ISAT 241 Analytical Methods III by i301aw

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									                           GSCI 164  Learn Through Teach
                               James Madison University


                              Laboratory #5  Ohm’s Law
                                Spring 2006, Section 0405



Objectives

   Learn to use basic electronic instrumentation.
   Verify Ohm’s law for a resistor.
   Review spreadsheet skills.
   Learn how to use linear regression analysis to test and model experimental data.


Theory

According to Ohm’s law, V = IR, the voltage across a resistor is proportional to the
current through the resistor. The constant of proportionality, R, is called the resistance.
For example, Ohm’s law applies to a piece of metal (e.g., a wire) as long as the voltage
and current are not so large that the metal heats appreciably. The resistance of a wire or
other sample is given by R = L/A, where L is the sample length, A is its cross-sectional
area, and  is a property of the material, called the resistivity (see Figure 1).




                          Figure 1. Electric resistance of a wire

If  is in ohm-meters, L is in meters and A is in meters2, then R is in ohms. Copper and
aluminum have very low resistivities (~2108 -m) and are used to fabricate wire
having negligible resistance. Other materials, like carbon and “nichrome”, a nickel-
chromium alloy, have resistivities 100 to 2000 times as large and are used to make
heating elements and resistors for electronic circuits.
Many devices do not obey Ohm’s law. For example, as the current through a light bulb
increases, it gets hotter and its characteristics change – its “effective resistance”
increases. This happens largely because the filament is so fine, i.e., A in Figure 1, is very
small. Other devices, such as diodes, have complex current flow mechanisms that result
in behavior that violates Ohm’s law. Such devices are said to be “non-ohmic”.


Materials

 Power supply (PS)
 Digital multimeters (DMM)
 Resistors (R)


Deliverables

A laboratory report is required. The report should contain the items and information
requested in the Data Analysis and Report section.

You will be graded on completeness, neatness, organization, and the reasonableness of
your answers to questions. You will be working in teams of four or five. Each team will
turn in a single report.


Procedure

1. Team up with three or four other people. This will speed up the data collection and
   recording.
2. Set up your experiment as show in the diagram in Figure 2, with all the instruments
   off. Note: To measure the current flow (I) through the resistor, you should use the
   “mA” input of DMM #1, which is connected between the power supply and the
   resistor, i.e., “in series with the resistor.” To measure the voltage (V) across the
   resistor, you should use the “V” input of DMM #2, which is connected across the
   resistor, i.e., “in parallel with the resistor”. If you are at all uncertain about your
   set up, please ask your instructor for assistance before proceeding.
3. Turn on the DMM that is to be used to measure current (DMM #1) and set it to the
   40mA DC scale.
4. Turn on the DMM that is to be used to measure voltage (DMM #2) and set it to the
   40V DC scale.
5. Make sure that the power supply output control is set at its minimum
   (counterclockwise) and turn on the power supply.
6. Increase the power supply output so that the voltage across the resistor increases in
   approximately 2V increments and record the voltage across the resistor and the
   corresponding current through it at each step, generating a table of values of V and I
   up to 20V.
7. Reduce the PS output to zero and reverse the wires connected to the PS. In other
    words, remove the wire from the + terminal and connect it to the – terminal and vice
    versa.
8. Repeat step 6, noting the polarities of the measured V and I.
9. Make sure that your data vary in a smooth and consistent fashion. For each pair of
    corresponding V and I data, if you divide V by I, you will get a value of resistance, R.
    If V is in volts and I is in amperes then R is in ohms. Check several data pairs. How
    consistent are they? You will be analyzing these data in more detail later.
10. Note: Examine the diagram in Figure 2. In this experiment, we assume that all of the
    current that goes through the DMM used to measure current (#1) then goes through
    the resistor. In other words, we assume that no current goes through the DMM used
    to measure voltage (#2). This assumption is very good for a “good” DMM and for a
    “reasonable” (i.e., not too high) value of R.




                            Figure 2. Resistor Characterization

11. Make sure that the PS is off. Leave DMM #2 connected to the resistor and remove
    the other connections from the resistor. Use the  or R input of DMM #2 and set the
    DMM to a scale that allows you to read the resistance directly. Record this value.
Data Analysis and Report

Your report should include the following items and answers to the following questions.
You should generate your tables and graphs using an Excel spreadsheet.

1. Prepare a table of your V and I data for the resistor. Columns should be labeled and
   units should be specified for each column.
2. Prepare a graph of V versus I for the resistor. V should be plotted on the vertical axis
   and I should be plotted on the horizontal axis. Plot your data as points only, with no
   connecting lines, and plot your data for both polarities on the same set of axes.
   Both axes should have labels and the appropriate units should also be specified.
3. The data that you acquired from the resistor will be used to introduce linear
   regression analysis. When you perform an experiment and plot your data, the results
   of a linear regression analysis tell you how well your graph of y versus x can be
   modeled by a straight line, y = mx + b. Moreover, the analysis will give you the
   values of the slope, m, and the y-intercept, b, for the straight line that describes your
   data best. When your tables and graphs are prepared in an Excel spreadsheet, this
   analysis can be done easily. The quantities that tell you how well the straight line, y =
   mx + b describes or “fits” your data are the correlation coefficient, r and the
   coefficient of determination, R2. If the slope, m, is positive, then r is positive. If m is
   negative, than r is negative. Obviously R2 is always positive. The closer that |r| and
   R2 are to 1, the better the straight line fits your data.

   Perform a linear regression analysis (least squares fit) of the resistor data and
   plot the linear regression line on the same graph axes as you used for Step 2 of
   this section. Plot the regression line as a line only, with no data points. There are
   several ways to do this. The easiest is as follows, using Microsoft Excel. Go to your
   graph of V versus I that you created in Step 2. Double-click on the graph and right-
   click on one of the data points. Choose “Insert Trendline…” and from the “Type”
   menu, choose “Linear”. From the “Options” menu, choose to “Display Equation on
   Chart” and choose to “Display R-squared Value on Chart”. You can also “Forecast”
   the line forward and backward to see where it intersects the axes.
4. The results of your analysis will tell you how well your graph of voltage versus
   current can be modeled by a straight line, y = mx + b (i.e., voltage = slopecurrent +
   b). You should give the values of slope, y-intercept, and the coefficient of
   determination, R2. Also give the units of slope and y-intercept.
5. Compare m with your results in steps 9 and 11 of the (resistor characteristic)
   measurement procedure.
6. Prepare a table of your V and I data for the diode. Remember labels and units.
                                Laboratory #5  Data Sheet
                                            Ohm’s Law

Date: ________________


The numbers of the questions below correspond to the numbers in the Data Analysis and
Report section of the lab procedure.

4. Fill in the values in the table below:

Quantity                                        Value              Units

slope                                           _________          _____

y-intercept                                     _________          _____

coefficient of determination, R2                _________          ********

5. Compare m with your results in steps 9 and 11 of the Resistor Characteristics
measurement procedure using the table below:

Quantity                                        Value              Units

m from linear regression                        _________          _____

Typical result from step 9                      _________          _____

Result from step 11                             _________          _____

Comments:
                   GSCI 164: Learn Through Teach
                        James Madison University


                    Laboratory #5  Ohm’s Law
                        Spring 2006, Section 0405


                        Instructor: Dr. Tony D. Chen




Group Members:

     ________________________            _________________________

     ________________________            _________________________

     ________________________            _________________________




          Cover Sheet
                                                       _____/10
          Introduction
                                                       _____/10
          Data Sheet
                                                       _____/20
          Table and Graph
                                                       _____/50
          Conclusions
                                                       _____/10
          Total
                                                       _____/100

								
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