Research in Second Language Teaching

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					                   Research in Second Language Pedagogy
                                English 63098
Time: Tuesdays 4:25-7:05                       Professor: Dr. Kristen Precht-Byrd
Place: 220 Satterfield                         Office: 202 Satterfield
Office hours 3:00 – 4:00 Mon & Tues            Email: kprecht@kent.edu
  and after class Mon & Tues                   Web page:
  and by appointment/skype/phone/chat          http://krpb.pbworks.com/research
                                               General page: krpb.pbworks.com


Overview
The goals for this course are two-fold: 1) to understand the importance of reliability and
validity, as demonstrated through one’s ability to critically analyze research articles; and
2) to design and carry out the research for a research article. In order to accomplish
these goals, students will perform a variety of tasks. For example, we will read research
articles, critique methodology, and try out methodologies in class.

                                  This course culminates with your writing a 20-page
                                  research article on a topic of interest to you. To
                                  complete this undertaking, the tasks involved in writing
                                  a research article will be broken down and completed,
                                  bit by bit, as the course progresses. For example, to
                                  start your project you need to become familiar with
                                  your field: You will create an annotated bibliography
                                  which will then morph into the literature review for your
                                  research article. Other parts of the research article will
                                  similarly be broken into manageable pieces as the
                                  term goes on. You will choose a methodology, gather
                                  data, analyze it, and write up your results.

You will also be responsible for reading the
textbook and research articles. Class discussion
of these materials is an essential part of learning
in this class, and there will be serious penalties
for not keeping up with the readings or for not
taking part in class discussions.

Course requirements
You are expected to complete reading
assignments and to come to class prepared to
discuss them. There will be a research article, which will be due in stages throughout
the term.

Handouts, reading notes, and assignment information, are available at
http://krpb.pbworks.com/research This course assumes a basic level of computer
competence: you should be able to send email attachments, load acrobat files, do
online research, and work with the web. To access the online journals at home, you will
need the VPN program at: http://www.library.kent.edu/page/10231

Grading
Participation              10% (5% class discussion, 5% groups)
Annotated Bibliography     15%
 and Lit Review             5%
Human Subjects              7%
Methodology                 7%
Results                          6%
Research Article           50%


Required Text
Brown, J.D., Rodgers, T.S. (2002). Doing Second Language Research. Oxford: Oxford
      University Press.

VERY Flexible Course Outline:
This outline will certainly change. Do not use this to identify homework from week to
week; rather, look at the website and listen in class to announced assignments.
Assignments will be due on Fridays at midnight unless otherwise posted.
                    Topic                    Reading                 Due Dates
11-Jan Introduction
       Basic Concepts
18-Jan Case Study                 Brown, Chapters 1 & 2
                                  Katz
25-Jan Introspection/Think-       Brown, Chapter 3            Topic due 1/28 midnt
       Aloud
1-Feb Classroom Research          Brown, Chapter 4            First Annotation DUE
8-Feb Classroom Research
15-Feb Corpus Linguistics                                     Annotated Bib DUE
22-Feb Survey                     Brown, Chapter 5

1-Mar    Significance Testing     Brown, Chapter 5            Human Subjects
                                                              DUE
8-Mar    Correlation              Brown, Chapter 6
15-Mar   catch up                                             Lit Review DUE
22-Mar   Spring Break
29-Mar   Quasi-Experimental       Brown, Chapter 7            Methodology DUE
                Topic                  Reading                                      Due Dates
5-Apr Individual meetings with
       KPB
12-Apr Quasi-Experimental                                                    Results DUE
19-Apr Combining Research      Brown, Chapter 8
26-Apr Paper Presentations
3-May                                                                        Research article DUE


        University policy 3342-3-18 requires that students with disabilities be provided reasonable
accommodations to ensure their equal access to course content. If you have a documented disability
and/require accommodations, please contact the instructor at the beginning of the semester to make
arrangements for necessary classroom adjustments. Please note, you must first verify your eligibility for
these through Student Disability Services (contact 330-672-3391 or visit www.kent.edu/sds for more
information on registration procedures).

Registration Requirement: The official registration deadline for this course is September 7, 2008.
University policy requires all students to be officially registered in each class they are attending. Students
who are not officially registered for a course by published deadlines should not be attending classes and
will not receive credit or a grade for the course. Each student must confirm enrollment by checking
his/her class schedule (using Student Tools in FlashFast) prior to the deadline indicated. Registration
errors must be corrected prior to the deadline

Cheating and plagiarism constitute fraudulent misrepresentation for which no credit can be given and for
which appropriate sanctions are warranted and will be applied. The university affirms that acts of cheating
and plagiarism by students constitute a subversion of the goals of the institution, have no place in the
university and are serious offenses to academic goals and objectives, as well as to the rights of fellow
students.

“Cheat” means to intentionally misrepresent the source, nature, or other conditions of academic work so
as to accrue undeserved credit, or to cooperate with someone else in such misrepresentation. Cheating
includes, but is not limited to:

“Plagiarize” means to take and present as one’s own a material portion of the ideas or words of another
person or to present as one’s own an idea or work derived from an existing source without full and proper
credit to the source of the ideas, words, or works.
name             topic                 methods                       stats
Katz             teacher style         qual – style
Freiermuth       chat                  # words, student
                                       comments & opinions,
                                       aspects such as confid
Sagarra        survey on computer      survey                        qual & ANOVA
               learning
Bell & LeBlanc gloss-L2 reading        pre-survey, reading w/        ANOVAs
                                       gloss, post-survey
Moyer            oral performance &    listening tests, confidence   correlation,
                 confidence            of correctness                MANOVAs
Lai & Zhao       noticing – comp       lots of chats                 ANOVA


Bell & LeBlanc http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/346199.pdf

Freiermuth
http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Freiermuth_Mark.pdf?issn=08026106&issue=v16i
0002&article=189_wtccoch1

Sagarra
http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Sagarra_Nuria.pdf?issn=09583440&issue=v20i00
02&article=208_bciwohspocll

Moyer
http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdf?vid=2&hid=114&sid=b2ad86f7-2fc0-4947-9b59-
f3d3a88d5640%40sessionmgr102

Lai & Zhao
http://llt.msu.edu/vol10num3/pdf/laizhao.pdf

Tan
http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Tan_Melinda.pdf?issn=09510893&issue=v59i000
2&article=126_alolelfalc
              Research ENG 63098/MCLS 60698
                                Table of Contents


Bell & LeBlanc ..................................................................... 5

Freiermuth ......................................................................... 17

Katz.................................................................................... 41

Lai & Zhao ......................................................................... 57

Sagarra .............................................................................. 76

Tan..................................................................................... 93
classroom research Austin
discourse analysis/corpus linguistics Krishnasamy
       http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Krishnasamy_Kanthimathi.pdf?issn=02660
784&issue=v23i3-4&article=40_eittloa Tamil advertising
categorization Freiermuth
       http://journals.ohiolink.edu/ejc/pdf.cgi/Freiermuth_Mark.pdf?issn=08026106&issu
e=v16i0002&article=189_wtccoch1 FTF – chat


survey
significance
correlation
quasi-experimental
16-Mar Significance Testing   Brown, Chapter 5
                              Gan*
23-Mar Significance Testing   Freed, et al.*     Lit Review DUE
                              Gan*
30-Mar Spring Break
6-Apr Correlation             Brown, Chapter 6   Methodology DUE
                              Gan*
13-Apr Quasi-Experimental     Brown, Chapter 7

20-Apr Quasi-Experimental     Smith*             Results DUE
27-Apr Combining Research     Brown, Chapter 8
4-May Paper Presentations                        Research article DUE
Research in Second
    Language
    Pedagogy
   ENG 63098/
   MCLS 60698



Prof. Precht
Spring, 2009

				
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