community ed calendar 12 13 by R5setp6

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									           Early Learning Community Education
                   Calendar, 2012-2013
             Tips to help you Tell Your Story
                your voice matters… use it!



                                                  Table of contents

       Why community education? ………………………………………………………………… 1
       How do I get started? ………………………………………………….……………………….. 2
       Chart: think about your audiences …………………………………………………………... 2
       Key messages ……………………………………………………………………………………. 5
       Calendar …………………………………………………………………………………………… 6



This calendar provides you with basic information on what’s happening in the state legislature, themes that you can use
for outreach, and suggested outreach activities to different audiences.
      You can find tools and templates online at http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.
      Two great toolkits to help: media relations (Media) and Building Relationships with your Legislators (Leg) are
         available at the link above and referenced throughout the calendar.

For help, connect with your Local Education and Resource Network (LEARN) Team.
Your LEARN team has developed relationships with legislators and the media and plans family and community events
throughout the year. You can find contact information for your LEARN team at http://paprom.convio.net/CEG.

Sign up for the Early Learning Community Education listserv to receive more tips and tools throughout the year … go
to http://paprom.convio.net/community_education to sign up.

Why community education?
In order for our young children to reach their promise, our families, communities and leaders need to work together to
provide quality early learning opportunities. They need to understand why quality early education is so important and how
to promote quality early learning for our young children.

As teachers and directors, you have something that most people – especially our leaders –don’t have; a true
understanding of early education, why it works, and how it’s helping children and families in your community.
 You understand the challenges families face to help their children develop while providing for their family.
 You understand why early education teachers have such a demanding and rewarding job and need specialized
   education and training.
 You can tell the stories of families who struggled to provide care for their children before they had access to programs
   like Child Care Works or PA Pre-K Counts, or how participating in quality early education made such a difference in a
   child’s life. Or, better yet, you can help those families tell their story.

Our school and community leaders, Governor, and legislators, need to understand that access to quality early education
is crucial for children to come to school ready to succeed. You can educate them like no one else can.

When you make the effort to educate your community:
   Families will help their children develop at home, choose quality early learning services, and tell their story to
      school and community leaders and policymakers
   Schools will recognize the importance of early education and partner with local early learning programs to prepare
      children for success in school
   Community leaders will understand the early learning services available, any gaps in services, and consider new
      opportunities in their local planning
   Policymakers will recognize that quality early learning is a “must have” for communities and consider it a priority
      for Pennsylvania.
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
How do I get started?
Community education is simply reaching out to school and community leaders, legislators and the Governor to share the
successes of children, families and teachers in your program. Activities can be as simple as sharing a child’s photo and
story, or as high profile as speaking at a leadership event.

Think about your audiences. Within your community, you have different audiences that have different roles to play to
promote quality early learning. For example, parents may be most interested in how to prepare their children for
kindergarten, while legislators and business leaders may be most interested in how quality early learning programs keep
working parents working. It’s good to think about which audiences you want to reach and prioritize your community
education efforts to reach those audiences.

Some audiences you may want to reach are:
    Families (parents, grandparents)
    Organizations that serve young children and families, especially at-risk children (e.g. CCIS agencies, child welfare
      agencies, homeless shelters, ESL classes, WIC, pediatricians, family court)
    School leaders (principals, administrators, school board members)
    Community and business leaders (mayors, county commissioners, companies that you do business with, family-
      friendly companies)
    Policymakers (legislators, Governor)

Below is a chart that lists possible audiences, what they need to know, and how they can promote early childhood
education. Use this chart as your guide or customize based on your interest and experience.

Audience             What do they need to know about ECE                   What can they do about ECE
Families                The first five years are so important to their       Include activities that promote early
                         children’s development and lifelong learning.         learning and development into their
                        Families are their children’s first teacher and       routines (talking and reading to children
                         greatest advocate for their development.              from birth, etc.)
                        Each child develops at his/her own pace but          Make choices of who cares for/teaches
                         all follow the same developmental stages.             their child based on quality
                        Understanding your child’s development               Reach out to other families to share
                         related to these stages will help you promote         what they know about quality early
                         their growth and notice any delays so you             learning
                         can get help when it can make the most               Tell their story to leaders such as school
                         difference.                                           principals, superintendents and school
                        Talking and reading to children at birth and          board members, city and county officials,
                         engaging in activities appropriate for their          and state and federal legislators.
                         children’s development will help them grow.
                        When looking for a person or program to
                         care for and educate your young child, pay
                         attention to the health and safety of the
                         environment/ home/classroom; that teachers
                         have education and training in early
                         childhood education; that the
                         classroom/home has a variety of
                         developmentally appropriate learning
                         activities; that you and your child feel
                         comfortable with the staff and the program;
                         and that you are treated as a partner in your
                         child’s learning.
                        Sharing your story with other families, school
                         and community leaders and policymakers
                         can improve early learning for all young
                         children in your community.




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         2
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
Audience             What do they need to know about ECE                  What can they do about ECE
Organizations           Quality early learning is an important part of       Share information on quality early
that serve young         a child’s development.                                learning with the families they serve.
children and            At-risk children are more likely to fail in          Take the opportunity to talk with families
families,                school, but quality early learning can help           about their child’s early learning and
especially at-risk       offset the effects of risk factors.                   development.
children (e.g.          Families can help their children develop by          Know about and share resources with
CCIS agencies,           including simple activities into their daily          families that promote quality early
child welfare            routines- several activity calendars available        learning.
agencies,                to help.                                             Get involved with their LEARN teams
homeless                Early learning programs can help connect              and early learning programs to develop
shelters, ESL            families with supports to help their child            partnerships that help reach more at-risk
classes, WIC,            develop and to help them afford quality early         families.
pediatricians,           learning.
family court)
School leaders          Quality early education provides a strong            Reach out to local early learning
(principals,             foundation for all learning, can help bridge          programs and families to support
administrators,          the achievement gap before it begins, and an          transition work and early kindergarten
school board             essential part of every child’s education             registration.
members                  (especially at-risk children).                       Make quality early learning a priority for
                        Quality early learning can reduce costs for           the school district and dedicate
                         special education; grade retention and                resources (in-kind, human resources,
                         remediation which helps school districts              and financial) to promoting quality early
                         balance their budgets. It can also improve            learning in the district.
                         graduation rates.                                    Encourage other school leadership to
                        Building partnerships between schools and             promote quality early learning in their
                         early learning programs to prepare children           districts.
                         and families for a smooth transition to
                         kindergarten promotes family engagement
                         and sustained student achievement through
                         the elementary grades.
                        Not enough school districts have made
                         quality early learning a priority.

Community/              The benefits of quality early learning extend        Support development of and access to
business leaders         throughout the community. Quality early               quality early learning in local planning
                         learning creates jobs and helps keep parents          efforts.
                         working while preparing tomorrow’s                   Talk to other business and community
                         workforce.                                            leaders and policymakers about the
                        Understand the state of quality early                 importance of quality early education to
                         education in their community- are there               workforce and economic development.
                         enough services available to meet the
                         community’s needs?
                        As business and community leaders, you
                         carry special clout with policymakers and
                         your voice can make quality early education
                         a priority for Pennsylvania.




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         3
                                                                          Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
Audience             What do they need to know about ECE                     What can they do about ECE
Policymakers            Quality early education is critical to our             Provide information to their constituents
(legislators,            children’s success in school and in life.               about the importance of quality early
Governor)               Investing in quality early education,                   learning, how to promote quality early
                         especially for at-risk children, will save tax          learning at home, and quality early
                         dollars in future cost savings for special              learning services available in their
                         education, grade retention, remediation,                community.
                         public assistance, and prisons.                        Visit with families and early learning
                        Understand the quality early learning                   programs in their communities to see the
                         services available in their community and               benefits of quality early education first-
                         areas where there are gaps in services.                 hand.
                        Hear examples of how their constituents                Support quality early education as a
                         have benefit from quality early education.              priority for Pennsylvania.
                                                                                Encourage their colleagues to make
                                                                                 quality early learning a priority for
                                                                                 Pennsylvania.




Take a look at the message you’re sending now. Whether you know it or not, you are already educating the
community:
    Every time you send a newsletter to families, you are educating them and the people they know
    Every time you address your board, you are educating members and staff of their organizations, as well as their
        friends and family
    Every time you hold an open house, you are educating families, business people, and community leaders.
    Your website and brochures are educating EVERYONE all of the time!

In your website and materials, see how you can use and customize some of our key messages to both promote quality
early learning and your program.

Share your good news anytime! Any time you have a success at your program, you can
    share it in your parent newsletter and on your website;
    send an announcement to local school principals and administrators;
    send a letter to local businesses, especially those that you use or partner with you;
    issue a press release; and
    send a letter to local officials and legislators.

You can share good news such as:
    Recognizing a parent, staff member, or volunteer for their achievement or commitment to early learning
    Joining Keystone STARS or moving up a STAR level
    Teachers and other program staff receiving awards, CDA, or other credential, or college degree
    Former student from your program succeeding in school, winning an award or some other honor
    Special activities for parents, such as parent workshops or family fairs

As you plan your program’s activities throughout the year, consider:
    Would this event help show to our local school principals or superintendent how our program is getting children
       ready for kindergarten?
    Would this event introduce our program and early education to other programs that serve young children and help
       build partnerships between us?
    Should I invite legislators that represent our families?
    Do we have local businesses that are family-friendly that might want to attend?




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         4
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
Key Messages

Here are some key messages to consider as you are reaching out to different audience. Use your own personal
experiences and examples to bring these messages to life. For more details, check out the “Building the case for quality
early education” on the PA Promise for Children website at
http://paprom.convio.net/site/PageServer?pagename=Building_the_case.
You may also want to check out the “The First Five Years Matter” section of the PA’s Promise website at
http://paprom.convio.net/site/PageServer?pagename=Why_quality_matters.

The education a child receives in the first five years of life is crucial to their school achievement and high school
graduation.
    Healthy brain development depends on quality early learning
    90% of a child’s brain connections are developed before age five.
    The achievement gap begins as early as 18 months of age

Young children in our county are at ____ risk of school failure
    Take a look at OCDEL’s Reach and Risk Report at
      http://www.pakeys.org/pages/get.aspx?page=EarlyLearning_Reach to find out your county’s risk level.

Early education levels the playing field for at-risk kids
     Forty years of research shows that children affected by risk factors such as poverty, low education level of the
        mother, and poorly performing schools can make significant gains and overcome these risks for failing in school
        when they participate in quality early education.

Pennsylvania’s early education programs promoting school readiness, school achievement
    Programs such as PA Pre-K Counts, Keystone STARS, Early Intervention, Nurse-Family Partnership, Parent-
      Child Home Program, and Head Start Supplemental are preparing children for kindergarten so they can enter
      school ready to learn and to succeed.

When our children receive a quality early education so they can succeed in school and in life, communities
benefit:
    Saves taxes. Children who participate in quality early education are less likely to need special education or
        remediation services or be held back a grade. Special education can cost twice as much as typical education.
    Saves jobs. When working parents have access to quality, reliable child care, they have fewer absences and can
        be more productive at work.
    Creates jobs. For every 10 jobs created in the early education sector, three more jobs are created outside the
        sector (Source: America’s Edge. “Strengthening Pennsylvania’s Business through Investments in Early Care and
        Education,” 2011, p. 3.)
    Builds a quality workforce. Children who receive quality early education are more likely to graduate high school
        and receive a college degree or career training.

Only ___% of our young children under age five have access to publicly-funded quality early education
programs.
    Take a look at OCDEL’s Reach and Risk Report at
       http://www.pakeys.org/pages/get.aspx?page=EarlyLearning_Reach to find the percent of children served in your
       county.

Help promote quality early learning to children in your community
        Learn about the benefits of quality early learning and early learning programs available in your community
        Share information with family, friends, employees, customers, constituents
        Volunteer in a local early learning program
        Sign the Pennsylvania’s Promise for Children declaration
        More ideas available on the PA’s Promise for Children website, www.papromiseforchildren.com, in the “Be a
          Children’s Champion” section



Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         5
                                                                         Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
September – December 2012
What’s happening in the state legislature: During September – December, legislators spend a lot of time in their
districts meeting with constituents. This is an excellent time to help legislators become aware of the publicly-supported
ECE initiatives (PA Pre-K Counts, Keystone STARS, Child Care Works, Keystone Babies, Early Intervention, Head Start
Supplemental, Nurse-Family Partnership, Parent-Child Home Program) in their districts and how these programs affect
children and families in their district.

Now is the time to:
    Invite legislators to visit early childhood programs
    Meet with legislators in district offices
    Have classrooms adopt a legislator
    Help parents tell their story


September themes
       Classrooms open, parent open houses                                 Children’s Eye Health & Safety Month
       International Literacy Day (Sept 8)                                 Children’s Good Manners Month
       Grandparents Day (Sept 9)                                           Deaf Awareness Month
       Child Passenger Safety Week (Sept 16-22)                            Baby Safety Awareness Month

September suggested activities
Have classrooms adopt their legislators. Send an introduction to each legislator of children in a classroom that
are in their district, about how excited the child is to enter school, their strengths, and areas they need to work on.
     You can include a photo of the child and a sample of the child’s artwork.
     Include a note from the parent about how they feel about their child’s participation in the program.
     Let the legislator know that you will provide regular updates of the child’s progress (you can provide an
         update up to every month, or after each assessment – fall, winter, spring)
     Contact your LEARN coordinator for help, or check out the building relationships with legislators toolkit at
         http://paprom.convio.net/community_education.

Organize site visits for school superintendents, school board members, business leaders, and legislators. Use
the visit as an opportunity to showcase how public investment in ECE programs is improving quality.
     Work with a teacher and parent so they can also talk to the leader about their experiences. Provide
          opportunities at all facility tours for parents to present their hopes and dreams for their children, and how
          the ECE opportunities help in preparing their children to be successful in school and in the community.
     See the legislator toolkit for tips on setting up a site visit.
     You may also want to invite the media for photos and interviews (make sure your leaders know you are
          inviting media)

Other activities
    Celebrate grandparents. Hold a Grandparents Appreciation Dinner where local programs invite the
       grandparents of the children in their program to participate. Ask a community VIP or legislator to hand out
       certificates or be the keynote speaker. Or invite grandparents to be celebrity readers during the month
    Start of school/ classrooms open. Develop a welcome packet for new school personnel (like
       superintendents and principals). Include highlights of why ECE is important to the children in their district
       and include how their school(s) has been involved in the past. Include figures from the OCDEL Program
       Reach & Risk Report to provide a comprehensive picture of children in their county. Report available at
       http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.
    Get parents to sign approval forms for children to be photographed, videotaped throughout the
       year. Ask parents to sign consent forms to allow their children to be photographed or videotaped
       throughout the year so if media show up to cover an event, you have children available for photo
       opportunities.



Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         6
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
October themes

Pennsylvania’s
    Promise for Children month- visit http://paprom.convio.net/month for activities and tools
    Parent Involvement Month                                      Family Health Month
    National Child Health Day (Oct. 1)                            Healthier Babies Month
    School Bus Safety Week (Oct. 15-19)                           Learning Disability Awareness Month
    Disability Awareness Month

October suggested activities
PA’s Promise for Children month
Visit http://paprom.convio.net/month for activities and tools

   Contact your local LEARN Coordinator to participate in planned activities for the month. They also have a
    variety of special materials you can use.
   Coordinate VIP readings at your programs by legislators, school, community and business leaders. Invite
    media.
   Coordinate a “career day” or “career week” at your program. Encourage children to dress up as what they
    want to be when they grow up and take pictures. You can then have children with parents complete the “I
    have the promise to be” notecards or add to the “We are Pennsylvania’s Promise” posters and send to the
    Governor, legislators. (contact your LEARN team for copies)
   Send thank you “ecards” or other gifts to teachers and parents in your program in honor of PA’s Promise
    month.

School Bus Safety Week (Oct. 15-19): Many providers and schools rely on school buses to transport children.
Ask the bus company about safety programs they provide to children and schedule a safety demonstration and
school bus tour!




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         7
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013
November themes

       Thanksgiving                                                      American Education Week (Nov 11-17)
       Child Safety and Protection Month
       Prematurity Awareness Month
       Election Day – Nov. 6

November suggested activities
Thanksgiving: Ask early learning programs to create Thanksgiving “thank you” cards (signed by kids and
parents) and send cards to each legislator in your area.
         Design take-home activity to thank legislators for investment in ECE
         Send thank you cards to teachers in local early learning programs for their commitment to early
            education
         Hold Thanksgiving luncheon for parents & legislators
         Have parents, children and staff of ECE programs write thank you letters to local businesses who
            have supported their programs

Provide teachers & schools with ECE information and resource information to distribute during parent-
teacher conferences. Distribute materials during Parent Nights at elementary schools.

American Education Week (Nov 11-17): Use the PA Promise Provider’s certificate to acknowledge those
providers who make a difference in your community! Also, check out suggested activities from the National
Education Association.



December themes
           Holidays
           National Handwashing Awareness Week (Dec 2-11)

December suggested activities
Holiday events.
     Have children in your program make holiday cards for school superintendents, school board members,
       and legislators
     Invite business leaders to participate in/sponsor holiday events
     Encourage parents to participate in a book drive to "Give the Gift of Literacy".
     Produce a “Happy Holiday Tips” sheet for families.

Send mid-year updates to your “adopted” legislators. Encourage programs to send updates on the children
in their classrooms to their “adopted” legislators. Parents and providers can share any new milestones the child
has achieved since the last update, or the child’s outcomes from their Ounce/Work Sampling assessment (if
applicable). Also include children’s artwork and photos.

Submit articles in local paper on topics such as: appropriate gifts for children, highlight events with practitioners




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         8
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013

January – March 2013

What’s happening in the state legislature: In February, the Governor will release his budget proposal for FY 2013-
2014. The legislators spend the following months reviewing the proposal and deciding their own budget priorities and if
they support the Governor’s proposal. The House and Senate Appropriations Committees will hold hearings on the
Governor’s proposal. The deadline to pass a state budget is June 30, 2013.

Now is the time to:
       Educate yourself on the early education items in the budget.
            • Understand benefits of programs such as PA Pre-K Counts, Keystone STARS, Child Care Works, Early
                   Intervention, Nurse-Family Partnership, Parent-Child Home Program and Head Start Supplemental
                   and where there may be increases or decreases
       Be prepared to answer legislator questions about early education using data and local stories
       Encourage parents to tell their story to legislators


January 2013 themes
           New Year – New Year’s resolutions
           ECE teachers graduate from CDA/ college degrees
           Poverty In America Month
           Autism Awareness Month
January suggested activities
New Year’s resolutions.
 Ask parents and providers to share with their legislators their New Year’s resolutions for their children, and
   ask legislators to make quality early education a priority for Pennsylvania as a New Year’s resolution
 Create and distribute a “New Year Baby Bag” to new parents. Include information about developmental
   milestones and the importance of early learning.
 Submit op-eds and letters to the editor that explain why early education is so important to our communities
   and Pennsylvania’s New Year’s resolution should be to help all young children reach their promise through
   quality early education.

Teachers and directors earning CDAs and college degrees. This is a great opportunity to educate leaders
and the public on the importance of teachers with education in early childhood, to show that child care, pre-k is
not babysitting.
     Tell parents about the teachers’/director’s achievements in your parent newsletter or other
        communication.
     Give the teachers/directors in your program that earned their CDAs and degrees this winter a
        congratulations note or PA Promise certificate of appreciation.
     You can also hold a special recognition event (breakfast, luncheon, reception) to acknowledge their hard
        work. Invite their legislators to attend, and media to cover.
     Issue a press release recognizing the teachers/directors and the CDA/degree earned.




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         9
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013

February themes
       Valentine’s Day
       Children’s Dental Health Month
       Governor’s budget proposal released

February suggested activities
Valentine’s Day.
     Have children complete Valentine’s Day cards about why they love their early education program and
        send to legislators.
     Ask passionate teachers to send letters to legislators including personal stories about why they love
        working w/young children

Invite legislators, school and community leaders to visit your classrooms.

Children’s Dental Health Month. Provide resources to families around the importance of dental health.

Governor’s budget proposal released.
 Watch for information over the Build ECE News with details on the Governor’s budget proposal for early
   education programs.
 Understand how the budget may impact your program and the children and families in your care.
 Share information with parents.
 Connect with an organization that is advocating on behalf of young children. Visit the PA’s Promise for
   Children’s website, and click on “Be a Children’s Champion” for a list of groups.



March themes
   Time to sign up for pre-k/Kindergarten next year                  Music In Our Schools Month
   St. Patrick’s Day (March 17)                                      National Nutrition Month
   Mental Retardation & Developmental Disabilities                   Poison Prevention Awareness Month
    Awareness Month



March suggested activities
Pre-K and Kindergarten registrations.
 Partner with your LEARN team and local schools to provide kindergarten registration deadlines to parents.
    Promote pre-k and kindergarten registration to parents in your program – encourage early registration. This is
    also a good opportunity to encourage families to support a smooth transition to pre-k or Kindergarten.

St. Patrick’s Day.
 “Sprouting Shamrocks”—have children decorate shamrocks and they or their parents write positive
    comments about ECE programs they’re a part of. Deliver shamrocks to policymakers with a letter explaining
    how “lucky” the children are to be a part of quality ECE.




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         10
                                                                      Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013

April – June
What’s happening in the state legislature:
During April-June, legislators choose their priorities for state funding for the budget. They will be telling their caucus
leadership (leaders of each party in both the House and Senate) what items they think should be priorities in the budget.
They will be voting on bills, and probably debating the bills on the House and Senate floor. Legislative leaders will begin
negotiations with the Governor’s office on a budget agreement. They spend most of their time in Harrisburg. The deadline
to pass a state budget is June 30, 2013.

Now is the time to:
       Keep informed of any budget proposals or bills coming out of the House and Senate and how they may affect
        early education, your program, and children and families in your care.
       Educate parents about the impacts of any new proposals.
       Connect with organizations that advocate on behalf of young children to stay updated on developments. A list of
        organizations is available on the PA’s Promise for Children website under “Be a Children’s Champion.”



April themes
       Week of the Young Child (April 14-18)                             World Health Day
       One Book, Every Young Child                                       Early Learning Investment Commission
       Mathematics Education Month                                        Economic Summit
       National Child Abuse Prevention Month



April suggested activities
Week of the Young Child (WOYC).
 Coordinate with your LEARN team to participate in WOYC events in your community, including parent events,
  parades,
 Invite legislators, school and community leaders to attend WOYC events; use this opportunity to show
  legislators how public investment in early learning is improving experiences for children
 Submit op-eds, letters to editor and editorials on WOYC
 Encourage school leaders to be presenters at Week of the Young Child events, proclamations, etc.
 Recruit parents to act as spokespeople at WOYC events, to speak to groups or talk directly with VIPS.

One Book, Every Young Child. Invite school leadership and business and community leaders, local celebrities and
legislators to do readings as part of One Book, Every Young Child campaign; use this opportunity to show legislators
how public investment in early learning is improving experiences for children. Invite media to cover.

Watch Me Grow classroom activity. Have classrooms create home-made flowers on which children write their
names and what they want to be when they grow up on the “petals.” Have parents deliver bouquets of the flowers to
legislators’ district offices.

Host a Child Care Awareness Day event in the community which includes an “I can go to work every day because
my child is in quality childcare” button. Ask business leaders to participate or sponsor the event.




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         11
                                                                       Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013


May themes

   Pre-K Graduation                                                  National Provider Appreciation Day (May 10)
   Mother’s Day (May 12)                                              www.providerappreciationday.org
   ECE teachers graduate from CDA/ college degrees                   Children’s Mental Health Day


May suggested activities
Pre-K Graduations.
 Ask parents/grandparents of children graduating to send a thank you to their legislators, explaining what this
   pre-k program has meant to their child and how PA Pre-K Counts, STARS, or Head Start made this quality
   experience possible.
 Invite media, school leaders, and legislators to come to pre-k graduation

Mother’s Day.
 Host a Mother’s Day Tea.
 Invite all moms to spend time in their child’s ECE classroom to celebrate Mother’s Day.
 Have classrooms send Happy Mother’s Day cards to legislators who are moms in your county.

Teachers/ directors earning CDAs and college degrees. This is a great opportunity to educate leaders and
the public on the importance of teachers with education in early childhood, to show that child care, pre-k is not
babysitting.
     Tell parents about the teachers’/director’s achievements in your parent newsletter or other
         communication
     Give the teachers/directors in your program that earned their CDAs and degrees this winter a
         congratulations note or PA Promise certificate of appreciation.
     You can also hold a special recognition event (breakfast, luncheon, reception) to acknowledge their
         hard work. Invite their legislators to attend, and media to cover.
     Issue a press release recognizing the teachers/directors and the CDA/degree earned.

Children’s Mental Health Day: Partner with a community parenting program to help families equate the
milestones of a child's social and emotional development from birth and how these can be impacted by access
to quality early education.




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         12
                                                                      Early Learning Community Education Calendar, 2012-2013


June themes

 PA PKC, Head Start Supplemental, and Keystone                     Father’s Day (June 16)
  STAR 3 & 4 end of year child outcomes released
 Budget deadline – June 30
 ECE teachers graduate from CDA/ college degrees


June suggested activities
PA Pre-K Counts, Head Start Supplemental, and Keystone STAR 3 &4 year-end outcomes.
 Share end of year outcomes with legislators, school leadership and media, include personal stories and
  testimonials from teachers and parents
 Include information in their parent newsletters or other communication to parents

Send end of year updates to your “adopted” legislators. Send updates on the children in your classrooms
to their “adopted” legislators. Parents and providers can share any new milestones the child has achieved since
the last update, or the child’s outcomes from their Ounce/Work Sampling assessment (if applicable). Also
include children’s artwork and photos.

Father’s Day.
 Have classrooms create Happy Father’s Day cards for legislators who are dads.
 Celebrate Father's Day with a Father & Child BBQ event. Invite legislators, school leaders. Invite media to
   cover.

Submit article to local paper about "What to Do" during summer - Free/inexpensive activities; No budget Family
Vacations




Last updated October 2012. Samples, tools and other resources available online on the OCDEL Community Education page at
http://paprom.convio.net/Community_Education.                                                                         13

								
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