will you please come forward to receive your gift?

Speaker: (after all girls have received gifts)
Let us be friends in everything of duty and of play.
And in whatever other deeds we do from day to day
Let us be kind and generous to those who cross our path
And not allow ourselves to live in jealousy or wrath
Let us consider what we have and how much we can spare
To spread the sunshine with us to others everywhere
For, after all, our happiness to some degree depends
On how we go about the task of comforting our friends                                                                              26
So let us follow friendliness with every step we take
And do some worthy deed each day for someone else's sake

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Close with an appropriate song.

After all girls have been seated, (a 5-10 minute break is appropriate, but not always necessary)

Speaker:          We are all so proud of all these girls and their accomplishments. Without the hard work and dedication of
the volunteers, the opportunities afforded these girls would not be possible. Our volunteers have a commitment to these
girls that is unsurpassed. I would like all the Troop Leaders, Co-Leaders, and Assistant Leaders to stand. Each one of them
deserves a round of applause. Thank you all! Every year Adult Recognitions are presented at ceremonies throughout our
Council, and tonight we have some volunteers that we would like to recognize.



Once Adult Recognitions have all been presented, make a short statement thanking ALL volunteers for their service.

Speaker:         Now, if you could please stand for the Retiring of the Colors.

                Closing Flag Ceremony (Script attached)

Speaker:          Thank you again for coming to our Court of Awards Ceremony. You are encouraged to join us for
refreshments, visit, and enjoy the displays we brought to share with you. These girls have worked very hard, as I am sure you
can see. Since they could not have had these experiences without your help and encouragement, please share with us a
traditional friendship circle for the closing song.

All:            Join in friendship circle and sing, “Taps.”, or “Make New Friends”



SENIOR TO AMBASSADOR BRIDGING

You are about to enter another phase of Girl Scouting. You will find yourself leaving behind your childish enthusiasm and
entering a world of new experiences where you will gain an understanding of your own self worth and individuality. As you
accept more responsibility, you will experience a growth in your knowledge, abilities, and judgments. In these tools place
your new enthusiasm for the future - use them wisely.

_______________, are you willing to accept the challenges and responsibilities of an Ambassador in Girl Scouts?

Senior response: I am

Leader: As you say the challenges, light the candles before you as a symbol of this acceptance.

(You could use different colored candles to correspond to the different worlds: Red for #1, blue for #2, orange for #3,
purple for #4, yellow for #5, white for #6, green for #7, and silver or gold for #8)

The Challenge of Ambassador Scouting:
                                                                                                                                   27
               I challenge myself to a greater understanding of the World of Well Being
               I challenge myself to better serve the World of People

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
               I challenge myself to accept the changing World of Today and Tomorrow
               I challenge myself to have a better insight and appreciation of the World of the Arts
               I challenge myself to understand and preserve the World of the Out-of-Doors
               I challenge myself to learn leadership and give service
               I challenge myself to accept and live the challenge of being a Girl Scout (or challenge of living the Promise
                and Law)
               I challenge myself to achieve the highest award as a Cadette (Senior), the silver award (the Gold Award.

Ambassadors should be in a horseshoe on one side of the bridge, and a Senior or Seniors on the other side of the bridge.
After the Seniors cross the bridge and are met and given the Girl Scout handshake by the Ambassadors Scouts, they should
then form a horseshoe with the Ambassadors.

Leader: "When you are an Ambassador Scout, your life is filled with action. In addition to group activities, Ambassadors
have many individual opportunities coming their way. You can take part in special events and activities planned by
Ambassadors for Ambassadors.

Need eight white candles in holders. New Ambassadors may alternate lighting candles and saying the parts of the
following pledge:

I pledge as an Ambassador Scout to:

               Uphold the highest ideals of womanhood as expressed in the Promise and Law
               Be thoughtful and considerate and assume my share of responsibility in the activities of my troop
               Be a better citizen of my community and prepare myself for the duties and responsibilities of adult
                citizenship in a democracy
               Realize my deep commitment to volunteer my services wherever and whenever needed
               Keep myself healthy and the world around me as safe as I can make it
               Seek new knowledge and the skill to use it
               Increase my knowledge and understanding of the peoples of the world toward the goal of peace
               Prepare myself for the future

Return to horseshoe

Scout Speaker: Tonight we Seniors celebrate with the Seniors who are ready to bridge into Ambassadors Girl Scouting. It is
our aim during this evening to see that you have a glimpse into the different options of the Ambassador Girl Scouting
program and that we can get to know each other. We know that you have prepared yourselves well and will want to use your
experiences to extend your knowledge and to explore new interests. We know too, that you will adhere to the belief in the
Girl Scout Promise and Law, which underlies the activities in the Senior Program. May we all repeat the Girl Scout Promise
and Law together?

Senior Scout: There are so many worlds to explore! There is the World of Yourself, partly known, but still full of mysteries
and surprises. There is the World of People, like you and unlike you, girls and boys, men and women, little children and
                                                                                                                              28
senior citizens. There is the World of the Out-of-Doors, and there are the worlds of laughter and beauty, career, and growing
up to be a woman.

                                                               Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Speaker: It now gives us much pleasure to present you with a gift to represent your bridging from Seniors to Ambassadors.
As your name is called, will you please come forward to receive your gift?

Speaker: (after all girls have received gifts)
Let us be friends in everything of duty and of play.
And in whatever other deeds we do from day to day
Let us be kind and generous to those who cross our path
And not allow ourselves to live in jealousy or wrath
Let us consider what we have and how much we can spare
To spread the sunshine with us to others everywhere
For, after all, our happiness to some degree depends
On how we go about the task of comforting our friends
So let us follow friendliness with every step we take
And do some worthy deed each day for someone else's sake
Close with an appropriate song.

After all girls have been seated, (a 5-10 minute break is appropriate, but not always necessary)

Speaker:          We are all so proud of all these girls and their accomplishments. Without the hard work and dedication of
the volunteers, the opportunities afforded these girls would not be possible. Our volunteers have a commitment to these
girls that is unsurpassed. I would like all the Troop Leaders, Co-Leaders, and Assistant Leaders to stand. Each one of them
deserves a round of applause. Thank you all! Every year Adult Recognitions are presented at ceremonies throughout our
Council, and tonight we have some volunteers that we would like to recognize.



Once Adult Recognitions have all been presented, make a short statement thanking ALL volunteers for their service.

Speaker:         Now, if you could please stand for the Retiring of the Colors.

                Closing Flag Ceremony (Script attached)

Speaker:          Thank you again for coming to our Court of Awards Ceremony. You are encouraged to join us for
refreshments, visit, and enjoy the displays we brought to share with you. These girls have worked very hard, as I am sure you
can see. Since they could not have had these experiences without your help and encouragement, please share with us a
traditional friendship circle for the closing song.

All:            Join in friendship circle and sing, “Taps.”, or “Make New Friends”

AMBASSADOR TO ADULT BRIDGING
                                                   (Girls receive candles)

This candle symbolizes the Girl Scout Family. May its flame light your way always. At this time, each Ambassador will add
                                                                                                                                   29
her personal light during the ceremony.
                                                            (OR)
This flower symbolizes the Girl Scout Family. May its beauty brighten your way always.

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
(If more than 1 Ambassador)
At this time, each Ambassador will add her personal light during the ceremony.
                                                            (OR)
At this time, each Ambassador will add her flower during the ceremony.

(As girls are lighting their candles, (OR) adding their flowers, read the following)

As you bridge from Ambassador Girl Scouting to Adult Girl Scouting, I have three challenges for you. The first challenge is
to stay involved in Girl Scouting. Do not let today be the end of your career, rather just the close of one chapter, and the
start of an exciting new chapter in Girl Scouting.

The second challenge involves a very important group of women. Can all the Ambassador Leaders please stand. THESE
WOMEN DESERVE A HUGE ROUND OF APPLAUSE. These women have been behind the scenes guiding you and helping you
develop in to wonderful young women. I challenge you to keep these women in your lives. Send them Christmas cards
every year, graduation, wedding and birth announcements. These women have been a part of your life for so many years,
and they will continue to care and be interested in you. Remember that wherever life may lead you, Girl Scouting will
always remain a part of your life. We are both friend and family.

The third challenge is to continue to live by and exemplify the ideals of the Girl Scout program. Continue to be a positive
role model for girls and women everywhere. Remember to keep focused and grounded and do not forget your values.

Would you now for your first time as an Adult Girl Scout, please join all of us as we recommit ourselves to the principles and
goals of the Girl Scout movement by saying the Girl Scout promise?

Will the audience please stand?

On my honor, I will try:
       To server God and my country,
       To help people at all times,
       And to live by the Girl Scout Law.


Congratulations, Ladies. We wish you all the best.



SAMPLE AMBASSADOR TO ADULT SCRIPT
Speaker:

I want to offer Congratulations to all of you—Leaders, Parents, family members, friends—and especially to our Girl Scouts!

In Girl Scouting, we help every girl discover who she can be and what she can do, wherever she chooses to put her energies.

The journey begins with the Girl Scout environment itself. A girl’s leadership blooms among other girls—away from school
pressures, social cliques and boys—where she can be herself and try new things.

Among Girl Scouts, activities are girl led. Each girl learns by doing and the learning is cooperative—not competitive.               30




                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
To discover who she can be, she needs wise adults who both inspire her and respect her. That is where our volunteers and
family members come in!

To discover what she can do, she needs opportunities to participate as varied as the world—so she can “try on” different
leadership roles and grow into the ones that fit her best.

Today’s Awards stand for accomplishment and teamwork—but the impact will last for a lifetime!

Girls are motivated to achieve and leaders, along with parents, partner with girls in helping them reach their goals!

Mentoring has played an important role in the development of these girls- Role modeling by parents and other family
members is critical to the positive ways girls learn and grow.

We are celebrating the achieving of these awards but we know the implications of these awards are important to each girl’s
future as she begins planning for college or post secondary education or career paths she may take.

We also know the relationships strengthened by the Girl Scout program with her family and community will provide a
platform for the rest of her life and indeed will have the capacity to impact her community, state—and nation.

We truly believe that you change a girl and change the world.

At this time we would like to welcome today’s guest speaker.
Girl Scouting cannot exist without the volunteer – without the inspiration and perspiration of our thousands of dedicated,
caring, talented volunteers, our girls would not have the opportunities and fun they do!

So today, we honor these amazing individuals and their dedication to the Girl Scouts organization.

As I call your name, please come forward to accept you award. Once you receive your award, please pause and smile for
pictures.
Let’s give our award recipients one more well deserved round of applause!

Before we honor our older girls, we will break to serve lunch. Please join me in Grace with the Girl Scout Prayer. You will
find the words on the table.

(Begin speaking once everyone is eating and seated.)


Speaker
Diamonds would like to honor a special group of young women, our Girl Scout members in graduating classes of 2010.

These girls have been part of our Girl Scout family for many years—their parents have supported their involvement and their
leaders have guided them along the path from Daisy to adult. You are all to be congratulated for continuing your Girl Scout
experience and service through your high school years.

You are a part of a Girl Scout family that will always be there for you. As you move forward with your adult life, keep in touch
with the leaders that have guided you along this path, the young girl scouts that admire you, and the Council that is so very
proud of you. We all want to know about the paths you are taking in life!

At this time, I would like all of our graduating seniors to make their way to the front.                                             31

EACH GIRL WILL STATE HER NAME AS SHE IS GIVEN A CANDLE. ONCE ALL GIRLS HAVE A CANDLE…SPEAKER SAYS:

                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
I would like to ask each Graduating Senior to cross over our bridge to Adult Girl Scouting, and light their candle. Please
remain standing in the front.

EACH GIRL WILL CROSS THE BRIDGE AND LIGHT HER CANDLE & PLACE IN HOLDER AS SPEAKER SAYS:

This candle symbolizes the Girl Scout Family. May its flame light your way always. As you bridge from Senior or
Ambassador Girl Scouts to Adult Girl Scouting, may you continue to live by and exemplify the beliefs of Girl Scouting.

We encourage you to take what you have gained through your Girl Scout experience and use it to become the positive role
model that an adult Girl Scout was for YOU. We hope that you become that young woman you always dreamed of being,
and that you will live your life by the Girl Scout Promise and Law.

Our wish for you is that you will cherish your Girl Scout memories and all the people who were a part of your Girl Scout
family. Remember the fun, friendships, and activities, use what you have learned, and share what you gained with our next
generation of young Girl Scouts by giving back…you KNOW how important it is!

Will the Audience please stand?

For your first time as an Adult Girl Scout, please join all Girl Scouts as we recommit ourselves to the principles and goals of
Girl Scouting by saying the Girl Scout Promise.

On my honor, I will try:
       To serve God and my country,
       To help people at all times,
       And to live by the Girl Scout Law.

Congratulations, Ladies and welcome to Adult Girl Scouting.

You may be seated.



Speaker
As we have celebrated these all these young women today, we must also look at the guiding hands that are truly behind
these girls -- their parents, grandparents and friends: Without your support, these girls would not be here today. You have
encouraged them when they were discouraged and celebrated their accomplishments along the way.

You, too, are an important part of the Girl Scout family and we would like you to know how much we appreciate each of you!
(applause)

As we close today, we would like to thank all of you for your attendance today in honoring our girls and volunteers

We so appreciate the continued support and loyalty of families and volunteers and pledge to continually work to deserve
your faith and support.

At this time, we ask Troop ____ to retire the Colors. Following this, you are all dismissed.

                                                                                                                                    32




                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                     BRONZE, SILVER,
                    AND GOLD CEREMONY
The Girl Scout Bronze, Silver, & Gold Awards are awards that girls can earn, over and above try-its, badges and Interest
Project patches. These awards are not earned easily, and the girls must make a commitment to themselves, their Leaders,
and their sister Girl Scouts to dedicate their time and effort in to earning these awards. We are very proud to have girls who
will be receiving the Bronze & Silver Awards tonight

Invite Troops receiving Bronze Awards

Bronze Recipients come up with Leader & receive pins

Invite Troops receiving Silver Awards

Silver Recipients come up with Leader & receive pins

Speaker-         Invite girls bridging to join on the left side of bridge

                 Invite girls not bridging to gather on right side of bridge
Speaker:

The colors of gold and silver are used as traditional symbols of outstanding achievement; so it is only fitting that the two
highest achievements a girl can earn in Girl Scouting are represented by the Girl Scout Gold and Silver Pins.

Today we will be honoring the young ladies who have earned these prestigious awards. By taking the initiative to give
countless hours of service to their communities, these girls exemplify what it takes to become the community leaders of our
future.

These are the girls who make things happen.

I have no doubt the founder of Girl Scouting, Juliette Gordon Low, would be proud of each one of these girls for following in
her footsteps in making the world a better place!

The Girl Scout Silver Award recognizes girls who have completed a process that begins with the discovery of an idea or
issue, inspires her to connect with her community, and finally, motivates her to take action in an effort to affect a positive
change in their world.

This process is lengthy, sometimes difficult, and many times, a very enlightening experience for these young ladies. The
things that can be learned about themselves and their community through the process of earning the Silver Award will stay
with them for the rest of their lives.

When taking action to complete the project the girls have an opportunity to take what they have learned through the
process and implement that knowledge in a way that can bring about a change and a level of understanding about the
particular topic of the project.
                                                                                                                                       33




                                                                    Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
The impact that these award recipients have on their communities because of their projects will continue to be evident for
many years to come. For many of these ladies, the paths they choose as adults will be determined by what they gained in
earning the Silver Award.

Projects vary based upon each individual’s interests, resources, and abilities.

It is my privilege to present the awards to those girls present today.

As I call each troop number, would all girls and leaders please come forward please come to the stage? Once you receive
your award, please pause and smile for pictures.

Troop XXXX
City:
Troop Leader:
Girls:

Congratulations, Girl Scout Silver Award recipients! Please join me in one more round of applause.


Speaker
Our last award—but certainly not least is the highest award in Girl Scouting – the Girl Scout Gold Award.

Gold Award recipients are an elite group of girls. Annually, only about 6% of eligible Girl Scouts earn this award.

To begin working towards the Girl Scout Gold Award, girls must be in grades 9-12. Earning the Gold Award is a process
intended to promote community service, personal growth, positive values, and leadership skills. Once a girl has completed
a portion of the process, planning and executing her project begins. Girls must also formulate a procedure for measuring
the outcome as a result of the project, and develop a plan to sustain the project beyond their completion of the award.

Each girl’s project is based on a desire to have a positive and lasting impact on her community, affecting change in a
specific area, and making the world a better place. This process is designed to give girls an opportunity to take something
of interest to them and develop that interest into passion and that passion into change.

We will be honoring our Gold Award recipients. These young ladies are our community leaders of tomorrow. It is my
privilege to present the Gold Award to those girls present today.

As I call your name, will the recipient, accompanied by her parents and troop leader or advisor please come forward? Once
you receive your award, please pause and smile for pictures.

Please remain standing until the complete group has been introduced.

Announce Gold Girls

And, congratulations, Girl Scout Gold Award recipients! Please join me in one last round of applause for these amazing
girls!



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                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                            ADULT CEREMONY
SAMPLE ADULT CEREMONY OUTLINE
    1. Call to Order & Welcome (approx 2 min):

    2. Opening Flag Ceremony (approx 5 min):

    3. Introductions (approx 5 min): Of special guests, board members, staff, etc

    4. Guest Speaker (3-5 min):

    5. Presentation of Adult Awards:

    6. Presentation of Awards:

    7. Closing Remarks:

    8. Closing Ceremony




            INVESTITURE CEREMONY
INVESTITURE CEREMONY BASICS
Investiture and rededication ceremonies can be done in various ways, and the two can be easily combined for established
troops wishing to welcome new members. Here are a few reminders and ideas:

1. Investiture takes place the first time a girl or adult joins Girl Scouting. The person being invested:

a) Says the Girl Scout Promise
b) receives the appropriate Girl Scout pin and
c) is welcomed into Girl Scouting

             o   Saying the Girl Scout Promise can be done individually or as a group, depending on the age of the
                 person(s) being invested. Investiture should be a special time, not a scary one.
             o   At this time, Daisies may also receive their beginning certificate.
             o   The girl should understand (as much as possible for her age level) that when she is invested, she is
                 agreeing to subscribe to the values and principals of the Girl Scout Promise and Law.
                                                                                                                                     35
2. Rededication takes place each year a girl or adult rejoins Girl Scouting (it does not matter if they are consecutive years or
if there has been a break in the years). As part of the ceremony, those rededicating themselves say the Girl Scout Promise.

                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
            o    If you have girls/adults rededicating and investing at the same ceremony, do the rededicating first - then
                 those girls and adults can assist with investiture.

3. Be sure that everyone receives and wears only the appropriate Girl Scout Pin:

                          Daisy Girl Scout Pin                                - worn only by Daisy Girl Scouts
                                                                              (Kindergarten or 1st grade)

                          Brownie Girl Scout Pin                              - worn only by Brownie Girl Scouts
                                                                              ( 2nd, or 3rd grade)

                          Girl Scout Pin                                      - worn by Juniors, Cadettes,
                          traditional (eagle)                                 Senior and Adult Girl Scouts
                          contemporary (three faces)



Simple Investiture Ceremony
Ask the girl a simple question:
"Why do you want to be a Girl Scout?" or “What does it mean to make a promise?"
The girl answers in her own words.

Ask the girl to make her promise.
This can be done singly or the whole troop at once. Help her if she is shy.

Ask, "Do you promise to serve God and your country...?"
This will help her recall the words. As she makes the Promise, she uses the Girl Scout sign and the troop stands quietly.

Pin the appropriate pin over the girl's heart, telling her she is now a Girl Scout. Give the Girl Scout handshake and welcome
her to Girl Scouting.

The girl turns to face the troop and they welcome her with the Girl Scout sign or a song.



TRADITIONAL CANDELIGHT
INVESTITURE/REDEDICATION CEREMONY
Before and/or after the investiture/rededication portion of the ceremony a troop may choose to have a flag ceremony, sing
a song, etc. However, the investiture/rededication should be the main part of the ceremony.

Props: 14 candles (3 for Promise, 10 for Law, and 1 to light all other candles from)
The troop stands in horseshoe formation around a table with ceremonial candles. Open end of the horseshoe should be
towards the audience.
The leader, or one of the girls, begins the ceremony by explaining the meaning of "investiture" and/or rededication and the
symbolism of the three candles for the Promise and the ten candles for the Law. The participating girls and/or adults begin 36
to light the candles. This is shown by the *



                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
            o    one candle is lit for each part of the Girl Scout Promise and the ten parts of the Girl Scout Law
            o    the number of participants will determine how many candles each girl lights
            o    if you need more "parts", consider having one girl speak and one girl light the candle

    1. The Girl Scout Promise: On my honor, I will try * (this is the candle used to light all others)
    2. To serve God and my country *
    3. To help people at all times *
    4. And to live by the Girl Scout Law. *
    5. The Girl Scout Law: I will do my best to (no candle lit)
    6. be honest and fair *
    7. be friendly and helpful *
    8. be considerate and caring *
    9. be courageous and strong, and *
    10. be responsible for what I say and do. And to *
    11. respect myself and others *
    12. respect authority *
    13. use resources wisely *
    14. make the world a better place *
    15. be a sister to every Girl Scout *

Leader: "At this time the girls of Troop # ________ will rededicate themselves to the service of Girl Scouting"


       All returning members are called forward. They repeat the Girl Scout Promise and are welcomed back to the troop
        by an adult member with the Girl Scout handshake. They then return to the horseshoe.


Leader: "Now our new members will be invested into Girl Scouting"


       Leader, or one of the rededicated girls, calls each new girl and adult forward
       Each new member then repeats the Girl Scout Promise,



FLOWERS OF FRIENDSHIP INVESTITURE/REDEDICATION
The original ceremony appears in "Ceremonies in Girl Scouting”, however, this is updated to reflect the changes in the Girl
Scout Law.

Items needed: Ten groups of flowers, a container to set flowers in, sachets, or potpourri for each girl.

Introduction: Welcome to our investiture/rededication ceremony. In almost all countries and cultures there are ceremonies
to mark important events in life - days of celebration, sad days, joyous days, days on which a special commitment is made,
days that mark an achievement. Girl Scouts, too, have ceremonies to mark important events and significant days. Tonight
we are here to confirm or reaffirm our belief in the Girl Scout Promise and Law.

The Girl Scout Promise and Law are the foundation of all Girl Scouting. The Promise is like a basket that holds flowers.    37
Flowers have always played an important role in human life. From the very earliest times, they have been given as tokens of
love and respect and have served in ceremonies and rituals of all types. The flowers we mention in this ceremony symbolize

                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
the ten parts of the Girl Scout Law.


Main Part of Ceremony

Please join me in repeating the Girl Scout Promise (All girls recite). And now we will dedicate ourselves to living the Girl
Scout Law (as each part of the Law is read, the corresponding flower is placed in the basket)

I will do my best to be:

honest and fair, This part of the law is represented by the white chrysanthemum. It shows truth, honor, trustworthiness,
equality, and fairness.

friendly and helpful, The zinnia represents thoughtfulness about friends, while Baby's Breath represents generosity.

considerate and caring, Together, a red and a white Rose stand for a warm and caring heart.

courageous and strong, The garlic plant grows anywhere and has a strong flavor. It represents courage and strength of
character and body. The Indian paintbrush shows cheerfulness even in difficulty.

and responsible for what I say and do, The gladiola symbolizes strength of character, maturity, and responsibility. Binding
it with straw, we show that we honor our word and keep our agreements.

and to respect myself and others, The white Rose and white zinnia show that we hold ourselves worthy and good. Winter
Greens symbolize the harmony we try to keep between others and ourselves.

respect authority, The daffodil represents careful thought, attention, and concern. With the daffodil, we are saying that we
hold others in high regard.

use resources wisely, The foxglove shows thriftiness. When we use our resources wisely, we are being thrifty.

make the world a better place, The cattail represents the peace we are trying to bring to the world when we help others. The
Caladium shows the great joy and delight we take in the world around us.

and be a sister to every Girl Scout, With the striped carnation, we are saying that we think about those Girl Scouts and
Guides who are not here with us. It helps indicate our love for our fellow Scouts and Guides.




Daisy Girl Scout Investiture
Welcome girls and parents at the door. Have girls sit with their parents until you are ready to start the ceremony. You may
design your own ceremony any way you wish as long as it includes the opportunity for the girls to make the Girl Scout
Promise and receive their Daisy Girl Scout pins. Here is a sample design for a Daisy Girl Scout Investiture Ceremony:


       Call girls to the front, seat them in a half circle, facing you; you face the audience, read, or tell the story of Juliette   38
        Low. (Daisy Story of Juliette Low Book)
       Have girls stand and face the audience. As a group, girls make the Girl Scout sign and recite the Promise. Briefly
        explain the meaning of the hand sign to the audience.
                                                                   Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
       Pin each girl with her Daisy Girl Scout Pin, give her the give Girl Scout Handshake, and welcome her into Girl
        Scouting
       Make a Friendship Circle, sing "Make New Friends".
       Give each girl her Beginning Year Certificate.
       Invite parents and girls to share refreshments.



Some other ideas you might like to incorporate into your ceremony

Daisy Poem                                                              The Motions
I'm a Daisy standing tall                                               stand tall
I'm a Daisy, friends to all                                             wave to friends
I'm a Daisy, helping everyday                                           hands out, palms up
Living my life in the Girl Scout way                                    give Girl Scout Sign


                                                          Daisy Poem
                                       Daisies are the happiest flowers that I've ever seen
                                       Dancing in the sunshine with their leaves of green

                                  Their faces always smiling bright, cheerful all the while
                                   Anyone who sees their dance will surely have to smile

                                      It takes a bit of magic to see the "Daisy Dance"
                                 As the circle in the sunlight who will gaily leap and prance

                                         A girl is not a flower, we all know it's true
                                But pretty girls who dance and sing, in aprons of true blue
                              Will make the magic of the flowers seem real enough, no doubt
                                 Especially when these girls exclaim "I'm A Daisy Scout"

Daisy Circle
Make and tape a large daisy to the floor of the ceremony site. Put the names of the girls in the troop on the petals. Use the
Daisy Circle to group the girls before, during, and at the closing of the ceremony.

Additional Ideas for Daisy Investitures

       Play Daisy to Daisy
       Invite a Brownie troop to help with the ceremony
       Have a flag ceremony
       Have each girl hold a real or artificial daisy during the ceremony




Brownie Investiture                                                                                                                    39
Three Brownies:


                                                                    Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
1. Carries a big sign saying, "I am an Owl"
2. Carries a big sign saying, "I am a Tree"
3. Carries a smaller sign saying "So Am I"

Leader enters with three or four Brownies and all repeat the Promise
They will form a horseshoe on stage so that at the conclusion of the Law all can repeat the Promise and sing a short song.

NARRATOR:
In Girl Scouting, we have one Law with ten parts.

I will do my best
(1) To be honest and fair
Three girls enter with each holding a glass and one holding a bottle of opened pop. She pours a little into each glass
making sure they are equal and says "Now let's be as fair as we can about this"

I will do my best
(2) To be friendly and helpful
A Brownie enters with a lop-sided cake and proudly announces that she helped her mother make this lovely cake. Mother
enters with flour all over her and her hair a mess and a general disheveled appearance

I will do my best
(3) To be considerate and caring
Two girls appear in archway and take turns saying "You go first - No you go first" Repeat about four times then both crowd
through archway together

I will do my best
(4) To be courageous and strong
Two girls enter, one wielding a whip and a chair, like she is taming a lion, the other lifting a "heavy" object over her head

I will do my best
(5) To be responsible for what I say and do
One or two girls enter carrying stuffed "pets", pretending that they are real. They are feeding, watering, brushing, and
walking them. They also talk to them lovingly.

I will do my best
(6) To respect myself and others
Three girls enter, each holding a small hand mirror. Looking into the mirror, they say to themselves "I respect you, I respect
you, I respect you". They then turn to each other and repeat the same thing.

I will do my best
(7) To respect authority
Three girls and an older scout. The girls form a straight line. The older girl gives orders such as "About face" "Left face"
"Right face". Each girl turns in opposite direction for general confusion

I will do my best
(8) To use resources wisely
A Scout dressed VERY outlandishly such as purple socks, green skirt, red sweater, blue blouse, etc., with everything fitting
very poorly. She says: My mother sent me shopping, now wasn't that nice. I got all these lovely bargains at half their
normal price                                                                                                                        40

I will do my best

                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
(9) To make the world a better place
Some girls enter with their pet rocks and potted plants. One shows the other the new home she has made for her pet rock.
The other talks to their plants, etc.

I will do my best
(10) to be a sister to every girl scout
Two girls enter wearing outfits with the sleeves and skirts sewn together

They then say (in unison)
"Some people say sisters argue
I'm sure this you've heard
But the thing that describes us best
You'll find, inseparable’s the word
Everyone repeats the Girl Scout Promise and sings "Girl Scouts Together"



Brownie Pond Investiture
Props Needed: Brownie Girl Scout "Pond" (can be constructed from a piece of cardboard covered with foil and border with
greenery, or use a mirror and border with greenery, or use a real one!)
Also, need Brownie Pins for each new member. They can be placed on the floor by the pond.

Lay pond on the floor in the middle of the ceremony area. If desired, new members can be sent outside with the assistant
leader. If new girls stay in the room, they should be on one side of the pond and the other girls should be on the other. All
stand or sit around the "pond" and then the leader says the magic words:

Cross your little fingers, stand upon your toes
That's a bit of magic every Brownie knows
Now we all are standing in a forest glade
Listen very carefully, see the magic made


If the new Brownies have been sent outside, the girls knock on the door
The leader with the troop asks: "Who comes to the Brownie woods?"

Brownies-to-be: "We do"

Leader: "What do you want?"

Brownies-to-be: "We want to be Brownie Girl Scouts"

The leader may ask why, and the girls may give their own reasons (help them prepare them before the ceremony if you plan
on asking). Then they enter and gather around the pond.
At this point, you may have a simple dramatization of the Brownie Story by the older Brownies or the leader may tell or read
the story to the girls.

Leader: Who comes first (or next) to the Magic Pond
                                                                                                                                   41
Co-Leader: (Reads girls names, one by one, alphabetically)


                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Leader: Turns girls, one by one, while saying:
"Twist me and turn me and show me the elf
I looked in the water and saw _______________"
Girl: Myself!

Leader pins on Brownie Pin, gives the girl the Girl Scout handshake, and welcomes her to Girl Scouting. After each girl
receives her pin, the Leader says:

Uncross your little fingers, down from off your toes
Then the magic goes away, everybody knows

Older Brownies can help clean up the "magic" while the leader sings this song:
Weave the magic in and out, in and out, in and out
Weave the magic in and out, for we are Brownies
We have tidied everything, everything, everything,
We have tidied everything, for we are Brownies.


Brownie's Gold Walk
Room setting: Room should resemble woods with a "golden" trail marking the way to the Brownie Woods. In the woods is
a wise old owl (paper) in a tree. The trail may be made of construction paper, cardboard, or crepe paper. Be creative.

Girls to be invested proceed down "path" accompanied by other members of the troop, girls from sister troop, or the leader
may lead the girls. At each obstacle, girls tell about Brownie Scouting, earning their way to the Brownie Woods. The leader
or girls may help with the answer.

Girl Scout Member or Leader:
Come along and take my hand
We'll follow the path to Brownie Land
To find the woods, we'll walk the golden mile
But first, sing a song about a Brownie smile

(Girls sing "The Brownie Smile Song")

Obstacle may be a chair to climb over, etc.

Girl Scout member or leader:
Becoming a Brownie is a special thing
We do our business in a Brownie ______________
(New girls answer "Ring")

Obstacle should resemble a door (strips hung from the ceiling will work)

Girl Scout member or leader:
This is the door to the Brownie woods
Knock, and then answer the way you should.
(New girls "knock" on the door)
                                                                                                                                  42
Leader: "Who comes to the Brownie woods?"


                                                               Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Brownies-to-be: "We do"

Leader: "What do you want?"

Brownies-to-be: "We want to be Brownie Girl Scouts"

Leader: Then enter the magic woods
New scouts enter the woods. Leader takes each girl to the pond, one by one. All Brownies in the woods repeat as she is
twisted:
"Twist me and turn me and show me the elf
I looked in the water and saw _______________"

Girl: Myself!

Leader: Now is the time your Promise to make
But first give me the Sign and Shake
All new girls give the leader the Girl Scout Sign and handshake.




           ADULT INVESTITURE/
          REDEDICATION CEREMONY
                                                At each *, a candle should be lit.

Leader: Today (or tonight), we came in silence as we rededicate ourselves to Scouting. We light three candles signifying the
three parts of our Promise as together we renew it.

All: On my honor, I will try to serve God and my country *, to help people at all times *, and to live by the Girl Scout Law *.

Leader: Our opportunity comes to us through value - the right to grow through our experience in the Promise and Law. This
candle becomes a bright as we realize our golden opportunities. *

Adult: On my honor, I will TRY. I cannot succeed if I do not try. So I will try, I may not always succeed but I will grow with
every new experience as I put into practice the Promise and Law

Leader: Our goal is to help girls be good citizens today and active citizens tomorrow*

Adult: I am proud of God and my country. And on my honor, I will try to serve God, my country, and help people at all times
to the best of my ability.

Leader: The Scout loves her country and has knowledge of its relationship to the world. *

Adult: All women are sisters. We learn that there are many likenesses in all people, but where there are differences, we
gain exciting opportunities of understanding                                                                                         43

Leader: The pathway of Girl Scouting grows broader and other people become involved*

                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Adult: Others need me. It is good to know that I have skills and knowledge which can make someone else happier

Leader: Opportunities to develop into a more capable person are given to the Girl Scout as she assumes her role in the
troop and in her patrol*

Adult: I am a link in the golden chain of Girl Scouting. It can be no stronger than each link

Leader: Each Scout is an individual and by keeping herself forever fit, she is better ready to serve others and to enjoy
everyday living*

Adult: It is my privilege to keep myself physically fit, to live with kind thoughts and unselfish deeds and to keep myself
morally strong

Leader: And so the light grows brighter as it now fills this room and these hearts with the flame of accomplishment.

Pin new leaders, having them each repeat the Promise, if desired.




    Recognition Suggestions
Thank You’s
          Awards or Recognitions are given when a person meets all the criteria for that certain award. A “Thank You” is
 given to volunteers and leaders for a job well done and/or to show appreciation for their efforts. These may be given at
 any time and hopefully in front of their peers. Thank You’s can be given for being a product manager, chair of an
 Ceremony, helping at Service Unit Ceremonies, taking troops on outings, or many different things. They should be
 timely, given as soon as possible. Here are some ideas for Thank You’s.

       Casserole for a leader who has just taken her troop on an outing and does not have to cook a meal for her family
        when she gets home.

       Cover the costs for a Girl Scout training or workshop –or offer to babysit while the Leader is taking it.

       Girl Scout mug and a bag of coffee or tea

       Put a sign outside her/his door, “Our Girl Scout Leader lives here. Thank You.”

       Flowers

       Wrap a few cinnamon buns or cupcakes with a note saying, “Thanks for working your buns off” or “You                          44
        take the cake!”


                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
       Candle: “No one holds a candle to you. Thanks for your leadership.”

       A gift certificate

       Pasta Spoon: “Girl Scout Volunteers provide wonderful “Pastabilities for girls”

       Million Dollar Chocolate Bar: “Thanks a Million”




“Just for Fun” Taglines

Squirrel &/or Bag of Peanuts: “I’m nuts about the new Journey Series.”
Ice Cream Scoop & Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream Candy: “Have you heard the latest scoop? Volunteer Weekend
was a huge success!”
Starburst Candy: “Congratulations… You are a Star.”
Life Savers: “You’ve been a real LIFESAVER!”
Garden Gloves: “Thanks for digging in and lending a helping hand!”

Samoa’s Lip Gloss: “Just when you do so much, you are always willing to do some moa.”
Sunglasses: “We love your bright ideas.”
Million Dollar Chocolate Bar: “Thanks a million”.

Measuring Cups: “Thanks, Girl Scout Volunteers! You really ‘measured up’ during volunteer recruitment.”
Popcorn Bag: “Just ‘popping’ in to say, thanks for helping me today!”

Seeds: “Plant the seeds and watch girls grow with Courage, Confidence, and Character”.
Guitar: “Girl Scout Volunteers ROCK & ROLL!”
Bright Colorful Band Aids: “We appreciate our First Aiders!”
Berry Jam: “You are ‘berry sweet!”
Pom-Pons: “Three cheers for our Product Sales Team!”
Magic Wand: “You make the ‘Magic’ happen on our Learning Team!”
Lemonade Mix: “We love your recipe for Volunteer Service”
1 Tablespoon of Patience
1 teaspoon of Smiles
½ teaspoon of Sincerity
¼ teaspoon of Dedication
                                                                                                                                  45
Mix well and serve constantly



                                                               Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
10 Things to Remember About Giving Recognitions1
        o Give it or else. If you do not recognize people, they will feel unappreciated and go elsewhere to have
           their needs met.

        o   Give it frequently. People forget quickly that they received a “Thank You”. Therefore, – staff, volunteers,
            parents, and girls – keep doing it!

        o   Give it different ways. Use more than one method. Not everyone likes the same thing.
            Here are four methods:
                -    From a person, for the work the volunteer did. (Good job, Thank you)
                -    From a person for being part of the organization. (Recognize Birthday, You are always so positive,
                     Leader’s Day)
                -    From the organization, for being part of the team. (Years of Service, newsletter story about person
                     – not based on a single thing done)

        o   Give it honestly. Do not give praise unless you mean it. If you praise poor performance, the praise you give to
            others for good work will not be valued. If you are praising effort, say so.

        o   Give it to the person, not the work. Praise the organizers of the Ceremony rather than the Ceremony itself.

        o   Give it appropriately for the achievement. Small accomplishments should be praised with low-effort
            methods, large accomplishments should get something more.

        o   Give it consistently. Those doing the same work should receive recognition of the same type or effort.

                   o Give it on a timely basis. Show appreciation as soon after the Ceremony as possible.
            Do not make people wait.

        o   Give it in an individualized fashion. Be personal. Match the person’s motivation for volunteering: feels good to
            help, learn new skills, and meet new people

        o   Give it for encouragement. Recognize those doing a good job now, as well as those you want to encourage to
            do better.


1
    Adapted from Volunteer Management, By Steve McCurley and Rick Lynch




                                                                                                                                     46




                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                        Sample Readings
GIRL SCOUT WORDS OF WISDOM

                                          Recipe for a Girl Scout Leader

     Combine one level head and one loving heart with equal parts of enthusiasm and energy. Blend in an
     ability to work with others and an appreciation of individual differences. Add a double measure of
     humor and the desire to help girls grow. Fold in the imagination of an elf and the memory of an
     elephant. Top with a rugged constitution and resilience to adapt to new ideas. When seasoned with
     training and steeped in experience, this recipe will serve many girls well.




                                             A Leader’s Promise

                         On my honor, I will try to have:
                         Belief in the purpose of Girl Scouting;
                         Interest in and understanding of girls and a desire
                            to share good times with them;
                         Enjoyment of working with girls of various races,
                            religions and backgrounds;
                         Good health, physical condition, abundant energy
                            and a sense of humor;
                         Maturity and good judgment.




                                                Girl Scout

 G         is for Girl, that’s why we are here.
 I         is for Interest, without it she wouldn’t care.
 R         is for Ready, to start to make her place in the world
 L         is for Living, the Girl Scout way.
 S         is for Seeking, to learn, to explore.
 C         is for Country, we’ll do our share and more.
 O        is for Obligation, to live the Promise we have made.
 U        is for Unity, together, one for all.
 T         is for Trust. Without that, we’d all fall.
                                                                                                                                      47
 So that’s what a Girl Scout is and ever so much more.
 No matter what the age, there are many surprises in store.

                                                                   Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
I am a Girl Scout:              I have a promise. It has three parts and Girl Scouts and Girl Guides all over the world are
                                sisters and friends in this promise. Will you all please say it with me? (Say Promise.)

I am a Girl Scout:              I have a law. This is the code by which I try to live. This law should be used daily in every
                                Girl Scout’s life, in all she does at home, school, and play. (Recite Law.)

I am a Girl Scout:              I have a motto. “Be Prepared.” This means that I can be depended upon, whenever and
                                wherever I am needed. This is my duty – to be ready when called upon.

I am a Girl Scout:              I have a slogan. “Do a Good Turn Daily.” I will try to help other people wherever I see a
                                need.

I am a Girl Scout:              I have a sign. This I give whenever I repeat my promise. It is important to stand erect and
                                show my pride in belonging. This reminds me to think straight and to realize my duty as a
                                citizen. I give the Girl Scout sign to other Girl Scouts and Girl Guides as a sign of
                                friendship. The three fingers stand for the three parts of the Law. (Show sign.)

I am a Girl Scout:              I have a uniform, and I am proud to wear it. It must be neat at all times. When in uniform,
                                I try harder than usual to obey the Girl Scout Law.



POETRY

The Leader
Author Unknown


A leader is best
When people barely know that he exists,
Not so good when people obey and acclaim him,
Worst when they despise him.
Fail to honor people,
They fail to honor you;
But of a good leader, who talks little,
When his work is done, his aim fulfilled,
They will all say, “We did this ourselves.”


The Gift Outright
By Robert Frost

The land was ours before we were the land’s. She was our land more than a hundred years
before we were her people. She was ours in Massachusetts, in Virginia. But we were England’s. Still colonials. Possessing
what we still were unpossessed by. Possessed by what we now no more possess. Something we were withholding made us 48
weak until we found out that it was ourselves. We were withholding from our land of living, and forthwith found salvation in
surrender. Such as we were, we gave ourselves outright, (The deed of gift was many deeds of war.) to the land vaguely
realizing westward. But still unstoried, artless unenhanced. Such as she was, such as she would become.
                                                               Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
The American’s Creed
by William Tyler Page

I believe in the United States of America as a government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers
are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a republic; a sovereign nation of many sovereign states. A
perfect Union, one and inseparable, established upon those principles of freedom, equality and justice; and humanity for
which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it, to
support its Constitution, to obey its laws, to respect its flag, and to defend it against all enemies.


The Red, White and Blue
By Dorothy P. Cohen
What does our flag mean to you?
Does it mean just colors – red, white and blue?
Just a piece of cloth that proudly waves
From buildings tall and soldiers’ graves?
Or does it mean people like you and me
Who love this land of liberty?
People whose skins may be brown or white,
But bravely work for freedom and right?
Can you see in its folds mountains and hills,
Wide flowing rives and picturesque rills?
Fields that are golden with ripening grain,
And cowboys roaming across the plain?
Cities with skyscrapers stately and tall
And towns and villages large and small?
Farms that supply our tables with food,
And orchards and forests that yield fruit and wood?
These are the things in our flag that I see.
Symbol of a nation that loves liberty.
So to our flag let us pledge to be true;
God bless you and keep you, dear Red, White and Blue.




Success
By Arthur Stanley Harvey

To laugh often and love much
To win the respect of intelligent persons and the affection and children
To earn the approval of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends
To appreciate beauty
To find the best in others
To give of oneself without the slightest thought of return                                                                         49
To have accomplished a task, whether by a healthy child, a rescued soul, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition
To have played and laughed with enthusiasm and sung in exaltation

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
To know that even one life has breathed easier because you have lived


Patriotism
from “This Land of Ours”
P       Proud of the heritage that has been carved out of history and passed along for you to nourish and protect.

A       Alert to any hint of either aggression or subversion that threatens to wrest or wear away your rights and those of
        others

T       Trusting in the faith that gave our founding fathers the strength and the wisdom to forge this land of ours.

R       Resolute in your refusal to compromise your fundamental freedoms for some fleeting promise or some easy
        answer.

I       Informed on the meaningful issues of the day, that you might exercise your precious voting rights with discretion.

O       Outraged at any injustice that dilutes the basic concept of the dignity and equality of all men.

T       Truthful in your relationships with others, for truth is the cornerstone of democracy; without it the structure would
        crumble.

I       Involved in your government at all levels, making your voice heard on the vital issues that will shape America’s
        destiny.

S       Sacrificing when sacrifice is called for, sure in the knowledge that the good of the nation far transcends any
        individual wants.

M       Moral in all your deeds and judgments; for without morality, any triumph is a hollow, meaningless thing.



What Men Live By
By Leo Tolstoy

(Russian author Leo Tolstoy once wrote this brief allegory in which an angel disguised as a man is sent to earth by God to
learn these three lessons: what is given to men, what is not given to men, and what men live by. At the conclusion of the
story, the angel reveals his identity to the poor shoemaker who had taken him in, and speaks of the lessons he has
learned.)


And the Angel’s body became manifest, and he was clad with light so bright that the eyes could not endure to look on him,
and he spoke in clearer accents, as if the voice proceeded not from him, but came from heaven.

And the Angel said, “I have learned that every man lives, not through care of himself, but by love.”

“It is not given the mother to know what her children need to keep them alive. It is not given the rich man to know what he
himself needs; and it is not given any man to know whether he will need boots for daily living, or slippers for his burial.”
                                                                                                                                    50
“When I became a man, I was kept alive, not by what thought I took for myself, but because a stranger and his wife had love
in their hearts and pitied me and loved me. The orphans were kept alive, not because other people deliberated about what

                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
was to be done with them, but because a strange woman had love for them in her heart, and pitied them and loved them.
And all men are kept alive, not by their own forethought, but because there is love in men.”

“I knew before that God gave life to men, and desired them to live; but now I know something beyond that.”

“I have learned that God does not wish men to live each for himself, and therefore has not revealed to them what they each
need for themselves; but He wishes for them to live in union, and therefore has revealed to them what is necessary for each
and for all together.”

“I have now learned that it is only in appearance that they are kept alive through care for themselves, but that in all reality
they are kept alive through love. He who dwelleth in love dwelleth in God and God in him, for God is love.”

And the Angel sang a hymn of praise to God, and the cottage shook with the sound of his voice.


Me
By Walter De La Mare

                                                         As long as I live
                                                        I shall always be
                                                    My Self – and no other
                                                              Just me.
                                                           Like a tree –
                                                          Willow, elder,
                                                          Aspen, thorn,
                                                       Or cypress forlorn.
                                                          Like a flower,
                                                          For its hour –
                                                       Primrose, or pink,
                                                           Or a violet –
                                                      Sunned by the sun,
                                                   And with dewdrops wet.
                                                         Always just me.
                                                   Speak gently to yourself.
                                                           Speak freely
                                                    in praise of all you are.
                                                          Speak clearly
                                                 with pride in all you’ve been.
                                                          Speak bravely
                                              with hope for all you may become.
                                                         Find in yourself
                                              the powers that only you possess,
                                                             the pains
                                                 that only you can overcome,
                                                          the promises
                                                    that only you can keep.
                                                           Look deeply
                                                  into the mirror of your life
                                             and discover the very special person                                                    51
                                                     that only you can be.


                                                                  Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
IF
By Rudyard Kipling

                                        If you can keep your head when all about you
                                            Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
                                      If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you
                                         But make allowance for their doubting too;
                                          If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
                                             Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies;
                                           Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
                                        And yet don’t look too good nor talk too wise;

                                    If you can dream and not make dreams your master,
                                       If you can think and not make thoughts your aim;
                                            If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
                                          And treat these two imposters just the same;
                                         If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
                                            Twisted by knaves to make a trap for foots;
                                        Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken
                                      And stoop, to build them up with worn--out tools;

                                        If you can make one heap of all your winnings
                                           And risk it on one game of pitch-and-toss;
                                         And lose, and start again at your beginnings
                                           And never breathe a word about the loss;
                                       If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
                                             To serve you long after they are gone,
                                          And so hold on when there is nothing in you
                                        Except the will, which says to them HOLD ON;

                                      If you can walk with crowds and keep your virtue
                                      Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch;
                                        If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
                                        If all men count with you, but none too much;
                                              If you can fill the unforgiving minute
                                           With sixty seconds worth of distance run,
                                             YOURS is the earth and all that’s in it,
                                        And – which is more, you’ll be a man, my son.


A Friend
By Henry David Thoreau

A Friend is one who incessantly pays us the compliment of expecting from us all the virtues, and who can appreciate them
in us.

A Friend asks no return but that his Friend will religiously accept and wear and not disgrace his apothesis of him. They           52
cherish each other’s hopes. They are kind to each other’s dreams.


                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Friendship is never established as an understood relation. It is a miracle which requires constant proofs. It is an exercise
of the purest imagination and of the rarest faith.

We do not wish for Friends to feed and clothe our bodies – neighbors are kind enough for that – but to do the life office to
our spirit. For this, few are rich enough, however well disposed they may be.

The language of Friendship is not words, but meanings. It is an intelligence beyond language.



Definition
By Jan Churchill
Limping, I dragged my weary well-scarred body to my friend.
“Fool,” she shrilled. “I told you that you couldn’t fly. Oh, fool.”
She was truly wise and I recognized her wisdom.
Why, then, did I limp on to my friend across the way –
My friend who saw me come in tears and said, “It didn’t work this time?
Let’s see, perhaps we can mend this wing – a feather here and there.
Rest – We’ll see what we can do.”



New Friends and Old Friends
By Joseph Parry

Make new friends, but keep the old;
Those are silver, these are gold.
New-made friendships, like new wine,
Age will mellow and refine.
Friendships that have stood the test –
Time and change – are surely best.
Brow may wrinkle, hair grow gray,
Friendships never know decay.
For ‘mid old friends, tried and true,
Once more we our youth renew.
But old friends, alas, may die,
New friends must their place supply.
Cherish friendships in your breast –
New is good, but old is best.
Make new friends, but keep the old;
Those are silver, these are gold.

Taking Leave of a Friend
By Li Po

Blue mountains lie beyond the north wall;
Round the city’s eastern side flows the white water.
Here we part, friend, once forever.                                                                                                53
You go ten thousand miles, drifting away
Like an unrooted water grass.

                                                                Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Oh, the floating clouds and the thoughts of a wanderer.
Oh, the sunset and the longing of an old friend.
We ride away from each other, waving our hands,
While our horses neigh softly, softly…
Words have no more wisdom when it’s time to say good-bye.


Fire and Ice
By Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To say that for destruction, ice
Is also great
And would suffice.


Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening
By Robert Frost

           Whose woods these are I think I know.
           His house is in the village though;
           He will not see me stopping here
           To watch his woods fill up with snow.

           My little horse must think it queer
           To stop without a farmhouse near
           Between the woods and frozen lake
           The coldest evening of the year.

           He gives his harness bells a shake
           To ask if there is some mistake.
           The only other sound’s the sweep
           Of easy wind and downy flake.

           The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
           But I have promises to keep,
           And miles to go before I sleep,
           And miles to go before I sleep.


On the City Street
By Li Po
They meet in the pink dust of the city street.                                                                                 54
He raises his gold crop high in salute.
“Lady,” says he, “where do you live?”

                                                            Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
“There are ten thousand houses among the drooping willow trees.”


In the Mountains
By Li Po

Why do I live among the green mountains?
I laugh and answer not, my soul is serene;
It dwells in another heaven and earth
 belonging to no man
The peach trees are on flower, and the water flows on.



The Road Not Taken
By Robert Frost

Two roads diverged into a yellow wood,
And sorry that I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down as far as I could
To where is bent in undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no steps had trodden black.
Oh, I keep the first for another day.
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged into a wood, and I –
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.




                                                                                                                               55




                                                            Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
Famous Quotes
Nothing great will ever be achieved without great men, and great men are only great if they are determined to be so. --
Charles De Gaulle


Deliberation is the work of many men. Action, of one alone. -- Charles De Gaulle


Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value. -- Albert Einstein
Only our individual faith in freedom can keep us free. -- Dwight D. Eisenhower


Failure is only the opportunity to begin again more intelligently. -- Henry Ford


Ignorance is preferable to error; and he is less remote from the truth who believes nothing, than he who believes what is
wrong. -- Thomas Jefferson

I am not afraid of tomorrow for I have seen yesterday and I love today. -- William A. White


The years teach much which the days never know. -- Ralph Waldo Emerson


Colors fade, temples crumble, empires fall, seasons change, but kind words endure forever.


The mark of your ignorance is the depth of your belief in injustice and tragedy. What the caterpillar calls the end of the
world, the master calls a butterfly. -- Richard Bach

Only a tranquil spirit can see beyond itself. -- Hugh Prather


Fight hesitantly. Judge halfheartedly. Be happy unnecessarily. -- Hugh Prather


Say what is easily forgotten. Do what is easily over-looked. Think what is everlasting. -- Hugh Prather


It is what you do when you have nothing to do that reveals what you are. -- Hugh Prather



What you are speaks so loudly, I cannot hear what you say. -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

                                                                                                                                    56




                                                                 Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
A cloud does not know why it moves at such a direction and such a speed. It feels an impulsion…This is the place to go
now. But the sky knows the reasons and the patterns behind all clouds, and you will know, too, when you lift yourself high
enough to see beyond the horizons.
 -- Richard Bach


Life demands from you only the strength you possess. Only one feat is possible – not to run away.
-- Dag Hammarskjöld


I see little of more importance to the future of our country and of civilization than full recognition of the place of the artist. If
art is to nourish the root of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him. -- John F.
Kennedy


I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality.
-- Martin Luther King, Jr.


We have always held to the hope, the belief, the conviction that there is a better life, a better world, beyond the horizon. --
Franklin D. Roosevelt


We must build a new world, a far better world – one in which the eternal dignity of man is respected. -- Harry S. Truman


Excellence is to do a common thing in an uncommon way. -- Booker T. Washington


Adaptability is not imitation. It means power of resistance and assimilation. -- Mahatma Gandhi


He who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe is as good as dead; his eyes are closed. -- Albert Einstein


The only limits to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt


Those who do not know how to weep with their whole heart don’t know how to laugh either. -- Golda Meir


If you wish your children to think deep thoughts, to know the holiest emotions, take them to the woods and hills, and give
them freedom of the meadows; the hills purify those who walk upon them. -- Richard Jefferies




                                                                                                                                        57




                                                                   Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
       Sample Certificate
            Templates
Rookie of the Year
Leader of the Year
Volunteer of the Year
Certificate of Appreciation




                                                                                                 58




                              Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
               Type Name Here
                   has been named




Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas


                                    Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
               Type Name Here
                   has been named




Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas


                                    Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                Type Name Here
                    has been named




Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas

                                     Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
                  Type Name Here
                    has been honored with




Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas

                                            Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
       Letters of Endorsement
The Council Recognition Review Committee uses letters of endorsement along with the nomination forms to determine
if nominees have fulfilled the criteria necessary to receive the appropriate award. Therefore, it is important that letters be
specific, well thought out, and neatly written (typed, if possible). Award recipients will be given the letters that were
written in support of their nomination. Letters must be submitted with the nomination form by the deadline date.
Sample letters are included in this handbook. Use them as a help, but be sure that the letters written reflect both the
viewpoint of the author and the accomplishments of the nominated individual.

Give those who are writing letters a copy of the award description, this page, and a sample letter to help them produce
letters that will support the nomination.

Letters of endorsement should include:
      The date

      Name of nominee

      Title of recognition

      How the letter writer knows the nominee and for how long

      Tell how the nominee has met the level of service required to receive the award. (If the award is for service to the
       service unit or region then do not include examples of troop leadership. An award for a troop leader is not
       supported by mention of service team jobs unrelated to girls.)

      Include examples of the nominee’s performance, which explains how the service was beyond what others in the
       same position, have done

      Tell how the nominee’s contributions have benefited Girl Scouting

      Any other comments or information that might be helpful

      Name of person writing the letter with phone number, email etc for future contact




                                                                                                                                  63




                                                               Girl Scouts Diamonds of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas March 2011|
SAMPLE LETTER OF ENDORSEMENT
February 15, 2011

Nomination for Outstanding Leader

Dear Ozark Service Unit,

I am very happy to support Edith Macy, leader of Troops 1405 & 215 in the Ozark Service Unit, for the GSUSA
Outstanding Leader Award. Edith has been a Girl Scout leader for the past 7 years. She is a strong woman who leads
two very active and involved Girl Scout troops for her two daughters. She works full time as a teacher and involves the
troops in school Ceremonies.

I have worked alongside Edith, as her Co-Leader in both troops, for the last two years. Our girls know that they can
count on her to always do her very best to make sure that their Girl Scout experience is a great one. She ensures this by
keeping current in Council policies & training, and she makes sure the girls are always involved in the decision making
process in regards to troop programming and direction. Under her leadership, the girls have grown as people and as
Scouts.

The Cadettes are given outstanding leadership opportunities as they help with the Brownie troop, sharing Girl Scout
ways and teaching the younger girls new skills, while working on portions of their Journeys and Try-Its. Edith goes out of
her way to recruit girls from underserved neighborhoods and bring them into our troops. The Brownies have been
learning to relate to each other, as well as the older girls, as part of their extended Girl Scout family. They are thrilled to
“teach” the Cadettes songs they have learned. Each girl has earned many recognitions, including (for the older girls),
the Bronze Award. Many of our Cadettes are currently working to earn the Silver Award. Edith has helped to instill the
girls with a sense of purpose, self-confidence, and accomplishment.

The girls in both troops, along with all of us in the Green Brigade Service Unit, are so incredibly lucky to have Edith as a
Leader. She is talented, dedicated, loyal, and competent. She is also fun and insightful. She is a fabulous person and
a true Girl Scout who shares herself, her time, and her knowledge without hesitation.

For her incredible dedication and for the many lives she has touched as a Girl Scout Leader, I wholeheartedly
support the nomination of Edith Macy as a deserving recipient of the GSUSA Outstanding Leader Award.

Sincerely,

Suzie Scout

Suzie A. Scout, Co-Leader Troops 1405 & 215
1234 Chappaqua Rd
Briarcliff Manor, AR 24680
555 456-7890
suzie@camp.now
Girl Scout Adult Recognitions Placement


                                                                                                        Adult Women



1      Adult Insignia Tab
2      World Trefoil Pin
3      Adult Position Pin
4      Girl Scout Pin
          (traditional or contemporary)
5      Membership Numeral Guard
6      Campus Girl Scout Guard
7      Girl Scout Gold Award
8      Bridge to Adult Girl Scouts Award
9      Years of Service Pin
10     Outstanding Volunteer Pin
11     Outstanding Leader Pin
12     Personalized ID Pin
13     Lifetime Membership Pin
14     Appreciation Pin
15     Honor Pin
16     Thanks Badge
17     Thanks Badge II




                                                                                                          Adult Men
 If an adult has received more than one special recognition (e.g. Appreciation Pin, Honor Pin, etc.),
the last one received is generally the one worn on the uniform.

				
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