Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar by 61Q2i5E

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									New Jersey Model Curriculum
  End-of-Unit Assessment
    Guide for Teachers


           Unit 1
         Grade 11




                              1
What’s in this Guide?

 o   An overview of the Student Learning Objectives (SLOs) for Unit 1, with some pointers for
     understanding and using them
 o   An Assessment Blueprint, with an explanation
 o   Some specific ideas about
        o What to think about before you begin teaching Unit 1
        o Things to do while you are teaching Unit 1
        o Some ways to use the assessment tasks as patterns for your own assessments
 o   An overview of the assessment tasks
 o   A general guide to evaluating student responses to these tasks, with scoring guides for
     each task.
 o   Some specific ideas about what to think about after you have scored the assessment




                                                                                            2
The SLOs and the Standards
You will see a document with two sections in the pages below.

     The first section, with a BLUE header, lists the Student Learning Objectives for Unit 1 of
      the Model Curriculum.
     The second section, with a YELLOW header, lists the Core ELA Standards that form the
      basis for Unit 1.

The SLOs describe WHAT students should know and be able to do after Unit 1 is over. Each
SLO has a number in the first column. In the last column, the exact connection to the Core
Standards for that SLO is given.

Some of the SLOs will appear again in later units in the Model Curriculum. The skills and
knowledge described in the Core Standards takes time to develop, and Unit 1 is just the
beginning of that process in many cases. You will see over the course of the units in the Model
Curriculum, five in all, that the description of the expectations you should apply to scoring
student responses to the assessment increase in their demands over the course of the year.

The SLOs in the table below are color-coded to help you identify the differences among them.
The SLOs that appear in RED are those that can only be assessed directly by you in the
classroom as teaching and learning unfold. Here is an example of one of those SLOs for Grade
11:

       Promote divergent and creative perspectives when speaking. [SLO 21]

The SLOs that are assessed in the Model Curriculum Assessment appear in the Blueprint,
which appears and is explained on pages 8-9 of this document. Not all of the SLOs are directly
assessed in the Model Curriculum Assessment, and we encourage you to assess SLOs as you
teach Unit 1. You will note, for example, in the 11th grade Unit 1 SLOs, that SLOs 17-24 focus
on students’ growing sophistication in discussion and interaction with peers, with emphasis on
the student’s ability to encourage lively exchanges of perspectives, to promote civil discourse,
and to synthesize and restate multiple perspectives. All of these SLOs can be assessed in
many ways as you teach the texts you have chosen, and encourage students to write, during
Unit 1.




                                                                                               3
                                                                                                  CORRESPONDING
#                     STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES Grade 11, Unit 1
                                                                                                         CCSS
      Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says        RL.11.1
1.
      explicitly.
      Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development      RL.11.2
2.
      over the course of the text.
3.    Provide an objective summary of the text.                                                  RL.11.2
      Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate             RL.11.3
4.    elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered,
      how the characters are introduced and developed).
      Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including
5.                                                                                               RL.11.4
      figurative and connotative meanings. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
6.    Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text.                   RL.11.4
      Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
7.                                                                                               RL.11.5
      trying a new approach.
      Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective
8.    technique; use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection,    W.11.3b.
      and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
      Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its
9.    significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator    W.11.3a.
      and/or characters.
10.   When writing narratives, create a smooth progression of experiences or events.             W.11.3a.
      Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or
11.                                                                                              W.11.3e.
      resolved over the course of the narrative.
      Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are
12.                                                                                              W.11.4
      appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
      Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or
13.   trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific      W.11.5
      purpose and audience.
      Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or
14.                                                                                              W.11.6
      shared writing products.
      Draw evidence from literary texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
      a. Apply grade 11 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of
15.                                                                                              W.11.9a.
      eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of
      American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat

                                                                                                                  4
      similar themes or topics”).
      Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and
16.   shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and    W.11.10
      audiences.
      Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study;
17.   explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research    SL.11.1a.
      on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well- reasoned exchange of ideas.
      Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set
18.                                                                                                 SL.11.1b.
      clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
      Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and
19.                                                                                                 SL.11.1c.
      evidence.
      When taking part in collaborative conversations, ensure a hearing for a full range of
20.                                                                                                 SL.11.1c.
      positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
21.   Promote divergent and creative perspectives when speaking.                                    SL.11.1c.
22.   Resolve contradictions when possible when speaking.                                           SL.11.1d.
23.   Synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue.                      SL.11.1d.
      Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal
24.                                                                                                 SL.11.6
      English when indicated or appropriate.
      Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when
25.                                                                                                 L.11.1a.
      writing or speaking.
      Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g.,
26.   Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, Garner’s Modern American Usage)                L.11.1b.
      as needed.
27.   Observe hyphenation conventions.                                                              L.11.2a.
      Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English and spell correctly when
28.                                                                                                 L.11.2b.
      writing.
      Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts,
      to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when
29.                                                                                                 L.11.3a.
      reading or listening; vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte’s Artful
      Sentences) for guidance as needed.
      Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases
      based on grade 11 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies; use
30.                                                                                                 L.11.4a.
      context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or
      function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase


                                                                                                                5
           Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or
    31.                                                                                                   L.11.4b.
           parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
           Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases
           based on grade 11 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies;
    32.    consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries,           L.11.4c.
           thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or
           clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage;
           Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking
    33.                                                                                                   L.11.4d.
           the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
           Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases,
    34.    sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness   L.11.6
           level;
           Demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word
    35.                                                                                                   L.11.6
           or phrase important to comprehension or expression.


  Code #                                             Common Core State Standards

RL.11.1    Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences
           drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
RL.11.2    Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,
           including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective
           summary of the text.
RL.11.3    Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or
           drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and
           developed).
RL.11.4    Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative
           meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple
           meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as
           other authors.)
RL.11.5    Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where
           to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall
           structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.
RL.11.6    Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from
           what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).


                                                                                                                                  6
W.11.3     Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details,
           and well-structured event sequences.
           a. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance,
           establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth
           progression of experiences or events.
           b. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop
           experiences, events, and/or characters.
           e. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course
           of the narrative.
W.11.4     Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task,
           purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
W.11.5     Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach,
           focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
W.11.6     Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in
           response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.
W.11.9a.   Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
           a. Apply grade 11 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-
           and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts
           from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).
W.11.10    Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a
           single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
SL.11.1    Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led)
           with diverse partners on grade 11 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own
           clearly and persuasively.
           a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that
           preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful,
           well- reasoned exchange of ideas.
           b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision making, set clear goals and
           deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
           c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a
           hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and
           promote divergent and creative perspectives.
           d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides
           of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is
           required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.
SL.11.6    Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and tasks, demonstrating a command of formal English when indicated or

                                                                                                                                   7
         appropriate.
L.11.1   Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
         a. Apply the understanding that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes
         contested.
         b. Resolve issues of complex or contested usage, consulting references (e.g., Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary
         of English Usage, Garner’s Modern American Usage) as needed.
L.11.2   Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when
         writing.
         a. Observe hyphenation conventions.
         b. Spell correctly.
L.11.3   Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices
         for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.
         a. Vary syntax for effect, consulting references (e.g., Tufte’s Artful Sentences) for guidance as needed;
         apply an understanding of syntax to the study of complex texts when reading.
L.11.4   Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 11 reading
         and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
         a. Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a
         sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
         b. Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g.,
         conceive, conception, conceivable).
         c. Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and
         digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its
         etymology, or its standard usage.
         d. Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in
         context or in a dictionary)
L.11.6   Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading,
         writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering
         vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression.




                                                                                                                             8
The Assessment Blueprint
The assessment blueprint, which appears on page 9, gives you a kind of map of the Model Curriculum Unit 1
assessment. The Blueprint is organized by the categories of Bloom’s Taxonomy, which suggests one way of
classifying the kinds of thinking required in various tasks and activities. For the purposes of this Blueprint, we
are using the original version of the taxonomy, which looks like this:




The lowest level, “Knowledge,” represents simply recalling what one already knows. Each category, as you
move up the pyramid, represents increasingly complex and abstract cognitive activity. “Higher order thinking”
is most often associate with the top three categories of “Analysis,” “Synthesis,” and “Evaluation.”

In the Blueprint, you will see in the first column the Standard[s] and SLO[s] being assessed in that row. As you
move across each row, you will see a particular task named in each box that task is designed to assess. As
you can see from the Blueprint, no one task assesses every SLO, and different tasks combine different parts of
the cognitive categories in Bloom’s taxonomy.




                                                                                                                     9
                                                             Blueprint Worksheet
                                                               Unit 1, Grade – 11
                                   Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun and Renny Christopher, “The Driver”

NOTE: The tasks in the Unit 1 assessment are continuously numbered, from 1-14 (Day 1) and the Writing Prompt (Day 2). Questions 1-6 are
                  based on the first text, Questions 7-12 on the second text, and Questions 13-14 on both texts together.

    SLO        KNOWLEDGE              COMPREHENSION           APPLICATION            ANALYSIS             SYNTHESIS       EVALUATION
                                         M/C 1, 7                                     M/C 1, 7
  RL11.1          M/C 1, 7
                                         TF 4, 10              SA 6, 12, 14           TF 4, 10
  SLO 1            TF 4
                                          SA 12                                        SA 12
  RL 11.2
                   TF 5                   T/F 5, 11                                   T/F 5, 11
  SLOs 2-                                                      SA 6, 12, 14                               SA 6, 12, 14
                SA 6, 12, 14             SA 6, 12, 14                                 SA 12, 14
     3
  R. 11.3
                   SA 13                     SA 13                SA 13                 SA 13                SA 13
   SLO 4
  W 11.3b           Day 2                    Day 2                 Day 2                Day 2                 Day 2
   SLO 8       Writing Prompt           Writing Prompt        Writing Prompt       Writing Prompt        Writing Prompt
  W 11.3a           SA 13                    SA 13                 SA 13                SA 13                 SA 13
  SLOs 9-      Day 2, Writing           Day 2, Writing        Day 2, Writing       Day 2, Writing        Day 2, Writing
    10             Prompt                   Prompt                Prompt               Prompt                Prompt
  W 11.3 e          Day 2                    Day 2                 Day 2                Day 2                 Day 2
  SLO 11       Writing Prompt           Writing Prompt        Writing Prompt       Writing Prompt        Writing Prompt
  W. 11.4           Day 2                    Day 2                 Day 2                Day 2                 Day 2
  SLO 12       Writing Prompt           Writing Prompt        Writing Prompt       Writing Prompt        Writing Prompt
                M/C 7, T/F10            M/C 7, T/F10
  W 11.9a
                    Day 2                    Day 2
  SLO 15
               Writing Prompt           Writing Prompt
              T/F 4, 5, 10,, 11,       T/F 4, 5, 10,, 11,    T/F 4, 5, 10,, 11,
  L.11.1a     SA 6, 12, 13, 14         SA 6, 12, 13, 14      SA 6, 12, 13, 14
  SLO 23       Day 2 Writing            Day 2 Writing         Day 2 Writing
                   Prompt                   Prompt                Prompt




                                                                                                                                       10
L. 11.2b          Day 2                Day 2          Day 2            Day 2            Day 2
SLO 26       Writing Prompt     Writing Prompt   Writing Prompt   Writing Prompt   Writing Prompt
L. 11.4a
                M/C 3,9               M/C 3,9
SLO 28
L.11.5a
                M/C 2, 8              M/C 2, 8      M/C 2, 8
SLO 29
           M/C—multiple choice
           T/F—True/False Justified
           S/A—Short Answer




                                                                                                    11
Using the Model Assessment to Support Your Teaching
The most important goal of the Model Curriculum is to assist you in improving student learning
outcomes. The assessment is designed to both measure how far students have come during a
particular unit of instruction, and also to give you some specific ideas about each student’s
strengths and weaknesses in terms of the Unit 1 SLOs.

Before you plan your Unit 1 instruction, it would be helpful to take a careful look at the
Standards and SLOs for Unit 1. As you can see from the section on the Standards and SLOs
above, there are some parts of these SLOs that only you can accomplish. That means that
some specific activities focusing on these SLOs during the 5 weeks of Unit 1 would be a good
idea.

In addition, there are certain kinds of reading and writing practice students should have over
and over again during Unit 1. These are the focus of the Model Assessment, and they should
be at the center of your instructional planning:

           o   reading various kinds of narratives, and in reading and interpreting poetry
           o   answering short answer questions that ask them to respond to a text—explain
               what it means, describe its language, connect it to their own experience or
               another text
           o   Identifying the elements of narrative in several different narratives so that they
               understand how to “tell a story”

You will see that the assessment is designed to directly assess students’ understanding and
developing skill in each of these areas. We encourage you to look at the assessment tasks and
model your own assessments on these tasks—use the tasks individually during your instruction
to check students’ understanding. While the assessment will be given at the end of Unit 1, you
can help your students and support their learning by adapting these tasks for your own
purposes, with your own texts and writing prompts.

In the next section of this Guide, you will find an overview of the assessment, as well as explicit
notes on each task, and suggestions for evaluating your students’ responses to each task. The
SLOs and Standards assessed by each task are also given again in these notes.




                                                                                                    12
The Grade 11 assessment has the following format:
   o There are two texts
         o     Scene from A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry
         o “The Driver” by Christopher Renny (a poem)
    o For EACH text there are:
                Three multiple-choice questions, with a single best answer
                Two true-false justified questions. Students must classify the given
                   statement as true or false, and then give text-based reasons for their
                   choice. Either answer is acceptable; the scoring of the answer should rest
                   on the rationale.
                One short-answer question that requires the student to write three to five
                   sentences in response.
         o For the two texts together
                Two short answer questions that
                          require at least 5 sentences in response
                          Ask students to relate the two texts in some way
         o A writing prompt that requires students to construct their own narratives, using
             the themes of the two texts as a starting point.


You may wish to give the assessment in two parts (bullets one and two above), or in three
parts (bullet 1 on day 1, bullet 2 on day 2, the writing prompt on day 3). The assessment has
been designed to require a full class period for the writing prompt in which each student
creates a personal narrative. You will need to provide lined paper for the Day 2 writing prompt
responses.




                                                                                             13
Scoring Guide, Day 1, Questions 1-14

Questions 1-3: Multiple Choice 0-1
  1. B
  2. C
  3. C

Questions 4-5: True/False Justified 0-3
For Each Question:

   0   No response, or misinterprets the task, quotes words from the text without explanation,
       shows no evidence of understanding the text
   1   Chooses True or False and provides some reference to the text to support the choice;
       reference may be unclear or not directly supportive of T or F; may focus on minor detail
       of text instead of central supporting details for either answer
   2   Chooses True or False and provides at least one specific reference to the text that
       supports the choice; clearly understands the task and provides some additional, if
       simple, support
   3   Chooses True or False and provides at least two specific references to the text that
       clearly support the choice and make an evidence-based case for that position


Question 6: Short Answer 0-3

   0   No response, or misinterprets the task, quotes words from the text without explanation,
       shows no evidence of understanding the text
   1   Response indicates some comprehension of the text and the task, but does not directly
       engage with the task and attempt a response to it
   2   Response indicates comprehension of the task and partial comprehension of the text,
       though some essential element[s] of full understanding of the task and text are missing
   3   Response indicates comprehension of the task and full comprehension of the text, with
       clear connections of text to the response




                                                                                              14
Questions 7-9: Multiple Choice 0-1

   7. B
   8. D
   9. B


Questions 10-11: True/False Justified 0-3
For Each Question:

   0   No response, or misinterprets the task, quotes words from the text without explanation,
       shows no evidence of understanding the text
   1   Chooses True or False and provides some reference to the text to support the choice;
       reference may be unclear or not directly supportive of T or F; may focus on minor detail
       of text instead of central supporting details for either answer
   2   Chooses True or False and provides at least one specific reference to the text that
       supports the choice; clearly understands the task and provides some additional, if
       simple, support
   3   Chooses True or False and provides at least two specific references to the text that
       clearly support the choice and make an evidence-based case for that position



Question 12: Short Answer 0-3

   0   No response, or misinterprets the task, quotes words from the text without explanation,
       shows no evidence of understanding the text
   1   Response indicates some comprehension of the text and the task, but does not directly
       engage with the task and connect the response to the text
   2   Response indicates comprehension of the task and partial comprehension of the text, at
       least one direct reference to the text is present, though some essential element[s] of full
       understanding of the task and text are missing
   3   Response indicates comprehension of the task and full comprehension of the text, with
       clear connections of text to the response



Questions 13-14 0-4

The scoring rubric for questions 13-14 appears on the following page. In every case, the
questions ask students to connect the two texts and to use specific details from the texts to
support their responses. The rubric focuses on the evidence the student presents that s/he
comprehends both texts, comprehends the task, and can use multiple relevant details from the
texts to support the response.


                                                                                                15
                         Open-Ended Scoring Guide


POINTS                                     GUIDE
         A student at this score point:

 4           Demonstrates full comprehension of the text[s]
             Draws appropriate and logical conclusions in response to the task
               that are elaborated
             Makes relevant and controlled use of the text[s]
             Provides appropriate details and accurate explanations
         A student at this score point:

 3           May indicate comprehension of the text[s] but specific text reference
               may only be implied
             Provides a simple but accurate explanation
             Makes some relevant use of the text[s] to support or explain
             Draws appropriate conclusions that are not fully elaborated
         A student at this score point:

 2           Provides some text reference which may be incorrect or provides a
               general explanation that omits specific links to the text
             May focus on irrelevant or minor details
             May simply restate the text[s]
             May imply text details by relating life experiences, by describing text
               elements, or by identifying concepts in the text[s]
         A student at this score point:

 1           Misinterprets the task or fails to address a major part of the task
             Present one simple idea or detail
             Provides no explanation
             Does not clearly refer to the text[s]
         A student at this score point:

 0           Completely misinterprets the task
             Merely selects key word or phrases from the task or the text[s]
             Shows no evidence of having read or comprehended the text[s]




                                                                                        16
Day 2, Writing Prompt

You read two texts, an excerpt from A Raisin in the Sun and the poem “The Driver.” Each work
explores complex family relationships.

Reflect upon your life and select someone for whom you have respect. Tell a story that
illustrates how that person gained your respect.

Write a narrative that develops this experience or event using effective techniques, well-chosen
details, and a well-structured sequence.

      Establish a point of view,
      create a smooth progression of events,
      Include narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, and sensory
       language.
      Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the experience or event.




Use the NJ Registered Holistic Writing Rubric to evaluate responses to this writing prompt. That
rubric is presented below. Note, as you apply this rubric, that the specific instructions to
students should be what you privilege in your scoring of these responses.




                                                                                              17
  In scoring,     Inadequate Command        Limited Command         Partial Command          Adequate         Strong Command       Superior Command
 consider the                                                                                Command
grid of written
   language
    Score                    1                       2                      3                    4                   5                      6
                     May lack opening          May lack           May lack opening      Generally has      Opening and            Opening and
                       and/or closing         opening and/or          and/or closing           opening            closing                 closing
                                                  closing                                   and/or closing
                     Minimal response         Attempts to           Usually has          Single focus       Single focus        Single, distinct
                      to topic; uncertain          focus               single focus                            Sense of unity              focus
                             focus           May drift or shift                                                and coherence         Unified and
                                                   focus                                                          Key ideas              coherent
                                                                                                                   developed         Well-developed
                         No planning           Attempts            Some lapses or       Ideas loosely          Logical        Logical progression
Content and                 evident;            organization              flaws in           connected           progression of            of ideas
Organization              disorganized         Few, if any,           organization         Transitions              ideas         Fluent, cohesive
                                                 transitions         May lack some            evident           Moderately         Compositional
                                               between ideas            transitions                                  fluent           risks successful
                                                                      between ideas                               Attempts
                                                                                                                 compositional
                                                                                                                      risks
                      Details random,         Details lack          Repetitious            Uneven              Details         Details effective,
                      inappropriate, or       elaboration, i.e.,          details           deployment of         appropriate         vivid, explicit,
                       barely apparent        highlight paper           Several               details             and varied        and/or pertinent
                                                                       unelaborated
                                                                          details
    Usage             No apparent           Numerous errors       Errors/patterns       Some errors         Few Errors         Very few, if any,
                         control                                     of errors may be        that do not                                  errors
                   Sever/numerous                                        evident           interfere with
                          errors                                                               meaning
 Sentence           Assortment of              Excessive           Little variety in    Some variety        Variety in         Precision and/or
Construction        incomplete and/or         monotony/same                syntax            Generally            syntax             sophistication
                   incorrect sentences           structure            Some errors             correct           appropriate        Very few, if any,
                                             Numerous errors                                                   and effective              errors
                                                                                                                Few errors
  Mechanics           Errors so severe         Numerous           Patterns of errors    No consistent       Few errors         Very few, if any,
                      they detract from        serious errors             evident              pattern of                                 errors
                          meaning                                                                errors
                                                                                            Some errors
                                                                                              that do not
                                                                                             interfere with
                                                                                                meaning

                                                                                                                                                  18
                     FR = Fragment                   Content/Organization                     Usage            Sentence            Mechanics
            Student wrote too little to allow a                                                              Construction
              reliable judgment of his/her           Communicates intended               Tense formation    Variety of         Spelling
   NON-                  writing.                         message to intended               Subject-verb          type,         Capitalizatio
SCORABLE                                                          audience                    agreement       structure, and           n
RESPONSES       OT = Off Topic/Off Task                    Relates to topic                Pronoun              length        Punctuation
              Student did not write on the              Opening and closing               usage/agreeme       Correct
                  assigned topic/task                           Focused                          nt           construction
                                                   Logical progression of ideas              Word
                    NE = Not English                          Transitions                  choice/meanti
            Student wrote in a language other         Appropriate details and                   me
                     than English                               information                  Proper
                                                                                               modifiers
                   NR = No Response
                        Blank




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After the Assessment Is Scored
Keep a record of each student’s responses to the Unit 1 Model Assessment tasks and your
scoring of those responses. Each student will have a different pattern of strengths and
weaknesses, and these will help you plan your instruction. Throughout the Model Curriculum
Units—and the Core Standards—the same ELA skills are emphasized. These are careful
reading of both fiction and nonfiction text, the ability to use details and ideas from the text[s] to
support your own interpretations, and the increasing complexity of the ideas, comparisons, and
inferences students are asked to deal with as the units unfold throughout the year. Unit 1 gives
you an initial benchmark for each student, and a way to measure progress throughout the Model
Curriculum Units this year.




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