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									                 DETROIT COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL
                          SIG NARRATIVE
                     LEA/SCHOOL APPLICATION
                          February 24, 2011

                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

Topic                                                                     Page #’s

Narrative                                                                 2 - 24

Overview of Detroit Community High School and                             2-6
Brightmoor Community

Evidence of Need for Improvement at DCHS                                  7

Strategic Initiatives                                                     7 – 24

        DCS Board Approved Performance Goals                              7–8

        Transformation Plan Initiatives                                   8 – 20

               Develop & Increase School Leader & Teacher Effectiveness   8 – 12

               Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategies              12 – 18

               Increase learning time & mechanisms for
               Community-Oriented Schools                                 19 – 20

               Providing operational flexibility & sustained support      20

        Continuous Improvement Model                                      21 - 22

        Transformation Specialist                                         23

        Community Engagement & Support Systems                            23 – 24

        Intervention Strategies & Program Options for Students            24

LEA Application – Part I                                                  25 – 32

Attachment III – School Application                                       32 – 37


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APPENDICES

    Appendix A   Merit Pay Program                   38 - 42

    Appendix B   Professional Development Calendar   43 - 52

    Appendix C   DCS Surveys                         53 - 64

    Appendix D   Community and School Partnerships   65 - 82

    Appendix E   CAO Job Description                 83 - 85

    Appendix F   Organizational Chart                86




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                 DETROIT COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL
                    SIG APPLICATION NARRATIVE
                           FEBRUARY, 2011

The following narrative indicates the research-based reforms that have begun to change the
culture of learning at Detroit Community High School (DCHS). Everyone from the
Superintendent, Chief Academic Officer (Transformation Leader), High School Principal,
Teachers, Students, Parents and Community members have begun to transform DCHS into a
school that can sustain reform efforts beyond the life of the SIG by building teacher and
leadership capacity for improved student achievement. Included in this narrative are the
following:

      Overview of DCHS and Brightmoor community
      Research-based initiatives that have begun in the 2010-2011 school year
      Proposed research-based initiatives over the 3 year life of the SIG
      Sustainable proposals after the life of the SIG


Overview of Detroit Community High School and Community
Detroit Community High School is a Public School Academy located in the northwest section of
the City of Detroit. This community, known as Brightmoor, is one of the most challenging areas
of Detroit.

Brightmoor is a community of 19,837 residents in Northwest Detroit. It is bordered on the west
by Telegraph Road, Eliza Howell Park and the Rouge River. The East roughly bordered by
Evergreen Road, with a Southern section between Evergreen and Southfield Roads. Today,
Brightmoor is still home to many working families including an estimated 7,380 children and
youth through age 18.

According to the 2000 census, the population of the Brightmoor area is 19,837, which is slightly
up (4%) from the 1990 census figure of 19,042. In comparison, the population of the state of
Michigan has increased 7% in the same time period.




                                               3
Brightmoor has a majority African American population (80.1%) with a white population of
(14.2%). This make up is comparable to the average population of Detroit.

Brightmoor is a young community with 37.2% of the population under 18 in 2000 compared to a
national average of 25.6% (Detroit 31.1%; State 26.1%). Seniors (65+) make up only 5.3% of
the population (Detroit 10.5%; State 12.3%; USA 12.4%). The percentage of seniors in the
Brightmoor area has decreased from 12% in 1990.

Brightmoor has a high population of single family households at 29.8% compared to a national
average of 9.1% for the same time period (Detroit 21.5%; state 9.4%). The rate of births to
unmarried women in this zip code area is 70.4% (Detroit 69.7%; tri-county 35%).

Brightmoor has a small percentage of foreign born residents at 2.8% (Detroit 4.8%; state 5.3%;
U.S.A. 11.1%). Brightmoor is a mobile community with 57.8% of respondents reporting that
they had moved into their residence less than five years prior to the date of the survey (city
42.4%; state 45.3%; U.S.A. 48.8%).

Income and Poverty




                                               4
The average income rate for Brightmoor in 2000 was $33,943 as compared to Detroit ($40,837),
the state of Michigan ($57,400), and the nation ($56,644). Lower income has translated into a
higher level of poverty at over three times the rate of the state of Michigan (Brightmoor 32.3%;
state 10.5%; Detroit 26.1%; U.S.A. 12.4%). Children living in poverty make up 40.4% of the
population compared to 13.9% state-wide (city 34.8%; U.S.A. 16.6%). The estimated
unemployment rate is 31% (city 25%; state 11.7%; U.S.A. 9.4%). In addition, 13.7% of the
population receives public assistance income (city 11.4%; state 3.6%; U.S.A. 3.4%).




Occupations reflect Brightmoor’s working class roots with 25.2% of the population working in
production jobs compared to 14.6% nationally. Other major occupations are management
(18.5%), personal care/service (23.2%), and sales (26.4%).

Education

The percentage of people in the Brightmoor community without a high school diploma is 27.8,
which is above the national average of 19.6% but less than the average in Detroit of 30.4% (state
16.6%). School attendance rates are generally higher than the tri-county area median, with an
enrollment rate of 97.7% for children ages five through 17 in the zip code area that includes
Brightmoor (Detroit 96.7%; tri-county area 97.5%).

The percentage of residents who have obtained a degree in higher education is only 8.2%. This
compares to 24.4% for the national average (Detroit 11%; state 21.8%; U.S.A. 24.4%).

Housing

The total number of housing units is 7,737 which is down 1,602 units from 1990. Eighty-eight
percent of all homes were built before 1970; many of them are 70 to 80 years old. Most housing
units are single detached homes (77.1%) or large housing blocks with 20 or more units (10.8%).
Average home values are low for the area at around $55,000 compared to about $70,000 for
Detroit and approximately $160,000 nationally.

The overall home ownership rates are up for African Americans from 27.6% in 1990 to 37.2%
but lags behind white residents (71.3%). Overall, the home ownership rate is 44.5% compared to

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54.9% in Detroit and 66.2% nationally (state 73.8%). Also, 47.8% of households pay more than
30% of their income for housing, which is qualified by HUD as bearing a “housing cost burden;”
and 28.2% bear a “severe housing cost burden” of over 50% of income. This compares
favorably to the national rates of 51% bearing a housing cost burden and 25.8% bearing a severe
housing cost burden (Detroit 46.1%, 25.6%; state 44.8%, 21.7%). This might be due to the fact
that the housing values are lower in this area thus creating less of a burden despite lower incomes
in the area.




The vacancy rate is also higher than Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan and national averages. A
very high percentage (46.7%) of home buyers are financed by “subprime lenders” or financial institutions
that charge a higher rate of interest based on a lender’s blemished credit rating (Detroit 44.1%; state
9.7%; U.S.A. 12.8%).

Detroit Community High School’s enrollment has been steady for the last three years. DCHS is
the only high school in the Brightmoor Community. Attendance rates continue to be consistent,
yet tardiness is a continuing issue for these students. Graduation rates consistently are above
79%.

In the spring of 2010, DCHS completed the comprehensive needs assessment and concluded that
most of the assessment was at the beginning stage. DCHS also was listed as a “Persistently low
achieving” according to the State of Michigan. It was clear from these items that changes
needed to take place.

Detroit Community High School immediately began to make changes. DCHS chose to follow the
Turnaround model to begin with and removed the Superintendent and the High School Principal.
A Chief Academic Officer was hired in the summer of 2010 to lead the high school
transformation. 50% of the high school teaching staff was also removed and new hires were
made for the beginning of the 2010-2011 school year.

DCHS began immediately in the summer of 2010 to reprioritize its budget and goals. It became
very clear that the District was placing student achievement as its number one goal. The new


                                                   6
Superintendent and School Board met frequently to discuss the needs of the school and what
needed to be done in order to change the culture of the school into a “learning culture.”

Evidence of Need and Goals for Improvement for DCHS

  Evidence of Need (Data as of 12/31/2010)                     Goals for Improvement
4 % of students met or exceeded MME scores         Increase the percentage of students who are
in Math (Spring 2010)                              proficient on the Math MME to 14% (2011)
20% of students met or exceeded MME scores         Increase the percentage of students who are
in Reading (Spring 2010)                           proficient on the Reading MME to 30% (2011)
14% of students met or exceeded MME scores         Increase the percentage of students who are
in Science (Spring 2010)                           proficient on the Science MME to 24% (2011)
43% of students met or exceeded MME scores         Increase the percentage of students who
in Social Studies (Spring 2010)                    proficient on the Social Studies MME to 53%
                                                   (2011)
.05% of students met or exceeded MME scores        Increase the percentage of students who are
in Writing (Spring 2010)                           proficient on the Writing MME to 11% (2011)
                                                   Increase all of the above by 10% each
                                                   academic year over the life of the SIG

It is evidenced in the above data that DCHS has tremendous room for growth. Following are the
Strategic Initiatives that DCHS began in the summer of 2010 and will continue through the end
of the 2010-2011 school year. It must be noted that the Detroit Community School District
immediately began making changes upon the release of the list of the lowest performing schools.
DCS authorizer, Saginaw Valley State University, made it known that closure was a very real
possibility, and therefore DCS moved swiftly. As noted earlier, administrators and teachers were
replaced. Many curriculum initiatives took place also prior to the beginning of the 2010 - 2011
school year.

Strategic Initiatives

Detroit Community Schools
Board Approved School Performance Goals
September 28, 2010

1. By the 2012/2013 school year, Detroit Community School’s students will
score at least 1% higher than State average on all administered MEAP and MME tests.

2. Detroit Community Schools will benchmark student performance on the
MEAP and MME with Harding and Gompers Elementary (two neighborhood
Detroit Public School Elementary Schools), Lessenger Middle School, and Henry Ford High
School. Note: Several of these schools are being consolidated and will be renamed.




                                               7
3. Detroit Community Schools will benchmark student performance on the
MEAP and MME with Detroit Service Learning Academy, Plymouth
Educational Center, and Detroit Edison Public School Academy (charter schools with similar
student demographics).

4. Detroit Community Schools will score at least 1% higher than the national average for goal
attainment on the NWEA measure of Academic Performance (MAP) Test in 2010 - 2011.

5. Detroit Community Schools will benchmark student performance on the NWEA Measure of
Academic Performance (MAP) Test with the national average of schools with similar student
demographics.

6. Detroit Community Schools will achieve Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) annually.

7. By the 2012/2013 school year, Detroit Community Schools will achieve at least a B letter
grade on the Ed YES! Report.

TRANSFORMATION PLAN INITIATIVES

   I. Develop and Increase School Leader & Teacher Effectiveness

             A. Requirement 1 -- Replace the Principal
                 1. The High School Principal was replaced on August 1, 2010. Mr. Aaron
                    Williams was named as the new principal.


             B. Requirement 2 -- Use of evaluation systems that take into significant
                account data on student growth as well as other factors.
                  1. Introduction of NWEA in addition to MEAP/MME data to track student
                     progress.
                  2. Detroit Community Schools has begun to partner with Orange Grove,
                     which is data warehousing system.

                      “Orange Grove revolutionizes student outcomes management by
                      providing an intuitive, easy-to-use technology for schools to more
                      efficiently gather, study and plan. More importantly Orange Grove gives
                      schools more time and structure to do, including identifying specific
                      student learning needs, installing interventions, monitoring their
                      implementations with data and understanding the effects of interventions
                      for course correction or amplification.”

                      Orange Grove facilitates objective, data-driven school performance and
                      improvement planning. Orange Grove:

                     Walks schools through the process of writing goals, objectives, action
                      plans, mission statements and vision statements


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        Includes a step-by-step guide that helps schools develop a School
         Improvement Plan that fulfills the requirements most often imposed by
         accreditation and compliance organizations
        New data means new insights, and Orange Grove lets schools easily
         integrate new data sets when they're ready to add them for inclusion in
         analysis
        Ties plan goals back to evidence for easy reference and review.
        Produces ready-to-share school improvement plans formatted for web
         or print, at the touch of a button. Orange Grove's breakthrough analysis
         engine identifies schools' potential areas for improvement focusing on
         subjects, sub-groups, grade level, or other important categories.

         Orange Grove schools drive school performance management through
         their ongoing school improvement activities. By significantly reducing the
         time schools spend on data acquisition, analysis, visualization and sharing
         Orange Grove assists schools with critical, student-centered performance
         activities including:

        Identifying specific student learning needs
        Identifying and installing interventions
        Ongoing monitoring of implementations with data through Orange Grove
        Understanding the effects of interventions for course correction or
         amplification

         This data will also be included as part of the annual teacher evaluation
         process and monitored by the school principal. All teachers will be given
         professional development in the use of Orange Grove and this data will be
         the basis of discussion for the Professional Learning Communities that
         take place weekly at DCHS.

     3. Identify teachers who are having success and also teachers whose data
        patterns show concern. Teachers may receive support to identify issues
        that will support an improved pattern for student success.
     4. Teachers who do not show improvement may be subject to the
        development of an Individual Development Plan.

C. Requirement 3 -- Evaluation systems are designed with teacher and
   principal involvement
    1. New teacher evaluation system utilizing the Charlotte Danielson has been
        introduced in the 2010-2011 school year. Continued development and
        training continues through the 2011-2012 school year. The Framework for
        Teaching has been introduced to all teachers, including new hires.




                                  9
Description > The Framework for Teaching

The Framework for Teaching is a research-based set of components of instruction, aligned to the
INTASC standards, and grounded in a constructivist view of learning and teaching. In this
framework, the complex activity of teaching is divided into 22 components (and 76 smaller
elements) clustered into four domains of teaching responsibility: planning and preparation
(Domain 1), classroom environment (Domain 2), instruction (Domain 3), and professional
responsibilities (Domain 4). Each component defines a distinct aspect of a domain; two to five
elements describe a specific feature of a component. Levels of teaching performance (rubrics)
describe each component and provide a roadmap for improvement of teaching. The Framework
may be used for many purposes, but its full value is realized as the foundation for professional
conversations among practitioners as they seek to enhance their skill in the complex task of
teaching. The Framework may be used as the foundation of a school or district’s mentoring,
coaching, professional development, and teacher evaluation processes thus linking all those
activities together and helping teachers become more thoughtful practitioners.

                            The Framework for Teaching:
                          Components of Professional Practice
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation           Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
 Demonstrating Knowledge of Content          Creating an Environment of Respect and
  and Pedagogy Demonstrating                 Rapport
 Knowledge of Students                       Establishing a Culture for Learning
 Setting Instructional Outcomes              Managing Classroom Procedures
 Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources        Managing Student Behavior
 Designing Coherent Instruction              Organizing Physical Space
 Designing Student Assessments
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities      Domain 3: Instruction
 Reflecting on Teaching                      Communicating with Students
 Maintaining Accurate Records                Using Questioning and Discussion
 Communicating with Families                 Techniques
 Participating in a Professional             Engaging Students in Learning
 Community                                   Using Assessment in Instruction
 Growing and Developing Professionally       Demonstrating Flexibility and
 Showing Professionalism                    Responsiveness




             D. Requirement 4 -- Identify and reward school leaders, teachers, and other
                staff who have increased student achievement and remove leaders and staff
                who have been given multiple opportunities to improve professional
                practice and have not increased student achievement outcomes.

                                               10
       1. Introduction of Merit Pay Program began in the fall of 2010. (See
          Appendix A)
       2. Development of Professional Learning Communities (PLC) has begun in
          January of 2011. These PLCs will provide teachers with the opportunity
          to have discussion regarding the impact that their practices have on
          student achievement.
       3. Instructional leader positions will be established for the start of the
          2011-2012 school year. Criteria for identification of these teacher
          leaders will include involvement in the Michigan School Principal
          Fellowship as determined in January, 2011. Compensation for these
          Instructional Leaders will be included in the Merit Pay Program that will
          continue for the 2011-2012 school year.
       4. Underperforming teachers will be identified, given assistance, and
          possibly removed if not able to meet expectations that DCS has for
          student achievement.
       5. Every staff person who works at DCS will annually receive a letter of
          district expectations and will be expected to sign this letter as a
          condition of employment at DCS. This letter will include the non-
          negotiable expectations listed in the handout.

E. Requirement 5 -- Provide staff with ongoing, high quality, job embedded
   professional development (subject specific pedagogy, differentiated
   instruction, or a deeper understanding of the community served).
   Professional development is aligned and designed to insure that staff can
   facilitate teaching and learning and have the capacity of successfully
   implementing school reform strategies.
   1. Professional Learning Communities began in January, 2011. Data-driven
       inquiry and decision making will be the foundation of this discourse.
       Orange Grove data warehouse will be utilized as the foundation for the
       PLCs.
   2. Curriculum enhanced professional development has been identified and
       professional development (PD) that includes reading and writing has been
       and will continue to be addressed.
   3. DCS faculty has begun and will continue to receive training in the use of
       PLC protocols that build capacity of academic teams to focus upon
       examining and improving instructional practice.
   4. University credit from Saginaw Valley State University may be an option
       for involvement in these Professional Learning Communities.
   5. ‘Learning Walks’ will be introduced for the 2011-2012 academic year in
       order for faculty to engage in observation and understanding of regular data-
       based analysis and inquiry.
   6. Professional Development Calendar has been developed and introduced in
       the 2010-2011 academic year and will be continued into the 2011-2012
       academic year. (See Appendix B)



                                  11
        F. Requirement 6 -- Implement strategies such as financial incentives,
           increased opportunities for promotion and career growth, and/or flexible
           working conditions designed to recruit and retain staff to meet the needs of
           students in a transformational school.
               1. DCS has begun and will continue to offer financial incentives that are
                  based on individual student achievement and school-wide achievement.
                  (See Appendix A)
               2. A Career Ladder for teachers that involves mentor and master teachers
                  will be introduced for the beginning of the 2011-2012 academic year.


II. Comprehensive Instructional Reform Strategies

     A. Requirement 1 -- Use data to identify and implement an instructional
        research based program that is vertically aligned from one grade to the next,
        as well as aligned to state standards.
         1. Regularly scheduled data review sessions (i.e. Carnegie Math, e2020, etc.)
            will take place in order to foster a culture of practice and continuous
            improvement at DCS.
         2. Refer to previous information regarding Orange Grove.
         3. The following measurable annual goals will be monitored by the faculty in the
            PLCs that have begun in the 2010-2011 academic year:

          Student Rates (Baseline Year: 2009-11 school years)

          • Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) student attendance rates
          • Truancy rate
          • Exclusion (i.e. expulsion rate)
          • Out of school suspension rate
          • Number of drug, weapon, or violent incidents
          • Student retention rate
          • Dropout rate

          Student Achievement (Baseline Year: 2009-2011 school years)

          • 4-year graduation rate
          • Percentage of students scoring warning/failing on MEAP/MME/NWA ELA -
          Aggregate
          • Percentage of students scoring warning/failing on MEAP/MME/NWA Math -
          Aggregate
          • Median Student Growth Percentile (MEAP/MME/NWA) ELA – Aggregate
          • Median Student Growth Percentile (MEAP/MME/NWA) Math – Aggregate

                                         12
College Readiness and School Culture (Baseline Year: 2009-11 school years)

• % students scoring C or higher in at least four MEAP subject areas (ELA,
  mathematics, science, social students,)
• % of sophomores who participate in PSAT examinations
• % of parents participating in at least one teacher-parent conference per year
• % of parents participating in Parent University
• % of parents returning signed home-school compacts
•% parents reporting meaningful opportunities to engage with and/or contribute to
the school – DCS Climate Survey
• Students’ mean score on student engagement index – DCS Climate Survey
• % students reporting that they are thinking about going to college and
understand what it takes to get there – DCS Climate Survey
• % of students reporting that effort and good work are recognized by their school
– DCS Climate Survey
• Mean score for collective teacher efficacy – DCS Climate Survey
• % teachers reporting using results from formative/interim assessments to
improve and/or differentiate their instruction to meet student needs – DCS
Climate Survey (See Appendix C)
• SVSU pacing guides and instructional guides have been adopted to ensure
    alignment with state standards as well as across grade levels.
• Thirty minutes of instructional time has been added to the instructional day in
    the 2010-2011 academic year. Thirty additional minutes will be added in the
    2011-2012 academic year. The additional minutes for the 2011-2012
    academic year will be utilized for discourse by the staff and data analysis in
    the Professional Learning Communities that have been established at DCHS.
• Every faculty and staff member is expected to convey and build a culture of
    high academic expectations for every student.
• For every class, every teacher is expected to have posted on the board.
• A self-explanatory activator in which students are expected to engage as soon
    as they sit, with the knowledge that a quick review will take place once the
    class begins.
• Objectives and lesson activities for the day.
• The evening’s homework assignment.
• Purposeful homework is expected to be assigned five days per week in the
    core academic disciplines building upon the classroom learning of the day.
• Learning walks will be implemented for the beginning of the 2011-2012
    academic year.
• The Principals and the Chief Academic Officer are expected to conduct daily
    classroom walk-throughs.
• Beginning in the 2011-2012, every teacher will be expected to be a teacher of
    reading, vocabulary development, and writing.
• A common set of writing rubrics will be developed for all students and all
    teachers for the beginning of the 2011-2012 academic year.



                                13
B. Requirement 2 -- Promote the continuous use of individual student data
   (formative, interim, and summative) to inform and differentiate instruction to
   meet individual student needs.

    1. DCS believes that student achievement in all disciplines will significantly
       increase if we are successful at establishing the following transformation
       components:
               A culture of shared leadership and accountability at all levels –
                  students, faculty, parents, administration, and community
                  members. DCHS has developed a partnership with the external
                  provider Michigan Principal Fellowship. As result of this
                  partnership, this culture of shared leadership and accountability has
                  begun to develop as an institution-wide approach to school
                  improvement.

                   The Michigan Principals Fellowship (MPF) is a research-based
                   approach to school improvement that provides principals and their
                   instructional leadership teams with essential knowledge, skills,
                   experiences and support that enable them to lead systematic
                   instructional improvement and increased student achievement.
                   Participation in the fellowship can help manage current school and
                   district initiatives more effectively.

                   This three-year program has been developed as a central
                   component of the Statewide System of Support (SSOS), the
                   Michigan Department of Education's strategy for supporting high
                   poverty, low performing schools.

                   The goal of the Michigan Principals Fellowship is to increase the
                   capacity of the school principal and instructional leadership team
                   in the following areas:

                      Leadership for change
                      Changing the culture of a school to include internal accountability
                      Multiple sources and uses of data for instructional improvement
                      Shared understanding about effective teaching and what it looks like
                       in practice
                      The professional knowledge base for teaching
                      Instructional program coherence
                      The instructional core
                      Models of effective turnaround practice

                Strong professional learning communities focused on improving
                 instruction
                Increased instructional time for students and professional
                 collaboration time for faculty


                                     14
 Use of data-based inquiry and periodic formative assessments to
  identify students’ learning gaps and effective instructional
  strategies that will address them
 A school-wide focus on effective literacy practices. DCHS will be
  implementing Reading Apprenticeship in the fall of 2011.




                    15
WestEd's Reading Apprenticeship helps teachers support students to become motivated, strategic, and
critical readers, thinkers, and writers. Our research-based framework supports middle school, high
school, and community college students at all levels to develop positive literacy identities and engage
with challenging academic texts. Teachers, schools, districts, and community colleges implementing
Reading Apprenticeship find that it can produce a dramatic, positive transformation of students’
engagement and achievement not only in literacy, but also in learning across all academic disciplines.

Reading Apprenticeship draws on teachers’ untapped expertise as discipline-based readers, and on
adolescents’ strengths as learners. This proven framework:

       De-mystifies reading: We help teachers and students see that reading is complex and that it
        changes depending on text and purpose for reading.
       Makes teachers' reading processes and knowledge visible to students and vice versa.
       Helps teachers develop a repertoire of classroom routines for building students’ sophisticated
        literacy skills into content area learning goals.
       Transfers increasing responsibility to students through routines for text-based social
        interaction.
       Builds students’ motivation, stamina, and repertoire of strategies for understanding and
        engaging with challenging academic texts.

Reading Apprenticeship Framework

Reading Apprenticeship involves four interacting dimensions of classroom life that support reading
development:

       Social
       Personal
       Cognitive
       Knowledge-Building

These dimensions are woven into subject-area teaching through metacognitive conversations—
conversations about the thinking processes students and teachers engage in as they read. Extensive
reading—increased opportunities for students to practice reading in more skillful ways—is central to
this framework.

       Social: The social dimension draws on students’ interests in peer interaction as well as larger
        social, political, economic, and cultural issues. Reading Apprenticeship creates a safe
        environment for students to share their confusion and difficulties with texts, and to recognize
        their diverse perspectives and knowledge.
       Personal: This dimension draws on strategic skills used by students in out-of-school settings;
        their interest in exploring new aspects of their own identities and self-awareness as readers;
        and their purposes for reading and goals for reading improvement.
       Cognitive: The cognitive dimension involves developing readers’ mental processes, including
        their repertoire of specific comprehension and problem-solving strategies. The work of
        generating cognitive strategies that support reading comprehension is carried out through
        classroom inquiry.
       Knowledge-Building: This dimension includes identifying and expanding the knowledge
        readers bring to a text and further develop through personal and social interaction with that
        text, including knowledge about word construction, vocabulary, text structure, genre,
        language, topics, and content embedded in the text.


                                                  16
            Appropriate and effective academic interventions that are tailored
             to students’ learning gaps;
            Parent engagement strategies focused upon their children’s
             learning; and
            Strong community partnerships that leverage additional resources
             into the school.

2. Student assessment at Detroit Community High School will include both
   formative assessments – on-demand writing samples, journal reflections,
   written feedback on drafts, quizzes, peer feedback, writing conferences – as
   well as summative assessments – standardized tests, performances, essays,
   research papers, a unit test, or portfolio review. The PLC practice of looking
   at student work is another form of formative assessment. We want to build a
   professional expectation that teachers will use assessment results to guide

                                17
   their daily instruction and curriculum revisions. DCHS will utilize the
   Orange Grove system to analyze discuss student data.
3. A Data Wall will be established for the beginning of the 2011-2012 school
   year. The goal is to create a data-rich professional culture in which faculty are
   problem solvers whose decisions are guided by data rather than past practice.

   A Data Wall is a simply designed bulletin board to show the results of
   interventions you have used to increase student achievement.

   A Data Wall:
   • Allows you (school, grade level and/or data team) to focus on specific
      areas of need
   • Shows students (and their parents) their successes
   • Helps you codify your students needs – The beginning, middle and end
   • Is focused
   • Targets a specific goal (Can it be measured?)
   • Has goals are tied to strategies and activities to get you to your goal
   • Monitors student progress
   • Is understandable (students and parents)
   (Based on work from Center for Leadership and Learning)

   Possible topics for the Data Wall:
   • Student attendance
   • Benchmark Results—Number of students at proficient and advanced
      and/or number of students who grew one performance level
   • SCOE Results
   • English Proficiency Results
   • Staff attendance
   • Number of books read by students
   • Numbers of office referrals for discipline, suspension, expulsion
   • Program results (Quick Reads, SRA Intervention, etc.)




                                 18
III. Increasing learning time and mechanisms for community-oriented schools

      1. Requirement 1 --- Establish schedules and strategies that provide increased
         time for all students to learn core academic content by expanding the school
         day, week
                     Detroit Community High School extended the students’ day by
                         thirty minutes in the 2010 – 2011 academic year. DCHS will be
                         extending the teachers’ day by an additional 30 minutes in the
                         2011-2012 school year. The additional 30 minutes next academic
                         year will be for the purpose of providing teachers with PLC time
                         each day. This time will be specific for the analysis of student data
                         and the interventions needed to address student needs.
                     Detroit Community High School will be exploring the use of a
                         Block Schedule in order to provide more sustained academic time
                         for students. Some of the advantages of the Block Schedule are as
                         follows:
                              A teacher sees less students during the day, thereby giving
                                 them the ability to spend more time with each individual.
                              Because of the increased span of teaching time, longer
                                 cooperative learning activities can be completed in one
                                 class periods. Also, there is more time for labs in science
                                 classes.
                              Students have less information to deal with over the course
                                 of a school day.
                              Because of the decreased number of classes, students have
                                 less homework on any given day during the week.
                              The teacher is able to provide more varied instruction
                                 during class. Thus, it is easier to deal with students with
                                 disabilities and differing learning styles.
                              Planning periods are longer. It seems that with a longer
                                 span of time, planning becomes easier and more gets done.

                         Professional Development will be provided for teachers over the
                         2011 summer in order for teachers to be prepared for this change in
                         instructional delivery time.



   A. Requirement 2 -- Provide the ongoing mechanisms for family and community
      engagement.

          School/Community Partnerships are essential for the well being of our community
          and for the improvement of student achievement. Detroit Community Schools

                                           19
          serve as the hub of the Wheel of Community Partnerships. This model is known
          as the “Promise Neighborhood” with the school as a point of focus for the
          community.

          Given the declining pool of resources, it is essential for community groups,
          businesses and educational institutions to find ways to collaborative. The attached
          report gives expression to a whole range of activities that are built upon the
          collaborative model. (See Appendix D) Furthermore, a successful urban
          education must address an entire range of issues that are far beyond the capacity
          of a single school district to handle, hence the necessity for partnerships.

          Again and again, one will hear the philanthropic community ask, “Who are your
          partners?” Their interest is in the expansion of service delivery to the entire
          community. In this sense, school/community partnership represents a reciprocal
          exchange of bringing the community into the school and the school into the
          community.

IV. Providing operational flexibility and sustained support

   A. Requirement 1 -- Provide the school operational flexibility (staffing, calendars,
      time, budgeting) to implement a comprehensive approach to substantially
      increase student achievement and increase graduation.
      1. The budget will reflect the school’s instructional priorities.
      2. The current financial plan is built largely upon the district’s general fund;
          therefore, building capacity over three years to sustain the acceleration work.
      3. The district will continue to seek outside funds in order to enhance the initiatives
          (e2020, READ 180, Charlotte Danielson training, etc.) that have begun at DCS.

   B. Requirement 2 -- Ensure that the school receives ongoing, intensive technical
      assistance and related support for LEA, SEA or other designated external
      partner or organization.

       1. Chief Academic Officer will coordinate all technical assistance with Wayne
          RESA and SVSU.
       2. External Partner is the Michigan Principal Fellowship. This partner will provide
          expertise to the high school principal and in turn to the faculty as a whole.




                                           20
Continuous Improvement Model
It is imperative that all of the activities are the springboard for continuing student improvement
at Detroit Community High School. The activities listed above must improve student
achievement immediately and through the three years of the SIG and beyond. The Continuous
Improvement Model will provide a ‘roadmap’ for DCHS to follow into the future.




(From maine.gov)

Activities in math and reading were identified in the summer of 2010 by reviewing the Contents
Needs Assessment, MME scores, and ACT scores and have been implemented for the 2010-2011
school year. These activities will be the basis for the Continuous Improvement Cycle over the
life of the SIG.

Math

    Review all math standards so that all involved have a clear understanding of the math
     goals
    Align math curriculum with the MME/ACT

                                                21
       Use of Carnegie Math as delivery of instruction
       Use of e2020 credit recovery and remediation
       Initiation of NWEA assessments to better track student learning
       Use of common assessments that include higher-level thinking skills



Reading

     Review all reading goals across the curriculum so that all involved have a clear
      understanding of the math goals
     Align reading curriculum with the MME/ACT
     Use of Read 180 for remediation
     Initiation of NWEA assessments to better track student learning
     Identify needs and create targeted Professional Development for teachers
     Implementation of Reading Apprenticeship

Instruction and Pedagogy Specifics

Detroit Community High School has begun and will continue to provide a system for measuring
changes in instructional practices based on the Professional Development that is provided for the
teaching staff. (See Appendix B for PD calendar for 2010-2011 school year) All teachers are
involved in the dialogue that needs to take place for continued school improvement through the
institution of weekly Professional Learning Communities that began in January, 2011. Teacher
leaders are being identified and the development of a new Teacher Evaluation Program based on
the Charlotte Danielson model of the Frameworks of Teaching.

Analysis of the NWEA and common assessments will provide teachers with the data that they
will need in order to know if the Professional Development provided is making a difference.
Assessment of student data, along with the Teacher Evaluation data will give DCHS insight into
the success of the PD and the effect that it has on the teaching and learning at DCHS.

Content specific professional development has taken place in Math, Social Studies and Science
since August 2010. Carnegie Math coaches are currently working with the DCHS math teachers
and providing in-classroom support. New curriculum materials have been bought and instituted
in Social Studies. Technology continues to be a strong thread for DCHS and currently is being
upgraded at DCS to provide remediation activities for all students through the e2020 system. All
teachers are being trained in the new Common Core Standards and are also being trained in the
use of the Pacing Guides provided by Saginaw Valley State University.

DCHS will incorporate 21 Things for the 21st Century Educator www.21things4teachers.net
beginning in the fall of 2011. These technology practices will assist the teachers to provide the technology
skills that all students must have to succeed in school and beyond.


                                                    22
Transformation Specialist
DCHS is committed to the transformation of this school. In July of 2010 the Detroit Community
Schools hired a Chief Academic Officer who is in charge of the transformation of this school.
The Chief Academic Officer is responsible for the following:

       The CAO is the administrator in charge of all academic issues and is the leadership coach
       for the High School Principal. The CAO has begun the process of implementing and
       purchasing new curriculum for all areas of DCHS. The CAO, along with teachers, has
       designed a new teacher evaluation system and professional development calendar for all
       staff.
       The CAO will serve as the director of all curriculum and its evaluation. The CAO will
       ensure that all curriculum is being delivered appropriately.
       The CAO will all assist the Superintendent in all aspects of implementing the SIG.

Community Engagement and Support Systems
It is the intent of Detroit Community Schools to provide, with the Community, an environment
where students reach high academic achievement. With the community involvement, DCS will
infuse a culture of support for all students.

DCS has begun this transformation into a ‘community infused’ environment by hiring a
Community Coordinator and Parent Liaison. These two positions have begun and will continue
to bridge the gap between students, teachers, parents and community.

According to the NEA Policy Brief (2008):

       “The research is clear, consistent, and convincing. Parent, family, and community
       involvement in education correlates with higher academic performance and
       school improvement. When schools, parents, families, and communities work
       together to support learning, students tend to earn higher grades, attend school
       more regularly, stay in school longer, and enroll in higher level programs.
       Researchers cite parent-family-community involvement as a key to addressing the
       school dropout crisis and note that strong school-family-community partnerships
       foster higher educational aspirations and more motivated students. The evidence
       holds true for students at both the elementary and secondary level, regardless of
       the parent’s education, family income, or background—and the research show
       parent involvement affects minority student’s academic achievement across all
       races.

       Supporting teaching and learning requires addressing students’ social service
       needs, as well as their academic ones, and this broad-based support is essential to
       closing achievement gaps. The positive impact of connecting community

                                               23
       resources with student needs is well documented. In fact, community support of
       the educational process is considered one of the characteristics common to high-
       performing schools.”

Detroit Community Schools has already begun to provide intervention strategies for
students by hiring a team of professionals consisting of a Social Worker, Attendance
Officer, Reading Specialist and a Carnegie Math coach. DCHS will also be instituting a
tenth grade academy in the 2011-2012 school year. With this team in place, DCHS is
wrapping services around tenth graders who are significantly below grade level. If
awarded SIG funds, Detroit Community High School will hire similar teams for each
grades eight and nine beginning in the 2011-2012 academic year.

Intervention Strategies and Program Options for Students
An increased learning time of 30 minutes was added to the school day during the 2010-2011
academic year. An additional 30 minutes will be added to the 2011-2012 academic year.
Planning for the 2011-2012 school year will include discussion regarding scheduling more time
for students to devote in depth quality to their courses.

Opportunities for remediation include READ 180, e2020 and Carnegie Math. These
opportunities include a schedule that provides opportunities for students to repeat courses that
they have failed. This will provide students the chance to stay on schedule for graduation.

Extended day opportunities for students to receive tutoring and to have the opportunity to utilize
the technology at DCHS for remediation is critical to student success. Also, DCHS will utilize
the 21things4students (http://www.21things4students.net/ ) which incorporates the Michigan
and National Educational Technology Standards (METS and NETS) to ensure that all students
have the ability to utilize the technology that they need for success in school and beyond.

Activities providing best practices will include the following:

      Credit Recovery
      Ninth Grade Academy
      Incentive Programs for students
      Parental Involvement Outreach
      Opportunities for community members to utilize technology at DCHS
      Career Exploration




                                                24
                         LEA APPLICATION – PART I
B. 1. Describe the process the LEA has used to analyze the needs of each school and how
the intervention was selected for each school.

      Detroit Community High School utilized the Process Rubrics (Content Needs
       Assessment) in order to define the needs that this school was experiencing. The content
       Needs Assessment was completed in June of 2010, and it was determined that DCHS was
       in the ‘Getting Started’ category of the majority of the CNA. The Content Needs
       Assessment was again completed in January, 2011, and DCHS was in the ‘Implemented’
       category in the majority of the CNA. DCHS will continue to analyze the CNA every six
       months in order to stay abreast of their progress towards the implementation of the
       Transformation Model.
      Data from the MME and the fact that the school was placed on the Lowest Performing
       5% list also provided the motivation for immediate change. DCHS, when confronted with
       this irrefutable data, chose the most comprehensive of the models – Transformation.
      Upon the critical nature of this information, the DCS Board of Directors began
       discussions with its authorizer, Saginaw Valley State University, to determine its most
       immediate issues. The School Board removed the Superintendent and replaced him with
       Mr. Milo Tilton who had been the previous Business Manager. This move indicated to all
       staff and community members that there must be immediate changes at DCHS. The new
       Superintendent immediately began the evaluation of all teachers and also removed the
       High School Principal. Fifty percent of the High School teaching staff was removed in
       June of 2010 along with the High School Principal. It became immediately clear that
       “business as usual” was not acceptable.
      It was determined that closure was not an option as this PSA is the only high school
       located in the Brightmoor Community of Detroit, and the families and students have
       formed an allegiance to this high school. School Board members, teachers, staff
       members, as well as consultants from Saginaw Valley State University and from Wayne
       RESA were consulted in the decision to select the Transformation model.
      DCHS, along with reviewing the CNA, has instituted the NWEA system in order to
       provide the district with critical and timely data to inform the school of student
       achievement data. This information will provide the staff with a ‘roadmap’ to identify
       needed practices that must be changed in order to improve student achievement.

1.a. Describe how the LEA has the capacity to use school improvement funds to provide
adequate resources and related support to each Tier I and Tier II school identified in the
LEA’s application in order to implement, fully and effectively, the required activities of the
school intervention model it has selected.




                                              25
   Detroit Community High School utilized the Process Rubrics (Content Needs
    Assessment) in order to define the needs that this school was experiencing. The content
    Needs Assessment was completed in June of 2010, and it was determined that DCHS was
    in the ‘Getting Started’ category of the majority of the CNA. The Content Needs
    Assessment was again completed in January, 2011, and DCHS was in the ‘Implemented’
    category in the majority of the CNA. DCHS will continue to analyze the CNA every six
    months in order to stay abreast of their progress towards the implementation of the
    Transformation Model.
   The district has made the initial change in the school leadership by removing the previous
    Superintendent and replacing him with the previous Business Manager. This change
    provided an ease of transition, especially when it is related to school finances. DCS also
    realized that there was a great need for a Transformation Specialist and created the
    position of Chief Academic Officer. These changes made it apparent to everyone that
    change was imperative and needed immediately.
   The district began to provide in the fall of 2010 a very detailed professional development
    plan that was targeted towards all of the curriculum changes that were introduced for the
    2010-2011 school year. The Professional Development Calendar is attached. (See
    Appendix B)
   The curriculum is overseen by the Chief Academic Officer. The curriculum has been
    updated and infused with new materials and with a great deal of professional
    development. Curriculum is aligned with the state standards as all teachers at DCHS
    follow the pacing guides that have been developed by Saginaw Valley State University.
   NWEA has been introduced into DCHS. Students take these assessments three times a
    year; therefore, providing the school staff with timely information regarding the needs of
    the students in reading and math.
   Detroit Community Schools has placed technology as a priority for the 2010-2011 school
    year. A new computer lab was developed specifically for Carnegie Math, and an
    additional lab has been created for the READ 180 program. Smart Boards have also been
    installed in all classrooms. Technology infrastructure has also been updated in the last
    two years.
   Detroit Community Schools is determined to provide a strong induction process for all
    teachers. Nearly 70% of the teaching staff was new in the fall of 2010; therefore, the
    targeted professional development calendar was built with all staff in mind. Detroit
    Community School is currently developing an induction process for new staff that will be
    implemented in the summer of 2011.
   Detroit Community Schools, as a PSA, has greater flexibility than a public K-12 due to
    the fact that it is not bound by a union contract. Therefore, DCS has been able to make
    many changes in the 2010-2011 school year. DCS has been able to provide financial
    resources by re-prioritizing what it had done previously. The district is committed to


                                            26
       providing a much more focused curriculum, as demonstrated by their financial
       commitments to curriculum changes beginning in August, 2011.
      The Detroit Community Schools Board of Directors has committed in their annual goals
       to become more efficient and effective than in the past. They have committed to
       increasing student achievement and this is demonstrated in their budgetary decision-
       making and use of data for student improvement. The School Board will hold the
       Superintendent responsible for increasing student achievement through the
       Superintendent’s Evaluation process.
      DCS has adopted the Charlotte Danielson Framework for Teaching Model as its teacher
       evaluation system. The Charlotte Danielson Group has been hired by Detroit Community
       Schools to provide the training needed for all staff to implement and understand this
       model of evaluation.
      Detroit Community Schools is in the process of developing a plan that includes
       incentives in order to recruit and retain staff. These discussions have begun, led by the
       Superintendent. Detroit Community Schools has also been selected as one of 14 K-8
       Schools to participate in a project headed by the Michigan Charter Schools Association
       that will provide monetary and professional development support for newly recruited
       teachers and for the retention of teachers.
      Detroit Community High School has begun to discuss the development of a ‘new’
       schedule for the 2011-2012 school year that will provide for the opportunity for teachers
       to be able to have time daily to collaborate. This discussion is being led by the chief
       Academic Officer and the High School Principal.

      B.2. For each Tier I and Tier II school in this application, the LEA must describe
       actions taken, or those that will be taken to: Design and implement interventions
       consistent with the final requirements.

   Detroit Community Schools has begun and will continue to utilize data for school
    achievement purposes in order to identify areas of need. Each strategic initiative will be
    outlined with detail for the purpose of providing activities that are allowed under the SIG.
    The Superintendent and Chief Academic Officer will oversee all activities and see that
    they are carried out with fidelity.
   See Transformation Plan Initiatives pgs. 8 - 20

2.a. Select External Providers from the state’s list of preferred providers.

       Detroit Community Schools has joined forces with the Michigan Principals Fellowship.

              A culture of shared leadership and accountability at all levels – students, faculty,
              parents, administration, and community members. DCHS has developed a
              partnership with the external provider Michigan Principal Fellowship. As result


                                               27
              of this partnership, this culture of shared leadership and accountability has begun
              to develop as an institution-wide approach to school improvement.

              The Michigan Principals Fellowship (MPF) is a research-based approach to
              school improvement that provides principals and their instructional leadership
              teams with essential knowledge, skills, experiences and support that enable them
              to lead systematic instructional improvement and increased student achievement.
              Participation in the Fellowship can help manage current school and district
              initiatives more effectively.

              This three-year program has been developed as a central component of the
              Statewide System of Support (SSOS), the Michigan Department of Education's
              strategy for supporting high poverty, low performing schools.

              The goal of the Michigan Principals Fellowship is to increase the capacity of the
              school principal and instructional leadership team in the following areas:

                                Leadership for change
                                Changing the culture of a school to include internal accountability
                                Multiple sources and uses of data for instructional improvement
                                Shared understanding about effective teaching and what it looks like
                                 in practice
                                The professional knowledge base for teaching
                                Instructional program coherence
                                The instructional core
                                Models of effective turnaround practice



2.b. Align other resources with interventions

    The interventions that SIG funding is being requested for were implemented in the 2010-
       2011 school year. These initiatives were paid for using fund balance and other resources
       currently available to Detroit Community High School.
       The Board of Directors of Detroit Community Schools has directed the Superintendent to
       ensure that future budgets support the initiatives contained within this application. This
       will be done by utilizing Federal Title dollars, 31a dollars, and outside grants. DCS
       leadership is very much aware of the "funding cliff" phenomenon, and is committed to
       ensuring that these interventions continue after SIG funding. It is the intention of the
       Board of Directors to use general fund dollars to support these interventions in the
       absence of other sources of funding.

   2.c. Modify its practices or policies, if necessary, to enable its schools to implement the
   intervention fully and effectively.

    Since the release of the list of the Lowest Performing Schools, Detroit Community
     Schools has replaced the President of the Board of Directors and the Superintendent and

                                                28
        also hired a Transformation Specialist (Chief Academic Officer). The culture of Detroit
        Community has changed into a culture of placing Student Achievement as its number one
        priority.

2.d. Sustain the reforms after the funding period ends.

     DCS is committed to improving student achievement as they have exhibited by the
      allocation of the budget during the 2010-2011 school year. This commitment will
      continue after the SIG funds have been exhausted as DCS is dedicated to being an
      integral part of the Brightmoor Community now and into the future.

        Detroit Community Schools began making significant changes in the summer of 2011.
        As stated in the narrative and also in this application, there have been many noteworthy
        improvements in the curriculum and structure of DCHS. DCS has utilized its Federal
        Funds (Title I and 31a) in order to support all these initiatives. DCS is committed to
        sustaining these improvements through the life of the grant and beyond as it prioritizes its
        efforts. Priority number one is improving student achievement; therefore, the general
        fund budget will reflect these priorities.

        Detroit Community Schools has committed to competitive salaries for all school leaders.
        DCS has also delegated the running of the high school to the high school principal.
        Micro-managing of the high school will be limited and the principal will have the
        responsibility of the school. This is significant for the retention of the high school
        principal.

        DCS has also selected the Michigan Principal Fellowship as its external partner. This
        partnership will give the Principal the support/mentoring that is so significant to
        retention.



B.3. Include a timeline delineating the steps to be taken to implement the selected
intervention in each Tier I and Tier II school identified in the LEA’s application. For each
Tier I and Tier II school in this application, the LEA must describe actions taken
throughout the remainder of the grant proposal.

                                   TRANSFORMATION (SIG)
                                    TIMELINE 2011 – 2014
          2011 – 2012                   2012 – 2013                             2013 - 2014
Continue implementation of         Continue implementation of         Continue implementation of
rigorous staff evaluation system   rigorous staff evaluation system   rigorous staff evaluation system
(Charlotte Danielson)
Continued implementation of        Continued implementation of        Continued implementation of
incentive program for teachers     incentive program for teachers     incentive program for teachers
Increase length of school day by   Institute program of re-           Incorporate team structures into


                                                   29
30 minutes for faculty             engagement for students in the       the school improvement plan and
collaboration                      Brightmoor Community who             school governance
                                   dropped out of school
Creation of high school schedule   Work with local universities and
that allows for more academic      community colleges to provide
time for students in each core     articulation agreements for
subject                            students
Continues Professional Learning    Creation of longitudinal data
Communities                        systems that can track student
                                   progress pre-K-12 through
                                   postsecondary and workplace
Continue ongoing targeted          Form inter-disciplinary teams of
professional development           teachers that share students and
                                   planning time in common and
                                   support the development of
                                   innovative curriculum and
                                   instructional practices
Continue credit recovery           Use the teacher evaluation results
programs i.e. READ 180, e2020      to differentiate among educators
                                   when granting leadership
                                   opportunities
Creation of high school schedule   Continue to improve a system of
that allows for smaller learning   rewards to encourage teachers
communities i.e. Freshman          along a career path.
Academy, Sophomore Academy,
Thematic Learning Academies
Provide more opportunities for
Dual Enrollment for students
Continue to work with local
business organizations, and
government agencies to provide
hands-on learning opportunities,
internships and job-shadowing
Implementation of RTI program
to provide early warning systems
for students
Establish recruitment goals in
terms of teacher quality and
quantity for the district




                                                   30
B. 5. Describe the annual goals for student achievement on the State’s assessments in both
reading/language arts and mathematics that is has established in order to monitor Tier I
and Tier II schools that receive school improvement funds.




 Detroit Community Schools School Performance Goals
 September 28, 2010

 1. By the 2012/2013 school year, Detroit Community School’s students will
 score at least 1% higher than State average on all MEAP and MME tests
 administered.

 2. Detroit Community Schools will benchmark student performance on the
 MEAP and MME with Harding and Gompers Elementary (two neighborhood
 Detroit Public School Elementary Schools), Lessenger Middle School, and
 Henry Ford High School. Note: Several of these schools are being
 consolidated are will be renamed.

 3. Detroit Community Schools will benchmark student performance on the
 MEAP and MME with Detroit Service Learning Academy, Plymouth
 Educational Center and Detroit Edison Public School Academy (those charter
 schools with similar student demographics).

 4. Detroit Community Schools will score at least 1% higher than the national
 average for goal attainment on the NWEA measure of Academic
 Performance (MAP) Test in 2010 - 2011.

 5. Detroit Community Schools will benchmark student performance on the
 NWEA Measure of Academic Performance (MAP) Test with the national
 average of schools with similar student demographics.

 6. Detroit Community Schools will achieve Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
 annually.

 7. By the 2012/2013 school year Detroit Community Schools will achieve at
 least a B letter grade on the Ed YES! Report.



B. 6. (NA)

B.7. (NA)

                                            31
B.8. As appropriate, the LEA must consult with relevant stakeholders (students, teachers,
parents, community leaders, business leaders, etc.) regarding the LEA’s application and
implementation of school improvement models in its Tier I and Tier II schools.

Surveys were created and will be administered to each of these subgroups. Focus groups have
been identified and scheduled and will allow DCS to gather data in more depth. (See Appendix
C)

C. BUDGET: An LEA must include a budget that indicates the amount of school
improvement funds the LEA will use each year in each Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III school it
commits to serve.

______________________________________________________________________________

ATTACHMENT III
SAMPLE SCHOOL APPLICATION
SECTION I: NEED

The school must provide evidence of need by focusing on improvement status: reading and
math achievement results, as measured by the MEAP; Mi-Access or the MME; poverty
level; and the school’s ability to leverage the resources currently available to the district.
Refer to the school’s Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) School Data and Process
Profile Summary report.

  Evidence of Need (Data as of 12/31/2010)                  Goals for Improvement
4 % of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who are
in Math (Spring 2010)                           proficient on the Math MME to 14% (2011)
20% of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who are
in Reading (Spring 2010)                        proficient on the Reading MME to 30% (2011)
14% of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who are
in Science (Spring 2010)                        proficient on the Science MME to 24% (2011)
43% of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who
in Social Studies (Spring 2010)                 proficient on the Social Studies MME to 53%
                                                (2011)
.05% of students met or exceeded MME scores     Increase the percentage of students who are
in Writing (Spring 2010)                        proficient on the Writing MME to 11% (2011)
                                                Increase all of the above 10% each academic
                                                year over the life of the SIG




SECTION II: COMMITMENT

Evidence of a strong commitment should be demonstrated through the district’s ability and
willingness to implement the selected turnaround model for rapid improvement in student

                                              32
achievement and proposed use of scientific and evidence based research, collaboration, and
parental involvement.

Using information gathered using the MDE Comprehensive Needs Assessment – CNA,
provide the following information:

   1. Describe the school staff’s support of the school improvement application and their
      support of the proposed efforts to effect change in the school.
          The Detroit Community High School Staff began journey of cultural change
             beginning in the fall of 2010. Approximately 60% of the staff was new as of
             September, 2010. Immediately upon the beginning of the school year, the staff
             was involved in the creation of new academic goals for the 2010 – 2011 school
             year. A variety of committees were formed (freshman academy, content area,
             RTI, incentives for teachers, MME preparation, teacher evaluation, etc.) with all
             teachers being included to assist in addressing the issues that were present at
             DCHS. Teachers accepted the challenges that were ahead of them and formed
             Professional Learning Communities that began in January 2011. These PLCs
             were formed so that teachers could have conversation regarding their practices in
             order to impact student achievement.

   2. Explain the school’s ability to support systematic change required by the model
      selected.
      SEE ORGANIZATIONAL CHART -- APPENDIX F

   3. Describe the school’s academic in reading and mathematics for the past three years
      as determined by the state’s assessments (MEAP/MME/Mi-Access).


  Evidence of Need (Data as of 12/31/2010)                  Goals for Improvement
4 % of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who are
in Math (Spring 2010)                           proficient on the Math MME to 14% (2011)
20% of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who are
in Reading (Spring 2010)                        proficient on the Reading MME to 30% (2011)
14% of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who are
in Science (Spring 2010)                        proficient on the Science MME to 24% (2011)
43% of students met or exceeded MME scores      Increase the percentage of students who
in Social Studies (Spring 2010)                 proficient on the Social Studies MME to 53%
                                                (2011)
.05% of students met or exceeded MME scores     Increase the percentage of students who are
in Writing (Spring 2010)                        proficient on the Writing MME to 11% (2011)
                                                Increase all of the above 10% each academic
                                                year over the life of the SIG


                                              33
SECTION III: PROPOSED ACTIVITIES
  1. Describe the proposed activities that address the required US Department of
     Education school intervention that the school will use as a focus for its School
     Improvement Grant.

     A. Transformation Model

         SEE NARRATIVE – PGS. 8 - 20

Permissible elements of the Transformation Model
         a. Provide additional money to attract and retain staff. (See Appendix A)
         b. Institute a system for measuring changes in instructional practices that result from
            professional development.
                 Professional Development Calendar (See Appendix B)
                 DCHS will institute a system of Learning Walks in the fall of 2011.

             Learning Walks are a part of the continual professional development cycle at
              DCHS. The Learning Walk obtains a “snapshot” of the learning at DCHS.
              Walkers’ observations are based on a brief period of time, and they are always
              mindful they are gathering evidence rather than drawing conclusions.
              Walkers formulate thought-provoking questions that encourage reflection and
              help identify the next level of professional development needed to support
              higher quality teaching in classrooms or in the school as a whole.

             The protocol always begins with an orientation to the site school staff. Staff
              are informed when Learning Walks will occur and of the focus for each
              Learning Walk. Teachers are encouraged to have input ready for the focus of
              the Learning Walk.

             As part of the Learning Walk, an orientation (pre conference) takes place.
              The principal discusses the focus of the walk and briefs the walkers about the
              professional development in which they will participate. School data
              pertinent to the walk is shared with walkers.

             Classroom visits last 5-10 minutes. Depending on the lesson, walkers can
              engage in discussion with the teacher or students, examination of student
              work, examination or the organization of the classroom and classroom
              resources.

             After each visit, walkers meet in the hall to debrief on the gathered evidence.
              Evidence is cited specific to the focus of the walk. Walkers may then propose


                                             34
       questions they might ask the teacher to learn more about what is going on
       during the lesson or related to student work.

    At the end of each Learning Walk, walkers convene for a debriefing session.
     They review evidence and questions raised during the walk. They then look
     through their observations for patterns that may have emerged. The
     debriefing should help the walkers set short-term goals that will support the
     schools long-term learning plan. This information is then disseminated to all
     staff.

c. Conduct reviews to ensure that the curriculum is implemented with fidelity and is
   impacting student achievement.
        DCHS is working closely with the vendors of the implemented
            curriculum. These vendors are supplying the coaches and mentors to
            insure that Carnegie Math, READ 180, e2020 is being implemented with
            fidelity.
        DCHS also utilizes the pacing guides provided by Saginaw Valley State
            University. These guides provide the ‘roadmap’ for all teachers implement
            curriculum. The High School Principal and the Chief Academic Officer
            are providing the oversight of all curriculum oversight.
d. Implement a school wide Response to Intervention model.
        Detroit Community Schools has already budgeted for and invested in a
            Response To Intervention Team beginning in January, 2011. DCS has
            hired a Social Worker, Reading Specialist, and Attendance Officer to
            begin services to all 10th graders who fall below grade level. This team
            will wrap services around these students in order to assist them in reaching
            grade level.
        DCS intends on creating an RTI Team for grades 8 & 9 with the use of
            SIG Funds.
e. Provide PD to teachers/principals on strategies to support students in least
   restrictive environments and English Language Learners.
f. Use and integrate technology-based interventions.
        Detroit Community Schools has invested heavily in technology
            infrastructure and new computer labs. New labs have been created in the
            2010-2012 school year for Math and Reading support.
g. Increase rigor through such programs as AP, IB. STEM, and others.
        Students at DCHS have the opportunity to take AP course in Lit and
            Calculus. A priority of DCHS is to re-invigorate dual enrollment
            opportunities for students.
h. Provide summer transition programs or freshman academies.
        DCHS has had a Freshman Academy for two years. Currently, DCHS is
            planning for an updated academy in the summer of 2011. Due to the fact

                                     35
             that many Freshmen are still struggling, DCHS plans on a Sophomore
             Academy to begin in the summer of 2011.
i.   Increase graduation rates through credit recovery, smaller learning communities,
     and other strategies.
          DCHS has purchased and is currently working with READ 180 and e2020
             as credit recovery options for students. Professional Learning
             Communities have begun in January, 2011 and the High School will be re-
             designing the students’ schedule for 2011-2012 school year to provide
             students with greater opportunities for smaller learning communities and
             sustained time for teaching and learning.
j.   Establish early warning systems to identify students who may be at risk of failure.
          Detroit Community High School has developed an RTI team consisting of
             a Social Worker, Reading Specialist, Attendance Officer, and a coach
             from Carnegie Math to provide services to students who have warning
             signs of failure. This team specifically is addressing sophomores, but
             DCHS intends on expanding this service to students in the eighth and
             ninth grades.
k.   Partner with parents and other organizations to create safe school environment
     that meet students’ social, emotional, and health needs. (See Appendix D)
l.   Extending or restructuring the school to add time for strategies that build
     relationship between students, faculty, and other school staff.
          Conversation has begun at Detroit Community High School to provide a
             much more flexible schedule for students and staff beginning in the 2011-
             2012 school year. Block scheduling will be utilized to provide more
             sustained learning time for students and collaborative planning time for
             teachers.
m.   Implementing approaches to improve school climate and discipline.
         • DCHS intends to provide the training for Capturing Kids’ Hearts (CKH)
             by the Flippen Group.




                                     36
Truly remarkable outcomes are possible in a classroom where trust, respect, and caring
relationships flourish. But creating such an environment is a tremendous challenge. Capturing
Kids’ Hearts is a 3-day off-site learning experience that provides tools for administrators,
faculty and staff to build positive, productive, trusting relationships — among themselves and
with their students. These processes can transform the classroom and campus environment,
paving the way for high performance.

Outcomes: Participants will learn proven, repeatable skills that help:

      Develop safe, trusting, self-managing classrooms
      Improve classroom attendance by building students’ motivation and helping them take
       responsibility for their actions and performance
      Decrease delinquent behaviors such as disruptive outbursts, violent acts, drug use and
       other risky behavior
      Utilize the EXCEL Model™ and reinforce the role of emotional intelligence in
       teaching
      Develop students’ empathy for diverse cultures and backgrounds

Approach: CKH is a dynamic, skill-driven, participatory experience. It is not a theoretical or
motivational lecture, but the beginning of an important transformational process. Teachers,
staff, and administrators learn and practice skills they will use and model in their schools.

Who: Capturing Kids’ Hearts is meant for all faculty, staff, and campus-level administrators.
CKH is the core of a powerful process that allows every member of the school family to foster
and become part of a high-performing, learning community. We encourage schools to get
started by sending to Capturing Kids' Hearts training several respected teachers and
administrators-influential faculty and staff who encourage and inspire their peers.




         n. Implement a per pupil school based budget formula weighted and based on
            student needs.
                 Detroit Community Schools will take the total amount of Federal Funds
                   available to them, subtract district Expenditures, and divide the remainder
                   on a per-pupil basis.




                                              37
Appendix A                                                                   Merit Pay Program


Performance Awards Program @
Detroit Community Schools
K-12 General Education Teachers

The Performance Awards Program @ Detroit Community Schools is open to all full-time
K-12 general education teachers. Special Education personnel, paraprofessionals, intervention
teachers are not covered in this plan. This program runs from the beginning of the school year to
the end of the school year.

There will be (2) two separate “pay outs” (Round 1 and Round 2) made available to general
education teachers. The first payout will be made by the end of the calendar year. The second
payout will occur at the end of the school year in June.

The monetary award pool for the DCS Merit Pay has been set at $100,000. The payouts are
based on earned and accumulated points. (see table below)

As a gesture of appreciation for all of the hard work generated to get the this school year off to a
positive start and as a symbol of our commitment to retaining quality educators, each K-12
general education teacher will receive a $500 stipend during the month of December. The
administration of DCS genuinely appreciates you as educators, individuals, and contributing
members of a district reimagining itself.

All of the $100,000 Merit Pay monies will be distributed to K-12 general education teachers.
With this being said, it is possible that teachers scoring in the “Level 1” category can earn
additional pay on top of the set amount.

Round 1

Level Amount Point Scale
             Level                             Amount                           Point Scale
               1                               $2,040                             90-100
               2                               $1,632                              89-89
               3                               $1,224                              70-79
               4                                $816                               60-69
               5                                $408                               50-59


Round 2
Level Amount Point Scale
             Level                             Amount                           Point Scale
               1                               $2,040                             90-100
               2                               $1,632                              89-89
               3                               $1,224                              70-79
               4                                $816                               60-69
               5                                $408                               50-59

                                                 38
Categories and Weighted Scores include:

Academic Achievement
50 points – Round 2 Only

Teacher’s Personal Attendance
20 points – Rounds 1 and 2

Principal Evaluation
20 points – Rounds 1 and 2

Professional Staff Development
20 points – Rounds 1 and 2
8
Disciplinary Referrals
20 points – Rounds 1 and 2

After School Contribution
20 points – Rounds 1 and 2

Explanation of Categories:
Teacher’s Personal Attendance (20 points possible)

Student achievement is directly related to effective teaching. In order for this effective
teaching to occur, a teacher’s presence is required on a consistent basis.

Each teacher begins with 10 points. Points are deducted for missed days of school
after (2) two absences. Days that are excused or not counted against the allotted (10)
points include: school-related days (i.e. professional staff development) or the death of
an immediate family member.

            20 points                         10 points                            0 points
          0-2 absences                       3-5 absence                     5 0r more absences


Principal Evaluation (20 points possible)
Educational Leaders consistently conduct classroom “walk throughs” to gauge if
effective teaching taking place in the classrooms as well as perform mandated teacher
evaluations. Effective leaders are visible and maintain communication with staff
members.


Each building principal will evaluate general education teachers by assigning points
ranging from (1 to 20) considering such factors as: Planning and Preparation, the
Classroom Environment, Instruction, and Professional Responsibilities.

                                                 39
                     20 points                15 points                 10 points                  5 points                2 points
               Teacher exceeds          Teacher meets            Teacher meets              Teacher meets           Teacher is showing
               expectations in all of   expectations in all of   expectations in at         expectations in at      growth in meeting
               the areas of:            the areas of:            least (2) two of the       least (1) one of the    expectations in all of
               Planning and             Planning and             areas of: Planning         areas of: Planning      the areas of:
               Preparation, the         Preparation, the         and Preparation, the       and Preparation, the    Planning and
               Classroom                Classroom                Classroom                  Classroom               Preparation, the
               Environment,             Environment,             Environment,               Environment,            Classroom
               Instruction, and         Instruction, and         Instruction, and           Instruction, and        Environment,
               Professional             Professional             Professional               Professional            Instruction, and
               Responsibilities.        Responsibilities.        Responsibilities.          Responsibilities.       Professional
                                                                                                                    Responsibilities.



               Professional Staff Development (20 points possible)
               Attending and participating in Professional Staff Development increases teaching pedagogy in
               many different aspects for classroom teachers. Being in regular attendance for scheduled PSD
               days is critical to the success of Detroit Community Schools.

               Each teacher begins with 20 points. Points are deducted for missed Professional Staff
               Development day. Days that are excused or not counted against the allotted (20) points
               include the death of an immediate family member.

                               20 points                              10 points                                    0 points
                              0 absences                             1-2 absence                             3 0r more absences


               Disciplinary Referrals (20 points possible)

               Effective classroom management is a key component to academic success and effective teacher
               pedagogy. In order for these two critical educational aspects to occur, a teacher’s classroom
               management should result in few, minimal disciplinary referrals. Disciplinary referrals will not
               be necessary if students have a solid understanding of expectations, those expectations are
               followed through consistently, students are engaged, and the rapport between teacher and
               student(s) is strong.

               Each teacher begins with 20 points. For each incident that requires a disciplinary referral, there
               will be a deduction of 1 point for each incident – not for each student. Referrals for uniform and
               attendance do not apply.

               Consideration will be determined by the building principal in the event of special circumstances
               including, but not limited to: students with special needs, students experiencing extraordinary
               circumstances, etc.

    0 pts.        18 pts.         16 pts.        14 pts.        12 pts.          5 pts.          4 pts.         3 pts.         2 pts.            0 pts.
      0              1               2              3              4               5               6              7              8                9+
disciplinary   disciplinary    disciplinary   disciplinary   disciplinary    disciplinary    disciplinary   disciplinary   disciplinary      disciplinary
  referrals      referrals       referrals      referrals      referrals       referrals       referrals      referrals      referrals         referrals


                                                                            40
After School Contribution (20 points possible)

With the many and varied needs of our students, time after school may be necessary in order to
provide additional academic support, mentoring, guidance, enrichment, etc.

Teachers can earn up to (20) twenty points for voluntarily contributing to after school initiatives
that reflect positively to Detroit Public Schools. These points will be based on the number hours
contributed to each after school opportunity made available to students.

Examples of such after school initiatives include, but are not limited to: e2020 Credit Recovery,
clubs, coaching, student advisory groups, student academic tutoring, student council, Destination
Imagination, robotics, Math Pentathlon, ACT preparation, performances, Math night, Science
night, etc.
8
Administrative approval by a building principal, the Chief Academic Officer, or the
Superintendent MUST be made prior to the beginning of the after school opportunity in order to
receive points towards Merit Pay.

         20 points                      15 points                           10 points                       5 points
A total of at least 60 hours   A total of at least 40 hours        A total of at least 30 hours   A total of at least 15 hours
were contributed towards       were contributed towards            were contributed towards       were contributed towards
 administrative approved        administrative approved             administrative approved        administrative approved
  after school initiative        after school initiative             after school initiative         after school initiative

Academic Achievement (50 points possible)

The overarching purpose of providing DCS staff members with Merit Pay is to increase student
achievement. Given that the fall months provided baseline data, the spring assessments will be
able to provide a more accurate measurement of growth. Below is a breakdown of the Academic
Achievement portion of the Merit Pay performance:

Kindergarten:
Fall to Spring comparison of students

1st grade:
Fall to Spring comparison of students

2nd – 5th grade:
Fall to Spring comparison of NWEA for Student Growth

50 points – 90% or more of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading and
Math
40 points – 80-89% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading and Math
30 points – 70-79% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading and Math
20 points – 60-69% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading and Math
10 points – 50-59% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading and Math

                                                              41
6th-10th grade Mathematics:
Fall to Spring comparison of NWEA for Student Growth
50 points – 90% or more of students meet Student Growth expectation in Math
40 points – 80-89% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Math
30 points – 70-79% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Math
20 points – 60-69% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Math
10 points – 50-59% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Math

6th-10th grade Reading:
Fall to Spring comparison of NWEA for Student Growth
50 points – 90% or more of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
40 points – 80-89% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
30 points – 70-79% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
20 points – 60-69% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
10 points – 50-59% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading

6th-12th grade Social Studies and Science teachers along with Encore teachers:
Fall to Spring comparison of NWEA for Student Growth
50 points – 90% or more of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
40 points – 80-89% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
30 points – 70-79% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
20 points – 60-69% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading
10 points – 50-59% of students meet Student Growth expectation in Reading

6th-8th grade Social Studies, Science = 8th grade Reading
9th-12th grade Social Studies, Science = 10th grade Reading
K-8 Encore teachers = 8th grade Reading
9-12 Encore teachers = 10th grade Reading

Note: It is understood that not every teacher has a “direct line” to the instruction of reading.
However, due to the fact that DCS has been recognized as a Low Performing school district, it
will take the efforts of every staff member, regardless of their assignment, to raise academic
achievement. Please consider the amount of educational expertise that exists within this district.

By truly becoming a Professional Learning Community, we can utilize the knowledge, expertise,
and experience of truly gifted educators to impact student achievement. We are all in this
together.




                                                42
Appendix B                                                    Professional Development Calendar

         DETROIT COMMUNITY SCHOOLS
                                     Professional Staff Development
                                         2010-2011 School Year

This PSD – Professional Staff Development calendar has been designed to align with School
Improvement goals, SVSU – Saginaw Valley State University’s Benchmarks and Goals, as well as with the
SIG – School Improvement submitted and approved by the MDE.

Given that MME Mathematics scores were only at 4% proficiency, a great deal of the PSD being
implemented has been to support teachers with the newly acquired Carnegie Learning – Mathematics.
High School Mathematics teachers are receiving PSD on the Carnegie model along with in-class support
while administration is involved in Data Analysis meetings.

All of the PSD this school is focused instruction in the four content areas of ELA – English Language Arts,
Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.




              MONDAY                                  TUESDAY                   WEDNESDAY                             THURSDAY

                            August 23                               August 24               August 25                                  A

                                                                                                        Welcome back PSD
                                                                                                        MM1 Enrollment
                                                                                                        Principal led bldg. meetings

                            August 30                               August 31


K-1 MLPP training                       K-5 HM Reading training
2-12 NWEA training                      7-9 ELA Expert 21 training
9-12 Interdisciplinary Connections      9-12 Core Content e2020 training
                                        9-12 Electives - Curriculum Mapping




                                                              43
               MONDAY                             TUESDAY                               WEDNESDAY                                THURSDAY




                         October 4                             October 5                               October 6                                 O

                                     “Snapshot” with Wayne RESA mentors

                        October 11                            October 12                              October 13                               Oc


  NO STUDENTS - PD Day
K-1 MLPP training
2-10 NWEA
Electives - Dr. Lee

                        October 18                            October 19                              October 20                               Oc


                                                                                                                   5-12 Social Studies -
                                                                                                                   Reaching All Learners: Skill Bu
                                                                                                                   Dyn Methods Teaching Key Sk
                                                                           9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -           Young Learners
                                                                           In class support and guidance
                                                                                                                   Reaching All Learners: Writing
                                                                           Expert 21 -                             Understanding-Turning Studen
                                                                           In class support                        Powerful Writers
                                                                           AM - MS ELA
                                                                           PM - MS ELA                             Reaching All Learners: Respon
                                                                                                                   Groups - Cultivating Rich Class
                                                                                                                   Discussions

                        October 25                            October 26                              October 27                               Oc

                                                                           Read 180 -
                                                                           In class support and guidance




                                                         44
              MONDAY                                   TUESDAY                               WEDNESDAY                               THURSDAY
                          November 1                               November 2                            November 3                                 Nov
                                          NO STUDENTS - PD Day
                                       K-5 Math Expressions -
                                       Math Expressions Institute I

                                       6-8 Algebra Readiness -
                                       Algebra Readiness in the middle
K-5 Math Expressions -                 School                                   BCMSC 7th grade Science Unit            9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -
Math Expressions Institute I                                                    training                                On site Instructional Coaching
                                       9-12 Carnegie Math

                                       5-12 Social Studies -
                                       Developing Content Literacy:
                                       Supporting Struggling Writers

                                       Electives - Dr. Lee
                          November 8                               November 9                             November 10                              Nove
                                                                                9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -
                                                                                On site Instructional Coaching
                                       9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -
                                       On site Instructional Coaching
                                                                                Charlotte Danielson –
                                                                                Framework Workshop
                         November 15                             November 16                            November 17                                Nove

                                                                                                                        K-6 HM Journeys -
                                                                                                                        Differentiated Learning

                         November 22                             November 23                            November 24                                Nove


                                                                                                                        Happy Thanksgi
                         November 29                             November 30




              MONDAY                                 TUESDAY                              WEDNESDAY                               THURSDAY
                                                                                                        December 1                                Decem

                                                                              Expert 21 -
                                                                              In class support                       K-6 HM -
                                                                              AM - MS ELA                            In class support and guidance
                                                                              PM - MS ELA

                          December 6                             December 7                             December 8                                Decem



                                                              45
December 13                          December 14                      December 15   Decemb
              9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -
              In class support and guidance        Carnegie Math training –
            4-7 p.m. Carnegie - MMC Pacing-        PD Day
            Correlation Guides
December 20                       December 21                         December 22   Decemb



                                                          Winter Break

December 27                          December 28                      December 29   Decemb


                                                          Winter Break




                                    46
               MONDAY                               TUESDAY                             WEDNESDAY                               THURSDAY
                         January 3                              January 4                              January 5                                   J
                                                                                                                   Danielson Framework
                                                                                                                   12-3:30 p.m. & 4-7 p.m.
                        January 10                             January 11                             January 12                               Ja



                        January 17                             January 18                             January 19                               Ja

                                                                                                                   5-12 Social Studies -
                                                                                                                   The Interactive Notebook: Cre
                                                                                                                   Dynamic repositories of Stude
NO School - MLK Day                                                                                                Evaluating Interactive Student
                                                                                                                   Notebooks

                                                                                                                   Study Island K-8
                        January 24                             January 25                             January 26                               Ja
                                     Expert 21 -
Expert 21 -                          In class support
                                     AM - 9th ELA                           9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -          9-12 Math Carnegie Learning
In class support                                                            In class support and guidance
                                     PM - Read 180                                                                 In class support and guidance
AM - MS ELA
PM - MS ELA                                                                 Reading Apprenticeship
                                     Carnegie Status meeting                                                       Reading Apprenticeship

                        January 31




               MONDAY                               TUESDAY                             WEDNESDAY                               THURSDAY
                                                               February 1                             February 2                               Fe




                        February 7                             February 8                             February 9                             Feb




                                                          47
                                 9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -
                                 In class support and guidance          Carnegie Math PD day


February 14        February 15                            February 16                          Feb




February 21        February 22                            February 23                          Feb


                                           Winter Break

February 28




              48
MONDAY                           TUESDAY                                  WEDNESDAY                                  THURSDAY
                                                    March 1                                   March 2




          March 7                                   March 8                                   March 9                           M

                    9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -             9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -             Carnegie Learning -
                    In class support and guidance             In class support and guidance             Onsite Data Analysis

         March 14                              March 15                                  March 16                               M




         March 21                              March 22                                  March 23                               M




         March 28                              March 29                                  March 30                               M




                                         49
  MONDAY                               TUESDAY                                   WEDNESDAY                            THURSDAY




                April 4                                    April 5                             April 6

                          9-12 Math Carnegie Learning -              Carnegie Learning -                 9-12 Math Carnegie Learning
                          In class support and guidance              Onsite Data Analysis                In class support and guidance

               April 11                                   April 12                            April 13




               April 18                                   April 19                            April 20


                                                                               Spring Break

               April 25                                   April 26                            April 27



Spring Break




                                               50
                MONDAY               TUESDAY                WEDNESDAY            THURSDAY
                         May 2                     May 3                May 4




                         May 9                     May 10               May 11




                         May 16                    May 17               May 18

  NO STUDENTS - PD Day Carnegie Math PD day
Carnegie Math

                         May 23                    May 24               May 25




                         May 30                    May 31

         Memorial Day




                                              51
MONDAY             TUESDAY                 WEDNESDAY                   THURSDAY
                                                              June 1




          June 6               June 7                         June 8




         June 13              June 14                        June 15


                                        Last day of school

         June 20              June 21                        June 22




         June 27              June 28                        June 29




                         52
Appendix C        DCS Surveys




             53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
Appendix D                   Community & School Partnerships




             Detroit Community Schools




                        65
                                     Community Partnerships
                                          Detroit Community Schools

                                        School/Community Partnerships

                                          “A Promise Neighborhood”

                                                                                                    I.
Brightmoor Alliance:

          “The Brightmoor Alliance is a coalition of 33 organizations dedicated to serving northwest Detroit’s
Brightmoor community. Brightmoor is an approximately 4 square mile area bordered by Puritan on the north;
Fullerton on the south; Telegraph on the west; and Evergreen/Westwood on the east.
          The Brightmoor Alliance was established in response to conditions in the community, such as poor
housing, a high crime rate, and a staggering amount of vacant land. Community organizations—many of which had
partnered with one another over the years—felt that the time was right to mobilize community resources and
focus their combined efforts to revitalize the area. Encouraged by city officials, an ad hoc steering committee
drafted a memorandum of understanding. This document was signed by the 17 member charter organizations,
formally establishing the Brightmoor Alliance in January 2000.
          The members of the Alliance share a vision for the community that is built on faith, and provides
opportunities for all residents of this community to pray, grow, learn, thrive and play. Schools, employment,
safety, housing, human services, shopping and recreation are the important issues that the Alliance addresses.”
          Detroit Community Schools has been a member organization/stakeholder of the Brightmoor Alliance since
2008, and in December of 2010 was voted by members of the community to serve on the nine member
Brightmoor Alliance Board as the community member stakeholder. Given the critical changes that are taking place
in the City of Detroit, changes that will have a profound impact on the Brightmoor community and the many
students who attend Detroit Community Schools, it is important for the ‘voice’ of Detroit Community to be
represented on the board. At present, there are a group of community residents and stakeholders who are deeply
involved in looking at an alternative future that will attract residents to Brightmoor, as opposed to moving them
out. Their vision statement: Brightmoor is an innovative community where people of modest means can live,
learn, work, commune, recreate and worship in a safe, healthy, culturally diverse and sustainable environment.
(Exhibit A)
          Direct impact of the Brightmoor Alliance is on approximately 340 families that attend Detroit Community
Schools.

 II. Pre-K through 20:
           The Federal School Improvement Grant, the governor of Michigan, the Michigan Department of
Education and a wide range of educational researchers and professionals in the field all agree that a true and
complete education begins at an early age and reaches beyond the high school years into college, hence the “new”
emphasis on Pre-K through 20 education. With this in mind, a partnership developed between Detroit
Community Schools, Development Centers, Inc. and Little Scholars (known as the Cody/Rouge-Brightmoor
Continuum) to provide a seamless connection of educational, social and health services for children and
families living in the combined neighborhoods to support the healthy growth and development of all children from
birth through higher education and training. (Exhibit B)
           During the past six months the partners have developed and submitted an extensive plan to pursue a
competitive grant through First Children’s Finance known as the Multi-Service Growth Fund. In January of 2011,

                                                       66
we were informed that we were among the small group that had been selected. The Growth Fund will provide for
the following services:

        $50,000 in contractual services and products to develop and implement a business plan;
        a blueprint for providing high-impact services for families and young children that enhances the financial
         condition and supports the mission; and
        the opportunity to network and exchange ideas with other participants, the Growth Fund Advisors, and
         other industry experts.

          Participation in the Multi-Service Growth Fund will provide an opportunity to develop a new business
model with quality child-care as the core for providing holistic services to families. Woven into this
strategic/business plan is the ‘build-out’ of 50,000 square feet of unoccupied space and the intention of developing
a pre-K center and full-service health clinic on location. As a first step, we are doing a parent/teacher zoomerang
survey of all of the existing twenty-seven pre-K initiatives in Brightmoor and from there we are offering a parent
outreach/child enrollment/teacher development training for the pre-K sites at Detroit Community Schools. This
will take place in March of 2011. The outreach effort can be seen as an initial step in ‘capacity building’ and has the
potential of reaching 300 families. As this plan evolves during the course of the next school year, we will engage
the University of Detroit School of Architecture to work with our high school students to develop the design and
architectural plans for the build out. This will involve 20 architectural students and 20 high school students and be
conducted on location.
          The other end of the spectrum is the establishment of the ‘community college connection’, and since we
have had a long-term partnership with Henry Ford Community College, we are pursuing conversations that involve
the development of training modules for sustainable/green enterprise, entrepreneurial endeavors and health
training.
III. Community Partnerships:
          Community partnerships provide a unique system of support for student achievement and are
fundamental to the enhancement of the wellbeing of the school and the community. The Detroit Community
Schools-School/Community Partnerships table represented below is designed to address the following key areas:
                Core Subject Knowledge
                Applied Learning
                21 Century Skills
                      st



         All of the activities of the partnering organizations must have these three components embedded within
their programs, and the programming is designed for after-school/year round and summer activities. They are
conceived to give ‘wholeness’ to the child’s education and to provide a continuum of services that extend
throughout the day and beyond the traditional school year.




                                                          67
Community Partnering            Core Subject      Applied Learning        21 Century Skills
   Organizations                Knowledge



         1.

Detroit Youth Energy    -Environmental         -Energy Education       -Service Learning
Squad (DYES)/WARM       Science
Training/AmeriCorps                            -Basic Retrofits        -Teamwork
                        -Civics
                                                                       -Oral Communication

                                                                       -Problem Solving

                                                                       -Work Skills

         2.

     Brightmoor         -ACT Prep              -College-Career         -Work Ethic
College/Career Access                          Preparation and
  Network (BCCAN)                              Readiness

                                               -Guidance Counseling
                                               (6-12)



         3.

   Hub of Detroit       -Physics               -Mechanical Skills      -Work Ethic

    “Earn-a-Bike”       -Introduction to       -Health and Safety      -Teamwork
                        Mechanics              Protocols
                                                                       -Problem Solving


         4.

  Summer Youth          -Science               -Green Sustainability   -Service Learning
Employment Program                             (Urban
                        -Mathematics           Agriculture/Building    -Work Ethic
                                               Restoration
                        -Arts                                          -Teamwork
                                               -Community Aesthetics
                                                                       -Communication
                                               -Community Building
                                                                       -Leadership




                                               68
            5.

New Work/New Culture         -Business Principles   -School Run Businesses   -Social
                                                                             Entrepreneurship
                             -Financial Literacy    -Business
                                                    Apprenticeships          -Creativity and
                                                                             Innovation

            6.

     East Michigan           -Environmental         -“Ugliest Schoolyard”    -Problem Solving
 Environmental Action        Science                (Landscape,
   Council (EMEAC)                                  Architecture,            -Teamwork
                                                    Engineering)

            7.

Business Apprenticeships     -Career Exploration    -Work Experience         -Communication

                             -Business Operations   -Organization            -Work Ethic
                                                    Development




           8.

  Coleman A. Young                                         Life Skills
     Foundation
                                 DROP OUT           -Sexuality/Relations     -Teamwork
(REAL Skills Program)           PREVENTION
                                 PROGRAM            -Mind, Body, Spirit      -Conflict Resolution
 th             th
6 through 9 Grades
                                                    -Career/College

                                                    -Safety Awareness

                                                    -Financial Literacy

           9.

 Southeast Michigan        -Reading/Writing         -Community-Based         -environmental
Stewardship Coalition                               Learning                 stewardship
                           -Math
      (Professional                                 -Place-Based Education
      Development)         -Science

                           -Social Studies




                                                     69
          A detailed description of the partnerships and programs and their effect on student learning is described
in #’s 1-9. Supportive documentation is presented in Exhibit C.



    1.   Detroit Youth Energy Squad (DYES)/WARM Training and AmeriCorps


       Detroit Community High School has entered into partnership with WARM Training and AmeriCorp as the
only high school in Michigan to offer an entry level green training/weatherization program. Detroit Youth Energy
Squad is the high school counterpart of WARM Training. The following description is excerpted from the
Memorandum of Understanding that was agreed upon by all parties and can be found in (Exhibit C). Students who
show promise and interest are encouraged to pursue the 10 week weatherization course or enroll in the two year
energy sustainability program at Henry Ford Community College. To be chosen for the program, the students had
to submit a written application and go through a formal interview procedure by two full-time AmeriCorps member
crew leaders. The program is funded by AmeriCorps for a three year period and based upon data collection and
documentation will be a candidate for expansion and renewal.

Program Structure: 20 students, including at least 17 students from DCHS and 3 from Cody High School will be
enrolled as quarter-time AmeriCorps members and earn a $4,000 living stipend (disbursed bi-weekly) and a $1,400
education award which can be used at any higher education institution. The AmeriCorps term requires the
completion 450 hours with D-YES, which will average 8-10 hours per week during the year and 35 hours per week
during an 8-week summer session. As AmeriCorps members, students are participating in community service.
Even though they receive a stipend, their service should not be referred to as a job, work, or employment. The
benefits of participation are recognition of their commitments.

Training: An initial 30-hour training (Tues, Nov 2 – Sat, Nov 13) is conducted by DYES coordinator and WARM’s
Energy Educators. Training includes resources from the EPA, U.S. Department of Energy, Lawrence-Berkeley
National Laboratory, and other reputable sources. Objectives include:

    1) Assess student academic abilities, career interests, and energy attitudes and knowledge.

    2) Increase knowledge, awareness, and literacy of basic energy and sustainability issues.

    3) Strengthen leadership and interpersonal skills through teambuilding challenges.

    4) Build effective and respectful communication skills through modeling and role-playing.

    5) Provide extensive opportunities to practice fifteen energy-efficient retrofits.

    6) Offer real-world practice through “Apprenticeship Days” with energy educators.

    7) Promote jobs and careers in Michigan’s rapidly growing clean energy economy.

Service: The most significant component of D-YES is providing free home energy visits for lower-income families in
Detroit. D-YES prioritizes this service for seniors, people with disabilities, and others needing assistance installing
supplies in their homes. Free home energy visits include teaching residents how to read and understand their
energy bills, encouraging households to adopt energy-conserving behaviors, and installing a range of basic energy
efficient supplies, including weatherstripping, caulking, pipe insulation, high efficiency water fixtures, and compact
fluorescent light bulbs. DCHS is welcome to promote these free visits to parents and other constituents.

                                                          70
        During the year, each student will participate in 2 home energy visits per week, and 12 per week during an
intensive summer session. By the end of the program session, each student will have an impressive 150 home
energy visits under her or his belt. In the process of helping households save $250 or more per year in energy
costs, students improve communication and organizational skills, leadership, and teamwork.

Education: Afternoon educational activities will focus on sustainability, climate change, social and environmental
justice, urban revitalization, and green jobs. These activities will incorporate a variety of formats, including field
trips, guest speakers, films, debates, and other interactive formats. We hope to provide a forum where students
gain essential literacy about sustainability and the green economy and think critically about issues with both local
and global impacts.

Career and Personal Development: Career development activities will include assessment of skills and interests,
goal-setting, identifying the credentials needed for different career paths, meetings with employers, and basic
employability skill-building (mock interviews, etc.). Each student will receive individualized feedback and coaching
as they consider and hone their career goals. Students will work with the same group of AmeriCorps crew leaders
throughout the year. Crew leaders are selected as role models and individuals who can help bring out the best in
students. Personal development activities may include teambuilding, personal goal-setting and reflection, healthy
living workshops, home repair, time management, and financial management.

Community Greening Projects: Community greening projects will be the culmination of service, education, career
and personal development and tie D-YES to the broader community. Students will work with crew leaders and
community groups to identify opportunities to improve local sustainability. These projects might include public
art, gardening, recycling, energy assessments for small businesses, alternative transportation corridors, etc.
Projects will follow a clear process of identifying the issue, developing a plan, implementing the plan,
communicating the results to stakeholders, and evaluation.



    2.   Brightmoor Career/College Access Network (BCCAN):


Mission of BCCAN: Through integrated community networks-including schools, service providers, the faith-based
community, families, private foundations, businesses, and higher education institutions-we aim to advocate for
and better position students in the Brightmoor neighborhood of Detroit for postsecondary education access.

Community Partners: Detroit Community Schools; University of Michigan: National Forum on Higher Education for
the Public Good; University of Michigan: Center for Educational Outreach; Brightmoor Alliance; City Mission;
Northwest Detroit Neighborhood Development; Next Detroit Neighborhood Initiative; Coleman A. Young
Foundation; Fisher Foundation; National Community Development Institute; Community Foundation of Southeast
Michigan; Charter One Bank.

Detroit Community Schools: Funding for the BCCAN was awarded in a grant via the Michigan College Access
Network for both ‘start-up’ and subsequent full funding. The fiduciary for the grant is Northwest Detroit
Neighborhood Development, and Detroit Community Schools is serving as the pilot institution in the Brightmoor
community because we are the only high school there. Future planning will include the Cody/Rouge community. A
review of the neighborhood snapshots found in Exhibit C for Brightmoor and Cody-Rouge will give a clear
indication of the scarcity of college preparatory services, and how BCCAN is servicing both school and community



                                                          71
needs through partnerships. The program began in the fall of 2010 and is now in a full implementation phase. The
following resources have been made available for 600 students and their families.

 AmeriCorps Representative: Individualized College Planning Process: Works individually with 11th and 12th grade
students to develop and implement a planning process for college entry. This includes: goal setting, scholarship
awareness, financial aid, interest surveys, meeting deadlines, college essay help, etc. The AmeriCorps
representative works two days per week at Detroit Community High School and coordinates the activities through
the school counselors.

University of Michigan: Center for Educational Outreach: Future You Program

        The Future You program was developed by CEO to provide college access and an on campus experience to
academically gifted, underserved and underrepresented Middle School students. There are currently 30 sixth
grade middle school students in the program, and the plan is to extend this program with the same group into high
                                        th
school while picking up a new group of 6 graders each year.

          The Center for Educational Outreach in partnership with middle schools will collaborate to work with
selected students to increase awareness through college access workshops. The Future You program aligns with
the five points of CEO, primarily focusing on serving a diverse student body and providing access to higher
education.

         The CEO Future You program provides college access and support for middle school students and parents:


Brief Description:
                                                                                           th
CEO offers the Future You program to underrepresented and underserved students grades 6 that are
academically talented. The program will teach students about the importance of Higher Education. The intent of
                                                                                                    th
the program is to provide interactive workshops, campus visits, and college access to the selected 6 grade
students and to encourage and provide information about the college going process and experience.

Goals:           -For the selected students to become more knowledgeable about college and goal setting.
                 -Provide access and pathways to higher education and post secondary education.
                  -Strengthen the college going culture within the student’s lives.

Process Objectives: -The implementation of pre and post college knowledge survey evaluations will be conducted
among the students.

                -Provide workshops and opportunities for middle school students and their families to better
understand higher education.

                  -To offer academic support and mentoring through graduate and undergraduates resources from
the University of Michigan.

Outcome Objectives: -Increased knowledge of higher education and its importance

                -To increase the enrollment of underserved and underrepresented students at the university of
Michigan through a pipeline.




                                                       72
Recruitment:      -During Fall 2010 we will select continue our partnership with middle school cohorts.
                  -Students: CEO will focus on the 30 students selected by the principals or counselors. Once we
have confirmed our students we will have an assembly with the parents, students and select staff from the school
inviting them to participate in the program. The method of initial contact will be through the schools selection
process then a reminder letter created by CEO. There will be a welcome back assembly that will provide the
parents and students with a packet that explains the program, the requirements, and why they should participate.

Workshop Structure:-The workshops will be lead by professors, graduate and undergraduate level students and
CEO staff.

                  -They will cover leadership skills, goal setting and planning, careers, and college knowledge.
                  -4 Campus visits through the academic school year focusing on different schools on campus

Resources Necessary        -Personnel :
                           -Outreach coordinator- oversees and facilitates programming
                           -UM students – facilitate college awareness and college access workshops
                           -Materials
                           -incentives
                           -Giveaways

                           -Snacks



University of Michigan: Center for Educational Outreach-College Corps

         College Corps. was developed by CEO to provide college and post secondary education preparation, and
awareness to middle and high school students. In addition, the program serves U-M students by promoting
mentorship opportunities and experiences with an interest in educational outreach, youth development, and
access to higher education.

        The Center for Educational Outreach in partnership with Project Community, a service-learning program
housed in the Ginsberg Center at the University of Michigan, and student organizations will draw upon
undergraduate students to participate in an academic enrichment and college awareness project at selected
Michigan Middle and High Schools.
                                                                                                             th
Brief Description:        CEO offers College Corps. to undergraduate students interested in assisting 9-10 grade
students and the community about the importance of Higher Education. The intent of the College Corps. is for U-
M students to provide information about the college going process and college preparation for students.

Goals:            -For middle and high school students to become more knowledgeable about college.
                  -Provide a pathway so students can access higher and post secondary opportunities education.

                  -Strengthen the involvement of U-M students who contribute to educational outreach.

Process Objectives:        -During fall 2010 – winter 2011, U-M students will facilitate a series of workshops once a
week, for 10 weeks, in select Michigan public Middle and High Schools to provide pre-college workshops.
                           -To recruit U-M students and student organizations that are interested in outreach.



                                                         73
Outcome Objectives:          -Increase in grades through academic assistance.
                             -Increased knowledge of higher education and its importance

Recruitment:              -Students: CEO is recruiting students who are looking for an opportunity to provide
college workshops and mentorship with underserved youth. Also, U-M students will be able to discuss their college
experiences with youth and the community. Brief announcements are being made at current student organization
meetings that are interested in our efforts. More specifically,

                             -CEO is targeting the following:
                                      -Multi-cultural student organizations
                                      -Educational Outreach student initiative groups
                                      -Volunteer student organizations

Resources Necessary:         -Personnel
                             -Outreach coordinator oversees all programming

                             -UM students facilitate college awareness and college access workshops
                             -Materials/Info packets/Incentives/Giveaways/Snacks

Process:           -Students: To join the College Corps
                   -Students are able to receive service learning credit through the Ginsberg Center, but this is not
           required.

Fieldtrip & Events:-Each semester, students are invited to receive college campus exposure through a fieldtrip to
U-M.

                   -Each semester, the field trip programming is centered on pre-college knowledge and ncouraging
           educational endeavors in various academic areas of interest.

                    -We provide a parent night each semester, as well. This event is structured around information:
                    -Benefits of attending college
                    -How parents can assist their student

Evaluation:

                   -Pre and post survey evaluations after every session will be conducted among students to gauge
               the effectiveness of the workshops.
                   -Outreach Coordinator will complete the P.E.A.R. forms to assess the effectiveness of
                   programming.


University of Michigan: ACT Prep:
                                                                                                             th
        12 students from the University of Michigan are working with Detroit Community High School 11 grade
students in preparation for the MME/ACT test.

Neighborhood College Night:

        As an offering to the Brightmoor community, Detroit Community High School and BCCAN offered a
‘neighborhood college night’. Representatives from University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; University of Michigan-


                                                           74
Dearborn; Schoolcraft College; Eastern Michigan University; Wayne State University; Oakland University; Henry
Ford Community College; Michigan State University; College for Creative Studies and University of Detroit-Mercy
set up information tables. Additional information was given on financial aid and the application processes. The
event was timed to coincide with parent/teacher conferences, and more than 100 parents and students sought
information.

Financial Aid Night:

        Offered on site for DCHS parents with professional help in filling out the FAFSA and college scholarship
information. Attended by 135 parents and families.

Michigan Campus Compact College Positive Communities Grant Proposal:
                                   th
          Phase I: Work with 25 11 grade students to explore career interests, aptitudes and academic goals and
identify summer programs offered at surrounding colleges that align with student’s career interests, aptitudes and
academic goals.
                                             th   th
         Phase II: Expand program to all 8 – 11 grade students in DCS and Brightmoor neighborhood.

        Phase III: Expand program to all youth grades 6-11 in Brightmoor neighborhood and surrounding
neighborhoods. (see grant proposal in Exhibit C)



         3. Hub of Detroit (‘earn-a-bike’)

       The Hub of Detroit proposes to initiate a bicycle maintenance and safe cycling curriculum, instruction and
shop set up for middle and high school students of Detroit Community Schools. The Hub of Detroit is a non-profit
that provides cycling education and services with a focus on youth development, sustainable practices, and
community access. The program will begin in late March of 2011 with the intention of continuing into the
2011/2012 school year. Each nine-week block of eighteen sessions will accommodate fifteen middle and high
school students and will incorporate mechanical maintenance and repair as well as applied physics into the
curriculum. Those students who complete the program will earn a bicycle as recompense for their efforts. This
partnership is the only one of its kind in the City of Detroit that is associated with a school. We are considering
partnering this initiative with the ‘safe-routes’ to schools and as a bicycling transportation program for alternative
community redevelopment practices in the Brightmoor community. An extension of this program into the
dynamics of a changing city, changing neighborhood is an example of ‘project-based’ learning in the form of
applied mechanics, civics and community service lessons.

       4. Summer Youth Employment: (Described in Numeral VI)

       5. New Work/New Culture: (Described in Numeral V)

       6. East Michigan Environmental Action Council: (EMEAC)

Detroit Community Schools has been the recipient of the $10,000 “Ugliest Schoolyard” grant from the East
Michigan Environmental Action Council. The purpose of this award is to create an outdoor classroom with the
                                       th
design help of a group of twenty-five 8 grade students who meet on a weekly basis to plan and implement this
project. They are guided by representatives from EMEAC while they plan for the project implementation during the
spring/summer of 2011 and are exposed to a wide variety of environmental issues. “The East Michigan

                                                          75
Environmental Action Council (EMEAC) began as a response in the 1960's to environmental concerns in southeast
Michigan. Algae blooms were choking out life in Great Lakes and inland waters. Household and industrial wastes
were piling up in landfills. Air pollutants were becoming a health issue in many urban neighborhoods and highways
and buildings were covering up wetlands and open areas at the urban fringe.” The Ugliest Schoolyard Grant is
made to a select group of applicants.

       7. Business Apprenticeships:

        Starting in the Brightmoor and Cody/Rouge communities and moving out into the city, a system of business-
oriented apprenticeships will be developed that will provide upper level high school students with an opportunity
to experience careers and apprenticeships of their choosing. The program will provide them an opportunity for
work in the ‘real world’ and better prepare them for the workforce when enrolled in an institution of higher
learning. This program is in a planning phase during the spring/summer of 2011 and will be implemented on a pilot
basis in the fall of 2011 with a select group of students. All aspects of the program will follow the guidelines:
        -Core Subject Knowledge
        -Applied Learning
           st
        -21 Century Skills

Evaluations of student performance will be conducted on a weekly basis via the office of School/Community
Partnerships.
      8. Coleman A. Young Foundation (REAL Skills Program)

This is a ten-week dropout prevention and life skills program that will involve both students and parents from the
 th              th
6 through the 9 grades. Weekly themes are presented during Saturday sessions that cover a wide range of
topics: Program Orientation; Sexual Responsibility and Relationships; Mind, Body and Spirit; Teamwork; Conflict
Resolution; Career/College Consideration Exploration; Safety Awareness; Financial Responsibility and a day of
Testimony. A college visit to Grand Valley State University will be part of the college/career orientation (Exhibit C).

       9. Southeast Michigan Stewardship Coalition:

Primary Goal:

“The Southeast Michigan Stewardship Coalition is made up of schools, community partners, teacher consultants,
and university educators working together to address serious ecological and social problems in Southeast
Michigan. We facilitate school-community partnerships and offer sustained professional development to teachers
to develop students as citizen-stewards who understand and can promote healthy ecological and social systems
affecting the Great Lakes basin, the southeast Michigan region and their communities.

What We Offer Your School:

    1. A team of teachers will engage in sustained professional development combining content, pedagogy,
         ongoing support, and community involvement funded by SEMIS through the Great Lakes Stewardship
         Initiative.
    2. Local and regional community groups form partnerships with the school as members of a sustained
         professional learning community that includes other participating schools.
    3. Students will become stewards of their local community as evidenced by a) engagement in and completion
         of place-based projects that address ecological and social problems and serve community needs; b)
         participation in cooperative relationships in the community to address real problems; c) willingness to
         examine and address their own assumptions about their relationships to and responsibilities for human
         and non-human members of communities.

                                                          76
    4. School administrators, teachers and students become members of the SEMIS Coalition where they have
         access to the resources and camaraderie of all of our partnering schools and community groups through
         networking meetings, a website, and shared public forums. In addition, teachers, administrators and
         students will have the opportunity to network statewide with other teachers and community
         organizations as participants in the Great Lakes Stewardship Initiative.
    5. We help teachers and students evaluate and communicate their work out to the local community, the
 region, and the state.”

IV. National/International Organizations:
       The national and international community has its eye on Detroit. There are groups and organizations that
are willing to invest in Detroit given the right circumstances. Excellent Schools Detroit and Michigan Futures are
welcoming successful educational operators into Detroit via the charter model. The city is reimaging itself through
Detroit Works; there is an urban gardening movement that is blossoming everywhere and there are growing
numbers of groups that are willing to volunteer their services to the community. Detroit Community Schools has
some strong connections in the national and international community. To name a few:

       RSF Social Finance-San Francisco
       Biodynamic Gardening and Farming Association headquartered in Wisconsin
       Sacred-Landscapes-Stuttgart, Germany
       Shade Tree Mentoring Foundation-Los Angeles
       New Work/New Culture-Ann Arbor


V. New Economy/New Work/New Culture:

        With the commencement of the 2011/2012 school year, Detroit Community High School will be entering a
pilot phase in the development of a community production facility. The building that we occupy has approximately
50,000 square feet of unoccupied space and is ideal for the development of community-based entrepreneurial
activities. Training our young people for the future of work has its foundations in the development of
entrepreneurial skills that can best be demonstrated through the practice of operating a school-run business. A
partial list of entrepreneurial skills taught is the following:

              Inner Discipline
              Courage to take Risks
              Innovation
              Adaptability to Change
              Persistency
              Visionary
              Communication Skills
              Financial/Business Skills
        We are currently working with Dr. Frithjof Bergmann (New Work/New Culture), Neighbors Building
Brightmoor, the Pastor’s Alliance and the Brightmoor Alliance towards the establishment of community-based
enterprise with the potential of supplying both students and their parents with employment opportunities. Our
first steps are to assess community needs, engage a group of students in the imagination of different business-
production companies/perform a feasibility study/produce a business plan/secure the funding and start the
operation. Exhibit D gives a more detailed outline of the work of Dr. Bergmann and New Work/New Culture.




                                                        77
VI. Year Round/Summer Youth Employment:

Current Situation of Youth Employment in the City of Detroit:

       The report, “System of Opportunities and Supports: Neighborhood Snapshots”, that was published by the
Skillman Foundation in Octobor of 2010 listed the following service delivery options at minimal levels in the Cody-
Rouge/Brightmoor neighborhoods. The table portrays the current situation within the primary neighborhoods
served by Detroit Community Schools.



                                             Neighborhood Snapshots

                                                         of

                                 Current Service Delivery Organizations/Options



                                               Cody-Rouge                           Brightmoor




Formal Volunteer Opportunities                      9%                                  0%




Youth Employment Preparation                        5%                                  6%




    Career Preparation and                          4%                                  11%
           Exposure




        Work Experience                             4%                                  0%




                                                         78
         The City of Detroit’s Youth Violence and Prevention Task Force that is chaired by City Council Members
Jenkins and Tate recognize that the city is in a state of emergency when it comes to youth employment. They
understand that young people must have meaningful activities if they are going to be encouraged to make
something of their lives and stay ‘off the streets’.

The Case for Youth Employment:

          At Detroit Community Schools, we have served as a worksite for the Summer Youth and Employment
Program (City of Detroit) since the summer of 2009 and have been able employ our students in community
revitalization projects both on site and on location in the Brightmoor neighborhood. (Exhibit E) Our observations
have revealed the following:



                The majority of young people have used their earnings for direct family support given the fact
                 that more than 85% of our students qualify for free and reduced lunch.
                A leadership corps of highly motivated and engaged students has grown out of the group of
                 students who have worked with us for two or more years.
                A sense of pride in one’s community through the active transformation and revitalization of
                 neighborhoods has grown into a student led initiative to start a recycling program at Detroit
                 Community Schools.
                A deeper dedication to community service and environmental awareness has awakened in the
                 students.
                Extended day and extended year opportunities have been offered as a supplement and
                 enrichment to the traditional classroom learning.
                Students have become motivated to achieve at a higher academic level knowing that their
                 employment is dependent upon maintaining a solid academic record.
                The core student group has inspired their peers to participate in these programs.
                Students have become motivated to ready themselves for advanced educational opportunities in
                 either career tracks through institutions like Henry Ford Community College or a professional
                 career through a four-year university program.
                Students have come to recognize and connect academic with applied, ‘real-world’ learning (see
                 photos and curriculum connections in Exhibit E).
                Students have come to know and work with young people and professionals from other cultures,
                 thus expanding their horizons and view of the world.
                Students have developed a sense of ‘work ethic’ that they have applied to the classroom setting.
                Students have come to understand that Service Learning is much more than a paycheck; that a
                 ‘calling’ is much more than a ‘job’.
                Neighborhood children have been integrated into the community arts portion of the summer
                 employment program.


                                                               st
Connecting Core Content Knowledge, Applied Learning and 21 Century Skills:

        Sustainable learning is rooted in two factors that have a profound effect on student achievement:
engagement and interest. Without either of these, student achievement is momentary, shallow and finite. Our
challenge is to broaden the educational pathway through a variety of forms that stimulate the imagination,
awaken the cognitive faculties and boost student achievement to new heights of learning.

        In an action research project conducted by Singleton, McDowell, Eddy and Sweda (2009), five levels of
student engagement and their inherent challenges were identified (see Exhibit E). It became obvious that the

                                                        79
more a student became engaged in his/her learning, the more their work ethic assumed a certain degree
effortlessness. So the question arises as to what forms of learning will increase student engagement, capture their
interest and develop a sense of work ethic that is relevant and applicable to the classroom and ‘real-world’
experience? Another way of saying this is to ask how the ‘real world’ can be brought to the classroom and how the
classroom can be brought to the ‘real world’? In a report issued by the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory
the following statement is made in regard to the efficacy of project-based instruction: “Project-based instruction is
an authentic instructional model or strategy in which students plan, implement, and evaluate projects that have
real-world applications beyond the class room (Blank, 1997; Dickinson, et al, 1998; Harwell, 1997). Learning
activities that are interdisciplinary, long term, and student centered are emphasized, rather than short, isolated
lessons (Challenge 2000 Multimedia Project)” (see Exhibit E). Project-based learning is one of the methodologies
that is designed to engage students in a heightened learning construct that ignites their passion and will to
achieve. Year round and summer youth employment is designed to accomplish all of the above.

Towards the Future:

          The summer of 2011 will see a significant increase in community partnerships and youth employment
opportunities. We estimate that over one hundred youth will find employment through Detroit Community, Youth
Growing Brightmoor, the Greening of Detroit, Mt. Vernon Missionary Baptist Church and the College for Creative
Studies. In turn, we will sponsor an international youth conference that will partner our youth with young people
from outside of Michigan and abroad for a week in July-(see Exhibit E for complete details).

         Additionally, we are proposing the following for both the Cody/Rouge and Brightmoor communities:

                                            Detroit Community Schools

                                              ‘A Hub of Opportunity’

                                           Children and Youth Initiative:

                                 Service Learning, Work and Career Development



             1.   College Access (BCCAN)
             2.   Career Pathways (College/University Partnerships)
             3.   Service Learning/Environmental Awareness/Sustainability
             4.   Youth Employment (Summer and Year Round)
             5.   Apprenticeships (Business Community)
             6.   Entrepreneurship (Community Production)


         Although many details will have to be worked out, we will develop this action plan during the course of
the next year with the idea in mind that we can serve the entire student body within a three-year framework.
Indeed, initiatives 1-4 are already underway while 5-6 are on the docket for the 2011-2012 school year.

VII. Skillman Goals 2016: Cody/Rouge-Brightmoor Children and Youth Initiative:
         The Skillman Foundation has designated six neighborhoods within the City of Detroit as being
targeted for improvement through their Good Schools and Good Neighborhoods initiative. Their most current
plan is known as the Skillman Goals 2016: Cody/Rouge-Brightmoor Children and Youth Initiative. By
combining two neighborhoods and coordinating service delivery via a yearlong planning grant, it is their
intention to implement programs in the 2011/2012 school year. These activities are designed to lead to the

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development of a high quality service delivery system that will improve the quality of life for children and
youth within both targeted neighborhoods. Community service needs were compiled in a study by Bradeis
University. Both the Cody/Rouge and Brightmoor communities represent highly organized and enriching
neighborhoods for children and youth to reside in. Both neighborhoods have rich histories and feature their
own unique neighborhood profiles. The Cody/Rouge-Brightmoor Children and Youth Initiative is designed to
build off the strengths of both separate and distinct neighborhoods. The collaborative partners within the
Initiative will work to maintain high quality services, address gaps in services, improve coordination of
services and share resources that will lead to the expansion of opportunities for children and youth within
both communities. We consider that Detroit Community Schools is one of those “Hubs of Opportunity” within
the Skillman neighborhood reach. 68% of our students come from the Cody/Rouge-Brightmoor communities
and the district is located on the boundary line between the two communities.
         This partnership is comprised of thirty (and growing) organizations that provide services to the
community. These groups are all engaged in some form of service delivery and are composed of local
mentoring or community-based agencies such as the Brightmoor Community Center; City Mission and Detroit
Community Schools; the Brightmoor Alliance and Cody-Rouge Community Action Alliance; Cody/Rouge Faith
Alliance; and city agencies such as City Year and the Youth Development Commission. The target population
consists of approximately 7,000 children in age range from 11-18. (Exhibit E).
         Detroit Community Schools has the capacity to provide service delivery for the two communities in
the following areas: recreation (state of the art gymnasium); credit recovery (extensive technology); after-
school arts and tutorial; mentoring and dropout prevention; youth employment and college/career access.
Our expectation is that we will become a ‘Hub of Opportunity’ for the two communities.



VIII. Local Foundations:
         Detroit Community has established significant relationships with a number of local foundations.
These currently include: Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation; the Ford Foundation; the Kresge and
Skillman Foundations. We have received small donations in support of our summer programming from
Kresge and Ford and are currently engaged in conversations with Fisher and Skillman in regard to the youth
employment issues in the Brightmoor community.
The Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan, Detroit, is a permanent community endowment built by gifts
from thousands of individuals and organizations committed to the future of southeast Michigan. Founded in 1984,
the foundation works to improve the region’s quality of life by supporting a wide variety of activities benefiting
education, arts and culture, health, human services, community development and civic affairs. www.cfsem.org

The mission of the Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation, Southfield, is to strengthen communities. The
foundation acts from a philosophy grounded in the beliefs of our founders and our shared Jewish values that life’s
purpose is found in service to others, in creating opportunities for those who lack them, empowering individuals in
self sufficiency, providing life-saving resources for those without them, and supporting human community in all its
forms from families to coalitions, cities to nations. www.mmfisher.org

The Ford Foundation, New York, is an independent, nonprofit grant-making organization. For more than half a
century it has been a resource for innovative people and institutions worldwide, guided by its goals of
strengthening democratic values, reducing poverty and injustice, promoting international cooperation and
advancing human achievement. With headquarters in New York, the foundation has offices in Africa, the Middle
East, Asia, Latin America, and Russia. www.fordfound.org

The Hudson-Webber Foundation, Detroit, seeks to improve the vitality and quality of life of the metropolitan
Detroit community. The Foundation concentrates its giving primarily within the city of Detroit and has a particular
interest in the revitalization of the urban core. At present, the Foundation concentrates its efforts and resources in
support of projects within five program missions: Detroit revitalization, safe community, the arts, economic
develop- ment and the Detroit Medical Center. www.hudson-webber.org

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The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek, was established in 1930 to “help people help themselves.” Specifically,
the organiza- tion supports children, families and communities as they strengthen and create conditions that
propel vulnerable children to achieve success as individuals and as contributors to the larger community and
society. Grants are concentrated in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the southern African
countries

of Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. www.wkkf.org

The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, Miami, invests in journalism excellence worldwide and in the vitality
of Detroit and 25 other U.S. communities. The foundation focuses on projects with the potential to create
transformational change. www.knightfoundation.org

The Kresge Foundation, Troy, is a private foundation established by Sebastian S. Kresge in 1924 “for the promotion
of human progress.” In partnership with grantees, Kresge seeks to influence the quality of life for future
generations by creating access and opportunity in underserved communities, supporting the revitalization of the
Detroit metropolitan region, and advancing methods for mitigating and adapting to global climate change. Nine
values drive the foundation’s grantmaking decisions. www.kresge.org

The McGregor Fund is a private foundation established in 1925 by gifts from Katherine and Tracy McGregor “to
relieve the misfortunes and promote the well-being of mankind.” The foundation awards grants to organizations in
the following areas: human services, education, health care, arts and culture, and public benefit. The area of
principal interest of the foundation is the City of Detroit and Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties. The
McGregor Fund has granted nearly $180 million since its founding and had assets of $197 million as of June 30,
2007. Visit www.mcgregorfund.org for additional information.

The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, established in 1926 in Flint, Michigan, by an automotive pioneer, is a
private philanthropy committed to supporting projects that promote a just, equitable and sustainable society. It
supports nonprofit programs throughout the U.S. and, on a limited geographic basis, internationally. Grantmaking
is focused in four programs: Civil Society, Environ- ment, Flint Area and Pathways Out of Poverty. Besides Flint,
offices are located in suburban Detroit, Johannesburg (South Africa) and London. The Foundation, with year-end
total assets of $2.63 billion, made 545 grants totaling $107.3 million in 2006. For more information, visit
www.mott.org.

The Skillman Foundation, Detroit, is a private philanthropy committed to helping children in metropolitan Detroit
by improving their homes, schools and neighborhoods. The goal of the Foundation’s programs is to achieve
significant results for kids. Skillman grantmaking primarily supports nonprofit organizations and agencies working
in six Detroit neighborhoods – Southwest Detroit (Vernor & Chadsey-Condon), Brightmoor, Osborn, Central, and
Cody-Rouge – and innovative, successful schools throughout the city of Detroit. www.skillman.org

IX. Brightmoor Pastor’s Alliance:
       A significant number of children who attend Detroit Community Schools are members of the 57 churches
that form the Brightmoor Pastor’s Alliance. The Pastor’s Alliance represents a highly significant voice in our
community that nurtures and stabilizes the families and their children. Exhibit G presents an overview of the
mission and vision of the Pastor’s Alliance and it is significant to note that one of their major goals is to support:
“Cutting edge education that empowers and attracts families into the community” Detroit
Community Schools has a strong and vibrant connection with the leadership group of the Brightmoor
Pastor’s Alliance. Please see their letter of support in the in Exhibit G.



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Appendix E                                                       CAO Job Description


                           DETROIT COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

                                CHIEF ACADEMIC OFFICER

                                       JOB DESCRIPTION

                                             June 1, 2010
The Chief Academic Officer is responsible for leading all aspects of the District related to its core
instructional mission of creating a High-Performing District. The CAO is responsible for implementing
policies and practices of the District that address student academic achievement. This includes the
responsibility to plan, direct, organize, coordinate, implement, monitor and manage all (K-12) educational
and instructional programs, policies, and procedures addressed by all staff.

RESPONSIBILITIES

Develop, with Transformation Team, the strategic plan of the district related to teaching and learning.
Plan and lead the District’s educational programs with input from all departments and stakeholder groups,
ensuring that Michigan education standards are met or exceeded.

Drive and support the integration of technology into content areas.

Oversee and ensure planned and positive outcomes for the improvement in student growth on Michigan
and District assessments; reduction of achievement gaps between pupil subgroups.

Plan and lead the district’s professional development efforts, including, but not limited to the teaching and
learning cycle. Ensure efficient integration of the District’s professional development objectives into the
curriculum for all teachers, especially new teachers.

Builds and supports a high performance educational team – inspiring, integrating and aligning the
academic work of the district. Develops and maintains clear and inclusive decision-making processes to
ensure integration of academic supports and services.

Conduct teacher evaluations in a timely manner as required by the school district. Conduct classroom
walk-throughs with every teacher monthly. Ongoing Professional Development shall be tied to staff
evaluations and student assessment results. Assures the assignment, evaluation, and training of staff for
the adequate delivery of curriculum and instruction.

Builds and supports a high performance educational team - inspiring, integrating and aligning the
academic work of the district. Develops and maintains clear and inclusive decision making processes to
ensure integration of academic supports and services.

Identifies and implements effective curriculum, instruction, and assessment policies and practices that
maximize educational options and lead to improved achievement for all students. Balances educational

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consistency and fosters best practice sharing and opportunities for collaboration at all levels.

Participate in district’s annual budgeting and strategic planning process to ensure adequate incorporation
of academic priorities.

Sets priorities and measurable goals and effectively manages district resources to support priorities and
goal achievement.

Ensure curriculum alignment to Michigan Department of Education academic standards.

Drive definition and implementation of data-driven programmatic accountability and monitoring systems
for teachers and students.

Ensure strong and consistent assessment systems, including assessment development and the process to
analyze results and drive required improvements.

Support, monitor, and maintain the quality of faculty recruitment.

Directs the development, implementation, and monitoring of a comprehensive and aligned curriculum
management system based on federal and state mandates and district policy that will enable all students
K-12, to meet or exceed state and district performance measures.

Drives the design, delivery, monitoring, and evaluation of district-wide intervention systems, including
compensatory programs that provide research-based means to allow as many students as possible to meet
and/or exceed the standards and reduce and close the gap in achievement between identified student
populations and groups.

Assists in the development and implementation of a comprehensive feedback and assessment system to
provide clear and useful data to drive decision-making in student learning, staff development, and
improvement of teaching.



MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

1. Master’s degree in education: preferably Curriculum.

2. Hold or eligible to hold appropriate Michigan teaching license.

3. Five or more years of instructional leadership and classroom experience in urban schools.

4. Demonstrated success leading strategic educational initiatives that result in measurable
improved student achievement.

5. Demonstrated ability to lead the design, implementation and management of school curriculum and
student achievement.

6. Successfully passing criminal background check.

7. Strong written and verbal communication skills, including effective presentations skills.

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DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS



1. Demonstrated knowledge of research based current curriculum, instruction, assessment and staff
development best practices.



2. Demonstrated success leading school improvement initiatives that close student achievement gaps
between racial, ethnic, and economic groups.



3. Strong organizational skills with demonstrated ability to manage multiple complex roles and
responsibilities.



4. Demonstrated success designing, organizing and leading a systemic change process in a diverse
organization.

5. Personal demonstration of continuous learning.

6. General knowledge of urban educational challenges.




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Appendix F        Organization Chart




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