CSR by APS1974soni

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									                       Summer Training Project Report

                                      On

―Comparative study on Corporate Social responsibility activities of
    Godfrey Phillips India Ltd. and other major Indian players‖
                                       At

                        CLEA PUBLIC RELATIONS




                            Under The Supervision

                                       of

                              Ms. Shobha Soman

 (Vice President CLEA PR & Major Coordinator Godfrey Phillips Bravery
                             Awards)




Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the award of the degree of

                      Master of Business Administration

                                       By

                                 Ekta Makhija

                                 (09 MBA-34)



                   Department Of Business Administration

                Faculty of Management Studies and Research

                     Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh

                                  (2009-2011)

                                                                                    1
Acknowledgement

An undertaking of work life, this is never an outcome of a single person; rather it bears the imprints
of a number of people who directly or indirectly helped me in completing the present study. I would
be failing in my duties if I don‘t say a word of thanks to all those who made my training period
educative and pleasurable one.
I am thankful to CLEA PUBLIC RELATIONS, New Delhi, for giving me an opportunity to do
summer training in the company. I have gained enriching experiences, learned a lot and become
more matured as an individual.
I am deeply indebted to my project guide Ms. Shobha Soman (Vice President, CLEA PR and Major
Coordinator, Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards), for giving me her valuable time, advice, guidance,
encouragement and help during the course of my project.
My heart full thanks to Ms.Amisha Gutgutia (Senior Manager) and the whole staff of Clea Public
Relations who gave me continuous support in every possible manner to gain practical knowledge in
Industry.

My very special thanks to Mr. Danish AG ( Managing Director, Middle East, North Africa, &
Levant, Drive Dentsu Inc.) who arranged this project for me and has guided me through out as a
mentor.

Finally I would like thank all lecturers, friends and my family for the kind of support and to all who
directly or indirectly helped me in preparing this project report.
And at last I am thankful to all divine light and my parents, who kept my Motivation and zest for
knowledge always high through the tides of time.




Date: July 23, 2010
Place: ALIGARH                                              EKTA MAKHIJA...




                                                                                                         2
Table of Contents
                                                    Page

Certificate

Acknowledgement

Chapter 1:

      Executive Summary                            05-09
      Research Methodology                         10-11

Chapter 2: Literature review

      Corporate Social Responsibility              13-29
      Women Empowerment                            30-34

Chapter 3: Company Profile                          36-43


Chapter 4: Case studies

      Tata Group                                   45-54
      Airtel                                       55-57
      Bajaj                                        58-60
      Hindustan Unilever Ltd.                      61-65
      Indian Tobacco Company                       66-70
      Godfrey Phillips India                       71-75
      IndianOil Corporation                        76-80

Chapter 5: Analysis & Interpretation

      Comparison                                   82-88
      Number of initiatives and Financial Outlay   89
      Analysis                                     90-91




                                                            3
Chapter 6: Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards

     Bravery Awards                         92-102
     Cases for Amodini Awards               103-116

Chapter 7

     Findings                               118-120
     Recommendations                        121-122
     Limitations                            123
     References                             124




                                                       4
Executive Summary

Introduction:

I did my summer training in CLEA Public Relations, New Delhi. It is a Public Relations agency of
repute and has some big names in its client list like Ashok Leyland, Hinduja Group, ITC,
Baccarose, French Connection, Nike, Calvin Klein, Godfrey Phillips India ltd etc. I was given a
project for one of its clients i.e. Godfrey Phillips India ltd. I did my project under the kind
supervision of Ms. Shobha Soman who is the vice President of CLEA Public Relations as well as a
Major Coordinator of Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards.

Corporate Social Responsibility:

There is little consensus on the definition of CSR. A useful pointer is provided by the UK
Department for Trade and Industry who define CSR as a company‘s response to the issues on the
sustainable development agenda. Sustainable development can be further defined as comprising the
social, environmental and economic agendas (sometimes called the triple bottom line). The reason
for sustainable development has been classically stated in the Brundtland Report as ―meeting the
needs of the present without compromising the choices available for the needs of the future‖. But
why should this matter to business? What are the business drivers to take on the agenda?

The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) defines CSR as ―The
continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development
while improving the quality of life of the work force and their families as well as of the local
community and society at large.‖

In KPMG's International Survey of Corporate (Social) Responsibility Reporting 2005, which
surveyed more than 1,600 companies worldwide and documented the top ten motivators driving
corporations to engage in CSR for competitive reasons, the following emerged: Economic

considerations, Ethical considerations, Innovation and learning, Employee motivation, Risk

management or risk reduction, Access to capital or increased shareholder value, Reputation or

brand, Market position or share, Strengthened supplier relationships and Cost.


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Objective:

The main objective of this report is to study the Corporate Social Responsibility in India and then to
do a comparative study on CSR activities of Godfrey Phillips India ltd and other major Indian
players doing CSR, with focus on Women Empowerment and on the basis of that I had to
recommend further strategies to Godfrey Phillips India to improve its CSR activities to hold its
vision to be a socially responsible corporate citizen and to reach up to the level of leaders.

Methodology:

A detailed search was conducted in business journals, market research sites, business newspapers,
and publications to study CSR activities, CSR strategy, etc of various leading Indian companies.
This was followed by comparing these leading companies across sectors with the selected
benchmark of the Tata group of companies (Indian Leadership Company). The companies reviewed
are Tata, Bajaj, Hindustan Unilever, Airtel, IndianOil Corporation, ITC and Godfrey Phillips India.



Analysis:

                   Community            Environment         Education           Health
GPI
ITC
HUL
Airtel
IOC
Bajaj
Tata




 High          Medium     Low

The companies have been ranked high, medium or low based on their focus as reflected by the
financials and organizational resources devoted to CSR causes, along with the number and size of
initiatives.


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Findings:
     Godfrey Phillips India has been very consistent in its efforts in the field of Community
      initiatives, since beginning. Since the size of the company does not allow it to take the
      initiatives on a massive scale so the company is extending its activities gradually like the
      bravery awards initially covered 12 states but now it covers a total of 16 states. Similarly, the
      Godfrey Phillips bravery awards started only in one category i.e. Physical Bravery but now it
      has five categories of awards namely ‗Physical Bravery Award‘, ‗Social Bravery Award‘,
      ‗Mind of Steel Award‘, ‗The Social Lifetime Achievement Award‘, ‗The Amodini Award‘.


     Godfrey Phillips is one of those very few companies which have an entire CSR team to
      develop and implement CSR programmes. Earlier the company had only three members in
      this team and presently it has a dedicated CSR team of seven people.


     Godfrey Phillips India is the only company which is contributing 10% of its total profits on
      CSR which is the highest among all the companies studied.


     Comparing the initiatives of Godfrey Phillips with other companies under study it is found
      that though the initiatives taken by company are less in number and are not taken on a very
      massive scale due to the size of the company yet most of its initiatives are unique like Blood
      donation drive and its project Godfrey Phillips White, the essence of WHITE is - 'It
      Honours the Importance of Tobacco Etiquette', responsible smoking programme by
      Godfrey Phillips India, a first of its kind initiative in India.          The key focus is on
      cultivating smoking etiquette among smokers - to respect non-smokers' space.


     GPI has more focus on community welfare and especially on women empowerment.
      However, Company‘s focus on environment is relatively low and company is not taking any
      initiative in the field of education.


     On comparing the activities of Godfrey Phillips with its competitor ITC, it is seen that both
      the companies are taking high number of community initiatives, with a high level of
      involvement as well. However if the initiatives of the two are compared in the light of the
      vast difference that exist in terms of revenue, profits, product portfolio and size of the
      companies then it is found that Godfrey Phillips is more involved in CSR activities.

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     It was found that most of the companies do not reveal their CSR expenditure in their annual
      reports which is otherwise necessary to publish.


     Out of the 8 companies studied, currently only three companies viz. Godfrey Phillips, Bajaj
      and Hindustan Unilever have a high focus on Women empowerment.




Recommendations:
     Almost all of the companies are investing in economic empowerment of women. However
      empowerment is more than just economic. It also includes Political, Legal, Social and
      Psychological components. Hence this is a field where GPI can take a lead.


     The Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards do not cover state of J&K, However as per a survey
      the highest number of women entrepreneurs exist in this state alone. So, the company can
      include this state from next year.


     Environment is one field where GPI has to invest more because being a tobacco company its
      responsibility towards environment becomes more.


     Since the size and the revenue of the company is not so large as compare to the other
      companies so In order to expand its activities further with a relatively low budget, the
      company should try to identify regional problems and devise state-specific solutions to do
      CSR work.


     Godfrey Phillips does not publish its separate Annual CSR report while it is recommended by
      the Indian Government. So, the company should publish its CSR report to conform to the
      International Standards set for the companies. This will also be a document for good PR as
      well as morale booster for its employees.


     Company can also allow the rural women to come and showcase their talent by setting up
      counters at the Bravery Awards function organised by the company.



                                                                                               8
   GPI can launch some projects where it connects unemployed designers graduating from B
    tier institutes with these rural women. These designers can help these women to polish their
    skills, making products which are in demand and in marketing aspect of these products.


   GPI can also provide its own show rooms to these NGOs to sell their products and for better
    marketing GPI can itself take this responsibility of marketing the quality products made by
    the rural women.


   There is no set procedure for selecting candidates for Amodini Awards yet, like in case of
    Physical Bravery Awards, Mind of Steel Award and Social Act of Courage. The selection for
    this category of award is done on ad hoc basis, so there is a need of developing a proper
    procedure for selecting candidates for these awards as well to make it more transparent.




                                                                                               9
Research Methodology

Problem Statement:

―To do a comparative study on CSR activities of Godfrey Phillips India ltd. and other major Indian
players doing CSR‖

Objective:

The main objective of this report is to study the Corporate Social Responsibility in India and then to
do a comparative study on CSR activities of Godfrey Phillips India ltd and other major Indian
players doing CSR, with focus on Women Empowerment and on the basis of that I had to
recommend further strategies to Godfrey Phillips India to improve its CSR activities to hold its
vision to be a socially responsible corporate citizen and to reach up to the level of leaders.

Sub Objective:

My sub objective was to study women empowerment as a Corporate Social Responsibility initiative
in detail and then as a part of a live project I was given the task of identification of women
candidates who can be considered for Amodini Awards,2010 (Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards in
field of Women Empowerment)

Nature Of Data:

This study is based upon the theoretical information and the data used at some place to support the
information or argument is secondary in nature. So there is no primary data used.

Research type:

This research is Qualitative in nature.

Methods of Data Collection:

      An initial search was conducted within the public domain to review the CSR reported
       practice of large Indian corporations, which are acknowledged to be at the forefront of the


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       engine of economic growth in India. This was established through selecting leading growth
       sectors and reviewing the leading company in each sector.


      To augment this, a detailed search was conducted in business journals, market research sites,
       business newspapers, and publications to study their CSR activities, CSR strategy and
       identify metrics used by them (if any).


      This was followed by comparing these leading companies across sectors with the selected
       benchmark of the Tata group of companies (Indian Leadership Company)


      And finally a separate comparison was done between the CSR activities of Godfrey Phillips
       India and rest of the companies under study.


The companies reviewed are:
      Benchmark: Tata
      Two-wheelers: Bajaj
      Rural Marketing: Hindustan Unilever
      Telecom: Airtel
      Oil and Gas: IOC
      Tobacco : ITC and Godfrey Phillips


Process of selecting the women candidates for Amodini Awards:
   There were two phases of the research:

      A detailed search was conducted in various local and national newspapers, and publications,
       magazines, webzines, websites etc to pick out the relevant stories.


      Then it was followed by the process of locating these people by contacting various Local
       organisations, editors of various newspapers etc. for further identification, verification and
       nomination etc.




                                                                                                  11
   Chapter 1:

Literature Review




                    12
Corporate Social Responsibility


Introduction:

The broad rationale for a new set of ethics for corporate decision making, which clearly constructs
and upholds a organization's social responsibility, arises from the fact that a business enterprise
derives several benefits from society, which must, therefore, require the enterprise to provide returns
to society as well. This, therefore, clearly establishes the stake of a business organization in the good
health and well being of a society of which it is a part. More importantly, in this age of widespread
communication and growing emphasis on transparency, the managers should help their company in
development of a CSR management and reporting framework.

The more the concepts of CSR are fostered and integrated into the business process, the easier it will
be to benefit from alternative thinking and perhaps handle the occasional problems that for certain
will occur. The more integrated the business process within the value chain, the more opportunity
there will be for organizations to influence the approaches of others on whom they depend. The
concept of CSR includes the openness or transparency of companies as well as taking into
consideration the will and expectations of their stakeholders.

Social responsibility means a doctrine that claims that an entity whether it is government, Private
Corporation or public organization has a responsibility to society. CSR is a concept that reduces
costs and risks, increases the brand value and reputation, effectiveness and the efficiency of
employees, improves transparency, and clarity in the working environment of the business house.




Background:
The role of corporates by and large has been understood in terms of a commercial business paradigm
of thinking that focuses purely on economic parameters of success.
As corporates have been regarded as institutions that cater to the market demand by providing
products and services, and have the onus for creating wealth and jobs, their market position has
traditionally been a function of financial performance and profitability. However, over the past few
years, as a consequence of rising globalisation and pressing ecological issues, the perception of the


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role of corporates in the broader societal context within which it operates, has been altered.
Stakeholders (employees, community, suppliers and shareholders) today are redefining the role of
corporates taking into account the corporates‘ broader responsibility towards society and
environment, beyond economic performance, and are evaluating whether they are conducting their
role in an ethical and socially responsible manner. As a result of this shift (from purely economic to
‗economic with an added social dimension‘), many forums, institutions and corporates are endorsing
the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).
They use the term to define organisation‘s commitment to the society and the environment within
which it operates. The World Business Council on Sustainable Development‘s (WBCSD) report was
titled Corporate Social Responsibility: Making Good Business Sense and the OECD Guidelines for 1
Multi-National Enterprises which includes a discussion on how CSR is emerging as a global business
standard. Further, there is a global effort towards reinforcing CSR programmes and initiatives
through local and international schemes that try to identify best-in-class performers.



CSR: A Historical Perspective:

In early 1950's & 60's the literature was not heavily represented in CSR discourse. However, this
decade 'marked a significant growth in attempts to formalize, or more accurately, state what CSR
means' (Carroll, 1999). According to Carroll, "CSR encompasses the economic, legal, ethical and
discretionary (philanthropic) expectations that society has of organizations at a given point in time."

Some of the most prominent writers during that time were Keith Davis, Joseph W McGuire,
William C Frederick and Clarence C Walton. Frederick wrote that ―Social responsibility in the
final analysis implies a public posture toward society's economic and human resources and a
willingness to see that those resources are used for broad social ends and not simply for the narrowly
circumscribed interests of private persons and firm‖ (Carroll 1999)

Howard Bowen in 1953 argued that since social institutions shaped economic outcomes it was to be
expected that business firms as an economic outcome of societal interests should consider the social
impact of business activity. According to Bowen, ―CSR refers to the obligations of businessmen to
pursue those policies to make those decisions or to follow those lines of relations which are desirable
in terms of the objectives and values of our society.‖ CSR implies some sort of commitment, through
corporate policies and action. This operational view of CSR is reflected in a firm's social
performance, which can be assessed by how a firm manages its societal relationships, its social


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impact and the outcomes of its CSR policies and actions (Wood, 1991). Social reporting and social
audits are examples of how firms can assess their social performance. In 1960's Keith Davies argued
that CSR refers to ―the firm's consideration of, and response to, issues beyond the narrow economic,
technical and legal requirements of the firm‖ (Davies, 1973). Frederick 1960 stated ―Social
responsibility means that businessmen should oversee the operation of an economic system that
fulfils the expectations of the people. And this means in turn that the economy's means of production
should be employed in such a way that production and distribution should enhance total socio-
economic welfare‖ (Fredrick, 1960). Thus, the definitions of CSR in 1960's were an attempt to
link society and businesses, defining society in broadest terms.

In 1970's there was one and only one social responsibility of business--to use its resources and
engage in activities designed to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game,
which is to say, engage in open and free competition, without deception or fraud. The idea and
inclusion of stakeholder began to appear. Harold Johnston 1971 stated that ―a socially responsible
firm is one whose managerial staff balances a multiplicity of interests instead of striving only for
larger profits for its stockholders. A responsible enterprise also takes into account employees,
suppliers, dealers, local communities, and the nation.‖ Carroll 1979 offered the following definition
of CSR ―The social responsibility of business encompasses the economic, legal, ethical, and
discretionary (or philanthropic) expectations that society has of organizations at a given point in
time‖ (Turner, 2006). European Commission described CSR as ―a concept whereby companies
integrate social and environmental concerns in their business operations and in their interaction with
their stakeholders on a voluntary basis.‖ World Business Council for Sustainable Development
defined CSR as ―the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to
economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well
as of the local community and society at large.‖

In 80s & 90s there were fewer definitions but more efforts to measure and conduct research for the
purpose of operationalizing CSR. New concepts which were closely related to CSR were introduce;
stakeholder theory, business ethics, corporate governance, responsiveness, corporate social
performance, and corporate citizenship. These concepts are closely related but not identical. Lee
1997 stated ―CSR refers to a company's commitment to operate in an economically and
environmentally sustainable manner, while acknowledging the interests of a variety of stakeholders
and maximizing economic, social and environmental value.‖ It is holistic concept that can mean
different things to different groups and stakeholders. Gray, Owen, & Maunders in 1987 defined
CSR as ―the process of communicating the social and environmental effects of organizations

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economic actions to particular interest groups within society and to society at large.‖ Similarly,
Perks 1993 defined corporate social reporting as ―the disclosure of those costs and benefits that may
or may not be quantifiable in money terms arising from economic activities and substantially borne
by the community at large or other stakeholders.‖

A term 'corporate social innovation' was first introduced by Rosabeth Moss Canter in 1999 who
argues that firms should use social issues as a learning laboratory for identifying unmet needs and for
developing solutions that create new markets. Large corporations began to go public about corporate
social responsibilities and publish some of their efforts, but they also made public that ―any approach
to corporate responsibility must begin with the practical recognition that the corporation must be
profitable enough to provide shareholders a return that will encourage continuation of investment‖
(Wilson, 2000). Another trend appearing in literature is the increasing dialogue between
stakeholders. Companies are augmenting their discussions with labor unions, environmental groups
and other relevant stakeholders and the implementation of certification solutions by corporations,
which is the establishment of codes of conduct (Kapstein, 2001), monitoring and reporting.
Kingston and Wagner 2004 suggest that leadership on sustainability and CSR are important to set
priorities and to ensure that commitments are achieved.

Bebbington et al.(2008) use the term CSR reporting, which highlights the link between the reporting
function and the organizational functions and operations that are concerned with, and impacted by,
activities associated with CSR. CSR and CSR (or sustainability) reporting are inextricably
intertwined across an organization, and at various levels, impact on strategic planning, governance,
stakeholder engagement, risk management, decision making, data collection and management
systems,   performance     measurement,      performance     management,     public    relations   and
communications. The CSR movement was an early response to an article published in 1970 by
Friedman stating that 'social responsibility of business is to increase its profits'. CSR has
emerged as the business issue of the 21st century and has been studied for over 50 years. To this day
academics do not have a consensus on its definition (Wood, 1991; Carroll, 1991). Bowen's
definition of social responsibility of businessmen was ―it refers to the obligations of businessmen to
pursue those policies to make those decisions, or to follow those lines of relations which are
desirable in terms of the objectives and values of our society‖ (Carroll, 1999). Due to Bowen's
concern with social responsibility and his leadership role in the topic, Bowen should be seen as
father of CSR.




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The main drivers for CSR have been the shrinking role of government, demands for greater
disclosure, increased customer interest, growing investor pressure, competitive labour markets, and
supplier relations. The companies enjoy several benefits like improved financial performance, lower
operating costs, enhanced brand image and reputation, increased sales and customer loyalty, product
safety, material recyclability, and greater use of renewable resources etc.




Codes / Standards / Principles on CSR:

      Universal Declaration of Human Rights: Adopted by United Nations, this declaration
       paved way for many international human rights standards for all sectors entities.


      UN Global Compact: An international multi-constituent, voluntary initiative based on
       internationally accepted ten principles in pursuit of a more sustainable inclusive global
       economy. The ten principles covers human rights forced labor, child labor, environmental
       challenges and responsibility, non discrimination, freedom of associations, collective
       bargaining, corruption, etc. Global Reporting Initiative (GRI): Since its founding in 1997, the
       GRI has been addressing the need for standardized approaches to corporate sustainability
       reporting. In 2006, GRI published Version 3.0 (G3) of its Sustainability Reporting Guidelines
       emphasizing performance indicators, which contain a separate section titled "Human Rights"
       with nine performance indicators.


      Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD): OECD guidelines
       contains recommendations on core labor, environmental standards, human rights,
       competition, taxation, science and technology combating corruption and safe guarding,
       consumer rights.


      Social Accountability 8000: 'SA 8000' standard for social accountability, created in 2000 by
       the Council on Economic Priorities Accreditation Agency (CEPAA). SA8000 developed by
       an international coalition of businesses, trade unions and non-governmental organizations
       (NGOs) on the basis of International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions--the Universal
       Declaration of Human Rights and the UN convention on the Rights of the Child. The SA8000
       code of practice is broken down into nine key areas child labor, management systems,


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       working hours, compensation, disciplinary practices, forced labour, health & safety, freedom
       of association & collective bargaining and discrimination.


      Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI): A set of global best practice principles for
       responsible investment. It provides a framework for achieving better long term investment
       returns and more sustainable markets.


      Equator Principle: Equator principle is a set of environmental and social benchmarks for
       managing environmental and social issues in development project finance globally. They
       were developed by private sector banks-led by Citigroup, ABN AMRO, Barclays and
       WestLB and were launched in June 2003.


      Role of International Labor Organization (ILO): ILO seeks the promotion of social justice
       and internationally recognized human and labor rights. It formulates international labor
       standards in the form of conventions and recommendations setting minimum standards of
       basic labor rights. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 26000: ISO an
       International Standard setting body is developing a new standard on Social Responsibility
       namely ISO 26000 to be published in Nov., 2009. ISO 26000 is intended for use by all types
       of organizations and in all countries and to assist organization to operate in a socially
       responsible manner.


      Occupational Health & Safety Advisory Services (OHSAS) Standard: OHSAS 18001 is
       applicable to any organization which aims to establish a health and safety management
       system at work.




CSR in India:

India has a long rich history of close business involvement in social causes for national development.
In India, CSR is known from ancient time as social duty or charity, which through different ages is
changing its nature in broader aspect, now generally known as CSR. From the origin of business,
which leads towards excess wealth, social and environmental issues have deep roots in the history of
business. India has had a long tradition of corporate philanthropy and industrial welfare has been put
to practice since late 1800s. Historically, the philanthropy of business people in India has resembled

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western philanthropy in being rooted in religious belief. Business practices in the 1900s that could
be termed socially responsible took different forms: philanthropic donations to charity, service
to the community, enhancing employee welfare and promoting religious conduct. Corporations
may give funds to charitable or educational institutions and may argue for them as great
humanitarian deeds, when in fact they are simply trying to buy community good will. The ideology
of CSR in the 1950s was primarily based on an assumption of the obligation of business to society.

In initial years there was little documentation of social responsibility initiatives in India. Since then
there is a growing realization towards contribution to social activities globally with a desire to
improve the immediate environment (Shinde, 2005). It has also been found that to a growing degree
companies that pay genuine attention to the principles of socially responsible behaviour are also
favoured by the public and preferred for their goods and services. This has given rise to the concept
of CSR.

After Independence, JRD Tata who always laid a great deal of emphasis to go beyond conducting
themselves as honest citizens pointed out that there were many ways in which industrial and business
enterprises can contribute to public welfare beyond the scope of their normal activities. He advised
that apart from the obvious one of donating funds to good causes which has been their normal
practice for years; they could have used their own financial, managerial and human resourced to
provide task forces for undertaking direct relief and reconstruction measures. Slowly, it began to be
accepted, at least in theory that business had to share a part of the social overhead costs of.
Traditionally, it had discharged its responsibility to society through benefactions for education,
medical facilities, and scientific research among other objects. The important change at that time
was that industry accepted social responsibility as part of the management of the enterprise
itself. The community development and social welfare program of the premier Tata Company, Tata
Iron and Steel Company was started the concepts of "Social Responsibility." (Gupta, 2007)

The term corporate social performance was first coined by Sethi (1975), expanded by Carroll
(1979), and then refined by Wartick and Cochran (1985). In Sethi's 1975 three-level model, the
concept of corporate social performance was discussed, and distinctions made between various
corporate behaviours. Sethi's three tiers were 'social obligation (a response to legal and market
constraints); social responsibility (congruent with societal norms); and social responsiveness
(adaptive, anticipatory and preventive) (Cochran, 2007).

The last decade of the twentieth century witnessed a swing away from charity and traditional
philanthropy towards more direct engagement of business in mainstream development and concern

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for disadvantaged groups in the society. This has been driven both internally by corporate will and
externally by increased governmental and public expectations (Mohan, 2001). This was evident
from a sample survey conducted in 1984 reporting that of the amount companies spent on social
development, the largest sum 47 percent was spent through company programs, 39 percent was given
to outside organizations as aid and 14 percent was spent through company trusts (Working
Document of EU India CSR, 2001). In India as in the rest of the world there is a growing realization
that business cannot succeed in a society which fails. An ideal CSR has both ethical and
philosophical dimensions, particularly in India where there exists a wide gap between sections of
people in terms of income and standards as well as socio-economic status (Bajpai, 2001).

According to Infosys founder, Narayan Murthy, ―social responsibility is to create maximum
shareholders value working under the circumstances, where it is fair to all its stakeholders, workers,
consumers, the community, government and the environment.‖ Commission of the European
Communities 2001 stated that being socially responsible means not only fulfilling legal
expectations, but also going beyond compliance and investing 'more' into human capital, the
environment and the relation with stakeholders(Bajpai, 2001).

According to ―Altered Images: the 2001 State of Corporate Responsibility in India Poll‖, a
survey conducted by Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI), the evolution of CSR in India has
followed a chronological evolution of 4 thinking approaches:


      Ethical Model (1930 –1950): One significant aspect of this model is the promotion of
       ―trusteeship‖ that was revived and reinterpreted by Gandhiji. Under this notion the businesses
       were motivated to manage their business entity as a trust held in the interest of the
       community. The idea prompted many family run businesses to contribute towards
       socioeconomic development. The efforts of Tata group directed towards the well being of the
       society are also worth mentioning in this model.


      Statist Model (1950 –1970s): Under the aegis of Jawahar Lal Nehru, this model came into
       being in the post independence era. The era was driven by a mixed and socialist kind of
       economy. The important feature of this model was that the state ownership and legal
       requirements decided the corporate responsibilities.




                                                                                                   20
         Liberal Model (1970s –1990s): The model was encapsulated by Milton Friedman. As per
          this model, corporate responsibility is confined to its economic bottom line. This implies that
          it is sufficient for business to obey the law and generate wealth, which through taxation and
          private charitable choices can be directed to social ends.


         Stakeholder Model (1990s – Present): The model came into existence during 1990s as a
          consequence of realisation that with growing economic profits, businesses also have certain
          societal roles to fulfill. The model expects companies to perform according to ―triple bottom
          line‖ approach. The businesses are also focusing on accountability and transparency through
          several mechanisms.
CSR needs to be understood within this context captured in the development oriented CSR
framework given below:

Model               Focus                                              Champions
Ethical             Voluntary commitment by companies to public        M.K. Gandhi
                    welfare
Statist             State ownership and legal requirements             Jawahar Lal Nehru
                    determine Corporate responsibility


Liberal             Corporate responsibilities limited to private      Milton Friedman
                    owners (Shareholders)
Stakeholder         Companies respond to the needs of                  R. Edward Freeman
                    stakeholders-customers, employees,
                    communities, etc.



CSR Initiatives in India:

         Industry Association Initiative: Leading Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India are
          traditionally active in social and environmental norms. Federation of Indian Chambers of
          Commerce and Industry (FICCI), CII works closely in partnership with Government. CII in
          partnership with UNDP set up India Partnership Forum to promote multi stakeholders
          approach to CSR. Social Development Council (SDC) set up by CII, ensures corporate
          participation in social development and provides an institutional base for social activities of


                                                                                                      21
    the corporate sector. Progress, Harmony and Development chambers of commerce and
    Industry (PHDCCI) has major interventions in family welfare and rural development.
    Associated Chambers of Commerce and Industry of India (ASSOCHAM) through their
    members provided drinking water in 110 villages by 1996 on occasion of its platinum
    Jubilee. Bombay Chambers of Commerce and Industry (BCCI) have been consistently on
    issues of populations and civic conditions in Mumbai.


   Company Initiatives: An internet-based survey was conducted to understand the philosophy
    & deployment of CSR as practiced (innovatively and in a sustained manner) for National and
    International organizations.


   Roundtables and Networks in India: Corporate Roundtable on Development of Strategies
    for the Environment and Sustainable Development--Business Council for Sustainable
    Development (CoRE-BCSD) of India is a grouping of Indian corporate trying collectively
    and individually to build in sustainable development concepts into their operations. The
    British Council's CSR Network: Towards promoting CSR and generating awareness and
    interest amongst young future business leaders.


   CSR Surveys: In the context of India, CSR studies were few and limited. Singh and Ahuja
    1983 conducted the first study in India on CSR of 40 Indian public sector companies for the
    years 1975-76 and found that 40 percent of the companies disclosed more than 30 percent of
    total disclosure items included in their survey. Raman (2006) used content analysis
    technique to examine the chairman's message section in the annual reports of the top 50
    companies in India to identify the extent and nature of social reporting. This study concluded
    that the Indian companies placed emphasis on product improvements and development of
    human resources (Raman, 2006). According to a survey done by Partners in Change 2000,
    which covered 600 companies and 20 CEOs for judging Corporate Involvement in Social
    Development in India 85 percent agreed that companies need to be socially responsible; only
    11 percent companies had a written policy; over 60 percent of the companies were making
    monetary donations; health, education and infrastructure were most supported issues.
    From 2000 onwards, 4 important surveys have been conducted, which give significant
    macro level conclusions about Indian corporate. The first and second surveys were carried
    out in 2001 and 2002 by Business Community Foundation for TERI-Europe. The survey


                                                                                               22
       sought to explore the perception of workers, company executives and general public about
       social, economic and environmental responsibilities. It was found that all companies
       irrespective of size or sector have awareness of CSR and its potential benefits. Many
       companies were collaborating with NGOs, have labour and environmental policy guidelines
       in place.
       A third survey was jointly conducted in 2002 by CII, United Nations Development
       Program (UNDP), British Council (BC) and Price Water Coopers (PWC). The most
       striking features of the responses to the survey is that the respondents are in near unanimity
       that CSR is very much a part of the domain of corporate action and the passive philanthropy
       is no longer sufficient. A significant proportion of respondents, recognize CSR as the mean to
       enhance long-term stake holder value.
       The fourth survey, the Karmyog CSR rating 2007-08 is for the largest 500 companies.
       Karmayog is a platform for the Indian non-profit sector providing research on CSR activities
       of Indian companies. It rated the 500 largest Indian Companies based on their CSR activities.
       The companies were rated on 0 to 5 levels based on criteria's like products & services, reach
       of CSR activities, expenditure on CSR, harmful processes etc.




CSR: Definitions
The totality of CSR can be best understood by three words: ‗corporate,‘ ‗social,‘ and ‗responsibility.‘
In broad terms, CSR relates to responsibilities corporations have towards society within which they
are based and operate, not denying the fact that the purview of CSR goes much beyond this. CSR is
comprehended differently by different people.
Some perceive it to be a commitment of a company to manage its various roles in society, as
producer, employer, customer and citizen in a responsible manner while for others it is synonymous
to Corporate Responsibility (CR) or Corporate Citizenship or Social Action Programme (SAP). Of
late, the term has also been started to link up with Triple Bottom Line Reporting (TBL) which
essentially measures an enterprise‘s performance against economic, social and environmental
indicators.
Discourses on CSR suggest that many definitions of CSR exist within the business community, and
CSR continues to be an evolving concept, with no single definition that is universally accepted.

Given below are three key definitions that have garnered wide acceptance and favour amongst
business circles:

                                                                                                    23
      Definition # 1: Philip Kotler and Nancy Lee (2005) define CSR as “a commitment to
       improve community well being through discretionary business practices and contributions of
       corporate resources” whereas Mallen Baker refers to CSR as “a way companies manage
       the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.”


      Definition # 2: According to World Business Council for Sustainable Development
       “Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave
       ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the
       workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large”.


      Definition # 3: Archie Carroll in 1991 describes CSR as a multi layered concept that can be
       differentiated into four interrelated aspects – economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic
       responsibilities. Carroll presents these different responsibilities as consecutive layers within
       a pyramid, such that ―true‖ social responsibility requires the meeting of all four levels
       consecutively. The model probably is the most accepted and established.




While the definitions of CSR may differ, there is an emerging consensus on some common principles
that underline CSR:




                                                                                                    24
      CSR is a business imperative: Whether pursued as a voluntary corporate initiative or for
       legal compliance reasons, CSR will achieve its intended objectives only if businesses truly
       believe that CSR is beneficial to them.


      CSR is a link to sustainable development: businesses feel that there is a need to integrate
       social, economic and environmental impact in their operation; and


      CSR is a way to manage business: CSR is not an optional add on to business, but it is about
       the way in which businesses are managed.



CSR: A Commonly Misunderstood Concept
In the absence of a universally accepted definition for CSR, there are some myths that
surround the concept:


      Myth # 1: Businesses invest the money; therefore they decide the modus operandi of the
       CSR initiative.
       There is a notion that since businesses invest money in society, they are the one who will be
       deciding upon the modus operandi of the CSR initiative. However this is not true. CSR
       driven by the mandate of an enterprise alone may not generate desired results. Stakeholders
       must be involved from the onset in defining an initiative to make it successful. Corporates
       must not assume that they understand the needs of a community by taking them at face value;
       stakeholder‘s needs must be considered within the local context and culture.


      Myth # 2: Financial resources alone can meet CSR needs of an enterprise.
       In fact, financial resources are only part of the equation. Besides financial resources, it is
       equally or even more important for the CSR programmes to be well defined and well
       accompanied by adequate human resources if they are to meet the intended objectives.


      Myth # 3: CSR is interchangeable with corporate sponsorship, donation or other
       philanthropic activities.
       The focus of responsible business practices in the profit sector is hitherto largely confined to
       community charity-based projects. While this may have been relevant for the historical


                                                                                                    25
       context in the mid-90s when Carroll‘s definition was coined, the current thinking of CSR has
       moved beyond philanthropy to in fact encompass all internal and external segments of
       business operations: employees, market environment and community.




CSR: Rationale
The rationale for CSR has been articulated in a number of ways. In essence, it is about building
sustainable businesses, which need healthy economies, markets and communities. The major reasons
for CSR can be outlined as:


      Globalisation: As a consequence of cross-border trade, multinational enterprises and global
       supply chains, there is an increased awareness on CSR concerns related to human resource
       management practices, environmental protection, and health and safety, among other things.
       Reporting on the CSR activities by corporates is therefore increasingly becoming mandatory.
       In an increasingly fast-paced global economy, CSR initiatives enable corporates to engage in
       more meaningful and regular stakeholder dialogue and thus be in a better position to
       anticipate and respond to regulatory, economic, social and environmental changes that may
       occur.
       There is a drive to create a sustainable global economy where markets, labour and
       communities are able to function well together and companies have better access to capital
       and new markets.
       Financial investors are increasingly incorporating social and environmental criteria when
       making decisions about where to place their money, and are looking to maximise the social
       impact of the investment at local or regional levels.


      International Legal Instruments and Guidelines: In the recent past, certain indicators and
       guidelines such as the SA8000, a social performance standard based on International Labour
       Organization Conventions have been developed. International agencies such as United
       Nations and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development have developed
       compacts, declarations, guidelines, principles and other instruments that set the tone for
       social norms for organisations, though these are advisory for organisations and not
       mandatory.



                                                                                                26
    One of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals calls for increased contribution of
    assistance from country states to help alleviate poverty and hunger, and states in turn are
    advising corporates to be more aware of their impact on society. In order to catalyze actions
    in support of the MDGs, initiatives such as Global Compact are being put in place to
    instrumentalise CSR across all countries.
    As the world‘s largest, global corporate citizenship initiative by the UN, the Global Compact,
    a voluntary initiative is concerned with building the social legitimacy of business.
    The Global Compact is a framework for businesses that are committed to aligning their
    business operations and strategies with ten universally accepted principles that postulate that
    companies should embrace, support and enact, a set of core values in the areas of human
    rights, labour standards, the environment, and anti-corruption.


   Changing Public Expectations of Business: Globally companies are expected to do more
    than merely provide jobs and contribute to the economy through taxes and employment.
    Consumers and society in general expect more from the companies whose products they buy.
    This is coherent with believing the idea that whatever profit is generated is because of
    society, and hence mandates contributing a part of business to the less privileged.
    Further, separately in the light of recent corporate scandals, which reduced public trust of
    corporations, and reduced public confidence in the ability of regulatory bodies and
    organisations to control corporate excess.
    This has led to an increasing expectation that companies will be more open, more
    accountable and be prepared to report publicly on their performance in social and
    environmental arenas.


   Corporate Brand: In an economy where corporates strive for a unique selling proposition to
    differentiate themselves from their competitors, CSR initiatives enable corporates to build a
    stronger brand that resonates with key external stakeholders – customers, general public and
    the government.
    Businesses are recognising that adopting an effective approach to CSR can open up new
    opportunities, and increasingly contribute to the corporates‘ ability to attract passionate and
    committed workforces.
    Corporates in India are also realising that their reputation is intrinsically connected with how
    well they consider the effects of their activities on those with whom they interact. Wherever


                                                                                                 27
       the corporates fail to involve parties, affected by their activities, it may put at risk their ability
       to create wealth for themselves and society.
       Therefore, in terms of business, CSR is essentially a strategic approach for firms to anticipate
       and address issues associated with their interactions with others and, through those
       interactions, to succeed in their business endeavours. The idea that CSR is important to
       profitability and can prevent the loss of customers, shareholders, and even employees is
       gaining increasing acceptance. Further, CSR can help to boost the employee morale in the
       organisation and create a positive brand-centric corporate culture in the organisation. By
       developing and implementing CSR initiatives, corporates feel contented and proud, and this
       pride trickles down to their employees.
       The sense of fulfilling the social responsibility leaves them with a feeling of elation.
       Moreover it serves as a soothing diversion from the mundane workplace routine and gives
       one a feeling of satisfaction and a meaning to their lives.




Benefits of doing CSR:
According to a global study by CSR network, a UK based CSR consultancy, released in 2004, the
top 10 benefits of engaging in Corporate Social Responsibility are:
Increased profit
      Access to capital
      Reduced operating costs/increased operational efficiency
      Enhanced brand image and reputation
      Increased sales and customer loyalty
      Increased productivity and quality
      Increased ability to attract and retain employees
      Potentially, reduced regulatory oversight
      Reducing risk, and increased risk management
      ‗Keeping up‘ with competitors and where the market is




Measurability and emerging metrics – Triple Bottom Line (TBL)
An increasing number of companies are adopting a new way of operationalizing the intangible
concepts of ‗corporate social responsibility‘ and ‗sustainability‘. Triple Bottom Line or TBL focuses
                                                                                                          28
on data collection, analysis and decision making using economic, environmental and social
performance information. In this concept, the company is judged on the basis of its triple bottom-
line: its returns to shareholders, communities and the environment. Under this concept, the company
will have to look at not just what it should do with its profits, but how it made its profits in the first
place. This implies looking at impacts on all its stakeholders.
This view, which is gaining ground, implies that CSR has to be seen as an essential part of business
— not something divorced from business. Companies like Tata group and ITC are at the forefront of
adopting the triple bottom-line approach in India.




                                                                                                       29
Women Empowerment

Introduction:

The term ―empowerment‖ has become one of the most widely used development terms. Women‘s
groups, non-governmental development organizations, activists, politicians, governments and
international agencies refer to empowerment as one of their goals. Yet it is one of the least
understood in terms of how it is to be measured or observed. It is used precisely because this word
has now been one of the fashionable concepts to include in policies/programmes/projects that there is
a need to clarify and come up with tentative definitions.

Women constitute more than 50% of the population, undertake most of the work (two thirds) but
only receive one tenth of the total income rather than men. The working hours of women are longer
than that of men, often 12-16 hours per day. In addition to their domestic responsibilities in child
care, women have to be responsible for housework, such as fetching firewood, water and cooking
and even hard work as ploughing and raking, planting, transplanting and harvesting. Women have to
suffer from continuing under nutrition and two thirds of them are anaemic. Rural women lack sex
education and have poor health due to frequent pregnancies. The illiterate women especially lack of
information on balanced diet, family planning, house cleaning and other information to improve their
health and the quality of life. They have lower status and low paid occupations, lower economic
positions so they are less conscious and lack self-confidence. They have a few books and a little
time to read so they can not appreciate the benefits of reading and have no motivation for reading.




The Concept of Empowerment:

Empowerment has become a widely used word. In spheres as different as management and labour
unions, health care and ecology, banking and education, empowerment also taking such place. It is
also a concept that does not merely concern personal identity but brings out a broader analysis of
human rights and social justice.

The term empowerment has been emerged as a ‗development buzzword‘. But empowerment is easy
to ‗intuit‘ but complex to define. An empowered individual would be one who experiences a sense

                                                                                                      30
of self-confidence and self-worth; a person who critically analyzes his/her social and political
environment; a person who is able to exercise control over decisions that affect his/her life‖. The
nature of empowerment renders it difficult to define. On the one hand, it is often referred to as a goal
for many development programmes/projects. On the other hand, it can also be conceived as a
process that people undergo, which eventually leads to changes. Nelly Stromquist, for instance,
defines empowerment as ―a process to change the distribution of power both in interpersonal
relations and in institutions throughout society‖ while Lucy Lazo describes it as ―a process of
acquiring, providing, bestowing the resources and the means or enabling the access to a control over
such means and resources.‖




Women Empowerment:

According to Namtip Aksornkool ―It is a process in which women gain control over their own lives
by knowing and claiming their rights at all levels of society at the international, local, and household
levels. Self-empowerment means that women gain autonomy, are able to set their own agenda and
are fully involved in the economic, political and social decision-making process.‖

According to Ms.Lazo, empowerment is a moving state; it is continuum that varies in degree of
power. It is relative. One can move from an extreme state of absolute lack of power to the other
extreme of having absolute power.‖ Empowerment can have six components: Cognitive,
Psychological, Economic, Political, Social and Legal.

According to Ms.Stromquist, the Cognitive Component would include the ‗women are
understanding of their conditions of subordination and the causes of such conditions at both micro
and macro levels of society. It involves acquiring new knowledge to create a different understanding
of gender relations as well as destroying old beliefs that structure powerful gender ideologies‖.

The Psychological Component, on the other hand, would include the ―development of feelings that
women can act upon to improve their condition. This means formation of the belief that they can
succeed in change efforts.‖

According to him the Economic Component ―requires that women can be able to engage in a
productive activity that will allow them some degree of autonomy, no matter how small and hard to
obtain at the beginning‖. Education is considered one of the most important means to empower



                                                                                                     31
women with the knowledge, skills and self-confidence necessary to participate fully in development
processes.

The Political Component would encompass the ―ability to organize and mobilize for change.
Consequently, an empowerment process must involve not only individual awareness but collective
awareness and collective action. The notion of collective action is fundamental to the aim of
attaining social transformation‖ (Stromquist). In past women role in politics is mere but know the
scenario is different a good percentage i.e nearly above 33% are participating. Encouraging them to
participate in community programmes, Integration of women in the general national development
plan, Allotting them good portfolio‘s like education, health, sanitary that motivates them to do good
practices, All family members, society, environment etc., should be support full, If all the trees were
one tree, what a great tree it would be; It is clear that women can be empowered individually, the
feminist vision is one where women are able to articulate a collective voice and demonstrate
collective strength. It was also stressed that incorporating the feminist perspective in the concept of
empowerment implies a long-term re-designing of societies that will be based on democratic
relationships. Ms.Dighe talks about empowerment as dealing with strategic rather than practical
gender needs.

Social Empowerment; It is a ―process to change the distribution of power in interpersonal relations
among different people, cultures, activities of the society.‖ In past awareness regarding the society is
unknown to the women but present scenario reveals completely different pictures and knows they are
equally participating in all activities of the society. Best references are our present President is Mrs.
Pratibha Patil. U.S. foreign secretary a women, Hillary Clinton. All efforts must be mobilized to
enabling at least the next generation to be genuinely literate to empower socially. Encouraging
traditional women organizations.

Talking about Legal Empowerment; Protection is needed for the women in terms of health,
harassments, superstitions, cultural barriers etc., Child marriages, satisahgamana are some of the
oldest traditions, which are the basic barriers for the girls development. But now there are no such
rubbish traditions to be in practice. Best reference is latest women gruhahimsa crime results in
lessening the harassments on women. Make them aware of the civil rights, Exercising the legal
rights whenever necessary, Preparing and canvassing the documents regarding the legal freedom for
women, Providing good literary programmes regarding the legal empowerment.




                                                                                                      32
Indicators of Empowerment:

Understanding that empowerment is a complex issue with varying interpretations in different
societal, national and cultural contexts, there is some listing of indicators.

At the level of woman and her household:

      Participation in crucial decision-making processes;
      Extent of sharing of domestic work by men;
      Extent to which a woman takes control of her reproductive functions and decides on family
       size;
      Extent to which a woman is able to decide where the income she has earned will be
       channelled to;
      feeling and expression of pride and value in her work;
      Self-confidence and self-esteem; and
      Ability to prevent violence.

At the community/organizational level:

      Existence of women‘s organizations;
      Allocation of funds to women and women‘s projects;
      Increased number of women leaders at village, district, state and national levels;
      Involvement of women in the design, development and application of technology;
      Participation in community programmes, productive enterprises, politics and arts;
      Involvement of women in non-traditional tasks;
      Increased training programmes for women; and
      Exercising her legal rights when necessary;

At the national level:

      Awareness of her social and political rights;
      Integration of women in the general national development plan;
      Existence of women‘s networks and publications;
      Extent to which women are officially visible and recognized; and
      The degree to which the media take on women‘s issues.


                                                                                             33
Facilitating and Constraining Factors of Empowerment:

Empowerment does not take place in a vacuum. In the same way that Ms.Lazo talks about women‘s
state of powerlessness as a result of ―a combination and interaction of environmental factors, ―one
can also discuss the condition/factors that can hasten or hinder empowerment.

Facilitating factors:

      Existence of women‘s organizations;
      Availability of support systems for women;
      Availability of women-specific data and other relevant information;
      Availability of funds
      Feminist leadership;
      Networking;
      Favourable media coverage;
      Favourable policy climate.

Constraining factors:

      Heavy work load of women;
      Isolation of women from each other;
      Illiteracy;
      Traditional views that limit women‘s participation;
      No funds;
      Internal strife/militarization/wars;
      Disagreements/conflicts among women‘s groups;
      Structural adjustment policies;
      Discriminatory policy environment;
      Negative and sensational coverage of media.




                                                                                                34
      Chapter 2:

    Company Profile




.
                      35
Godfrey Phillips India Ltd.

Introduction:

Godfrey Phillips India Limited, one of India‘s leading corporate houses, is the flagship Company of
the K K Modi group. Diversified in Tea, Confectionary, Tobacco, Industrial Chemicals, Polyester,
Multilevel Marketing, Retail and Cosmetics, The Modi Group is one of India‘s most reputed
conglomerates. As the second largest player in the Indian cigarette industry, Godfrey Phillips India
Ltd‘s annual turnover exceeds INR 2200 crore (approx. US $458.05 million) The company has over
1500 employees, 2 manufacturing locations in Mumbai and Ghaziabad, it‘s Leaf Division at Andhra
Pradesh and 5 Branch offices at Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad and Chandigarh.

It owns some of the most popular cigarette brands in the country like Four Square, Red and White,
Jaisalmer, Cavanders and Tipper. Over the years it has also set its own benchmarks in innovation
with revolutionary brands like Stellar, the first slim cigarette and I-gen, the first euro norm cigarette
in India.

Its products are distributed over an extensive India wide network of more than 500 distributors and
800,000 retail outlets. With the Corporate Office in Delhi, the Company has offices all across India
in over 8 locations.

Godfrey Phillips India has two major stakeholders, one of India's leading industrial houses - the K.
K. Modi Group and one of the world's largest tobacco companies, Philip Morris. The Company also
enjoys a strong backing of over 12,000 shareholders.




Vision:

―To become a leading tobacco player in India and beyond.‖

Godfrey Phillips India empowers all its people to think and act radically, stretch relentlessly and
generate path breaking ideas and strategies to propel the Company. This helps to create and build
powerful brands with unmatched service and world class processes.



                                                                                                      36
Godfrey Phillips India will rapidly grow shareholder value and achieve a commanding presence
nationally while gaining a significant presence in global markets. Godfrey Phillips India will be
amongst the most respected companies in India and in the tobacco industry worldwide.




Values

 1. Passion for winning:
    Constantly thrive in bettering the competition in every field.
    Have a positive attitude, and restlessly seek and capture new opportunities.

 2. Innovation through learning and entrepreneurship:
    Be a world class innovative organization by continually developing and successfully
      launching new brands.
    Encourage risk taking and learning, and create conditions for empowerment with
      accountability.

 3. Winning trust internally and externally:
    Build enduring relationships with all stakeholders including employees, shareholders and
     trade/alliance partners, and honour all commitments.
    Encourage transparent and fair systems and policies.

 4. Global mindset:
    Constantly benchmark in all areas against the best globally, and strive to exceed those
      benchmarks.
    Develop opportunities through a global network of distributors and alliances.

 5. Socially responsible corporate citizen:
    Ensure the compliance of all applicable laws and the highest standards of corporate
      governance.
    Support and encourage employees to actively participate in identified social and
      environmental concerns.




Directors and Management:

Godfrey Phillips India is a Company committed to innovation and continuous improvement which
can be seen in the Company employees; from the top management to the factory level.




                                                                                              37
Directors:

(A) Executive & Not Independent Directors

      Mr. K. K. Modi
      Mr. R. Ramamurthy
      Mr. Lalit Kumar Modi
      Mr. Samir Kumar Modi

(B) Non-Executive & Independent Directors

      Mr. R. A. Shah
      Mr. Lalit Bhasin
      Mr. Anup N. Kothari
      Mr. C. M. Maniar
      Mr. O. P. Vaish

Senior Management:

Mr. S Seru                        Chief Executive (Domestic Operations)
Mr. R.N. Agarwal                  Chief Financial Officer (Finance & Materials)
Mr. P.A. Mittra                   Executive Vice President (HRD & Administration)
Mr. Arun Kumar                    Executive Vice President (Operations)
Mr. Ajit Suryanarayanan           Executive Vice President (New Product Development)
Mr. Bhisham Wadhera               Executive Vice President (Sales)
Ms. Nita Kapoor                   Executive Vice President (Marketing & Corporate Affairs)
Mr. S. R. Balasubramanian         Executive Vice President (IT & Corporate Development)
Mr. M.M. Yusuf                    Sr. Vice President (Leaf)
Mr.Sanjay Gupta                   Company Secretary



Brands:

Godfrey Phillips India is best known for its leading brands like Four Square, Red & White, Jaisalmer
and Cavanders along with innovative brands such as Stellar, I Gen and Tipper.



                                                                                                 38
Cigarette Brands:

     Stellar: The first slim cigarette to be launched in India. It has been specially engineered to
      deliver low nicotine without a compromise in taste and flavour. It is available in an elegant
      slim shaped 10‘s and 20‘s pack, aimed at the cognitive consumer who wants to be
      progressive and responsible in his habits and lifestyle.




     I gen: India‘s 1st Euro Norm 10-1-10 cigarette holds the promise of an advanced cigarette
      quality and immense style. This progressive brand, known for its innovation, has also
      introduced India‘s 1st King size 5‘s pack, a convenient and stylish pack format for the young
      adult of today.




     Four Square: The flagship brand of Godfrey Phillips, Four Square is the market leader in the
      majority of its operating markets. The vibrant brand continues to delight its loyal consumers
      through constant innovation and an enriching product experience.




     Jaisalmer: A Premium King Size brand. It is a luxurious blend of finest sun dried Virginia
      tobaccos which deliver a smooth mellow flavour.




     Red & White Flake: One of the most renowned brand names of the nation, it has been rated
      in the top 50 brands in the FMCG sector. It is continuing to build upon its iconic stature.




     Northpole: Launched in the year 1958 North Pole is the largest selling menthol cigarette in
      India. North Pole has recently the Golden Peacock commendation Award for innovation in
      packaging.




                                                                                                    39
      Cavanders: Cavanders is one of the oldest and most trusted brands of the industry. Known
       for its heritage and highest quality standards, Cavanders has been providing superb value and
       satisfaction to its consumers.




      Tipper: Tipper is the fastest growing micro segment brand from Godfrey Phillips. The brand
       is the undisputed national leader in the tipped micro segment with significant presence in
       states of Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh.




Tea Brands:

      Symphony Premium Teas: A premium assortment of original brews and flavours is
       available in three variants, Assam Tea, Darjeeling Tea and Green Tea.
            Symphony Assam Teas: A refreshingly balanced blend of distinct taste and strength
               is crafted with the finest mix of fresh granular and orthodox long leaves picked from
               the most superior gardens of Assam.
            Symphony Darjeeling Tea: The classic brew from the highlands of Darjeeling gives
               a golden coloured liquor with muscatel flavour and distinctive aroma.
            Symphony Green Tea: High on anti oxidants and nutritional content, this natural tea
               is famous the world over for innumerable health benefits.


      Super Cup: A mid premium segment brand of Tea City is a blend from sprawling tea
       gardens of Assam which gives a full bodied brew. It is for them who like their tea ‗strong‘.
       Its strength and stimulating flavour creates a strong combination of intense taste, enriching
       colour and refreshing aroma. Super Cup comes in two formats: Leaf & Dust




      Samovar: Samovar Green tea is a special blend of pure long leaves. Its tender leaves when
       brewed with noon give a refreshing taste and distinct colour which brings the purity and
       originality of ‗noon chai‘ made in a samovar.




                                                                                                 40
      Super Cup Duet: Super Cup Duet offers a completely new tea drinking experience. Along
       with strong granular CTC one can enjoy the aromatic Darjeeling tea which comes in a pouch
       inside. While the granular CTC gives strength and colour, Darjeeling tea gives a delightful
       aroma in every sip.




      Utsav: Made from choicest of tea leaves, small quantity of Utsav tea leaves gives a full
       bodied strength and rich colour. It is an economy brand that comes in leaf as Utsav Chai and
       dust variant as Utsav Dust Chai.




      Rangoli: A special blend of Assam CTC tea, its fuller granules give it strength and a rich
       colour. It is an economy brand that comes in two variants to suit all taste palates – Leaf and
       Dust.




Diverse Business:

Confectionary

      Funda Mint - "Mint with a twist": India has extremely diverse taste requirements. Gujaratis
       love a sweet touch to their foods, whereas people from Andhra Pradesh prefer their food to
       be extremely spicy. On this thought, Funda-Mint took birth to provide the Indian consumer
       with a mint that refreshes them instantly and ensures it caters to India‘s varied taste. A mint
       that is modern but is essentially "Dil Se Desi". Currently available in 2 flavours – Saunf
       Fresh & Double Thanda.



Cosmetics

      ColorBar is a brand from USA and is marketed and distributed by ColorBar Cosmetics Pvt.
       Ltd., a part of the K. K Modi Group of Companies. ColorBar has been developed with the
       philosophy to provide the customers with innovative high quality products at attractive prices
       and widest range of colours. Extensive research and study on the needs and liking of the
       consumers globally has gone into creating the packaging for the products. All formulations

                                                                                                   41
        were put through the litmus test as various R&D labs in Europe and are at par with any
        leading brand. The products have premium international formulation and the range consists
        of lip sticks, lip glosses, retractable lip liners, long stay lipsticks, kajal etc.




Retail

       24X7 Stores are 24 hour convenience chain of stores located in the central areas of the city
        of Delhi offering wide variety of products and services to customers. Convenience being the
        operative word, the stores caters to the new emerging consumer with a changing lifestyle.
        Providing international shopping experience, the store stocks packaged foods and beverages,
        personal and home care items, has a pharmacy and other service counters where one can pay
        bills or courier documents. A concept rising to the challenges and the demands of the
        discerning consumer, 24X7 celebrates as it moves ahead with plans to open many more
        stores.




International Division:

Striving towards it vision to become a leading tobacco player in India and beyond, Godfrey Phillips
India has forayed into international markets with successful new business ventures.

Today, Godfrey Phillips India is partnering with some of the top most players in the international
tobacco industry in marketing their products and providing various professional and expert services
which include contract manufacturing, consultancy services, cut tobacco and smoke analysis.

Already present in the Middle East, West Africa, South East Africa and South East Asia, Godfrey
Phillips India wishes to strengthen its position as an international player by entering new markets.




Achievements:

       The company Won Golden Peacock Award 2007 for excellence in Product Innovation
        category for Four Square.




                                                                                                       42
   Tipper won ‗Golden Peacock Award‘ for the best product innovation in the year 2003
    and then again in 2006 for innovative product and service. It has also won the Silver medal at
    the Monde Selection Brussels, World Selection of Quality 2006.


   The Indian National Suggestion Schemes' Association (INSAAN) presented awards to
    Andheri factory for its best suggestions/ideas during the various convention held on different
    topics and places for the record 11th consecutive year in a row.


   The Guldhar factory won The 'Greentech Environment Excellence Awards' and
    ‗Greentech Safety Awards', in the year 2006. These awards are the most coveted awards in
    corporate world for outstanding achievements in the field of environment management.


   The pack design of Jaisalmer, the premium King Size cigarette of the Company, won the
    coveted PFFCA (Paper, Film & Foil Converters Association) Star Award, felicitating the
    pack for its excellence in design, development and creativity in packaging.


   North Pole has also won the Golden Peacock award for innovative packaging in 2005.




                                                                                               43
Chapter 3:

Case Studies




               44
Tata Group


PRINCIPLES

CSR over view:

Tata Group, one of India's oldest, largest and most respected business conglomerates, is a leader in
the CSR scene. The Tata Group has been recognized by its endeavour to institutionalize CSR in its
96 companies and integrate CSR with its business processes. With a strong commitment from its top
management, it has developed tools such as the Tata Index for Sustainable Human Development,
a model for measuring the social work that the group enterprises undertake. With investments as high
as Rs 380 crore, the Tata Group is a benchmark for Indian companies.




Vision/Mission and the Philosophy Regarding CSR:

 Purpose                             Values                             Commitment


      • ―Our purpose is                   • The five Tata                    • Tata‘s
        to improve the                      values are:                        Commitment:
        quality of life of
        the                               •   Integrity                      • Community
        communities
                                          •   Understanding                    initiatives
        we serve. We
                                          •   Excellence                     • Environment
        dothis through
        leadership in                     •   Unity                          • Employee
        sectors of                        •   Responsibility                   relations
        national                                                             • Corporate
        economic                                                               governance
        significance, to
        which the
        Group brings a
        unique set
        ofcapabilities.‖




                                                                                                 45
Major CSR Themes:
Tata Group‘s CSR investments include all major themes, such as education, health, environment,
rural development, sports, arts and employee relations.




PROCESS


CSR Strategy:

Community Initiatives:
Each Tata company has its own priorities in social development. The main companies in the group,
such as Tata Steel, Tata Tea and Tata Chemicals, have in-house organizations dedicated to
Community Initiatives. There are several projects, in different areas such as education, health,
women-children welfare, rural development, income generation, sports, arts and others.


Environment:
The group's contribution falls into two categories:
      Efforts of Tata companies to preserve and enrich the environment
      Philanthropic endeavour of the Tata Trusts, which support non-governmental organizations.
These two categories accommodate and nurture a variety of initiatives in a range that extends from
watershed programs and land regeneration to forestry projects and protection of endangered species.


The Tata approach to environmental management operates makes it mandatory for Group
companies to:
      Have a vision and mission statement that explicitly states its policy on environmental
       management.
      Define a corporate environment policy and communicate it to all employees
      Set up environmental management systems and programs at the organizational level and
       annually budget for environmental improvement.
      Train its workforce on environmental issues and assign management representatives and
       facilitators to the task of monitoring environmental systems.


                                                                                                 46
      Regularly scrutinize resource consumption and the quality of air, water and land.
      Set quantitative objectives and targets for continuous improvement (preferably beyond legal
       compliance).
      Review environmental performance at different levels in the management hierarchy.
      Establish a convention for conducting impact-assessment surveys and periodic audits.
      Publish annual environmental performance in annual reports.
      Encourage applications and attainment of eco-labels and accreditations such as ISO
       14000/01.
This is to be followed by lifecycle assessments and eco-labelling for product stewardship throughout
the supply chain.


Employee relations:
The Tata Group has more than 245,000 employees. Tatas were the pioneers in employee benefits that
were later mandated through legislation in India and elsewhere in the world. The eight-hour working
day, free medical aid, welfare departments, grievance cells, leave with pay, provident fund, accident
compensation, training institutes, maternity benefits, bonus and gratuity were introduced by the
group before any legal rules were framed on them.




CSR Programs:

1. Community initiatives:


―Temples of Knowledge‖
Under the Group‘s program to develop centres of learning and research, knowledge and intellectual
capital, Tata funds five Indian ‗Temples of Knowledge‘:
      The Indian Institute of Science
      The Tata Institute of Fundamental Research
      The Tata Institute of Social Sciences
      The Tata Memorial Centre
      The JRD Tata Ecotechnology Centre



                                                                                                  47
Sports:
The Tata Group has been supporting sports by creating academies in different disciplines and by
backing talented sportspeople. Some initiatives of the Group are:
       The Tata Football Academy, set up in Jamshedpur in 1987, selects boys (14 years and
        below) and trains them for a four-year period in world-class facilities, taking care of all their
        needs.
       The Tata Archery Academy, established in Jamshedpur in 1996, has produced a long list of
        archers who have won national and international honours.
       The Tata Adventure Foundation, headed by Bachendri Pal, the first Indian woman to climb
        Mount Everest, has rock climbing, river rafting and parasailing on its alternate sports agenda.


Arts:
Tata‘s initiative towards Arts is best reflected by Tata Steel. It first sponsored prizes and scholarships
for art in 1943, at the annual exhibition at the JJ School of Art, Bombay. The company's 'Art In
Industry' series has since then featured renounced Indian and international artists. The Jamshedpur
School of Arts has groomed local talent. Besides promoting contemporary Indian art, the Tatas had
the vision of preserving the country's performing arts. Indian folk and classical dance forms, music
and theatre, traditionally handed down through the gurukul system, received a fillip when J J
Bhabha, a Tata stalwart along with others established the pushed and persevered for long years to
establish the National Centre for the Performing Arts (NCPA) in 1966. The Tata Group has also
supported the cause of folk, tribal and rural crafts. The Tribal Culture Centre (TCC), founded by
Tata Steel in 1990 at a cost of Rs 35 lakh, is a showcase for the artistic talents of the tribal
communities of Jharkhand.


Tata Chemicals Society for Rural Development:
Tata Chemicals set up the Tata Chemicals Society for Rural Development (TCSRD) in 1980 to
promote its social objectives for the communities in and around Mithapur and Babrala, where its
facilities are located. Some of the initiatives of TCSRD are:
       Agricultural development
       Education
       Women's programs
       Animal husbandry
       Rural energy

                                                                                                       48
      Training
      Watershed development
      Relief work
      Infrastructure


Tata Steel Rural Development Society:
Established in 1979, the Tata Steel Rural Development Society (TSRDS) is involved in social
development programs aimed at helping the rural communities living around Tata Steel's
units. TSRDS covered 32 villages around Jamshedpur in its first year of operation. Today the
Society has seven units, six of them in Tata Steel's operational areas, and covers 600 villages in the
states of Jharkhand and Orissa. TSRDS is most actively involved in the spheres of livelihood
generation, health and hygiene, and people empowerment. Recently, TSRDS has expanded its
agenda and identified the advancement of education, sports and self-reliance as tools to ensure a
better quality of life for the people it works with.



Rallilove ACTS:
Rallilove ACTS (Assisting Communities Through Service), an organization set up by Rallis, seeks to
improve the quality of life of the poor, especially women and children, through sustainable
community development programs.
Through ACTS, Rallis has been involved in the following community development initiatives:
      Contribution to the Akanksha Foundation, Mumbai
      Girl Child Project of Rallis Committed Community Development Trust (CCDT), Mumbai
      Educational support for 285 underprivileged students in Lote, Maharashtra
      Tree plantations in and around its factories and at RRC, Bangalore
      Dental and eye check-up camps at various factories
      Health awareness programs for Adivasis and other communities in Turbhe, Maharashtra
      Rallis CCDT Ankur Girl Child Project aims to create opportunities for a healthy and safe
       environment for girls living on the streets near Kamapthipura, the largest red-light area in
       Mumbai.




                                                                                                   49
Voltas for Women:
Voltas for Women (VOW) was founded in 1965 and registered in 1975. The organization, whose
membership is restricted to female employees of Voltas and the wives of male employees, helps the
needy with assistance in health and education, and offers career and vocational guidance. VOW has
supported a number of deserving organizations. Its contributions include:
      Setting up a ward for female leprosy patients at the Vimala Dermatological Centre in
       Mumbai.
      Establishing fully-equipped speech and physiotherapy units at SPJ Sadhana School for the
       handicapped, Sophia College, Mumbai.
      Setting up a medical care unit at Asha Sadan, a home for destitute women and children run by
       the Maharashtra State Council of Women.
      Providing audio-visual equipment to assist the mentally challenged at the Dilkush School at
       Juhu in suburban Mumbai.




2. Environment:
Waste Management:
Tata Steel has laid great emphasis, over the years, on creating a green environment in and around its
plants and on utilizing the waste generated in the process of manufacturing steel.
The company generates roughly 700 kg of various wastes (excluding fly ash) in the process of
producing one ton of crude steel. Of this, 83.16% is utilized either through recycling and reuse in the
company's own processes or is sold as raw material to other industries. The rest is sent for safe land
filling. A number of companies today look to Tata Steel for guidelines on efficient waste
management, and the company is confident that its 'war on waste' will have far-reaching effects.


Tata‘s ―Mini Jungle‖
Tata Motors created a ―mini-jungle‖ in the surroundings areas of the Telco complex in Pune. The
last previous biodiversity survey recorded the existence of more than 150,000 trees including 78
exotic species and 110 indigenous species, in the 800 acres complex.




3. Employee Relations:


                                                                                                    50
Learning:
The Tata Group‘s programs include Tata Management Training Centre (TMTC), which provides
training to high performers within the Group and the Tata Administrative Service (TAS), which
recruits fresh graduates and postgraduates from leading business schools to put them on the business
leadership path. The Group encourages cross-functional exposure and cross-company mobility as an
aspect of leadership development. The Tata Group has also created high-value leadership
development programs in partnership with some of the best universities in the world.


Tata Townships:
Tata has created cities and towns – Jamshedpur, Mithapur, Babrala and Mathigiri – around
industrial facilities.
Tata Steel maintains Jamshedpur's public utilities such as the local municipality and takes care of
road maintenance, water and electricity supply, streetlights, healthcare and sanitation. Considering
the good standard of the maintenance facilities, Tata Steel has floated Jusco as a separate entity, to
share its knowledge and expertise, which is unparalleled in the country.




Financial Outlay:
Projects                                  2005 - 06 (Rs crore)

Social Welfare                            212
Environmental                             141
Others                                    27
Total                                     380


Tata Group investment on CSR in 2005-06 corresponded to 4% of Profit After Tax (PAT).


Organizational Support:
Tata Council for Community Initiatives
The Tata Council for Community Initiatives (TCCI) is a centrally administered agency that helps
Tata companies through specific processes. TCCI's charter embraces social development,
environmental management, biodiversity restoration and employee volunteering. The organization is


                                                                                                   51
headed by Kishor Chaukar, a member of the Tata Group Corporate Centre, and 43 chief executive
officers of Tata companies are its other members. It coordinates the varied and widespread
community development activities of Tata companies.


Personnel Support
Anant G. Nadkarni, is the Vice President – Group, Corporate Social Responsibility.




OUTCOMES:


Awards:
Some of the Awards won by Tata companies:
      Tata Steel was awarded with the Businessworld-FICCI-SEDF Corporate Social
       Responsibility award 2009 by Shri Anand Sharma, Hon‘ble Union Minister for Commerce
       and Industry, Government of India.


      Tata Housing Development was honoured with the prestigious Best Developer – Corporate
       Social Responsibility for Shubh Griha (Smart Value Homes) at the Cityscape Awards – Real
       Estate Asia, 2010 for their commitment and positive contribution to the society.


      In March 2007, Tata Steel was conferred the Award for Corporate Social Responsibility
       in Public Health by the US–India Business Council (USIBC), Population Services
       International (PSI) and the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Tata Steel
       was selected for its contribution in the fight against HIV/AIDS.


      In February 2007, Tata Consultancy Services won the Golden Peacock Global Award for
       Corporate Social Responsibility (Asia) – 2007 in the 'Large Business' category.


      In February 2007, Tata Motors was conferred with the Golden Peacock Global Award
       for Corporate Social Responsibility by the Institute of Directors. This award was based
       on assessment of the company‘s integration of CSR concerns with corporate functioning,




                                                                                                 52
      responsiveness to the needs of different stakeholders, and development of innovative
      partnership models to fulfil social responsibilities.


     The Tata Group was awarded the Civil Society Award 2006 by UNAIDS for its role in
      fighting HIV in India. Several Tata Group companies provide support for HIV prevention,
      treatment and care services across the country.


     The governor of Tamil Nadu, Surjit Singh Barnala, presented The Mother Teresa Award
      for Corporate Citizen 2005 to Tata Steel.


     Tata Steel was adjudged one of the top energy-efficient units in India and was awarded a
      shield and a certificate for being the 'Excellent Energy Efficient Unit - 2003' by the CII-
      Sohrabji Godrej Green Business Centre, Hyderabad.


     Software and service consultancy firm Tata Consultancy Services received the ‗2003 Asian
      Corporate Social Responsibility Award‘ for support and improvement in education
      category. The company had designed a computer-based functional literacy model, a
      multimedia-based teaching method, and has set up an adult literacy program to help the
      government eradicate illiteracy.


     Tata Steel received the GBC HIV/AIDS award — 2003 for its commendable awareness
      work on HIV/AIDS in the community.


     Tata Engineering has bagged the Corporate Social Responsibility Award for 2001-2002
      instituted by the Tata Energy Research Institute (TERI). Tata Engineering won the award
      for creating health and rural upliftment opportunities in and around its Pune plant and for its
      leprosy project in Jamshedpur.


     In April 2001, Tata Engineering‘s Pune plant won the Dr. R. J. Rathi Award 2001 for
      Environmental Pollution Control in Industries in Maharashtra.




Metrics and its Evaluation:
                                                                                                  53
 Environmental Management, Occupational Health and Safety Assessment
  System:
  Most of Tata‘s companies have been awarded the ISO 14001 for their Environmental
  Management System and OHSAS 18001 for Occupational Health and Safety Assessment
  System.


 Tata Index for Sustainable Human Development:
  TCCI, in collaboration with the United Nations Development Program (India), created the
  Tata Index for Sustainable Human Development. This was aimed at directing, measuring and
  enhancing the community work that group enterprises undertake. TCCI is also involved in
  assisting Tata companies address the sustainability subject through the Global Reporting
  Initiative, a United Nations initiative that has guidelines for companies on social
  responsibility. The Tata Index for Sustainable Human Development is a set of guidelines for
  Tata companies looking to fulfil their social responsibilities. It has been built around the
  Tata Business Excellence Model (TBEM), an open-ended framework that drives business
  excellence in Tata companies.




                                                                                           54
Airtel (Telecom)

PRINCIPLE


CSR Overview:
According to the company, ―Corporate Social Responsibility is a way of life at Bharti.‖ Airtel has
been looking after the needs and interest of its stakeholders, including employees, consumers, and
communities, along with the environment.


Vision/Mission and the Philosophy regarding CSR:
―Airtel is strongly committed to being a responsible corporate citizen. Providing a platform to
leverage the potential of the citizens of tomorrow and concern for the environment are our top
priorities.‖
- Sunil Bharti Mittal – Chairman and Managing Director. Quoted from the 2005-06 annual report.


Major CSR Themes:
The company invests in several CSR initiatives, from consumer privacy policy to the promotion of
entrepreneurship. However, Bharti Airtel‘s major CSR themes are Education and Environment.




PROCESS


CSR Programs


1. Community:
       Customer: Airtel has been implementing consumer-focused programs, such as the Consumer
        Privacy Policy, which retrains the sending of promotional messages and the Consumer
        Contact Program, where employees, including senior managers, contact five customers every
        month to obtain feedbacks.

                                                                                                 55
      Employees: It has launched the ‗Empower Program‘, an initiative to help employees and
       their families deal with stress.
      Human Rights: Airtel launched the CII-Bharti Woman Exemplar Award in 2005 to
       promote women‘s empowerment at the grassroots. It seeks to recognize women who have
       excelled in the fields of primary education and literacy, health, micro-finance and enterprise.
       This is a joint initiative by the Bharti Foundation and the Confederation of Indian Industry
       (CII).


2. Environment:
      5,000 sites are using a green-shelter system that provides cooling for four hours in the Base
       Transceiver Station. This system saves cost and reduces pollution. Airtel also shares 25% of
       its mobile cell sites, which contribute to decrease environmental disturbance. Internally, the
       company has implemented a wastage reducing campaign to decrease paper consumption.


3. Education:
      Bharti Airtel founded the Bharti Foundation in 2000, with the vision: ―To help
       underprivileged children and young people of our country realize their potential.‖
       Through the foundation, several initiatives were started such as the Bharti Computer Centres,
       which have provided computer learning to more than 130,000 children in five states; the
       Bharti Library Program, aimed to encourage reading habits of children; and the Mid-day
       Meal Program, in which Bharti Foundation has supported Akshaya Para in providing meals to
       43,000 children per day in 292 government schools. For the coming years, the foundation has
       plans to start a large number of primary schools in rural areas across the country. It will also
       provide teacher‘s training facilities.


4. Health:
      HIV: Red Ribbon Caravan: The Company supported the Rajasthan State AIDS Control
       Society in a campaign to create awareness about HIV/AIDS. A caravan of five vans travelled
       in 32 districts of Rajasthan.
      Donations: Airtel donated item such as woollens to Kalakar School; medicines, stationery,
       and clothes to the      Missionaries of Charity Home for Destitute; and water bottles to
       Kashmir‘s earthquake-affected area in October 2005.



                                                                                                    56
Financial Outlay:
Bharti Airtel has committed Rs 200 crore to support CSR initiatives over the 2006-08 period.


Organizational Support:
CSR at Bharti Airtel is the responsibility of the Corporate Director Alliance & CSR. The corporate
director is under the Chairman and Managing Director (CMD), Sunil Bharti Mittal.
Outcomes


OUTCOMES
Awards:
Bharti Airtel has won awards such as:
      Bharti Airtel has received the prestigious Businessworld-FICCI-SEDF Corporate Social
       Responsibility Awards 2009-2010.
      India‘s Most Customer Responsive Telecom Company Award in 2006 for the second
       consecutive year. The award was instituted by Avaya Global Connect Ltd.
      The Golden Peacock Award for Corporate Social Responsibility for 2006 in the NGO
       category. This award was instituted by the Centre for Social Responsibility supported by
       Institute of Directors (IOD), Centre for Corporate Governance (CFCG), and the World
       Council for Corporate Governance (WCFCG), UK.
      India's 'second best employer' in 2004: Conducted by Hewitt Associates globally, this study
       identifies ‗Best Employers' based on employee opinion, the organization's employment and
       people practices, and the perspective of its senior leadership.




                                                                                               57
Bajaj (Automotive)

PRINCIPLES
CSR Overview:
Bajaj Auto‘s philanthropic activities among the rural poor are carried out by a trust, the Jankidevi
Bajaj Gram Vikas Sanstha (JBGVS). Established in 1987 by Ramkrishna Bajaj in memory of his
mother, Jankidevi Bajaj, this Trust acts as a catalyst to development at the grass root level in 32
villages around its plants in Pune and Aurangabad.


Vision/Mission and the Philosophy Regarding CSR:
The Company affirms that its competitiveness is interlinked with the well-being of all sections
of the Indian society.
According to the company, Bajaj Auto is committed to nation-building and contributing to the
uplift and development of the weaker sections of society. This, the company believes is the
legacy of its founders, Jamnalal and Kamalnayan Bajaj.


Major CSR Themes:
The philanthropic activities implemented by the company are aimed at the integrated development
of villages through women empowerment, income generation, health programs, agricultural
extension, animal husbandry, watershed development, drinking water schemes, sanitation and
education.




PROCESS
CSR Strategy:
Community, Health & Education:


CSR Programs and policies:


                                                                                                       58
1. Jankidevi Bajaj Gram Vikas Sanstha (JBGVS)
      Vision Statement: JBGVS is a non-political and secular organization, which strives to
       improve the quality of life of the rural poor by creating self-employment opportunities at the
       grass-root level, through the use of appropriate technologies, in harmony with nature.
      Focus: The trust initiates sustainable, integrated development through long term projects in
       rural health, hygiene and sanitation, education and adult literacy, improving agricultural and
       livestock yield, watershed development and women‘s empowerment. Through its poverty
       alleviation schemes, the Trust provides micro-credit and income generation opportunities for
       the poor. These projects have a positive impact on the quality of rural living standards. The
       Trust is stepping up its projects encompassing agricultural extension services, lift irrigation,
       environmental sanitation, veterinary services, health and education.
      Implementation strategy: To ensure the involvement of its rural constituents, JBGVS relies
       on a participatory approach in implementing all its projects. The Trust also secures the
       participation of local elected bodies eg. gram panchayat (village council), co-operative
       societies, women‘s and youth bodies, in decision making.


2. Samaj Seva Kendra:
      Set up by Bajaj Auto in 1975, the Samaj Seva Kendra (SSK) undertakes social activities in
       the semi-urban areas on the outskirts of Pune. Local industrial workers are provided
       opportunities for self- development, education, healthcare, sports and recreation. SSK
       involves local institutions and municipal bodies, local Rotary Clubs and NGOs in its
       activities.
      SSK has helped empower wives of factory workers by providing them earning opportunities.


3. Kamalnayan Bajaj Hospital:
      The company operates a multi-specialty hospital in Aurangabad, western Maharashtra.
      High-quality secondary and tertiary healthcare and specialist facilities are provided under one
       roof.


Financial Outlay:
The Bajaj Group spends Rs. 100 million ($2.15 million) every year on philanthropic activities
through various trusts and foundations holding an asset of Rs. 700 crore ($153 million).


                                                                                                    59
Organizational and Personnel Support
     Bajaj Auto Limited adopted the Code of Conduct for Affirmative Action. This became
      effective from December 1, 2006.
     The Company will make available its learning and experiences as a good corporate citizen in
      Affirmative Action to other companies desiring to incorporate such policies in their own
      business.
     C P Tripathi is the Vice President (Corporate Social Responsibility) in the company.




OUTCOMES
Outcomes

Awards:
     Bajaj was awarded the Meritorious Performance in Industrial Safety Award from 1998-
      2001. The award was given by the National Safety Council.
     Award for ―Achieving Longest Accident-free Period‘ under Heavy Engineering Industries
      Group. Bajaj received this award for three consecutive years (1997-1999) from the National
      Safety Council.


Metrics and Evaluation
     The Environmental management system, which is an integral part of the overall management
      system at Bajaj Auto‘s Aurangabad plant, was awarded ISO 14001 certification in 1997.




                                                                                              60
Hindustan Liver Limited (Rural Marketing)

PRINCIPLES


CSR Overview:
In Hindustan Lever Limited (HUL), CSR is rooted in its Corporate Purpose - the belief that, "to
succeed we require the highest standards of corporate behaviour towards our employees, consumers
and the societies and world in which we live.‖


Vision/Mission and the Philosophy regarding CSR:
HUL's CSR philosophy is embedded in its commitment to all stakeholders, including consumers and
employees, the environment, and the society the company operates in. HUL acknowledges that
development and poverty reduction depend on economic prosperity, and that international trade and
investment create new employment, raise skill levels, and increase economic activity. The company
depends on sustainable sources of raw materials, and is committed to minimizing the environmental
impact, improving sustainability throughout the value chain.
Relating CR to Business Strategies
Relating CR to Business Strategies
Product Development              Water conserving products
Human Resource                   BLT placements, igniting growth volunteering, hiring and
                                 investing in local talent (merit-based through employment
                                 exchanges)
Manufacturing                    Safety Health Environment manufacturing
Sourcing                         Code of Business Practices (COBP) Compliance
Sales                            Shakti, cause marketing
Investment                       Local enterprise development
Profit apportionment             Community involvement initiatives




                                                                                              61
Major CSR Themes:
     Health & hygiene, education, women empowerment, rehabilitation of special or
      underprivileged children, care for the destitute, HIV-positive, and rural development.
     Sustainable initiatives have long-term benefits, and an ongoing business purpose linked to
      them is given priority focus.




PROCESS


CSR Programs:

1. Community:
     Rural Development: HUL launched Project Shakti in 2001 to create income-generating
      capabilities for underprivileged rural women by providing a small-scale enterprise
      opportunity, and to improve rural living standards through health and hygiene awareness. The
      project has been extended to 15 states covering 80,000 villages. The company has launched
      ‗i-Shakti‘ kiosks – an IT-based rural information service developed to provide information
      and services to meet rural needs in agriculture, education, vocational training, health, and
      hygiene. To improve business skills of the rural population, especially women, extensive
      training programs are held. The total strength of Shakti Entrepreneurs has reached over
      30,800. Shakti also contributes approximately Rs 100 crore to HUL‘s topline, and the project
      was expected to achieve cash break-even by 2006.


     Special Education and Rehabilitation Centre: In 1992, HUL started a centre for the
      handicapped in Assam called Ankur, to impart special education and provide services to
      children suffering from various disabilities such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation,
      deafness, blindness, polio, and other physical disabilities. Subsequently, the company
      launched other centres in Coimbatore called Kappagam (1998) and Anbagam (2003). It is
      also involved with The Spastics Society of Bangalore in providing education and support to
      children with brain damage. The society runs a school, a vocational training centre, and a free
      medical centre in Bangalore. HUL also bears the capital and upkeep expenses for Asha Daan,



                                                                                                  62
       a home started by Mother Teresa and the Missionaries of Charity in Mumbai for abandoned,
       challenged children, destitute people and HIV-positive patients.


      Women Empowerment: HUL's initiative – The Fair & Lovely Foundation aims at economic
       empowerment of women across India. It aims to achieve this through providing information,
       resources, inputs, and support in the areas of education, career, and enterprise. It specifically
       targets women from low-income groups in rural as well as urban India.


      Disaster Relief: HUL has reconstructed a village in the Bhachau Taluka of Gujarat's Kachch
       district, which was completely wrecked by the devastating earthquake of January 2001.


2. Environment:
      Water Conservation and Harvesting: HUL is also committed to extending its efforts on
       water management to the larger community, and engages in community projects in water
       adjacent to manufacturing sites.



3. Education:
      Rural Education Program – HUL is also developing a Rural Education Program, which
       aims at using audio-visual aids, such as video cassettes and CDs. These tools enable teachers
       to explain basic concepts in mathematics, such as operation on numbers, fractions, algebra,
       and geometry, to primary school children in villages.
      Schools Contact Program – The program indirectly benefits children studying in 21
       schools. It offers donations to build an auditorium, a library, or a laboratory, or for
       purchasing computers, organizing training workshops for teachers, thus enabling them to
       more effectively manage both classrooms and the school.


4. Health:
      Health & Hygiene Education: To educate people about basic hygienic habits, HUL‘s health
       and hygiene education initiative called Lifebuoy Swasthya Chetana, is the single largest rural
       educational program ever undertaken in India. The program has so far covered approximately
       15000 villages in eight states.




                                                                                                     63
Organizational Support:
Approximately 9% of the company‘s resources for community involvement come in the form
of employee time. Their time is ranged from their involvement in Ashadaan to the disaster affected
Yashodadham village near Bhuj. HUL management trainees spend approximately four weeks on
Project Shakti in rural areas with NGOs or Self Help Groups.


Financial Outlay:
In 2005, HUL committed Rs 80 million for immediate relief of the tsunami-hit areas of Pondicherry,
Tamil Nadu, and Kerala. The company also planned to spend Rs 30 million, inclusive of employees‘
contribution. Its employees donated a day's salary, totaling Rs 5.1 million, which was used to help
people restore their homes and start to resume their livelihoods.
The company also provided Rs 10 million for Mumbai flood relief in 2005.


Personnel Support:
Paresh Chaudhary and R Ram handle its corporate communications department. Project Shakti
was headed by Sharat Dhall, HUL‘s Marketing Operations Manager.




OUTCOMES
Awards:
      HUL won award at the World HRD Congress 2010: 'The Most Admired & Best HR Team
       Award.‘


      Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL) has been awarded the CII (Western Region) HR
       Excellence Award for the year 2008.


      2005: Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry Civic Award for Community
       Development.


      2005: Tatapuram and am Tindiindivanam factories received Awards for Exemplary Safety
       Performance from National Safety Council and the Government of Tamil Nadu.


                                                                                                     64
     2003: TERI-CSR Special Award from The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) for
      initiatives in sustainable development.


     2001: Good Corporate Citizen Award by the Bombay Chamber of Commerce & Industry
      (BCCI).


Metrics and Evaluation:
     HUL proves its commitment to quality by mandating that all manufacturing facilities are
      certified to a quality system standard.
     The company has a management system conforming to ISO 14001 & OHSAS 18001




                                                                                          65
Indian Tobacco Company (Tobacco)

PRINCIPLES

CSR Overview:
ITC believes that corporations like itself have a responsibility to set exemplary standards of ethical
behaviour, both internally within the organization, as well as in their external relationships.


Vision/Mission and the Philosophy regarding CSR:
According to ITC Chairman, Y C Deveshwar, "Envisioning a larger societal purpose (a commitment
beyond the market) has always been a hallmark of ITC. The Company sees no conflict between the
twin goals of shareholder value enhancement and societal value creation. The challenge lies in
fashioning a corporate strategy that enables realization of these goals in a mutually reinforcing and
synergistic manner."


Major CSR Themes
The company is involved in various initiatives like environmental performance, primary education,
agriculture, women empowerment, but the groups‘ focus is on rural development.




PROCESS
CSR Focus:


1. Community:
      e-Choupal: This empowers 3.5 million farmers through access to customized crop-specific
       information in their native village, habitat and language. Vernacular Web sites relating to
       each agricultural crop that the company deals in provides ready and real time information to
       even marginal farmers on the prevailing Indian and international prices and price trends for
       their crop, expert knowledge on best farming practices, and micro level weather forecast.



                                                                                                    66
     Livestock Development Program: In collaboration with BAIF Development Research
      Foundation, a national NGO specializing in livestock development, ITC assists small and
      landless farmers to cross-breed their low milk-yielding cattle with high-yielding breeds.
     Integrated Agriculture Development: This intervention aims to improve farm productivity
      and hence incomes by promoting a package of efficient farm practices and technologies. The
      efficiency of water-use through such systems has been documented comprehensively with a
      view to sharing the information with farmers through the e-Choupal network.
     Women Empowerment: ITC aims at micro-credit and skills training to generate alternate
      employment opportunities for women to facilitate better nutrition, healthcare and education
      for their children.


2. Education:
     Primary Education: ITC provides infrastructure facilities to select government schools
      under its "Project Classmate.‖ Its initiatives include improving school buildings,
      constructing toilets, providing electricity connections and supplying fans and lights.


3. Environmental Performance:
     Renewable Energy: The Company focuses on the use of renewable energy such as biomass
      and solar energy. Several of its units have installed solar thermal systems in canteens and
      kitchens.


     Energy Conservation: ITC endeavours to be a carbon positive corporation. Its efforts in the
      field of energy conservation, use of carbon neutral fuels and large scale tree plantations
      through social and farm forestry have resulted in sequestering 85.6% of the CO2 emitted by
      its operations, the company claims.


     Wasteland Development: Its social and farm forestry program have together greened nearly
      41,000 hectares with over 149 million saplings.


     Watershed Project: The government of Rajasthan and the ITC Rural Development Trust
      signed a memorandum of understanding for a watershed development project in Kalyanpura
      village, over 250 km from Jaipur. ITC seeks to achieve two critical objectives: water
      conservation and soil enrichment through its watershed projects.

                                                                                                  67
Community Investments




OUTCOMES
Awards:
Some prominent awards received by ITC are:
      United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) Award at the
       international conference on Sharing Innovative Agribusiness Solutions 2008 at Cairo for
       ITC's exemplary initiatives in agri business through the e-Choupal.


      The Golden Peacock Awards for 'Corporate Social Responsibility (Asia)' in 2007.


      The Stockholm Challenge Award in the Economic Development category for e-Choupal in
       2006.


      The Pacific Asia Travel Association Gold Award in the Corporate Environmental category
       for the WelcomEnviron initiatives in 2006.




                                                                                           68
      The MIS Asia Award for IT Excellence for e-Choupal – 2006.


      The first Indian company and the second in the world to win the prestigious Development
       Gateway Award in 2006.


      The Award for ‗CSR in Emerging Economies 2005‘, instituted by the Institute of Directors,
       New Delhi, in association with the World Council for Corporate Governance and Centre for
       Corporate Governance.


      The inaugural 'World Business Award' in 2004, instituted jointly by the United Nations
       Development Programme (UNDP), International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and the HRH
       Prince of Wales International Business Leaders Forum (IBLF).


      CII & Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply & Sewerage Board Hyderabad Water
       Conservation Award –2005.


      LEED V2 Platinum Rating by The U.S. Green Building Council (Leadership in Energy and
       Environment Design, Green Building Rating System).


      Green Rating by the Centre for Science & Environment, India.




Metrics and Evaluation:


Certifications of superior EHS performance:
ISO 14001: Environment Management System:
      All ITC Units and the four hotel properties owned by ITC (Maurya Sheraton, Mughal
       Sheraton,Chola Sheraton and Grand Maratha Sheraton) have obtained ISO 14001
       certification for their Environment Management Systems.
      Kidderpore cigarette factory is the first cigarette factory in the world to get ISO 14001
       certification.




                                                                                             69
OHSAS 18001: Occupational Health and Safety Management System:
      Kidderpore Cigarette factory certified for OHSAS 18001 in 2003–04.
      Leaf processing plants at Chirala and Anaparti already certified.


SA 8000: Social Accountability System:
      Leaf processing plants at Chirala and Anaparti have received this certification.




                                                                                          70
Godfrey Phillips India

PRINCIPLES

CSR over view:

Godfrey Phillips India not only recognize the importance of being a responsible corporate citizen but
its identity as a cigarette manufacturing Company and its success in it imposes even a greater
responsibility upon it to take it further. Being cognizant of this fact, the company strives to be active
and committed participants in enhancing the community it works, lives and does business in.

Besides strong internal responsible marketing policies that govern all its actions, it has undertaken
several initiatives like Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards, Blood Donation Drive, Women
Empowerment projects, Godfrey Phillips WHITE, various GAP (Good Agricultural Practices)
and support programs for tobacco farmers, environmental management besides many
philanthropic and charitable gestures which is a part of the Company culture.




Vission Mission and values:

      The company ensures the compliance of all applicable laws and the highest standards of
       corporate governance
      Build enduring relationships with all stakeholders including employees, shareholders and
       trade/alliance partners, and honour all commitments.
      Encourage transparent and fair systems and policies.
      Supports and encourages employees to actively participate in identified social and
       environmental concerns.



Major CSR Themes:
The company is involved in various initiatives like community programmes, environmental
performance, health, agriculture, but the company‘ focus is on women empowerment currently.




                                                                                                      71
PROCESS
1. Community:

   Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards: Godfrey Phillips India salutes the extraordinary courage
      exhibited by ordinary people in selflessly protecting and saving others lives. Started in 1990,
      Godfrey Phillips Bravery Award is the only award of its kind instituted by a corporate house
      that recognises the acts of common people; irrespective of their age, gender or faith. Over the
      years, the Award has grown both in terms of stature and eminence. And now the movement
      takes the message of bravery to the masses further increasing their involvement and widening
      its scope with two initiatives - Blood Donation and Women Empowerment.


     Godfrey Phillips Blood Donation Drive aims to educate, create awareness and sensitize the
      public on voluntary blood donation and on safe blood for all. Voluntary blood donation is
      bravery as it is selfless like other acts of Bravery and it saves lives. Godfrey Phillips Blood
      Donation Drive aims to bring to light the issues, motivate and encourage participation, and
      most important of all, call upon the conscience of the people to be selfless and caring towards
      others, thus creating an evolved and compassionate society.
      Since its inception in July 2006, Godfrey Phillips Bravery has successfully conducted 62
      Blood Donation Drives covering 11 states, and has collected over 7800 units of blood
      through voluntary donations. Bravery Ambassador, Preity Zinta has also donated blood at the
      drives to inspire and motivate others to do the same.


     Women Empowerment Project is aimed at making women economically self-sufficient and
      independent by providing them with vocational skills and training. . Apart from conducting
      literacy classes, the company is also empowering women to stand up to domestic violence,
      drug abuse, HIV/AIDS and to understand their legal rights. This drive will help promote
      gender equality and redress power imbalances. The gifts and samples prepared by the
      beneficiaries are now sourced by GPI itself for its corporate gifting occasions.It includes a
      wide range of aromatherapy products, honey, preserves, chutneys, tea, spices, soaps and bath
      & body products, all housed in beautiful Amodini gift boxes. Handcrafted by rural women
      who have been trained to create exquisite products. All proceeds from their sale go back into
      training these women. Reputed NGO's like Charities Aids Foundation, Navjyoti, Vidya and
      others have joined hands with Godfrey Phillips India in this endeavour.

                                                                                                  72
      Farmer Programme: The Company realized that there is no better way to ensure that the
       industry flourishes by helping the people who are at the very heart of it, the tobacco farmers.
       Godfrey Phillips helps create awareness amongst the farming community about the benefits
       of adopting approved agricultural practices. Infact, it imparts training and knowledge to
       farmers in tobacco producing areas of northern light soils, southern light soils, Karnataka
       light soils & light soils of Dharwar Burley, ensuring the transfer of technology from lab to
       land. By taking their problems back to the lab to look for ideal solutions, Godfrey Phillips
       helps produce tobacco leaves that are comparable to the best in the world. They are supplied
       healthy seeding at the right time. To make technical knowhow available to all farmers,
       Godfrey Phillips is involved with them at every stage, making their farms and lives better. ,
       this demonstration plot started yielding over 50% more tobacco through improved farm
       practices. This has created real interest amongst the tobacco farmers, who now want to use
       these methodologies to achieve higher productivity and higher realisation of their produce.
       To further encourage them, the company has instituted the Best Growers Award in 1994-
       95, to facilitate farmers in achieving higher yields and realising higher returns on their
       investment.


      Godfrey Phillips White: Godfrey Phillips India believes in creating and fostering harmony
       by respecting the choices individuals make i.e. to smoke or not to smoke. As the popular
       adage states ‗with freedom comes responsibility‘, the view is echoed in the essence of
       WHITE - 'It Honours the Importance of Tobacco Etiquette', responsible smoking
       programme by Godfrey Phillips India, a first of its kind initiative in India.
       The key focus is on cultivating smoking etiquette among smokers - to respect non-smokers'
       space. Initiated internally, this is something every member of the Godfrey Phillips India
       family adheres to. As a WHITE ambassador the individual actively propagates responsible
       smoking behaviour because as a 'Socially Responsible Corporate Citizen' Godfrey Phillips
       India believes in setting examples by practicing the change that one wants others to emulate.



2. Health and Environment:

Some of the Company's key initiatives are as follows:

      Arguably, there are no greater shadows over the world today than illness and the wrath of
       nature. Hence, the company‘s participation in AIDS Prevention Programme, rehabilitation

                                                                                                   73
       of the Gujarat Earthquake victims and Blood donation camps. However, since charity
       starts at home, the company insists upon and ensure safe environmental practices within its
       factories and offices.


      Godfrey Phillips India Limited, Andheri Factory, is committed to work towards continually
       reducing risk of injury, occupational illness and environmental impact of its operation. As a
       part of this commitment the company is working towards improving workplace safety,
       quality of air emission, maximising reuse of treated water and conservation of resources.




Financial Outlay:

The company spent Rs.14 crore, i.e. 10% of its profits, on its CSR activities in the financial year
2009-10.

Organisational Support:

Godfrey Phillips has an entire CSR team consisting of 7 members.

Personnel Support:

Ms. Nita Kapoor is the Executive Vice President (Marketing & Corporate Affairs) and heads the
CSR team of Godfrey Phillips India Ltd.




OUTCOMES

Awards:

      The Guldhar factory won The 'Greentech Environment Excellence Awards' and
       Greentech Safety Awards', in the year 2006. These awards are the most coveted awards in
       corporate world for outstanding achievements in the field of environment management.




                                                                                                   74
      The Indian National Suggestion Schemes' Association (INSAAN) presented awards to
       Andheri factory for its best suggestions/ideas during the various convention held on different
       topics and places for the record 11th consecutive year in a row.



Metrics and evaluation:

Social Accountability - SA 8000:2001

Company‘s production facility M/s International Tobacco Company Limited, Ghaziabad has
obtained the Social Accountability Certification, SA 8000: 2001 in 2006.

M/s International Tobacco Company is the second cigarette manufacturing Company in the world to
have been accredited with Social Accountability Certification.




                                                                                                  75
IndianOil Corporation (Oil & Gas)

PRINCIPLES
CSR Overview:
IndianOil Corporation has been an active founder-member of the United Nations Global Compact, an
international initiative that brings companies together with UN agencies, labour and civil society to
support universal environmental and social principles. Indian Oil has included CSR in its Vision and
Mission statement and has built its corporate strategies around it.


Vision/Mission and the Philosophy regarding CSR:
      IndianOil Vision: ―A major diversified, transnational, integrated energy company, with
       national leadership and a strong environment conscience, playing a national role in oil
       security& public distribution‖.
      IndianOil Mission regarding CSR: ―To help enrich the quality of life of the community and
       preserve ecological balance and heritage through a strong environment conscience.‖
      Apart from its Vision and Mission, IndianOil has a statement of obligations towards
       customers and dealers, suppliers, employees, community, and defence services.


Major CSR Themes:
IndianOil has been making contributions every year to national causes, social welfare and
community development programmes throughout the country. The majority of these programmes
focus on provision of drinking water & sanitation, health & family welfare, education, and
empowerment of women and other marginalised groups in rural and backward areas.




PROCESS
Process
CSR Programs:


                                                                                                  76
1. Community:
      The IndianOil Foundation: This is a non-profit trust set up to protect, preserve and promote
       national heritage monuments in collaboration with Archaeological Survey of India and the
       National Culture Fund of the Government of India. Among the monuments short listed by the
       foundation for adoption are Khajuraho, Konark, Hampi, Kanheri caves and Warangal Fort.
       Funded by IndianOil with an initial corpus of Rs. 25 crores and an annual recurring
       contribution of Rs. 10 crores, the IOF will adopt at least one heritage site in every state and
       union territory.


      Providing Clean Drinking Water: Clean drinking water is a major requirement of a
       significant number of remote areas in India. IOC has constructed ring wells, tube wells,
       installation of hand pumps, overhead tanks with water pipelines in some remote areas of the
       country.


2. Environment:
      IndianOil Corporation environmental initiatives includes: development of cleaner fuels such
       as diesel with low sulphur content and biodegradable lube formulations; pollution control
       program, in which all refineries are provided with facilities to control pollution from different
       sources; and ecological parks, which are scientifically designed green belts that have been
       developed at Gujarat Panipat refineries, to serve as a pollution sink and to enhance the
       aesthetic look of the refinery area.


3. Education:
      The IndianOil Scholarship Scheme: Each year, 450 meritorious students from
       economically weaker sections of society pursuing 10+/ITI and professional courses in
       Engineering, Medicine and Business /Administration/Management disciplines are awarded
       scholarships.


4. Health:
      Providing Medical Care: To promote and improve health of communities neighbouring the
       operational areas, IOC runs child and maternity health centres. These activities are conducted
       with the active partnership of local communities. Equipment and ambulances have been
       provided to hospitals and Indian Red Cross Society to upgrade their facilities.

                                                                                                     77
      HIV: In 2004, IndianOil signed a Memorandum of Collaboration with the Bill and Melinda
       Gates Foundation to address the spread of HIV/AIDS in India. IndianOil has stocked and
       distributed condoms from its selected petrol stations, launched communication campaigns to
       create awareness, trained petrol station staff as 'Peer Educators' and offered space at petrol
       stations for setting up clinical services for truckers.


Financial Outlay:
IndianOil Corporation investment in CSR (Rs crore):
Year                Donations/                       Community                       Total
                    Contribution                     Development                     Rs crore
1999-00             23.44                            2.35                            25.79
2000-01             36.05                            3.96                            40.01
2001-02             10.60                            3.12                            13.72
2002-03             13.46                            3.49                            16.95
2003-04             16.15                            9.71                            25.87


The budget allocation for a typical year towards IndianOil's social responsibility activities:




                                                                                                  78
Organizational Support:
―Indian Oil is committed to continue rendering support to the Global Compact Programme of the
United Nations and will endeavour to abide by all the ten principles of the programme, some of
which also are a part of our Vision and Mission Statements. Therefore, the company continues to
pledge support to the programme through its policies, processes, products services and people.‖ V C
Agrawal – Human Resource Director of IndianOil Corporation.


Personnel Support:
V C Agrawal is an electrical engineer from Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. He is the
current HR Director of IndianOil and Managing Director of IBP.




OUTCOMES
Outcomes

Awards:
      In February 2007, the Forum of Women in Public Sector (WIPS) conferred the Best
       Enterprise Award on IndianOil for the Corporation's pioneering efforts towards women
       development and related issues.


      IndianOil‘s Mathura Refinery won the National Energy Conservation Award for the year
       2006. (These awards were instituted by the Ministry of Power in 1991 to promote energy
       conservation in all energy intensive industries).


      IndianOil won the TERI Corporate Environmental Award 2002-03 in category III
       (companies with an annual turnover exceeding Rs. 500 crore). This was presented to
       IndianOil for installation of Flue Gas scrubbing (BELCO) system to treat flue gas from
       RFCC unit of Barauni Refinery to remove particulate matter and sulphur di-oxide.


Metrics and its Evaluation:
      Seven refineries and the IndianOil Research & Development Centre at Faridabad have
       achieved the ISO 14001:1996 accreditation for Environment Management System.


                                                                                                79
   IndianOil‘s Mathura Refinery has been certified for "Occupational Health and Safety
    Management System (OHSMS)" by DNV - the first refinery worldwide to receive this
    certification.


   Mathura Refinery is the first Refinery in Asia, and the third in the world in the Petroleum
    Sector, to be certified ISO-14001 for its efficient Environmental Management System.




                                                                                            80
  Chapter 4:

 Analysis &

Interpretation




                 81
Comparison
The review of the case studies shows programmes in the Community, Education, Environment and
Health areas. Specifically reviewing how these companies have picked up on these issues the
following Highlights emerge:


Community:
Tata Chemicals set up the Tata Chemicals Society for Rural Development (TCSRD) in 1980 to
promote its social objectives for the communities in and around Mithapur and Babrala, where its
facilities are located. Some of the initiatives of TCSRD are: agricultural development, education,
women‘s programmes, animal husbandry, rural energy, training, watershed development, relief work
and infrastructure. TCCI, in collaboration with the United Nations Development Program (India),
created the Tata Index for Sustainable Human Development. This was aimed at directing, measuring
and enhancing the community work that group enterprises undertake.


Bharti Airtel founded the Bharti Foundation in 2000, with the vision: ―To help underprivileged
children and young people of our country realise their potential.‖ Through the foundation, several
initiatives were started such as the Bharti Computer Centers, which have provided computer learning
to more than 130,000 children in five states; the Bharti Library Programme, aimed to encourage
reading habits of children; and the Mid-day Meal Programme, in which Bharti Foundation has
supported Akshaya Para in providing meals to 43,000 children per day in 292 government schools.
For the coming years, the Foundation has plans to start a large number of primary schools in rural
areas across the country. It will also provide teachers‘ training facilities.


Bajaj Auto‘s philanthropic activities among the rural poor are carried out by a Trust, the Jankidevi
Bajaj Gram Vikas Sanstha (JBGVS). Established in 1987 by Ramkrishna Bajaj in memory of his
mother, Jankidevi Bajaj, this Trust acts as a catalyst to development at the grass root level in 32
villages around its plants in Pune and Aurangabad. The trust initiates sustainable, integrated
development through long term projects in rural health, hygiene and sanitation, education and adult
literacy, improving agricultural and livestock yield, watershed development and women‘s
empowerment. Through its poverty alleviation schemes, the Trust provides micro-credit and income
generation opportunities for the poor. These projects have a positive impact on the quality of rural
living standards.

                                                                                                 82
The Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards, a social initiative undertaken by Godfrey Phillips, bring into
limelight extraordinary, little known acts of physical bravery and social acts of courage. A corporate
initiative of Godfrey Phillips, these Awards are the only awards of their kind instituted by a
corporate house. It's a rare example of corporate responsibility undertaken with a heart, and not by a
mind.

Godfrey Phillips also helps create awareness amongst the farming community about the benefits of
adopting approved agricultural practices. In fact, it imparts training and knowledge to farmers in
tobacco producing areas. Godfrey Phillips helps produce tobacco leaves that are comparable to the
best in the world. They are supplied healthy seeding at the right time. To make technical knowhow
available to all farmers, Godfrey Phillips is involved with them at every stage, making their farms
and lives better. To further encourage them, the company has instituted the Best Growers Award in
1994-95, to facilitate farmers in achieving higher yields and realising higher returns on their
investment.

Godfrey Phillips‘ Women Empowerment Project is aimed at making women economically self-
sufficient and independent by providing them with vocational skills and training. This drive will help
promote gender equality and redress power imbalances. Reputed NGO's like Charities Aids
Foundation, Navjyoti, Vidya and others have joined hands with Godfrey Phillips India in this
endeavour. Through its partners, the Charities Aids Foundation (CAF) and Navjyoti Foundation, the
company is trying to spread the skill of embroidery and sewing, and imparting literacy. Nearly 1500
women have started benefiting from these activities, the company says. The gifts and samples
prepared by the beneficiaries are now sourced by GPI itself for its corporate gifting occasions.
Currently it is benefitting around 1500 rural women. In Rajasthan, Delhi and Baroda it has found
NGO partners for giving vocational training to women, but is looking for more NGOs to tie up with
in Bhopal and Punjab.

Godfrey Phillips Blood Donation Drive aims to educate, create awareness and sensitize the public
on voluntary blood donation and on safe blood for all. Since its inception in July 2006, Godfrey
Phillips Bravery has successfully conducted 62 Blood Donation Drives covering 11 states, and has
collected over 7800 units of blood through voluntary donations.




Healthcare:


                                                                                                   83
Tata organise camps, which include general OPDs, antenatal checkup, vaccination for children aged
0-5 years, family welfare, health awareness through meetings, eye screening and eye operation
camps.


HUL launched Project Shakti in 2001 to create income-generating capabilities for underprivileged
rural women by providing a small-scale enterprise opportunity, and to improve rural living standards
through health and hygiene awareness. The project has been extended to 15 states covering 80,000
villages. The company has launched ‗i-Shakti‘ kiosks – an IT-based rural information service
developed to provide information and services to meet rural needs in agriculture, education,
vocational training, health, and hygiene. To improve business skills of the rural population,
especially women, extensive training programmes are held. The total strength of Shakti
Entrepreneurs has reached over 30,800.


Quoting ITC Chairman, Mr. Y.C.Deveshwar, "Envisioning a larger societal purpose ('a commitment
beyond the market') has always been a hallmark of ITC. The Company sees no conflict between the
twin goals of shareholder value enhancement and societal value creation. The challenge lies in
fashioning a corporate strategy that enables realisation of these goals in a mutually reinforcing and
synergistic manner". The groups focus is on rural development. ITC's e-Choupal empowers 3.5
million farmers by enabling them to access customised crop-specific information in their native
village, habitat and language. Vernacular websites relating to each agricultural crop that the company
deals in provide ready and real time information to even marginal farmers on the prevailing Indian
and international prices and price trends for their crop, expert knowledge on best farming practices,
and micro level weather forecast.
Women Empowerment: ITC aims at micro-credit and skills training to generate alternate
employment opportunities for women to facilitate better nutrition, healthcare and education for their
children.



Godfrey Phillips's key initiatives in this area include its participation in AIDS Prevention
Programme, rehabilitation of the Gujarat Earthquake victims and Blood donation camps.



Environment:


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Tata Steel has laid great emphasis, over the years, on creating a green environment in and around its
plants and on utilising the waste generated in the process of manufacturing steel. The company
generates roughly 700 kg of various wastes (excluding fly ash) in the process of producing one tonne
of crude steel. Of this, 83.16% is utilised either through recycling and reuse in the company's own
processes or is sold as raw material to other industries. The rest is sent for land filling.


Bajaj Auto‘s has an Environmental management system, which is an integral part of the overall
management system at Bajaj Auto‘s Aurangabad plant, was awarded ISO 14001 certification in 1997


HUL is also committed to extending its efforts on water management to the larger community, and
engages in community projects in water adjacent to manufacturing sites. The company has a
management system conforming to ISO 14001.


ITC focuses on the use of renewable energy such as biomass and solar energy. A number of units
have installed solar thermal systems mainly for use in canteens and kitchens. It claims it endeavours
to be a carbon positive corporation. Its efforts in the field of energy conservation, use of carbon
neutral fuels and large scale tree plantations through social and farm forestry have resulted in
sequestering 85.6% of the Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emitted by its operations. The Watershed Project,
Government of Rajasthan and the ITC Rural Development Trust, have signed a memorandum of
understanding (MoU) for the project in Kalyanpura village, over 250 km from the state capital,
Jaipur. ITC's watershed development seeks to achieve two critical objectives: water conservation and
soil enrichment. All ITC Units and the four hotel properties owned by ITC (Maurya Sheraton,
Mughal Sheraton, Chola Sheraton and Grand Maratha Sheraton) have obtained ISO 14001
certification for their Environment Management Systems.


Indian Oil Corporation has been an active founder-member of the United Nations Global Compact
(UNGC), an international initiative that brings companies together with UN agencies, labour and
civil society to support universal environmental and social principles. Indian Oil has included CSR in
its vision and mission statement and has built its corporate strategies around it. Environmental
initiatives include: development of cleaner fuels such as diesel with low sulphur content and
biodegradable lube formulations; pollution control programme, in which all refineries are provided
with facilities to control pollution from different sources; and ecological parks, which are
scientifically designed green belts that have been developed at Gujarat Panipat refineries, to serve as
a pollution sink and to enhance the aesthetic look of the refinery area. Indian Oil won the TERI

                                                                                                    85
Corporate Environmental Award 2002-03 in category III (companies with an annual turnover
exceeding Rs.500 crore p.a.).
This award has been presented to Indian Oil for installation of Flue Gas scrubbing (BELCO) system
to treat flue gas from RFCC unit of Barauni Refinery to remove particulate matter and sulphur di-
oxide. Seven refineries and the IndianOilResearch & Development Centre at Faridabad have
achieved the ISO 14001:1996 accreditation for Environment Management System. In 1998-99, the
Salaya-Mathura Pipeline and the Koyali-Ahmedabad Pipeline became the first oil pipelines in the
world to be accredited with ISO-14001 for Environment Management System. IndianOil‘s Mathura
Refinery has been certified for "Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSMS)" by
DNV – the first refinery worldwide to receive this certification and Mathura Refinery was the first
Refinery in Asia, and the third in the world in the Petroleum Sector, to be certified ISO-14001 for its
efficient Environmental Management System.


Godfrey Phillips India Limited, Andheri Factory, is committed to work towards continually
reducing risk of injury, occupational illness and environmental impact of its operation. As a part of
this commitment the company is working towards improving workplace safety, quality of air
emission, maximising reuse of treated water and conservation of resources. Company‘s production
facility M/s International Tobacco Company Limited, Ghaziabad has obtained the Social
Accountability Certification, SA 8000: 2001 in 2006. The Company had appointed Chess
Management in April 2006 to conduct a Systems Audit to check the Company complying with its
Statutory Obligations which was successful. M/s International Tobacco Company is the second
cigarette manufacturing Company in the world to have been accredited with Social Accountability
Certification.




Education:

Bharti Airtel founded the Bharti Foundation in 2000, with the vision: ―To help underprivileged
children and young people of our country realize their potential.‖ Through the foundation, several
initiatives were started such as the Bharti Computer Centres, which have provided computer learning
to more than 130,000 children in five states; the Bharti Library Program, aimed to encourage reading
habits of children; and the Mid-day Meal Program.




                                                                                                    86
HUL is developing a Rural Education Program, which aims at using audio-visual aids, such as video
cassettes and CDs. These tools enable teachers to explain basic concepts in mathematics, such as
operation on numbers, fractions, algebra, and geometry, to primary school children in villages. And
its Schools Contact Program indirectly benefits children studying in 21 schools.




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Number of initiatives and Financial Outlays

It is clear from the case studies that the 4 key themes for Indian CSR programs are mainly related to
Community, Environment, Education and Health.
The number of CSR initiatives taken, by various companies studied, in different fields and their
financial outlay is summarized in the table below which serves as the basis for further comparison of
the CSR activities of these companies.



    Company       No. Of initiative                                                 Outlay
                  Community        Environment Education            Health          (in Rs)

    Tata          8                3               3                1               380 cr (05-
                                                                                    06)

    GPI           5                1                                2               14 crore
                                                                                    (2009-10)

    ITC           4                4               1                                46.91 crore
                                                                                    (03-04)

    HUL           4                1               2                1               Na


    Airtel        3                1               1                2               200 cr
                                                                                    (2006-08)

    IOC           2                1               1                2               25.87 crore
                                                                                    (03-04)

    Bajaj         2                1               1                2               Na




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Analysis
It is clear from the table above that the 4 key themes for Indian CSR programs are related to
Community, followed by environment, education and Health.



                    Community            Environment        Education          Health
GPI
ITC
HUL
Airtel
IOC
Bajaj
Tata




 High          Medium      Low

The companies have been ranked high, medium or low based on their focus as reflected by the
financials and organizational resources devoted to CSR causes, along with the number and size of
initiatives.


        Tatas have a high focus and level of involvement in community development, education,
         environment space and health.


        After Tatas, the other company that score high on CSR initiatives in India is ITC. ITC lays
         great stress on community and environmental initiatives, but is low on the initiatives taken in
         education and health. Also, ITC is the only company in India which works on CSR programs
         related to climate change.


        On comparing the Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives of Godfrey Phillips India with
         the big names like ITC, it was found that the company has been very consistent in its efforts
         unlike other big names which have huge revenues to take up these initiatives on a large scale
         and at a one time. Like, the Godfrey Phillips bravery awards started in only one category in

                                                                                                     89
    1990 i.e. these awards were given only in the field of physical bravery but later company
    realised that bravery is not only physical and now it has five categories of awards namely
    ‗Physical Bravery Award‘, ‗Social Bravery Award‘, ‗Mind of Steel Award‘, ‗The Social
    Lifetime Achievement Award‘, ‗The Amodini Award‘.


   IOC has undertaken very few CSR initiatives; it is the company which scores the least on
    CSR activities with very low focus on community welfare, environment and education, and
    medium level of focus on health. Though the size of the company is much bigger than
    Godfrey Phillips yet the company‘s involvement in CSR is lower than that of Godfrey
    Phillips


   GPI has more focus on community welfare and especially on women empowerment.
    However, Company‘s focus on environment is relatively low and company is not taking any
    initiative in field of education.


   Indian companies seem to be spending most of their time and effort on community initiatives.


   Almost all the companies studied are investing in the field of women empowerment.
    However, only three companies Bajaj, HUL and Godfrey Phillips are actually involved in
    this. Godfrey Phillips has a detailed section dedicated to women empowerment.


   On comparing the activities of Godfrey Phillips with its competitor ITC, it is seen that both
    the companies are taking high number of community initiatives, with a high level of
    involvement as well. However if the initiatives of the two are compared in the light of the
    vast difference that exist in terms of revenue, profits, product portfolio and size of the
    companies then it is found that Godfrey Phillips is more involved in CSR activities.


   Generally the companies are spending 1%-5% of their profits on CSR activities. But Godfrey
    Phillips is the only company studied which is spending 10% of its annual profits on CSR
    activities.




                                                                                              90
  Chapter 5:

Godfrey Phillips

Bravery Awards




                   91
―There is a brave heart in every individual.‖

Godfrey Phillips India salutes the extraordinary courage exhibited by ordinary people in
selflessly protecting and saving others lives.

Godfrey Phillips India instituted the Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards started to bring to light
the gallant acts of bravery and selfless courage of the common man, and make them positive
role models for society to emulate.

Started in 1990, Godfrey Phillips Bravery Award is the only award of its kind instituted by a
corporate house that recognises the acts of common people; irrespective of their age, gender
or faith.




Overview:

Since its inception in 1990, the Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards has recognized over 1000 persons,
from across the country and all social levels, for their contributions to making a better society.

Starting with the state of Delhi, over the past years, the Awards have grown gloriously in stature now
in Himachal Pradesh, Delhi, Gujarat, Haryana, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh,
Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Punjab, Orissa, Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Goa, West Bengal and
Uttaranchal constitute 5 zones in which the Awards are presented.

The Awards have received patronage of people like Shri Bhairon Singh Shekhawat – Honourable
Former Vice President of India and various Chief Ministers, Governors, and many others. With their
support and blessings these Awards have truly become a Movement.

The Awards for the zone are conferred in the following categories – Physical Bravery and Social
Acts of Courage. In each of the above categories, currently the winners are awarded Gold, Silver
and Bronze awards along with cash awards of Rs. 50,000/-, Rs. 40,000/- and Rs. 30,000/-
respectively and Certificates. The Gold Award winners go on to represent the region at the National
Awards later in the year.

A third category was introduced 2 years ago called the Mind-of-Steel Award. This Award singles
out one extraordinary individual who has overcome personal limitations and pushed the limits of




                                                                                                     92
courage and performance to a new level. The Mind- of-Steel Award carries a Special recognition
along with cash component of Rs 50,000/-.

A panel of distinguished judges select the ―bravest of the brave‖ from amongst the winners of the
Zone level Godfrey Phillips Bravery Award Gold medal winners, in all the categories. The winners
are rewarded in Delhi at a National Award Ceremony with Gold, Silver and Bronze Awards along
with Cash awards of Rs. 1,00,000/-, Rs. 75,000/- and Rs. 50,000/- respectively.

The prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award for Social Service, instituted to recognize those who
have selflessly spent their lives working for the betterment of society is presented at the National
Award Ceremony. The Social Lifetime Achievement Award carries a specially designed Trophy, a
Citation and a Cash Award of Rs. 2, 00,000/-.

Since 2006, to enhance and help Bravery Awards reach the status of a movement and actively
involve and motivate the masses, Godfrey Phillips Bravery in addition to awarding Brave
acts, enhanced its charter by inclusion of issue based activities like promoting Safe Voluntary
Blood Donation and Women‘s Empowerment Initiatives.

In 2006, Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards evolved from merely recognising and awarding brave
citizens of India, to getting involved in making a difference in the community it lives in. It took on
two initiatives, Voluntary Blood Donation and Women Empowerment.

The Godfrey Phillips Bravery Blood Donation initiative, kick started in 2006, has so far collected
over 7000 units of blood till date.

Godfrey Phillips Bravery‘s commitment to empowering women is being realised with the help of
NGO partners. The Women‘s Empowerment projects provide vocational training and skill
development to women, in order to help them become financially independent. So far, over 600
women have been directly benefited.




Bravery Initiatives:

The various Bravery Initiatives taken by Godfrey Phillips India Ltd include:

   1) Bravery Awards
   2) Blood Donation Drive


                                                                                                   93
   3) Women Empowerment




1) BRAVERY AWARDS:

Ordinary turns to extraordinary when some daring individuals decide to respond to life‘s numerous
challenges with something ‗extra‘. In the process are created inspiring tales of valour and heroism
that spark off a resurgent and reformative spirit in the society.

Godfrey Phillips India Ltd has taken it upon itself to bring to light these new age heroes and inspire
many more to create a better world. A resolve that began in 1990, today Godfrey Phillips Bravery
Awards has metamorphosed into a nation-wide movement. It has grown both in stature and resolve-
to acknowledge many more unsung heroes in different walks of life, and to further inject this fervour
of selfless courage into the very being of society.

      Award Categories
      Nomination
      Judging
      Award Zones
      Awards/ Prize Details




Award categories:

With the hope to catalyze a positive change in the society, Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards
celebrates the selfless acts of courage. The Award recognizes bravery in real life and honours‘ those
unsung heroes who have risen above and beyond the call of duty and proved that selflessness and
compassion towards their fellow beings knows no bounds.

   i) Bravery Is Physical: Bravery is a personal calling. When someone chooses to hear the inner
       voice and volunteers to risk owns life to save another. It is this moment of crisis that defines
       life and makes the person immortal. Godfrey Phillips Bravery has instituted ‗Physical
       Bravery Award‘ to honour such daring individuals who plunged into action without thinking
       about the consequences.




                                                                                                    94
  ii) Bravery Is Social Act Of Courage: Bravery often blooms under the dark shadows of social
     prejudice one witnesses or experiences. Godfrey Phillips Bravery has instituted ‗Social
     Bravery Award‘ to honour the fearless people who exhibit steely resolution to fight against
     any impediments in the progress of society. It believes that such long drawn battle against the
     existing biased social norm that brings positive change in the society is no less an act of
     courage.



  iii) Bravery Is Mind Of Steel:At times life throws challenges to which one either bows down,
     or, rises to the occasion by challenging the conventional, the accepted inevitable and pushing
     courage beyond the known human limits. It is for such people that Godfrey Phillips Bravery
     has instituted ‗Mind of Steel Award‘.


  iv) Bravery Is Life Devoted To A Social Cause: How we spend our days, is how we spend our
     lives. ‗The Social Lifetime Achievement Award‘ is the most prestigious of the awards and
     is for Outstanding Achievement in the field of Social Work, presented to any individual who
     has made significant lifelong contribution for the betterment of society. This award is an
     Annual award given at the National level.



  v) Bravery is making lives better: ‗The Amodini Award‘ is the most recent category of
     award added in the list of Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards in 2009. It is for outstanding
     achievement in the field of Women Empowerment, presented to a woman who has made
     significant contribution for the betterment of women community. Currently the cash prize
     given in this category is the highest among all the categories of Award.



Nomination:

   Participation Criteria: All the Indian civilians over the age of 18 can participate in Godfrey
     Phillips Bravery Awards.


   Soliciting Entries: Entries are solicited through Newspaper Advertisements, TV Commercial
     and Website. In addition, over 25,000 direct mailers and letters are sent to NGOs, Home
     Departments, Police Departments, Media Houses etc across the country. Representatives of

                                                                                                 95
     the Godfrey Phillips Bravery Secretariat also travel to various centres sourcing potential
     cases.



Judging:

   Judging for Zone Awards
     o All entries are received at the Awards Secretariat.
     o All entries are scrutinised for meeting up the eligibility criteria, collated, and then are sent
         forward to the first panel which consists of three to four impartial judges for initial
         selection.
     o The panel ranks the top 5 – 6 entries in each category, state wise.
     o The shortlisted entries are sent for verification by offices.
     o The eligible entries are then sent to the State level panel of judges and the shortlisted
         entries coming out of this state level judging go for Zone level judging.
     o The selection of the zone winners is made.
     o Independent judging by each of the judges is done before the actual Award ceremony. It
         is the prerogative of the judges to disqualify any entry they consider unfit.

      The final panel of judges at the state and the zone level are personalities of eminence and
     distinction from the field of Administration, Principal Secretaries, Secretaries, Police and
     Armed Forces etc.




   National Bravery Awards: All Zonal Gold Award Winners, in all categories automatically
     become eligible for the nomination to the National Awards.




   Parameters for Judging: Judging includes rating on the following criteria:
        a) Physical Bravery:
        o Personal Risk
        o Situational Intensity
        o Selflessness


        b) Social Acts of Courage:

                                                                                                    96
         o Determination
         o Foresight
         o Selflessness
         o Perseverance


         c) Mind of Steel:
         o Determination
         o Foresight
         o Selflessness
         o Perseverance

      Each of the above criteria carries a total of 10 marks, marking for Physical Bravery is done
      out of 30 and marking for Social Acts of Courage and Mind of Steel are done out of 40
      marks. Final scores are added up, and the winners are decided on the descending levels of
      their total scores.




Award Zones:

The Awards cover 16 States with 5 Zone Award events and 1 National Award event at Delhi.

    The States under Zone: The Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards at the zone level are held for
      the states of Himachal Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan,
      West Bengal, Orissa, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Delhi, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Goa,
      Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh


    The five Zones have the following states :
         o Himachal Pradesh, Punjab & Haryana
         o Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan
         o Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Orissa, West Bengal
         o Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Goa
         o Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Delhi




Prize/Awards Details:
                                                                                               97
   The Zone Bravery Awards
       a) For the categories of Physical Bravery and Social Acts of Courage, currently the
          winners receive,
       o Gold medal along with cash award of Rs.50,000.00 and Merit Certificate
       o Silver medal receives cash award of Rs. 40,000.00 and Merit Certificate
       o Bronze medal receives cash award of Rs. 30,000.00 and Merit Certificate




       b) For the category of ‗The Mind of Steel Award‘, There is only one award per Zone.
          Winner currently receives
       o Gold medal along with cash award of Rs.50,000.00 and Merit Certificate




   The National Bravery Awards
       a) For the categories of Physical Bravery and Social Acts of Courage, winners
          currently receive
       o Gold medal along with cash award of Rs. 1,00,000.00 and Merit Certificate
       o Silver medal receives cash award of Rs. 75,000.00 and Merit Certificate
       o Bronze medal receives cash award of Rs. 50,000.00 and Merit Certificate


       b) For the category of The Mind of Steel Award, there is only one Awardee who
          currently receives
       o Gold medal along with cash award of Rs. 1,00,000 and Merit Certificate




       c) For the category of Social Lifetime Achievement Award, there is only 1 Awardee
          who currently receives
       o A citation, a shawl along with cash award of Rs. 2,00,000.00




2) Blood Donation drive:




                                                                                       98
It‘s a matter of grave concern that in a country of over a billion people, safe blood is not readily
available. Annually India manages only 3 million units against the requirement of 9 million. As a
result, despite of the best of medical facilities, millions die due to the paucity of safe blood.

Godfrey Phillips Blood Donation Drive aims to educate, create awareness and sensitize the public
on voluntary blood donation and on safe blood for all. Using an ideal three pronged approach of
Awareness, Activation and Participation, company‘s effort is to educate and sensitize the masses
about the ever-increasing gap between the demand and supply of safe blood and encourage people to
share this intrinsic part of their being.

Voluntary blood donation is bravery as it is selfless like other acts of Bravery and it saves
lives. Godfrey Phillips Blood Donation Drive aims to bring to light the issues, motivate and
encourage participation, and most important of all, call upon the conscience of the people to be
selfless and caring towards others, thus creating an evolved and compassionate society.

Since its inception in July 2006, Godfrey Phillips Bravery has successfully conducted 62 Blood
Donation Drives covering 11 states, and has collected over 7800 units of blood through voluntary
donations. Bravery Ambassador, Preity Zinta has also donated blood at the drives to inspire and
motivate others to do the same.




3) ‘Amodini’-Women Empowerment Project:

“Nothing can be more absurd than the practice that prevails in our country of men and
women not following the same pursuits with all their strengths and with one mind, for thus,
the state instead of being whole is reduced to half”

-Plato, The Laws

Gender equality implies a society in which women and men enjoy the same opportunities,
outcomes, rights and obligations in all spheres of life. Equality between men and women exists when
both sexes are able to share equally in the distribution of power and influence; have equal
opportunities for financial independence through work or through setting up businesses; enjoy equal
access to education and the opportunity to develop personal ambitions.

For many women in India gaining ―living strength‖ for themselves and being able to ―follow
the same pursuits‖ can only be gained by overcoming formidable challenges. The challenges

                                                                                                    99
are not always overt. They are often insidious, lurking below the surface and in myriad
forms.

Empowerment stands on two pillars. Empathy – understanding the real needs and the challenges that
they face, of the women to whose lives the company wishes to make a positive contribution. Power –
the second pillar is providing women with the wherewithal to be able to do something to uplift their
lives.

A critical aspect of promoting gender equality is the empowerment of women, with a focus
on identifying and redressing power imbalances and giving women more autonomy to
manage their own lives. Godfrey Phillips Bravery believe that the first step for women‘s
emancipation is by imparting them the skills or vocations to gain financial independence.

The company‘s initiative for Women‘s Empowerment believes that a financially
independent woman impacts society directly. Realizing this, under the aegis of Godfrey
Phillips Bravery has collaborated with some renowned NGO‘s committed towards this cause,
for four major projects for underprivileged women.

With the Navjyoti Police Foundation Adult Women Literacy Project, the company is providing
primary and secondary education to underprivileged women. Apart from conducting literacy classes,
the company is also empowering women to stand up to domestic violence, drug abuse, HIV/AIDS
and to understand their legal rights.

With Charity Aids Foundation, it is providing vocational training to women through organizations
like Sukarya.

With Sukarya, women are being trained in processing spices and cereals and are being imparted
with entrepreneurship skills.

Godfrey Phillips Bravery is also partnering with Literacy India in its Project Karigari Janani. This
programme is aiming at an integrated intervention for sustainable livelihood for women. Under this
project the women receive vocational training courses that give them basic skills on tailoring, block
printing, paper bag making etc. Post training, women with potential are moved up to Indha. The
products made by these women are then sold in the market through various retail outlets and
exhibitions.




                                                                                                 100
To make a deeper impact, the Godfrey Phillips Bravery Women‘s Empowerment Initiative is
aiming at an integrated intervention for sustainable livelihood for women. The programme is
called Amodini - Hope and Joy to Women.

Amodini is dedicated to the economic empowerment of women inspired by the past and is
focused firmly on the future. The economic empowerment of women improves the financial
status of the underprivileged enabling them to make significant improvements in areas such
as health and education and thereby investing in a better future for themselves and their
children. It also gives women three powerful tools which can make a very significant impact
on the future of the nation as a whole: Contribution: Empowerment: Freedom.

The gifts and samples prepared by the beneficiaries are now sourced by GPI itself for its corporate
gifting occasions.It includes a wide range of aromatherapy products, honey, preserves, chutneys, tea,
spices, soaps and bath & body products, all housed in beautiful Amodini gift boxes. Handcrafted by
rural women who have been trained to create exquisite products. All proceeds from their sale go
back into training these women.




                                                                                                 101
Candidates for Amodini Awards


Case 1:

One Woman‘s Entrepreneurial Venture Now Employs Thousands

Shameema Wani‘s simple venture, begun from scratch grew into the 2,000-strong business
enterprise, employing mainly women, that it is today in this capital city of India‘s disputed Jammu
and Kashmir state.

When her husband had an accident in1990, leaving him incapacitated for gainful work, Wani figured
it was time to put her college education to good use by setting up a small business.

Using what little was left of her family‘s resources after her husband‘s costly treatment, she bought a
sack of ‗pashmina‘ from Leh – capital of the Himalayan kingdom in Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir
– to make shawls.

Almost two decades on, the college dropout‘s initial foray into business has grown into a major
enterprise that provides livelihood for thousands of women in her village and elsewhere in the Indian
state.

When her business had grown big enough, she thought it was time she started hiring other women in
her village to work for her. "I felt this job was quite suited to women, who could still do their chores
at home while earning part-time," she reasons.

Soon even women from outside her village started coming to her, because they needed work. Now
they are earning 2,500 to 4,000 Indian rupees (around 55 to 89 U.S. dollars) a month from making
shawls.

Not that trying times are over. Seeing how pashmina manufacturers and traders are exploiting the
laborers, she wants to put up her own shawl factory. This would be in addition to the Wani Pashmina
Katayee Centre that she set up in 1993. Here her workers bring their processed pashminas.

Traders, she says, pay her only one Indian rupee (less than 1 U.S. cent) per pashmina knot instead of
the more realistic price of 20 Indian rupees (about half a U.S. dollar). "That is too miniscule," she
says. "This prompted me to think of putting up my own shawl-manufacturing unit."

                                                                                                    102
Today, the Wani Pashmina Katayee Centre is flourishing.

Not one to sit on her laurels, Wani has also begun to trade in other commodities, namely, Kashmiri
almonds and cosmetic products. Women find it more convenient to buy items for their special needs
at Wani‘s outlet than elsewhere in the male-dominated market, she says.

By dint of hard work and firm determination, Wani has achieved her dream. She sees no reason why
other women cannot do the same and turn into successful entrepreneurs.




Case 2:

Bimla Devi, a young dalit woman from Nagal Teju village in Haryana, has managed to ensure
safe motherhood and deliveries in her village. She has got the upper and lower castes drinking
water from the same tap. She has prevented a child marriage. And she has spread awareness
about gender equality and Panchayati raj.

Every afternoon in Nagal Teju village in Rewari District in Haryana, a group of about 20 young
women get together and sit and chant the name of god.

These women are brought together by a Dalit woman, Bimla Devi, ostensibly to take part in a kirtan
(hymn-singing session). Her aim: To share information with them about reproductive and
sexual health and laws that affect them. At the same time these women are also told about the
importance of voting in elections, the significance of economic empowerment and gender
equality.

Says 29-year-old Bimla who is helping this group of Dalit women under the Haryana state
government scheme called Sanjivani: "Women in our villages have time for everything but for
looking after their health. Moreover, ours is a very closed society where women don't talk openly
about their health problems. But I saw women going to the temple on every Tuesday to pray and I
thought of having a prayer meeting in my house every week."

Once the women became interested in the prayers, Bimla introduced the subject of their health.

A cobbler by caste, Bimla has many other firsts to her credit. Bimla protested against people of her
caste not being allowed to drink water from the same tap as the Thakurs. Thanks to her




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efforts, today both the upper and lower-caste people in the village use the same tap for
drinking water.

A few months ago, Bimla was also instrumental in stopping a child marriage in her village by
persuading the parents that they were not doing the right thing. Taking her endeavours
further, Bimla, who has studied till Class 8, has also come up with books on the subject of
reproductive health which are passed on by her core group to other women so that the message
of safe motherhood can be spread further.

Successful in influencing even the men, Bimla has awakened the Dalit Panchayat members to their
responsibilities and convinced them not to sign any papers without being fully aware of their
contents.

Now Bimla has another mission in life - to remove the barriers that exist between the Thakurs and
the Dalits in her village. And As a first step, Bimla has joined hands with a local non-governmental
organisation (NGO) where she accompanies peer educators to talk to upper-caste adolescent girls so
that along with talking about health, she can also start sensitising them about the issue of caste.




Case 3:

Sally Holkar, the woman behind Women Weave, a voluntary organisation that seeks to address
the concerns of women weavers in India

Sally Holkar, best known for her work in reviving the handloom traditions of the famous
Maheshwari saris of Maheshwar, Madhya Pradesh, is now concentrating her efforts on Women
Weave, an NGO that seeks to address the concerns of women weavers, who are both the ‗repository
of handloom traditions‘ and victims of discrimination within the sector. Holkar is also involved with
Synergy Weave, a venture that combines the skills, techniques and materials of three famous
handloom-weaving centres -- Kota in Rajasthan and Maheshwar and Chanderi in Madhya
Pradesh.

It started in 1978 and when she left the organisation in 2000 it had 120 looms and its gross sales for
that year was one and-a-half crores. About 20% of its gross profits are spent on health, education and
housing for the weaving community. It runs a housing colony, a medical programme and a school.




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―To bring about sustainability without our intervention, we have run several different programmes.
One of them is called Young Weavers. So, we have a scheme that deals with you as the educated
young weaver. We will try to sustain your traditional skills and we will try to nurture your newly
acquired skills too and see how they fit together. We also work with designers, customers and
weavers to sustain that interaction‖ says Sally.

We are no longer only involved with Maheshwar. We are working towards creating partnerships
between weavers and weavers, between master weavers and weavers, and between all of these
people and the market. Our job is not to produce and sell goods but to ‗hand-hold‘, at different
levels, throughout the process. We are looking to have, in any given year, about five partners. Two of
them have to be what we call advance-level partners who are qualified and excel in the areas we have
earmarked. Of the remaining three, one should be a beginner and two at the middle level.

But we also tell them that we will deal with them only on one condition: that they involve the women
of their community at whatever level is feasible -- not only sitting at the loom but also in quality
control, dyeing, sourcing of raw materials, interacting with customers and designers, etc.

So they (the women) are required to learn things, be it graphics or designing or marketing, because
all of these are exercises they must become involved in. We feel that if women don‘t become
involved now in a very important way, the handloom sector will die. Simply because they (women)
are the repository of this tradition and because the men are going to move on, become truck drivers
or peons in offices or go away to cities or whatever.

We also try to lobby for equal pay for men and women. We are trying to enable small, friendly
family groups to become micro businesses on their own. If they become micro businesses, then
we can get micro finance for them.




Case 4:

The building blocks of change

Belaku Trust started as a small health research project in rural Karnataka, in 1995. One of its
founders, Dr Saraswathy Ganapathy, a paediatrician turned public health professional, recalls how
bleak the project appeared then. ―The women wouldn‘t speak to us, or even look at us. The
nutritionist came out from the first health session and wondered how to talk ‗calories‘ to them.‖ But


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soon, she says, they understood that they were also in Kanakapura to learn and grow. ―We came in
thinking we knew all the answers. It took us very little time to realise that we knew nothing.‖

Once the community and the founders joined hands in the learning process, Belaku grew in
unprecedented ways. Now, Belaku‘s block-printed scarves and kurtas are worn in France and
England; they are unique in design and craft. And its paper pens and innovatively bound and
decorated handpaper books and greeting cards are much sought after at sales in urban spaces.

In the villages, Belaku has provided multiple job options to women who had very little choice in
their lives. They are gainfully employed as trained teaching help in government-run anganwadis or in
Belaku‘s embroidery unit. A few local women are conducting a pregnancy care research project
across 60 villages.

Belaku‘s development charter in the region was defined by the community, especially the women. Dr
Ganapathy remembers that at the end of workshops on food and care during pregnancy, the women
said: ―It‘s all very well to talk about eating right, but who is going to pay for it?

Thus was born Kirana, a micro-business group engaged in the production of recycled paper.
―Friends volunteered to train the women to make paper. What they initially made was like cardboard.
They‘ve worked really hard to reach the quality they have achieved now. They continuously
improvise and come up with their own new decoration techniques,‖ says Dr Ganapathy, who is
always on the look-out for markets for the products.

―Most of the women are battling odds and coming to work every day,‖ says Dr Ganapathy.
Domestic violence is considered ‗normal‘ in most houses. The women say that the quality of their
lives has improved over the years with Belaku.

Next door to the papermakers is the government pre-school, or anganwadi, which is ―brilliant in
concept but abysmal in execution,‖ says Dr Ganapathy. A study by Belaku revealed that most of the
anganwadis in the region were badly in need of teaching help, and repair. The government-appointed
anganwadi workers are trapped in paperwork and a threat-oriented teaching style. Training sessions
did not change their teaching methodology. With support from its funders, Belaku trained and
appointed ‗gelathies‘ or ‗friends‘ of the anganwadi teachers. These ‗friends‘ support the anganwadi
worker with more child-friendly classroom strategies.




Case 5:
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ANANDI: Helping women set the development agenda

In Saurashtra and the Panchmahals district of Gujarat ANANDI is ensuring that women set the
agenda for infrastructure development, food security and much more. Women here have rebuilt 700
quake-damaged homes, and are trained in disaster-proof construction, repair of hand pumps and the
digging of wells

To a substantial extent, the credit for this goes to the initiative of five key women with experience in
working on development issues in rural areas. Sumitra Thacker, Jahnvi Andharia, Sejal Dand,
Nita Hardikar and Preeti Sheth would often run into each other during the course of their work
with different NGOs. What drew them together was the conviction that a new approach was
necessary to stir change in the rural areas. Their collective restlessness led to the formation, five
years ago, of ANANDI (Area Networking and Development Initiatives) which believes that
social and economic development can occur only when women play a pivotal role in it.

The Anandi women gave themselves a clear four-point agenda: to set up women's self-help
groups, to involve women in the rural development process, to involve women in the planning
of rehabilitation work following man-made and natural disasters, and to become a link
between different organisations working for women's welfare and health.

And where is Anandi today? Two women's collectives have been set up with as many as 3,000
women members. In Saurashtra, the NGO has developed a network with six local development
organisations and have already mobilised over 2,000 women. With Anandi's guidance, women in
these regions are now addressing issues related to water, electricity, affordable credit, health, food
security, micro-credit and capacity building of women in panchayats (local village councils).

Anandi's groundwork was put to the test when Gujarat was torn apart by the January 2001
earthquake. The NGO selected one of the five most backward blocks of Gujarat: Maliya taluka
(block) bordering Saurashtra and Kutch. In Maliya, about 19,000 houses in 47 villages were
damaged and 185 people died. With help from Anandi, the women of 10 villages in the taluka began
the process of rehabilitation.

The local women built as many as 700 houses themselves; no masons were hired. Anandi trained
them in masonry and earthquake-proof housing, and also arranged to pay them for the masonry.
Today, these women are considered experts on disaster-proof housing.




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With funds from the Prime Minister's Relief Fund, Anandi had four schools reconstructed, while a
primary school was established through a donation from a Dehradun-based NGO. And funds
collected by children - random small donations from passers-by on the streets of Warangal district in
Andhra Pradesh - helped set up an educational centre in Venasar village of Maliya taluka.

Village women have constructed about 100 water tanks and 650 toilet blocks in the Jasdan,
Kalyanpur and Gadhada talukas of Saurashtra. They can repair water hand-pumps and dig wells too.

Following the 2002 communal riots in Gujarat riots, Anandi plunged into riot relief work in the
worst-affected Panchmahals district, amid a very hostile political environment.

They also gave food and material aid to as many as 10,269 people to help reconstruct destroyed
homes.

Understanding the importance of creating livelihood options, Anandi also distributed sewing
machines to several Muslim women. The machines have become an integral part of their lives and
scores of women in many villages of Panchmahals now have a reason for hope.

The unwritten credo of Anandi clearly is: There is no limit to what can be achieved if one is not
concerned about who takes the credit.




Case 6:
Battling chauvinism to do a man's job

Illiterate tribal women in Uttar Pradesh equip themselves with non-conventional skills like repairing
handpumps through the intervention of a voluntary group called Vanangana. Founded by Madhavi
Kuckreja in 1994, Vanangana, derived from van (forest) and angan (courtyard), seeks to impart
non-conventional skills to women, enabling them to manage their daily lives more effectively.

Banda‘s low water table and indifferent irrigation facilities led to a heavy reliance on handpumps,
which never seemed to work. Training the women in repair has changed the character of this dry and
hard land. ―There was some doubt whether illiterate women could understand the mechanics
involved, but they surprised all of us by learning quickly,‖ recalls Ashok Mishra, junior engineer of
Jal Nigam, a government agency that trained the women initially.

In the Manickpur block to which the women were first assigned, nearly half the pumps were
inoperative. Villages had to wait for days for the two Jal Nigam mechanics who attended to nearly
930 pumps spread over an area of 1,000 sq kms. The newly acquired skills of the women, however,
have now ensured that almost 90 per cent of the pumps work all through the summer.


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The lives of the women have simultaneously changed. Many have chosen this as a profession. While
Chamela fought with her mother-in-law to be allowed to do the job, others have battled chauvinism,
scorn and apathy to become mechanics themselves.

The achievements of the women mechanics have prompted the Uttar Pradesh (UP) state government
to replicate the scheme in other regions too. Vanangana was also chosen by the Uttar Pradesh
government as one of the participant NGOs in the World Bank-funded Swajal Project. This rural
water supply and environmental sanitation project works in over 1,000 villages in 19 districts of the
state.



Case 7:

Swayam is an NGO founded by Anuradha Kapoor. The main task that it undertakes is to rekindle
a will in women and help them determine the course of their life. ―Swayam,‖ explains founder
Anuradha Kapoor, ―means oneself.‖ The centre offers a range of direct services to the women,
addressing their emotional, practical and financial needs.

When a client approaches Swayam, her needs are assessed. These might include counselling for
trauma, medical aid, police assistance, legal advice, financial help, help for her children, shelter, etc.
Swayam has a team of volunteers, including counsellors, social workers, lawyers, and a network of
doctors.

Opportunities for emotional healing are important and the Swayam Drop-In Centre allows women to
meet, share experiences and support each other. Support group activities have resulted in two
initiatives. One is a Bengali magazine, Prayas, which deals with the issue of violence. The other is
the Swayam theatre group, which regularly organises plays in public parks and streets.

Programmes to sensitise the community to the problems of violence against women are also
undertaken. Workshops for the police, judges and lawyers, and the public in general are organised.
Swayam also holds regular campaigns in schools. ―Violence against women is a result of society
regarding them as inferior to men,‖ says Kapoor. ―Making children realise the inequities and
injustice that characterise gender roles is essential since they are the decision-makers of tomorrow.‖




Case 8:

Empowering peasant women


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The Centre for Women‘s Development Studies has worked over two decades to train Santhal tribal
women in Bankura, West Bengal, in collective and individual livelihood skills.



Peasant women from the Bankura district of West Bengal now have a voice in panchayats (local self-
government bodies) and family matters, thanks to a remarkable partnership with academicians from
Delhi.

Following a land reform camp organised for landless workers in 1980, Dr Veena Mazumdar of the
Delhi-based Centre for Women‘s Development Studies (CWDS) agreed to organise the women of
Bankura. Most of the women were Santhal tribals and low-caste Hindus. All of them were landless,
while many had been deserted by their husbands and did not even own a homestead plot. Their worst
ordeal was seasonal migration to the distant Burdwan or Hoogly where they slogged in the paddy
fields for a small income.

CWDS began action research projects to study the impact of migration and to explore alternative
employment opportunities. In 1981, 65 women formed the first collective (Samiti) in Jhilimili and
decided to find alternatives to migration. Initially they began to sell kendu leaves and sal seeds to a
government co-operative society.

In neighbouring Bhurkura, another collective was formed and women took on the Herculean task of
planting arjun and asan saplings on stony donated land. They also volunteered to protect and
maintain the plants. Their sincere work paid off and plant survival on the Samitis‘ plantations was
routinely 98 per cent, in sharp contrast to the average survival rate of 55 per cent on government
plantations. Impressed, the Central Silk Board‘s field station (Birbhum) imparted training in tussar
silk cocoon rearing.

Women diversified to other income-earning activities, matching their needs and skills with local
demand and raw materials. Among these were sal leaf tableware, rope-making and goat/pig-rearing.
When seven collectives had been formed in adjoining villages, the apex body, Nari Bikash Sangha
(NBS) (Women‘s Development Union,) was set up in 1986. Today it comprises 24 collectives in
three districts.

NBS women now get training and small loans to start fledgling ventures. New technologies such as
vermiculture and compost-making have been taken up in collaboration with the Vidyasagar
University. Women also receive training in professional management, management of assets,
enterprise and organisation-building. Women have become active participants in management, and
have the skills necessary to regenerate wasted community assets.

Incomes have gone up steadily, though not dramatically. Most households are still poor but few now




Case 9:

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Shakti Shalini initiates effective action against dowry-related crimes.

With the support of the parents of more than 25 other dowry death victims, Satya Rani Chadha
embarked on 21 years of sustained legal activism and court cases, which led to many landmark
judgments and fundamental amendments in the criminal law. In 1987, Shakti Shalini, a Delhi-based
organisation that helps and motivates other parents of dowry victims to fight this social menace, was
formed.

Run exclusively by women, the NGO initially focussed on dowry cases and provided access to legal
aid for parents of dowry victims. Now, a temporary shelter in Delhi takes in homeless victims who
are given support, legal information and counselling. Depending on need, women are housed in the
shelter from three months to three years. Currently, 20 women share this home, which is financially
supported by the ministry of human resources.

One of Shakti Shalini's co-founders and current president Shah Jahan Begum informs, "We also
disseminate information on the evils of dowry and organise workshops, street theatre and sustained
media campaigns. Several college students come forward to volunteer at the Home and at the rural
slum centres." Begum too joined the struggle after she lost her daughter in a dowry death in the
early-1980s.

The organisation plans to build a hostel and school for the children of victims in the near future.
Shakti Shalini also runs service centres in Delhi's slum areas like Nangloi, Shakur ki dandi and
Jahangirpuri. Besides counselling, these centres seek to reach out to thousands of rural migrant
women. Stress is laid on raising awareness of their rights and status in society.

To make the women self-reliant, vocational training is imparted in tailoring, embroidery, typing etc.
Counselling of the woman and family is followed by the requisite legal advice. Shakti Shalini takes
care of around 400 cases each year. Sometimes it also prevents disasters by addressing husbands, in-
laws and other people involved.



Case 10:
Ritika‘s Venture: Empower India

The woman who cleans Ritika‘s apartment building works tirelessly so that her children might have
the opportunities she did not. Inspired by such selfless dedication, Ritika launched Empower India.
She provides high-quality supplemental education for children of domestic workers, focusing on
English, math, and life skills. Since beginning the Venture, Ritika‘s volunteer team has grown to
include retired teachers who offer years of experience. Each session provides children with one-on-
one attention to address specific educational needs.




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Case 11:
Annapurna Mahila Credit Co-operative Society

As a Trade Unionist, Mrs. Prema Purao saw women's problems for the first time. Despite the fact
that these were long standing problems of women, it had earlier not been the center of any
organizational work. When male labourers themselves were hard put to find work, who cared about
women‘s problems? Prema Purao, affectionately called ―Tai‖ (Elder Sister) however, recognized
their true potential and refused to relegate their problem to the background. She knew that solution to
their problems was intense to the movement for workers rights.

In 1975, with the backing of Dada Purao, who was Secretary of the All India Bank Employees Union
& Prema Tai‘s husband, the Annapurna Mahila Mandal was formally registered as a Charitable Trust
and Society.

Initially the office functioned from Prematai‘s house. Eventually the need for office was felt by the
Annapurna members. They raised a building fund by putting together a small sum of Rs 100/- each.
This fund was augmented by the Government and Donor Agencies.

 In 1986, to allow the organization‘s growth to follow its path in an appropriate legal structure,
Annapurna registered a credit cooperatives Society. After this registration followed a period of
steady growth and diversification that saw Annapurna open several catering units, a trainings centre
etc. In 2004 however, Prematai retired and handed over the managing direction of Annapurna
structures of Mumbai to her daughter Medha Purao Samant who still manages the organisation
today.

Today Annapurna Mahila Credit Cooperative Society is catering loans & Savings services to its
communities as well as non-financial services in the form of business related trainings as well as
family budget trainings. It Branches in Lower Parel/Bycaulla/Dadar, Chembur, Mankhurd &
Thane/Navi Mumbai and it is registered as a multi-state Credit Cooperative Society since 1986.

In future, Annapurna seeks to develop tremendously throughout Mumbai by opening branches in
new area and increasing the volume of activity in existing branches. It also aims at deploying further
its non financial services activities in all its branches while availing its members all services
available in Annapurna Parivar other structures (crèches, health insurance, job placement, etc.).



Case 12:
Paying girls to stay in school

The problem of the girl-child in India is an economic one, former corporate chief Virendra Singh
realised. His Pardada Pardadi school in Anoopshahr, UP, keeps girls in school by offering them three
meals a day, ten rupees for every day they attend school, a bicycle after two years and a toilet at
home after three years


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Sam (Virendra Singh) retired as one of the top bosses at DuPont. But instead of settling down in a
shiny happy American suburb, he returned to Anoopshahr, a small village in Uttar Pradesh‘s
Bulandshahr district, to start a girl‘s school that pays girls to stay in school. .

The literacy rate for women in rural Uttar Pradesh is 43%. In a strongly patriarchal society there is
little incentive to send girls to school and, in 2000, when Sam started Pardada Pardadi, many girls
were marrying at the young age of 13.

Starting with an initial group of 35 students in 2000, today the school boasts around 1,000 students.
Fifty have graduated from the first four batches of Class 10; some of the graduates went on to study
fashion designing, become teachers, get jobs in places as far away as Delhi.

It is to this world that Sam returned, hoping to convince parents that girls too needed to be educated.

At DuPont, Sam said, his job was to analyse corporate strategy and bottom lines. And he did just that
in Anoopshahr; this time the bottom line was compulsory education for girls.

The problem of the girl-child has always been an economic one. After years of attending corporate
social responsibility conferences that spoke of child labour and of exploitation, Sam came away
believing that development was contextual and that the western model would never fit the Indian
reality. What was important for these girls -- most of them first-generation learners -- was social and
financial independence. While it is important that they have a strong academic background, they
needed vocational skills that will guarantee them jobs.

Pardada Pardadi had to be a part-vocational, part-academic school. Sam decided that he would
systematically target every excuse to keep girls at home and also make up for the lost hours of
manual labour -- the time the girl spends in school. He decided to offer three meals a day, clothes,
books, transport and Rs 10 that would be deposited in the girl‘s account for every day she attends
school. The amount, approximately Rs 35,000, is redeemable after graduating, as a scholarship for
further studies. After two years in school, a girl is entitled to a free bicycle (depending on how far
away from school she lives) and, after three years, the school funds the construction of a toilet at her
home in the village. Sam initially funded the entire process with his savings.

In the mornings, students attend regular classes and in the evenings they learn hand embroidery and
machine embroidery to make products that are sold at outlets in Delhi and online. .



Case 13:
Women farmers in India rebuild rural economies by reviving millet cultivation


The age-old tradition of millet cultivation, which thrived in rural India despite poor soil or lack of
rainfall, was displaced by the Green Revolution of the 1960s which made water-intensive rice and
wheat the staple groups. Now millet cultivation, revived by a remarkable group of women in the



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the Medak district of Andhra Pradesh state, is fighting hunger even during drought, keeping
farmers debt-free, and providing much-needed nutrition without using pesticides.

About a decade ago, Edavulapalli village in Medak district of Andhra Pradesh was dotted with
fallow strips and housed poverty-stricken families. But today, this countryside is lush green with
millet cultivation. Farmers with small holdings have been doing wonders with their crops hitherto
unheard of.
The seeds of this silent revolution were sown 16 years ago by 32 women farmers who formed
Sangham, a self-help group. Slowly, with the help of Deccan Development Society (DDS), an NGO
working with poor Dalits in this district, they ploughed the land, revived it with organic manure, and
sowed the seeds. A few months later, they saw their fallow fields springing back to life all over
again.
Now, 52 villages in Medak boast grain banks where quality seeds are being preserved through
traditional methods like using dried neem leaves to keep the insects away. Hitherto sidestepped by
their male counterparts, women farmers are now steering the whole process and are back in charge of
agriculture once again.
Says Lakshmama from Chilamamidi village: ―We started Sangham with 32 women pooling in five
rupees each. No one thought we could do such wonders with our land. Even during drought, none of
us will be hungry as we now have good grain banks.‖
Besides ensuring seeds for the future, Sangham also persuaded each farmer to give a small portion of
the output to the grain bank so it could be distributed among the poorest people. ―We give millets
from the grain bank to the very poor, destitute, and old people who cannot work,‖says Swarupamma
of Edavulapalli.




Case 14:

Geetanjali‘s Venture: Shramika
Geetanjali lives in an industrial zone within Thane, a suburb of Mumbai. In this zone, women
workers earn a meager Rs. 70 for a twelve-hour factory shift - hardly enough to feed their families.
Geetanjali launched ―Shramika‖ to help women tap into their entrepreneurial potential. She enables
community women form self-help groups. All group members pay Rs. 100 per month; they can then
draw loans from their communal pool at the low rate of two percent. Geetanjali trains these women
in jewelry-making, catering, and the basic business skills they need to launch their own small-scale
businesses. The income generated helps the women not only feed their families, but also expand
their                                                                                    operations.
Geetanjali has begun to incorporate concepts of social business, such as sustainable impact through
income generation, into the trainings. Shramika has enabled the women in the community to launch
nine self-help groups. Geetanjali also worked with two police stations to open ―Visava,‖ a

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counseling cell for women suffering from domestic violence. She plans to expand Shramika into
community healthcare and education.




Case 15:
Women-run NGO helping men shun addictions!

By coming in contact with Youth Viranganay (YV), an NGO run by women, the people whose lives
have been ruined due to addiction to alcohol have transformed mentally, physically and
psychologically.

With free counselling, the dedicated women of YV are helping victims to shun addiction so that they
can start life afresh. The happiest of the lot are the family members of the victims who had to face
the brunt of the harsh society. They give the credit for rebuilding their homes to YV.

Singh, a transporter, told TOI that before meeting YV officials, he attended many rehabilitation
courses to shun his bad habits which were almost two decades old. ―Counselling by activists of
Youth Viranganay helped me to quit smack,‖ he says.

―The main branch of YV is in Ambala, Haryana. Apart from Nagpur, the NGO is also active in
Punjab, New Delhi, Uttar Pradesh and Chhattisgarh,‖ said Pushpa Buri, senior vice-president of
Youth Viranganay from Ambala.




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Chapter 6




            116
Findings

    Godfrey Phillips India has been very consistent in its efforts in the field of Community
     welfare. Since beginning since the size of the company does not allow it to take the initiatives
     on a massive scale so the company is extending its activities gradually like the bravery
     awards initially covered 12 states but it adds one state every year and now the company
     covers a total of 16 states. Similarly, the Godfrey Phillips bravery awards started in only one
     category in 1990 i.e these awards were given only in the field of physical bravery but later
     company realised that bravery is not only physical and now it has five categories of awards
     namely ‗Physical Bravery Award‘, ‗Social Bravery Award‘, ‗Mind of Steel Award‘, ‗The
     Social Lifetime Achievement Award‘, ‗The Amodini Award‘.




    The company has understood the importance of motivation which is a guiding factor in a
     society like India so it has started recognising the good work which is happening in the
     society by its awards in various categories like, Bravery, Social achievement, Women
     Empowerment etc which is a movement altogether because it inspires others to take a lead.


    Godfrey Phillips is one of those very few companies which have an entire CSR team to
     develop and implement CSR programmes. Earlier the company had only three members in
     this team and presently it has a dedicated CSR team of seven people.


    The recommended expenditure on CSR is 0.2% while the Godfrey Phillips India is the only
     company which is contributing 10% of its total profits on CSR which is the highest among all
     the companies studied.


    ITC and GPI are alleged to promote their products through their CSR initiatives, many
     corners of the world have called it as surrogate advertising. However GPI changed the name
     of its bravery awards from Red & White bravery Awards to Godfrey Phillips Bravery
     Awards, adhering to its vision of being a socially and showing its true concern for the society.




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   Comparing the initiatives of Godfrey Phillips with other companies under study it is found
    that though the initiatives taken by company are less in number and are not taken on a very
    massive scale due to the size of the company yet most of its initiatives are unique like Blood
    donation drive which has benefitted over 1000 people till now and its project Godfrey
    Phillips White, the essence of WHITE is - 'It Honours the Importance of Tobacco
    Etiquette', responsible smoking programme by Godfrey Phillips India, a first of its kind
    initiative in India. The key focus is on cultivating smoking etiquette among smokers - to
    respect non-smokers' space. Initiated internally, this is something every member of the
    Godfrey Phillips India family adheres to. As a WHITE ambassador the individual actively
    propagates responsible smoking behaviour because as a 'Socially Responsible Corporate
    Citizen' Godfrey Phillips India believes in setting examples by practicing the change that one
    wants others to emulate. However no such initiative is taken by any other company in
    tobacco industry.


   GPI has more focus on community welfare and especially on women empowerment,.
    However, Company‘s focus on environment is relatively low and company is not taking any
    initiative in field of education.


   In a country like India people are generally influenced by the celebrities, they easily identify
    with the bollywood people understanding this mindset of Indian Society Godfrey Phillips
    India chose Preity Zinta as the Brand Ambassdor for its Blood Donation Campaign to make it
    a mass movement. It is one of those very few companies whose CSR activities are widely
    covered by Media.


   On comparing the activities of Godfrey Phillips with its competitor ITC, it is seen that both
    the companies are taking high number of community initiatives, with a high level of
    involvement as well. However if the initiatives of the two are compared in the light of the
    vast difference that exist in terms of revenue, profits, product portfolio and size of the
    companies then it is found that Godfrey Phillips is more involved in CSR activities.


   It was found that most of the companies do not reveal their CSR expenditure in their annual
    reports which is otherwise necessary to publish.




                                                                                                118
   Out of the 8 companies studied, currently only three companies viz. Godfrey Phillips, Bajaj
    and Hindustan Unilever have a high focus on Women empowerment.




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Recommendations
    Almost all of the companies are investing in economic empowerment of women. However
     empowerment is a very broad concept it also includes Political, Legal, Social Psychological
     components. So this is a field where Godfrey Phillips can take a lead. Because the company‘s
     prime focus is on Women Empowerment currently so company can do more in this field by
     investing into women education because education is a field where GPI is not making any
     investments currently.


    The Godfrey Phillips Bravery Awards do not cover the state of J&K. However as per a
     survey the highest number of women entrepreneurs exist in this state alone. Also As per the
     Assocham Eco Pulse study Jammu & Kashmir is a state where the Indian companies are
     making the least CSR investment. So it is an opportunity for GPI to become a leader by
     extending its women empowerment project ‗Amodini‘ to this state and by considering this
     state for Awards as well.


    Godfrey Phillips does not publish its separate Annual CSR report while most of the other
     major players do. So, the company should publish its CSR report to conform to the
     International Standards set for the companies. This will also be a document for good PR as
     well as morale booster for its employees.


    Company can also allow the rural women to come and showcase their talent by setting up
     counters at the Bravery Awards function organised by the company.


    Environment is another field where GPI can invest more because being a tobacco company
     its responsibility towards environment becomes more. It is felt that company‘s focus in this
     field is less and company should devote more efforts in this field. Company s not having ISO
     14001 certification for its environment management system while its major competitor ITC
     and all other companies studied have acquired this certification. So to compete with these
     companies and to be more responsible corporate citizen GPI should strive to get this
     certification.




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   GPI can launch some projects where it connects unemployed designers graduating from B
    tier institutes with these rural women. These designers can help these women to polish their
    skills, making products which are in demand and in marketing aspect of these products
    because the major problem of these rural women is ―how to sell‖. So it can serve two
    purposes providing employment to unemployed as well as will provide a chance to rural
    women to polish their skills.


   Since the size and the revenue of the company is not very large so In order to expand its
    activities further with a relatively low budget, the company should try to identify regional
    problems and devise state-specific solutions to do CSR work.


   GPI can also provide its own show rooms to these NGOs to sell their products and for better
    marketing GPI can itself take this responsibility of marketing the quality products made by
    the rural women. Because In India most of the handy craft products are outsourced by the
    business persons from these poor rural people for very meagre amounts and are exported out
    with better packaging and their trademarks for thousands of rupees so GPI can expand its
    CSR activities in this field which can also provide it a business opportunity.


   There is no set procedure for selecting candidates for Amodini Awards yet, like in case of
    Physical Bravery Awards, Mind of Steel Award and Social Act of Courage. The selection for
    this category of award is done on ad hoc basis, so there is a need of developing a proper
    procedure for selecting candidates for these awards as well to make it more transparent.




                                                                                               121
LIMITATIONS:
    This study is based upon the literature present & secondary data only, so the study in itself is
     confined up to a certain extent.


    Due to paucity of time and limits the CSR activities of companies are described in short and
     there is a scope of more detailed study.


    The comparison is based on the qualitative information. There is not much information
     available on the CSR expenditure of companies and its break up so the comparison is limited
     in its scope.


    There was no interaction with any professional of the companies studied so study lacks
     practical approach.


    The other limitation was that I could not get a chance to interact with the candidates I chose
     for Amodini awards due to time constraints.




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References

www.godfreyphillips.com

www.godfreyphillipsbravery.com

www.itcportal.com

www.infochangeindia.org

www.timesofindia.com

www.business-standard.com/bs_csr/index.php

www.in.kpmg.com

www.tata.com

www.karmayog.org

www.airtel.in

www.bajajauto.com/rural_development.asp

www.unilever.com

www.iocl.com/Aboutus/corporatesocialresponsibility.aspx

http://ezinearticles.com/?expert=Bernadette_Dsilva

www.bhaskar.com

http://ipsnews.net

www.assocham.org

Carroll, A.B. (1979), "A three-dimensional conceptual model of corporate performance", Academy
of Management Review, Vol. 4 No. 4, pp. 497-505.

Matten, A. and Crane, D. (2005), "Corporate citizenship: toward an extended theoretical
conceptualization", Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30 No. 1, pp. 166-79.

Sethi, S.P. (1995). "Introduction to AMR's special topic forum on shifting paradigms: Societal
expectations and corporate performance." Academy of Management Re view, 20, pp.18- 21.

Waddock, S. (2004), "Parallel universes: companies, academics and the progress of corporate
citizenship", Business and Society Review, Vol. 109 No. 1, pp. 5-42.
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