Pest Management Concepts by HC121104002213

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									Pest Management Concepts (2)
               Bioeconomics
   Study of the relationships between pest
    numbers, host responses, and resultant
    economic losses

   Connects biology and ecology with
    sampling and identification of the pest
              Bioeconomics
                            Theoretical Natural Pest Population


Economic Losses
                                                  Economic Injury Level
Noneconomic Losses
                                                  Damage Boundary




 No Loss
                     Time
          The EIL concept
 Economic damage: amount of injury which
  requires intervention
 Economic injury level: lowest population
  density that will cause economic damage
 Economic threshold: density where an
  intervention should occur to prevent the
  population from reaching the EIL
             Decision Making
   The Economic Injury level
    – EIL = C/VIDK
    – Where C = cost of the management tactic, V =
      market value of the produce, I = injury per
      insect, D = damage per unit of injury, K =
      proportion reduction in pest injury or damage
              Decision Making
   The Economic Threshold (the action
    threshold)
    – Based on:
       » pest and host phenology
       » Population growth and injury rates
       » Time delays associated with intervention tactic
               Types of ETs
   Subjective: based on experience, not
    formulated from objective criteria

   Objective: based on calculated EILs, change
    with the EIL
              Types of ETs
 Fixed: ET is set at a fixed % of the EIL
 Descriptive: a description of population
  growth is made and timing of the
  intervention is based on expected future
  growth
 Dichotomous: based on statistical
  procedures for classifying the population as
  economic or noneconomic. Based on a time
  perspective rather than a space perspective.
          Predictive Models
 Predictions are important because only
  future losses can be prevented
 Rate of insect growth is determined by
  temperature and moisture
 Could also simulate what may occur
  without intervention
       Cost-Benefit Calculations
   Intervention is cost effective only if the
    value of the commodity minus the cost of
    the intervention (+ sampling costs) is
    greater than the value of the commodity
    without intervention
       Preventive vs. Responsive
             Intervention
   Preventive: Prevent the development of the
    population (exclusion, sanitation, impact
    machines, and stock rotation)

   Responsive: based on estimated density
        Intervention in Response to
                 Sampling
   Treat only the areas that need to be treated
    instead of the entire facility
    –   Farm bins
    –   Elevators
    –   Food processing
    –   Flour milling
     Effectiveness of Intervention
   Sampling programs should evaluate the
    effectiveness of the intervention

   Few interventions are 100% effective
                      IPM
   An approach to pest control that uses cost-
    benefit analysis in making decisions

   Pest control is cost-effective when the cost
    of control is less that the reduction in
    market value due to the pest
                     IPM

                   Start of Intervention
Population Size




                                           EIL
                                           ET




                  Time

								
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