The Diversity Commitment: Creating a Diverse Workforce in

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					                        2012 Joint WBEA/CBEA Conference
                        Newport Beach, CA
                        February 18, 2012




Does Business Curriculum
Meet Industry Standards?
Presenter:
Irina Weisblat, Ed.D.
Business Professor
Southwestern College
Statement of the Problem

A problem of educating “knowledge workers” for the global
  economy:

• Are we teaching what we need to teach?
• Is our Program Review process relevant to student learning
  and success?
• Who are our partners in the process?
• Do we include our business leaders in decision-making?




                                                               2
  Statement of the Problem, cont.
  The projected shortage of skilled workers for the global economy elevates
  concerns about California’s economic growth and competitiveness in the
  world.
• The SCANS (1991) Report:
   • creates “world class standards” of student performance
   • identifies the skills required in the 21st century
• Basic Skills Initiative, or AB 194 (2007) focuses on developing
  of fundamental “3R”-skills in reading, writing and arithmetic.
• Literature identifies global competencies that students must
  have in order to be ready for the jobs in the global economy.


                                                                              3
2010 Study on Skills for Business Major Grads
  The purpose of this study was to compare the perspectives of community
  college educators and employers in California on skills and competencies
  required of business major graduates in the global economy.

• To find out whether there was a match between the skills that
  CCC teach and the skills that employers actually expect
  business major graduates to have.

• To examine how well CCC have adjusted their business
  curriculum to meet the needs of employers.

• To find out what kind of implications the identified
  differences may have for practice.


                                                                         4
Literature
• Considers globalization, defines it and shows its influences on
  a changing mission of institutions of higher education, and on
  their curriculum (Hill, 2006; Levin, 2001; Tagg, 2003).
• The skills gap threatens our competitiveness in the globalized
  market place (Moore & Shulock, 2007).
• We are not fully committed to preparing a new generation of
  “knowledge workers” (Drucker, 1973).
• Extended discussions about new set of skills and
  competencies needed, but –
• Little research that clearly identifies these skills and
  competencies.
                                                               5
15-Item List of Skills
     Basic Skills
1    Spoken English language
2    Writing in English
3    Reading comprehension in English
4    Basic math
     Global Skills and Competencies
5    Foreign language(s) proficiency
6    Working with diverse cultures & people
7    Social responsibility
8    Ability to adjust to change
9    Ability to build partnerships
10   Listening
11   Teamwork ability
12   Leadership ability
13   Productive use of resources (time, money, materials, space, and staff)
14   Computer proficiency
15   Information Technology (IT) literacy

                                                                              6
    Key Findings
•   Findings point to differences in views of skills expected from
    graduates with a business major between 2 populations: CC
    educators and employers.

• Key findings relate to the following 7 areas:
    (a)   business curriculum
    (b)   relative importance of basic skills and global competencies
    (c)   collaboration of CC educators and business leaders
    (d)   quality of teaching of the job-related skills in CC
    (e)   employers’ expectations toward necessary knowledge
    (f)   inventory of skills for successful performance at work
    (g)   importance of various skills for competitiveness in the global economy.


                                                                                7
Conclusions
• The study affirms the relevance the SCANS (1991) skills.
• Basic skills surpass global competencies in importance.
• A gap between the skills and competencies that community
  colleges teach and the job-related skills that employers need.
• Difference in the interpretation of epistemology, the theory
  of knowledge:
   • educators focus on content areas
   • business leaders look for practical application of knowledge (i.e.,
     project-based learning)
• A greater level of cooperation between community college
  educators and business leaders in California is needed.


                                                                           8
Collaboration of CC educators and business leaders
  •         Data about collaboration of CC educators and business leaders is inconsistent
  ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________



  Form of collaboration                                                                                              BUS responses                                            CC responses
  _________________________________________________________________________________
  Designing new curriculum                                                                                                                       6%                                                        72%
  Participation in program review                                                                                                                5%                                                        61%
  Offering scholarships for business students                                                                                                    8%                                                        52%
  Developing student learning outcomes
  on the program and course-level                                                                                                                2%                                                        51%
  My college (company) does not collaborate
  with the business leaders (colleges)                                                                                                           36%                                                       3%
  __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________




  Note: N=284 each: BUS = business leaders; CC = community college educators.
                                                                   (Weisblat, 2010)



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  9     9
  Quality of Teaching

Teaching of the job-related skills was not perceived as successful by employers.

• 80% of CC educators considered teaching of all job-related skills
  to be successful;

• 52% of employers were uncertain about the quality of teaching;

   All in all, the two populations strongly disagreed about
   successful teaching of 13 out of 15 job-related skills within the
   business curriculum, as the t-Test results show.

                                                      (Weisblat, 2010)




                                                                             1010
   Implications for Practice and
   Continuous Improvement

• The findings of the study may help community colleges to:
   • make informed decisions
   • improve their business curriculum

   • improve the program review process

   • develop the skills and competencies that business graduates need in
     order to compete for the jobs in the global economy

   • develop business programs that are meaningful and relevant to the needs
     of all stakeholders, and beneficial to the society in general

   • motivate stronger collaboration of business faculty and business leaders
     for the benefit of students’ success



                                                                                11
What does it mean for educators?

  To ensure a high quality of certificate and degree programs,
  we should be looking at recently completed program reviews
  and discussing the following questions:
• What has program review achieved?
• Why does it matter?
• What are the implication to the degree?




                                                            12
    Why are we concerned with the Program Review?

•       Colleges are mandated to report on student assessment results.

Who mandates it?
   • Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior
       Colleges (ACCJC) of WASC (Western Association of
       Schools and Colleges)

    •      WASC Accreditation Standard II:
           “Instructional programs are systematically assessed in order
           to assure currency, improve teaching and learning strategies,
           and achieve stated student learning outcomes”
                                            (www.accjc.org)


                                                                     1313
What is a Program Review?
• A process that can be used to inform decisions and improve
  student learning and development (Bresciani, 2006; Maki,
  2004; Suskie, 2004)
It Consists of:
1. Required elements of Self Study;
2. Internal and External reviews;
3. Integration of findings of program review into planning and
   budgeting;
4. Students - partners in the program review process:
             Surveys (at program entrance/exit)
             Tracking of Alumni success
             Alumni participation in program review

                                                             14
Program Review and Assessment




                                15
The purpose of assessment


*** Assessment is an important tool
to measure how we use resources
in a cost-effective and responsible manner. ***
                                  (Linda Suskie)




                                                   1616
   WASC Data about Colleges on Sanction
   January, 2010 (19 CCC)



                           Deficiencies causing sanctions

                    20

                    15
Frequency




                    10
                                       17                                16
                              13
                      5                        11               11
                                                        8

                      0
                            Program Planning Board Internal Financial Miscella
                             Review assessm roles & governan manage neous
            Deficiencies      13       17      11       8       11       16

                                                                                 1717
Recommendations for Program Improvement
• In accordance with the “WASC Resource Guide for ‘Good
  Practices’ in Academic Program Review,” Colleges should
  generate an initial set of “guiding questions” upon which to
  base its self-study inquiry:
   – Are we teaching what we need to teach?

   – Are our students learning what we are teaching them?




                                                                 18
Process
A. Are we teaching what we need to teach?
• Does our curriculum provide students what they need to be competitive in the
    job market?
• Are our program, course, and learning objectives appropriate?
• Are we teaching in accordance with our program, course, and learning
    objectives?
• Do our library resources adequately support our Cert. & Degree ?
• Is diversity reflected in our curriculum?
• Who are the students enrolled in the programs, and how does their profile relate
    to our program objectives?
• How does our curriculum compare to that of other institutions with similar
    degree programs/concentrations?
• Is our curriculum aligned with disciplinary/ professional standards?
• What resources do our students in the program need to be successful upon
    graduation? Professional associations? Internships? Career counseling?
• Are the most appropriate faculty developing/teaching courses in this program?


                                                                                 19
Process
B. Are our students learning what we are teaching them?
• Are the learning objectives of the degree program being achieved?
• Are the learning objectives of courses within the program being
   achieved?
• Do our students recognize the contribution of diversity to learning?
• Are students in this major/degree program taking full advantage of the
   college Library, other support services?
• Is course sequencing (or lack thereof) an impediment to student
   learning? If so, what are the recommended course sequences?
• How well do our graduates perform on professional certification exams?
• How much do our students perceive themselves to have learned upon
   completing courses within the degree program?
• How prepared do our students feel upon graduation to enter the
   job market, etc., with the CCC degree in Business?

                                                                       20
     Global Risk Summit
     New York City – June, 2011


   Purpose:
• Establish the framework for the first
  Global Risk Network
• Actively address the shared risks that
  threaten to disrupt business operations
• Promote collaboration in the increasingly
  interdependent world and a globalized
  economy: public and private sectors




                                              21
    Examples of shared risks

•     Natural disasters
•     Changes in global climate
•     Bioterrorism
•     Terrorism
•     Cyber-theft , “hacktivism”, and other technology-related risks
•     Geographic crises and regional turmoil (Middle East, North
      Africa)
•     Financial crisis and its effect on the global supply chain and
      business continuity




                                                                22
Global Risk Summit
New York City – June, 2011




                             23
The Network Participants:
Multi-national corp. and Government


•   BP                    •   IBM
•   Microsoft             •   Kraft
•   Cisco Systems         •   Philip Morris
•   Raytheon              •   Iron Mountain
•   Expedia               •   U.S. Chamber of Commerce
•   Target Corp.          •   U.S. Dept of Homeland Security)
•   Marriott              •   FBI
•   Starbucks             •   Central Intelligence Agency
•   Ernst & Young         •   9-11 Commission
•   Bank of England       •   INTERPOL
•   Royal Canadian Bank   •   United Nations



                                                                24
What does it mean for higher education?


• How do institutions of higher education
  respond to these pertinent issues related to
  security and risk management?




                                                 25
   How does Business Curriculum meet industry needs?



International Business Basic Certificate
(13-16 units):
• BUS 122 – Principles of Exporting and Importing (3)
• BUS 177 – Intro to International Business (3)
• BUS 140 – Business Law/The Legal Environment of Business
  (3)
• BUS 126 – Business Logistics Management (3)
• CL 120 – Computer Literacy (1), or CIS 101 Intro to Computers
  and Info Processing (4)

                                                             26
    How does Business Curriculum meet industry needs?

Logistics and Transportation Basic Certificate
(19 units):
• BUS 122 – Principles of Exporting and Importing (3)
• BUS 140 – Business Law/The Legal Environment of Business (3)
• BUS 126 – Business Logistics Management (3)
• BUS 173 – Transportation Management (3)
• BUS 183 – Business Mathematics (3)
• CIS 101 – Introduction to Computers and Information
   Processing(4)



                                                            27
Topics of Security & Risk Management covered in:


BUS 177 – International Business
• Political, economic, and legal risks




                                                   28
Topics of Security & Risk Management covered in:

BUS 122 – Principles of Exporting and Importing
• Managing foreign exchange risks
• Risks associated with entering foreign markets
• C-TPAT-Security (Customs-Trade Partnership Against
  Terrorism) and Five-Step Risk assessment process
• Risk Awareness and Validation in Global Trade
• Nationalization, expropriation, and other political and legal
  risks
• Trade barriers, and risk associated with price fixing,
  antidumping, intellectual property rights


                                                                  29
   Opportunities

Logistics and Transportation Basic Certificate
(19 units):
• BUS 122 – Principles of Exporting and Importing (3)
• BUS 140 – Business Law/The Legal Environment of Business (3)
• BUS 126 – Business Logistics Management (3)
• BUS 173 – Transportation Management (3)
• BUS 183 – Business Mathematics (3)
• CIS 101 – Introduction to Computers and Information
   Processing(4)



                                                           30
Suggested Topics in Security & Risk Management for:

BUS 126 – Business Logistics Management

• Changes in economic controls due to government
  deregulation in:
   • Transportation
   • Financial institutions
   • Communications
   • Energy (utility) industry



                                                   31
Suggested Topics in Security & Risk Management, cont:

BUS 126 – Business Logistics Management
• Supply Chain Security Solutions
   • Every four days there is a terrorist attack on the global supply chain.
   • Governments world-wide ask businesses to apply higher levels of
     diligence to suppliers' security practices and compliance.

• Crisis Management
• Emergency Management




                                                                               32
Suggested Topics in Security & Risk Management for:


CL 120 – Computer Literacy, or
CIS 101— Intro to Computers and Info Processing
   • Cyber Threat

   • Cyber-theft

   • “Hacktivism”, and other technology-related risks




                                                        33
Recommendations for
Curriculum Development


  Security and risk management are relevant to our region
  affected heavily by cross-border trade:

• Logistics and Transportation program should include a
  coursework that covers security and risk management.
• An interdisciplinary approach to curriculum development.




                                                             34
Recommendations for
Curriculum Development, cont.

• Educators should constantly incorporate business
  leaders’ input into curriculum in order to:

   • help develop skills that students need to enter the job market
   • improve business curriculum that is meaningful and relevant
   • help students to prepare for high-demand and well-paid careers




                                                                      35
Contact Information


Irina Weisblat, Ed.D.
Business Professor, Southwestern College
Mobile (619) 251-0542
iweisblat@swccd.edu




                                           36
Time for Questions and Discussion




                                    37

				
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