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									Management Plan for

Centenary Riverside

 April 2010 – March 2015




            1
                                         Acknowledgements
Sheffield Wildlife Trust would like to thank the many individuals who have contributed to the formulation
of this management plan. In particular, thanks go to Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council (Greg
Lindley, Steve Smith and Carolyn Barber); Rotherham and District Ornithological Society; Additionally,
thanks go to the many staff and trainees who have contributed: Chris Stones, Rob Miller, Be Wiggs, Hannah
Wittram, Sarah Sidgwick, Matt Duffy and Roy Mosley.




Report by:    Chris Stones and John Paul Ward

Edited by:    Robert Miller

              Sheffield Wildlife Trust

              37 Stafford Road

              Sheffield S2 2SF

              0114 263 4335

              www.wildsheffield.com




                                                   2
                                                                          Contents
1.0     Introduction .......................................................................................................................................................... 5
  1.1        Purposes and formulation of the plan ............................................................................................... 5
  1.2        Vision Statement ............................................................................................................................... 7
2.0     Management Aims And Objectives ..................................................................................................................... 8
3.0     Site Details ......................................................................................................................................................... 13
  3.1    Location and extent ......................................................................................................................... 13
  3.2    Landscape value and context .......................................................................................................... 13
  3.3    Site tenure and occupancy .............................................................................................................. 13
  3.4    Statutory designations ..................................................................................................................... 14
  3.5    Adjacent land ownership................................................................................................................. 14
  3.6    Past, recent and current land use ..................................................................................................... 14
  3.7    Services ........................................................................................................................................... 15
  3.8    Infrastructure ................................................................................................................................... 15
  3.9    Public Rights of Way ...................................................................................................................... 15
  3.10 Current funding schemes, income and grants ... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark
  not defined.
4.0     Environmental information ................................................................................................................................ 16
  4.1      Topography ..................................................................................................................................... 16
  4.2      Geology ........................................................................................................................................... 16
  4.3      Climate ............................................................................................................................................ 16
  4.4      Hydrology ....................................................................................................................................... 16
  4.5      Biodiversity Action Plans ............................................................................................................... 17
     4.5.1      Table 1: BAP Priority habitats and species............................................................................. 17
  4.6      List of surveys, monitoring schemes and reports............................................................................ 18
5.0     Biodiversity ........................................................................................................................................................ 18
  5.1      Overview ......................................................................................................................................... 20
  5.2      Grassland...................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.2.1     Haymeadows ........................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.2.2     Pasture .................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
        5.2.2.1          Acid grassland .............................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
        5.2.2.2          Neutral grassland .......................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
        5.2.2.3          Marshy grassland .......................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  5.3      Scrub within the grasslands ......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  5.4      Hedgerow boundaries .................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.4.1     Table 2: Results of HEGS survey ..... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
     defined.
     5.4.2     Table 3: Hedgerow management timetable ................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error!
     Bookmark not defined.
  5.5      Water bodies and courses............. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.5.1     Pond ..................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.5.2     Water courses ....................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  5.6      Woodland ..................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.6.1     Mixed deciduous woodland . Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.6.2     Conifer plantation ................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     5.6.3     Copses .................................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.


                                                                                     3
  5.7      Species assemblages ....................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.23
     5.7.1     Fungi ....................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.23
     5.7.2     Invertebrates .........................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.23
        5.7.2.1          Butterflies ..................................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
       5.7.3         Reptiles and amphibians ......................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.23
       5.7.4         Birds .....................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.23
       5.7.5         Mammals..............................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.24
6.0     Infrastructure ...................................................................................................................................................... 23
  6.1      Public Rights of Way ................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
  6.2      Boundaries - internal and external drystone walls ............... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error!
  Bookmark not defined.
  6.3      Other structures ............................................................................................................................... 24
     6.3.1      Water supply structures........................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.25
     6.3.2      Culverts and crossings ......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
     6.3.3      Seating..................................................................................................................................... 25
7.0     Cultural context .................................................................................................................................................. 26
  7.1    Archaeological features and management . Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
  defined.
  7.2    Recreational usage .......................................................................................................................... 26
  7.3    Information and interpretation ........................................................................................................ 26
  7.4    Community ..................................................................................................................................... 27
  7.5    Education ........................................................................................................................................ 27
8.0     Economic ........................................................................................................................................................... 28
  8.1      Productive land-use ......................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.27
     8.1.1     Farming ................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.27
     8.1.2     Forestry ................................................................................Error! Bookmark not defined.28
     8.1.3     Collection of yellow rattle seed ...........................................Error! Bookmark not defined.28
  8.2      Grant and schemes funding ............................................................................................................. 28
  8.3      Employment and training ................................................................................................................ 29
9.0     References .......................................................................................................................................................... 29
10.0         WORK PROGRAMME ............................................................................................................................... 30



List of figures
Figure 1: Site location and Boundaries
Figure 2: Adjacent land ownership
Figure 3: Services
Figure 4: Infrastructure
Figure 5: Public Rights of Way
Figure 6: Hydrology
Figure 7: Phase 1 Habitat Survey 2010
Figure 8: Bank stabilisation & compost soxx
Figure 9: Aerial photo



                                                                                     4
      1.0 INTRODUCTION
Sheffield Wildlife Trust is part of a national association of 47 local Wildlife Trusts, which work with
communities throughout the UK to protect wildlife in town and country. Sheffield Wildlife Trust aims to
promote conservation, advance education in environmental matters and improve the quality of life in
Sheffield and Rotherham, through the development and promotion of sustainable land management
practices, linked directly to both rural and urban regeneration.

The Living Don Living Landscapes aims to establish a suite of high quality, connected, well managed and
accessible wildlife reserves that will reverse past unsustainable trends in land use on some of Sheffield’s
finest wildlife sites. The project will also assist in the environmental regeneration of Sheffield by linking
the management of land for wildlife, with the creation of jobs and green enterprise initiatives across the city.
Ranging in scope from small urban commons, to large moorland areas, these sites will act as the core to
Sheffield's Local Biodiversity Action Plan, and will be managed in partnership with the Local Authorities,
statutory bodies, voluntary organisations and members of the public, for the benefit of the people, wildlife
and the wider environment of Sheffield.

The objectives of the Living Don Living Landscapes are as follows:

    To manage core sites within the landscape to provide quality areas for biodiversity and recreation.

    To connect the core sites with other green spaces including other nature reserves, parks, allotments
     and gardens.

    To undertake and promote positive management of the natural environment to provide an
     ecologically functional landscape that provides ecological, economic, social and environmental
     services.

    To promote and enable appropriate public access to, and enjoyment of, wildlife reserves throughout
     Sheffield and Rotherham.

    To increase public understanding of the Living Don area’s local natural heritage, and the
     participation of local people in the care and enjoyment of their local environment.


1.1      Purposes and formulation of the plan

This management plan has been formulated for the following reasons:

        To provide comprehensive and cohesive information about the urban nature park in one
         document, with reference to other documents where necessary.
        To outline the key long-term aims and the associated objectives that form the framework of
         management.



                                                       5
 To outline the rationale for management so as to give a clear and comprehensive explanation of
  why aspects need management and in what form that management will take place.
 To provide a key document from which projects are developed and associated funding sought.
 The plan allows consistency and continuity so that when changes of staff take place, or changes
  in ownership or disposal of the land occurs, then management aims, objectives and prescriptions
  are continued.

The work programme is set out within this document. However, the nature of work programmes is
such that they vary and are modified due to unanticipated changes or developments. Therefore the
full annual work programmes are kept and updated electronically at the Sheffield Wildlife Trust
office.




                                            6
1.2     Vision Statement
To be confirmed & decided upon when consulted with local stakeholders once a reserve advisory group is
set up:


Centenary Riverside Nature Park provides an important green oasis amongst the industrious past of
Rotherham. Created on the site of a former steelworks, Centenary Riverside will be managed to
provide flood storage capacity & mitigation to help protect Rotherham from serious flooding from
the River Don whilst providing a stepping stone for wildlife to move up and down the river corridor
to other local green spaces.




                                                   7
        2.0 MANAGEMENT AIMS AND OBJECTIVES


                                             Aims                                                               Objectives

1.3.1 FUNCTION


Aim 1                                                            a) To assist in the protection of Rotherham City Centre during times of flooding by providing
                     Provide an area of flood storage capacity
                                                                    an area of floodplain.
                     that is managed as an Urban Nature Park     b) Monitor the lagoon and riverbanks for flood damage and report to stake holders where
                                                                    relevant.
                     for wildlife & people, as part of the
                                                                 c) Maintain outflow pipes by removing blockages to allow passage of water to reduce
                     Renaissance Flood Alleviation Scheme for       flooding.
                     Rotherham.                                  d) Monitor flood defences adjacent to the site and report any problems to relevant
                                                                    stakeholders.
                                                                 e) Maintain vehicle access to the far end of the site so that flood defence infrastructure can be
                                                                    maintained by the Environment Agency.
                                                                 f) Monitor silting of lagoon following flood events and maintain as necessary.


1.3.2 BIODIVERSITY


Aim 2                                                            a)       Maintain the meadows as a low-nutrient wildflower meadow by taking an annual hay cut and
                     Enhance and maintain biodiversity of the             removing arisings.

                     nature parks meadows.                       b)       Monitor plateau for success of germination and reseed or plug plant as necessary.
                                                                 c)       Put in additional soil and compost on barer areas where necessary and reseed.
                                                                 d)       Dig scrapes in the wetter areas of the meadow adjacent to paths to prevent path erosion and diversify
                                                                          the habitat.




                                                                      8
Aim 3                                                   a)       Replace dead trees as necessary to maintain stocking rate.
        Manage the planted woodland areas and
        ensure their successful management.             b)       Encourage establishment of trees by mulching, strimming weeds and spraying weeds with herbicide
                                                                 around trees.

                                                        c)       Water trees in times of drought.

                                                        d)       Remove stakes and rabbit guards in autumn 2013.

                                                        e)       Identify new areas for planting as site develops.



Aim 4                                                   a)       Identify donor site for pillwort and undertake successful transplant of pillwort plants.
        Maintain Pillwort pond.
                                                        b)       Manage pillwort through trampling of pond edge to create muddy areas for colonisation.
                                                        c)       Remove litter from the pond.
                                                        d)       Monitor the growth of algal mats and reduce if necessary.
                                                        e)       Monitor the development of planted aquatics and self-seeded aquatics. Consider planting if
                                                                 necessary.
                                                        f)       Ensure pond water levels are sufficient and top up if necessary.


Aim 5                                                   a)       Develop a rotational cutting regime for willow stands and reed beds to achieve a diverse structure of
        Protect and enhance the wetland areas                    scrub and reed bed.
        around the lagoon and river bank.               b)       Monitor bare areas and consider planting/transplanting of reeds if natural colonisation is poor.
                                                        c)       Remove and prevent establishment of invasive species such as Japanese knotweed and Himalayan on
                                                                 the river bank and lagoon.
                                                        d)       Remove rubbish deposited by river after flooding.
                                                        e)       Monitor water levels and ensure that there is no access for people onto the islands. Removal of silt
                                                                 may be required to maintain sufficient depth of water.
                                                        f)       Maintain outflow pipes by removing blockages to allow passage of water and wildlife.




Aim 6                                                   a)       Continue monitoring of key indicator grassland species on the reserve.
        Record and monitor the ecological features of   b)       Monitor breeding populations of birds on the reserve.
        the reserve.                                    c)       Undertake a breeding bird survey and winter bird survey every 5 years.
                                                        d)       Monitor the colonisation of aquatic flora and fauna of the lagoon, river bank and pillwort pond.

                                                             9
                                                                       e)    Undertake small mammal survey every five years.
                                                                       f)    Undertake pond survey every five years for vegetation, amphibians and fish.
                                                                       g)    Monitor the establishment and development of the compost soxx and coir matting.
                                                                       h)    Nominate for and achieve Local Nature Reserve status when appropriate.




1.3.3 INFRASTRUCTURE


Aim 7                                                                  a)    Maintain hard standing path network through herbicide treatment, vegetation removal, path side
                       Maintain and improve physical access to the           strimming and spot repairs.
                       reserve, to enable appropriate public use and   b)    Maintain grass path through regular strimming throughout the spring and summer.
                       management.                                     c)    Remove build up of silt and bird droppings on the boardwalk to maintain good condition and
                                                                             aesthetics.
                                                                       d)    Widen top hard standing paths to a width that accommodates a flat bed truck.
                                                                       e)    Create scrapes adjacent to paths in wetter areas to store excess water and prevent water logging and
                                                                             erosion.
                                                                       f)    Extend the lagoon boardwalk at both ends to the extent of the water inundation line and reroute the
                                                                             hard standing path accordingly.
                                                                       g)    Maintain both boardwalks in good condition and carry out spot repairs when necessary.
                                                                       h)    Undertake regular patrols to provide a site presence, identify maintenance issues and to keep the
                                                                             reserve litter free.
                                                                       i)    Encourage the responsible use of the site by dog walkers
                                                                       j)    Improve the hard standing areas leading up to the entrance gate and between the gate and the bridge.
                                                                       k)    Investigate the feasibility of constructing a bridge over the canal from Don Island to join Centenary
                                                                             Riverside with the Trans Pennine Trail.



Aim 8                                                                  a)    Regularly clean benches and undertake any necessary spot repairs.
                       Maintain benches and other features.
                                                                       b)    Replace any broken timbers on post and rail fences.
                                                                       c)    Clean and undertake spot repairs to steps and boardwalk around pillwort pond.
                                                                       d)    Ensure Steelhenge is free from graffiti and damage.
                                                                       e)    Regularly clean interpretation panels and repair/replace if needed.
                                                                       f)    Repair any damage to compost storage area as necessary.

                                                                        10
                                                              g)    Maintain entrance gate & bollard and repaint if necessary in conjunction with RMBC.



1.3.4 CULTURAL


Aim 9
                 Protect cultural features.                   a)    Maintain Steel Henge and deckchairs.

                                                              b)    Retain the wall alongside bridge.

                                                              c)    Maintain condition of bridge in partnership with Rotherham MBC.




Aim 10                                                        a)    Contact local interest groups and the wider community to publicise Centenary Riverside Urban
                 Promote and encourage community                    Nature Park.
                 involvement in the reserve.                  b)    Develop a Friends of Group made up of local stakeholders including local residents, businesses,
                                                                    interest groups, schools and individuals.
                                                              c)    Keep the Friends Of Group and other local people and organisations informed and involved in
                                                                    decision-making where appropriate.
                                                              d)    Conduct a visitor (on-site and postal) survey every 5 years.
                                                              e)    Advertise an events programme that encourages use of the site.
                                                              f)    Encourage feedback from users and stakeholders by the provision of contact details.
                                                              g)    Recruit ‘community rangers’ to provide an on-site presence and to report any maintenance issues.




Aim 11                                                        a)    Develop educational resources for use by schools on the reserve.
                 Utilise Centenary Riverside Nature Park to   b)    Run education visits for local schools on the site.
                 raise awareness and understanding of the     c)    Encourage schools to use of Centenary Riverside Urban Nature Park independently.

                 importance of biodiversity and the natural   d)    Provide guided walks, talks to local groups, and attend local events to promote the reserve and
                                                                    wildlife trust membership.
                 world.




                                                               11
1.3.5 ECONOMIC


Aim 12
                                                                   a)   Commission a study into the feasibility of an education and training centre to ascertain opportunities,
                 Undertake feasibility study on the prospect of
                                                                        constraints, function, costings and design.
                 developing an education and training centre       b)   Identify and apply for external funding to secure the development and construction of an education
                                                                        and training centre if deemed desirable.
                 on site.




Aim 13                                                            a)    Provide training opportunities to the Trust’s staff and other interested individuals in relevant skills
                 Provide opportunities to use the reserve as a
                                                                        such as hay meadow and pasture management, tree planting and aftercare, hedge planting, plant ID
                 training resource.                                     skills, bird ID and ecological survey skills.




Aim 14                                                            a)    Annually submit claims for ERDF, SITA Trust, BIFFA and RMBC where necessary.
                 Continue and develop on-going sources of         b)    Make applications to Landfill Tax Credits where applicable and desirable.
                 grant aid and other income to support the        c)    Investigate additional funding for ongoing management of the reserve.
                 management of the reserve.                       d)    Recruit 50 new Trust members from local businesses, local residential areas and interest groups.




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      3.0 SITE DETAILS


3.1      Location and extent
(Figure 1: Site location & boundaries)

Centenary Riverside is an urban wetland Nature Park and is part of the pioneering flood alleviation scheme
on the banks of the River Don. It covers 4.5 hectares consisting of planted wet woodland, dry woodland,
Wildflower Meadows and naturally regenerated wetland habitats. It is centred on grid reference SK 420 921
in the Templeborough area of West Rotherham which is a mixed commercial and business area, not far from
the town centre. The site is approximately 1km from junction 34 on the M1 motorway.



3.2      Landscape value and context
Centenary Riverside is part of the Rotherham Renaissance flood alleviation scheme phase 1. The site will
act as a multipurpose wetland park and has been developed on derelict former industrial land just off
Riverside Way. The Urban Nature Park will provide a natural centre piece to the economic, social and
environmental regeneration of west Rotherham. Centenary Riverside will provide flood storage capacity and
mitigation to help protect Rotherham from serious flooding from the River Don, similar to that experienced
in the summer of 2007. The site will contribute significantly to the Green Infrastructure of Rotherham
helping the area adapt to the impact of climate change.

Centenary Riverside will provide value for the local community with a varied range of informal outdoor
recreation opportunities for local residents. It is also hoped that it will become a centre for the delivery of
high quality non accredited training, environmental training and outdoor learning for local communities.

The construction of Centenary Riverside and its future management and maintenance is aimed at
maximising its value for biodiversity. Being an urban site, it will provide a green oasis in the middle of an
industrial and commercial area of west Rotherham. Being on the banks of the River Don, it will provide a
‘stepping stone’ for wildlife moving up and down the river corridor, linking up to the nearby Blackburn
Meadows wetland site approximately 1.5 km west of Centenary Riverside.



3.3      Site tenure and occupancy

Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council owns the freehold on the site. Sheffield Wildlife Trust leases the
land from Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council for 99 years, the lease having commenced in April
2009.




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3.4       Statutory designations
The Rotherham Unitary Development Plan states that ‘High priority will be given to reclamation and other
environmental improvements to enhance the quality, appearance and development potential of the
Borough.’ (Policy ENV4 Environmental Improvement).
Centenary Riverside has no statutory designations, but it will be desirable for it to be nominated in the next
round of Local Nature Reserve designations.


3.5      Adjacent land ownership
(Figure 2: Adjacent land ownership)

Land to the north west of centenary riverside is owned by Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council and is
reclaimed industrial land which has been landscaped with trees, shrubs and grass and has become well
established. The TPT trail runs through this site and would be an ideal location to connect to Centenary
Riverside via a footbridge. The canal to the north of the park provides potential ecological connectivity to
Centenary Riverside. To the west of the park lies Blackburn Meadows nature reserve, providing another
important ecological linkage. Also to the west is the visitor attraction, Magna Science Park. This provides
opportunities to makes links to the site from here such as site leaflets and other marketing material in their
buildings.
The wasteland at the entrance way (between the bollard & the gate) to the nature park is privately owned by
Hinchcliffe and Pentagon. It is thought that this land will become developed during the course of this
management plan.


3.6      Past, recent and current land use

Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council own Centenary Riverside. Up until the late 1800’s the area was
known a Bromley Sands and was used for livestock grazing as well as being a place of recreation. During
the 20th Century the area of Templeborough was well known for its steelworks, which was reputed to be a
mile long and at its height in the mid-20th century employed 10,000 people. The steel works became part of
the British Steel Corporation after nationalisation in 1967. The steelworks closed in 1993. The large melting
shop at Templeborough was producing about 11,000 tons of ingots per week in 1953, equivalent of an
output of 550,000 tons of steel per annum. The plant at the Templeborough melting shop consisted of seven
open hearth furnaces of 60 tons capacity for the production of acid and basic steel ingots. All the furnaces
were fired by producer gas provided by a battery of four 3-ton Morgan gas machines. The melting shop was
mainly devoted to the production of high and medium carbon steels and alloy steels, some of which were
sold to customers in ingot form. The greater proportion of the output was used within the works for the
production of forgings, railway tyres, wheels, axles and springs, and certain rolled products.

The huge relics of the site’s industrial past are being celebrated in its new incarnation, with the sculpture
Steel Henge on the flood defence bank being constructed of reclaimed iron moulding cats; adaptation of the
concrete foundations to create wildlife habitats; and the creation of giant deck chair sculptures reflecting the
massive forms of the steel industry and the increasing use of the Don for leisure.

The area around the reserve was regularly flooded over the years by the River Don causing disruption and
inconvenience to local business and people, the latest event being in 2007 hence the need for a flood
defence system. The new flood defence system should build the confidence of existing business and help
attract new business to the area as the adjacent land can be developed safely.




                                                       14
3.7      Services
(Figure 3: Services)

The large DOGSTAR gas pipe runs along side the rail track at the Eastern boundary of the site crossing over
the rail track and entering Centenary Riverside from its North Eastern Border into the dry woodland area.
The gas pipe follows the boundary Northwards and leaves the site at the most Northern tip.

There are no other services present on site.


3.8      Infrastructure
(Figure 4: Infrastructure)

Centenary Riverside currently has one access point from a bridge in the north east of the reserve. It is hoped
that a pedestrian and cycle bridge will be constructed linking the urban nature park to the Trans Pennine
Trail. The urban nature park will contain a network of surfaced paths allowing wheel chair and push chair
access across the plateau above the flood defence bank. A further network of informal surface paths
maximise access around the reserve. These will be maintained (mowed) to keep them accessible. These
paths have not been surfaced to encourage the majority of visitors on site to keep to the upper areas of the
site, so as to minimise disturbance to wildfowl nesting on the island in the main water body.
A boardwalk has been installed enable visitors to cross the lagoon. In times of high water level the
boardwalk can be submerged and is prone to silt being deposited when the water recedes. The silt will need
to be regularly cleared to maintain the appearance of the boardwalk.
There are eight seating area’s located around the site, particularly near features of interest such as the
pillwort pond and Steel Henge. These benches will need to be regularly cleaned and also any damage
repaired to keep them in good order.

Around the bridge buttresses are post and rail fences to restrict access onto the bridge structure. There is a
further post and rail fence running along the northern boundary restricting access to the railway. These will
need to be maintained and repaired as they are prone to vandalism.
Two water flow pipes connect the River Don to the lagoon allowing water to drain from the lagoons when
the river level drops. They also function as fish passes. These will need to be regularly cleared of
vegetation, silt and litter.

There is a metal security fence running along the northern boundary separating the site from the railway.
This fence and its maintenance is the responsibility of Network Rail.

There are two interpretation features on Centenary Riverside. One is situated next to the pillwort pond and is
a ‘traditional’ style panel consisting of composite material set in a metal frame. The second is an etched
steel plate set in a steel stand. Both will need to be monitored for vandalism and cleaned regularly and
repaired or replaced as necessary.




3.9      Public Rights of Way
(Figure 5: Public Rights of Way)




                                                      15
Centenary Riverside does not contain any designated Public Rights of Way at present. The Trans Pennine
Trail (TPT) runs along side the nature park on the other side of the railway track and there are plans to build
a bridge to link the TPT to the site.
A network of hard standing and soft paths run through the site. These will need to be maintained through
regular strimming and application of herbicide as well as any spot repairs undertaken to maintain a quality
surface.




       4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION



4.1        Topography
Centenary Riverside lies on the bank of the River Don at an altitude between 29.4 metres and 25.4 metres
above ordnance datum.


4.2        Geology
The underlying geology of Centenary Riverside Nature Park is mainly the original soil of the site that has
been landscaped to create the current landform. Contaminated materials were removed from site during
construction. Top soil and compost have been spread up to 190mm along the flood defence area of the site
and along other planted areas.
Rotherham falls in the Natural England Coal Measures Natural Area. The underlying bedrock is
characterised by alternating sandstones and shales.


4.3        Climate

Data is available for the thirty-year average (1970 - 2000) from local Sheffield weather station (see Table 1).
The prevailing wind is from the west.
Table 1. Local climate data for Centenary Riverside
        Location              Mean Annual Rainfall     Mean             Mean max temperature (0C)
                                    (mm)               annual
                                                      sunshine           Daytime            Night
                                                        (hrs)
Sheffield (131m)                       825             1380           13.1            6.4




4.4        Hydrology
(Figure 6: Hydrology map)


                                                                 16
The River Don runs along the South and East boundaries of the site. The wetland park will provide a
floodplain which will become periodically inundated during times of high river level. This provides areas of
wet woodland and grassland alongside the River Don. The site will also contain a small lagoon which
contains reed beds and islands for breeding wild fowl. The area of the main water body will cover 1-2 Ha
depending on the water levels. A pillwort (Pilularia globulifera) pond has been excavated in the North
West of the site which is 1600mm at its deepest and 500m2. In times of wet weather small rills are present
on the flood bank and areas of ephemeral standing water appear along some sections of the path network.




4.5        Biodiversity Action Plans

Centenary Riverside is a newly created Nature Park that has been planted with a mixture of woodland and
meadow. Wetland areas have been allowed to develop naturally. The woodland areas will take several
years to develop and mature while the bank meadow areas flowered first in 2009 and both the bank and
plateau flowered in 2010. The wetland areas are developing well naturally but will need to be monitored for
dominance of willow and reeds.

The pond will provide a habitat for pillwort which has been defined as an internationally threatened species
in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan. It also receives general protection under the Wildlife and Countryside
Act 1981 and is now classified as vulnerable in the UK. Pillwort generally favours ponds that are disturbed
by cattle. However, it is hoped that organised trampling activities will be carried out by school children
visiting the site to create muddy areas for the pillwort to colonise.

Bird records have been collected by the Rotherham Ornithological Society in 2009/2010 after the opening
of the site. For a young site there is a surprising number of birds species present. In future years as the
habitats develop it is hoped that these species will diversify and the populations become established.


4.5.1          Table 1: BAP Priority habitats and species

Rotherham BAP Priorities (short and medium list only)


Habitats                                                Species

Wet woodland                                            Pillwort (Pilularia globulifera)

Oak – birch woodland




                                                          17
UK BAP Priorities (short and medium list only)


Habitats                                         Species

Wet woodland                                     Linnet (Carduelis cannabina)

Lowland meadow                                   Reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus)

Rivers                                           Bullfinch (Pyrrhula pyrrhula)

Ponds                                            Song Thrush(Turdus philomelos)




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4.6       List of surveys, monitoring schemes and reports

Author           Date     Document             Summary
                          National
                          Vegetation           65% of site is National Vegetation Classification MG5 Cynosaurus cristatus – Centurea nigra grassland, 35% of site is unimproved
Tony Askins        2008   Classification       grassland & flushes. Several locally rare plant species present.
                          Landscape Plans      Whole variety of plans and specifications for planting of meadows & woodland, plus specifications for installation of infrastructure
Tony Askins        2008   and specifications   such as boardwalks, benches, pillwort pond, footpaths and giant deckchairs etc.
                          Compost Soxx &
                          Coir Matting Base    Wildscapes was commissioned in 2009 by WRAP to carry out a monitoring programme of vegetation on the bank of the River Don at
Belinda Wiggs      2009   line report          Centenary Riverside. Three compartments were selected to be monitored and are adjacent to each other on the banks of the River Don.
Rotherham
Ornithological            Bird Species
Society           2009/10 Record               A list of species and numbers of individual birds found on Centenary Riverside during 2009/10.




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      5.0 BIODIVERSITY
(Figure 7: Phase 1 Habitat Survey 2010)




5.1      Overview
The habitats at Centenary Riverside are a mixture of wet and dry woodland, wet grassland, meadow, reed
bed, marshland and a small pillwort pond. The woodlands areas are newly planted and as such will take time
to develop. The woodland areas have been planted with a mix of half-standards and whips complete with
rabbit guards. The planting of whips and half-standards has been done in a semi-random fashion to achieve
a more natural looking effect as the woodland develops, as apposed to artificial rows usual in woodland
planting.

The marshland lagoon contains three islands formed by retained slag piles. The islands will provide habitat
for nesting birds that will have no access to people or dogs, so providing an undisturbed habitat. The dry
woodland is found to the north of the site on the plateau above the flood defence bank. The habitats will
take time to establish and develop and to realise their potential for biodiversity.

There has been a mix of urban common perennial and more ornamental ‘rusty’ perennial planting on the
flood defence bank and plateau (the species have been chosen to have orange and red flowers to reflect rusty
iron in reference to the steel industry heritage of the site). Before the work to create the nature park began a
good mix of naturally regenerated species were found on site in August 2008. The most notable include
Monkey Flower (Mimulus guttatu) and Wild Mignonette (Reseda lutea). It is hoped that these will return
once the area has had time to regenerate.

The habitats are all divided by a network of crushed brick and reinforced grass paths and a section of
boardwalk across the lagoon.

Centenary Riverside will form part of Rotherham’s flood alleviation scheme and has been specifically
designed to allow flood water from the River Don to accumulate in the main water body in times of high
flow and volume. The cycle of flooding and receding waters leads to material from the river being deposited
on the river bank and other areas around the reserve. Materials deposited include silt, litter, woody debris,
vegetative materials and seeds. Invasive species such as Japanese knotweed and Himalayan balsam will be
a continuous problem as they will be brought downstream by the river.


5.2      Wet Woodland
The wet woodland areas have been planted alongside the main water body and the River Don. The trees
have been planted with 800mm pea canes which have been inserted up to 300mm into the ground to assist in
location for maintenance. All standards have been planted with a 700mm timber supporting stake with
rubber ties and spacers. A 300mm radius has been left around each tree to allow for the spraying off of weed
growth. Lists of planted species are shown in the appendix.




                                                      20
The wet woodland areas have been planted semi-randomly rather than in lines to encourage natural looking
woodland as it matures. Species have been planted randomly in small groups with alder (Alnus Glutinosa)
and downy birch (Betula Pubescens) dominating. The number of invertebrates associated with alder, birch
and willows is very large and once these areas have had time to develop will provide an important habitat.

Management

Initial management will concentrate on the development and maintenance of the wet woodland. After
planting there may be a need to monitor plant growth which could be affected by theft, vandalism, High
River flow or loosened by frost or wind. Beating up (replacing trees that have not established and died) may
be required to maintain the plant density of the areas. The planted areas will need to be kept free from weeds
using suitable herbicides, strimming or by topping up the mulch. They are also prone to being covered in silt
and litter after flood events. This material will need to be removed to enable the plants to flourish.
Once the woodland has become established it usually requires very little management or maintenance.
There may be a need to monitor and control the spread of non wet woodland species (or non native species)
to prevent succession to a drier woodland community. More intensive woodland management may be
needed in the future once the trees become mature. This will take around 20 years or more but options to
consider would be pollarding, crown reduction, ring barking and thinning.


5.3      Dry Woodland
Dry woodland areas have been planted in the areas less prone to flooding, on the banks above the main
water body to the north and west of the site. The trees have been planted with 800mm pea canes which have
been inserted up to 300mm into the ground to assist in location for maintenance. All half standards have
been planted with a 700mm timber supporting stake with rubber ties and spacers. A 300mm radius has been
left around each tree to allow for the spraying off of weed growth. Each tree in the dry woodland and
woodland edge area has been planted with a 600mm circle of bark mulch (up to 75mm in depth) around it.
As with the wet woodland, the trees have been randomly planted rather than in straight lines for the same
reasons. Planting has taken place randomly in small groups within the plot with Sessile Oak (Quercus
Petraea) being the dominant species.

Management

The early years of management will consist of maintenance tasks to ensure the woodland is successfully
established. Similarly with the wet woodland, plants may be affected by vandalism, theft or weather
conditions and this should be monitored. For the first 2 years failed trees should be replaced to maintain
plant density of the woodland. Also, the area will need to be kept free from weeds using herbicide or extra
mulch as necessary. Trees have been planted with rabbit guards to prevent grazing damage as they are most
vulnerable at the early stage of their development. However, it is worthwhile keeping a regular check to
ensure they are not being damaged by rabbits. The rabbit guards can also protect the tree if the need arises to
apply herbicide around the tree.

The soil can become very dry after a prolonged period without rain. Bowsers may have to be used to water
the trees to ensure they are not subjected to drought. The condition of the trees will be monitored through
regular checks by the SWT land management team.

A regular litter pick may be required to remove rubbish as it is unsightly and a potential hazard to wildlife
and people. Although this should be assessed once the park is in regular use. Apart from the general
maintenance mentioned above, the woodland will be left to develop over the years and will hopefully
produce some thriving woodland communities.
                                                     21
Woodland management may be considered in the future once the trees begin to mature. As with the wet
woodland this can take 20 years or more. Options to consider include thinning, coppicing, ring barking,
under planting and crown reductions.



5.4      Wetland areas
The wetland areas have been left to develop naturally with the planted wet woodland around the edge of the
wetland areas. The habitat consists of reed beds, aquatic herbs and ruderals, bare areas of mud and
developing willow scrub. The wetland areas will be largely left to develop naturally although there may be
a need to undertake willow scrub and reed removal on rotation to prevent dominance of these species and to
provide a variety of habitat. There are large areas of bare ground caused by the installation of the deck chair
features. In the spring of 2010 these were beginning to be colonised but could offer the opportunity for
targeted planted of species desirable for the wetland area. Further areas of bare ground in the west end of
the lagoon could be planted up if they do not re-colonise naturally.

The main water body ranges between 1-2 ha depending on water levels. A reed bed boardwalk crosses over
this area.


Management

The wetland areas should be monitored for the development of scrub and overgrown reed beds and a
rotational cutting regime implemented. Selected individual trees should be left to grow to maturity to
provide song posts and perches. Cut material can be composted on site and the reeds can be pulled and
transplanted to un-vegetated areas around the lagoon.
Areas of ruderal and herbs may also be cut if they become dominated by a particular species due to nutrient
build up. The arisings should be removed and composted.

5.5    Bank Stabilisation and Pre-seeded compost soxx
(Figure 8: Bank stabilisation & compost soxx)

With the river don running along two sides of the site, and the floodplain designed to overtop several times a
year, water entering and leaving the floodplain was causing some considerable scouring to the bank sides.
Following these findings, funding was secured to stabilise the banks by two different methods and to
monitor the success of these via a trial.

The project proposed to install bank stabilisation solutions along a 50m stretch of bank where water enters
the site and a 50m stretch where it leaves the site – the areas most affected by scour. Compost filled soxx
were installed along half of each length subject to scour and coir matting on the other half to achieve a
directly comparable trial. Both the compost soxx & coir matting have been planted with native marginal
plug plants with the coir matting being covered in a thin layer of compost and seeded with grass. This
enables both systems to root down over a period of time. The base line report of this project can be found on
the server at Sheffield Wildlife trust headquarters.




                                                      22
5.6          Pillwort pond
During the construction of the Pillwort pond the identified donor site lost its colony of Pillwort. An
alternative site will need to be found to allow translocation of Pillwort to Centenary Riverside. If a donor
site cannot be found then Pillwort could be bought in from a supplier.
The pond has had a small number of aquatic plants put into it and it is hoped they will spread and also that
the ponds will naturally colonise with further species. This will need to be monitored and further species
planted if beneficial. The pond has had significant algal growth which will need to be monitored and
removed as necessary. It is hoped that as the pond vegetation develops it will control the growth of algae but
if this is not the case then treatments will need to be investigated.



5.7      Surveying
As Centenary Riverside is a ‘new’ site in that the majority of the habitats have been planted, with only the
wetland areas being left to regenerate naturally, wildlife data is restricted to planting lists and informal
surveys and observations. A programme of surveys for vegetation, birds, invertebrates, mammals and
amphibians will need to be carried out to establish a baseline of information to inform future management
and to monitor the impact of management.

Monitoring will be carried out on the meadow areas and the compost soxx and coir matting bank
stabilisation areas to record the development of the seeded areas.

Initial species lists have shown that there is a wide variety of naturally regenerating species. Bird recording
undertaken by the Rotherham and District Ornithological Society has recorded 71 species including notable
species such as lapwing, bullfinch, linnet and song thrush. A series of bird surveys such as common bird
census, wintering bird and breeding bird will need to be undertaken to get a fuller picture of the bird
population on site.

After initial Phase 1 habitat surveys NVC vegetation surveys will be desirable for targeted areas of the
wetland to determine the NVC communities present and to form a baseline to monitor the development of
the wetland areas and to identify what management can be used to improve the habitat.

Local naturalist groups will be engaged and encouraged to visit Centenary Riverside and to share their
information on species recorded.
.




6.0          INFRASTRUCTURE



6.1      Footpaths and tracks
The site contains both surfaced and un-surfaced paths as well as a boardwalk. This is in keeping with the
character of the site as a nature park providing paths suitable for push chair and wheel chair access as well
as those that allow a more natural feel around areas of the site. There is potential to link the site with
                                                      23
Sustrans Trans Penine Trail and provide even greater access to the nature park. This will require a bridge
to be built over the canal from Don Island and will need substantial resources and investment to make it
possible.
The paths need to be maintained in order for them to be accessible. The crushed brick surfaced paths will
need to be spot sprayed with herbicide to remove any unwanted vegetation from taking hold as well as being
strimmed to manage encroaching vegetation. Spot repairs will be carried out when necessary to maintain a
quality surface. Some areas of the path become wet and eroded as the surrounding ground becomes
waterlogged. These areas will be scraped out to enable to both hold water and promote evaporation to
prevent water seeping into the path surface material. The un-surfaced paths will be mowed regularly in the
spring and summer to prevent them becoming over grown.
As the lagoons are designed to hold water from the river in times of high flow and volume the boardwalk
will occasionally be submerged. When the water recedes, it leaves behind a deposit of silt that will need
removing. Warning signs will be erected to warn the public that the boardwalk can become submerged and
to not use it during high water levels.


6.2      Walls, Fences and Other Boundaries
(Figure 3: Infrastructure)
Description and evaluation:

The site only has one access point via the bridge over the River Don. There is a locked entrance gate which
can be used by maintenance teams for vehicle access. Public access is through a squeeze stile that prevents
access onto the site by motorbikes. The entrance gate is metal and has been painted. This will need to re-
painted as it becomes scratched and damaged to maintain a welcoming feel to the site entrance.
The northern boundary between the site and railway track consists of metal fencing. Network rail are
responsible for the maintenance of the fence. There is a further post and rail fence in front of the railway
fence which will need repairing as it gets damaged. There is a wall leading from one side of the bridge to the
railway fence that restricts access to the river channel. This will need to be repaired if it is damaged as there
is a steep drop down to the river and is a significant health and safety risk. More post and rail fencing can
be found around the bridge buttresses to prevent access onto the bridge structure. Again the fence will need
to be regularly repaired as it is prone to vandalism.


   6.3       Other structures
There are two large interpretation features situated on site. Steel Henge has been constructed from large
iron casting moulds and as such will be very difficult to vandalise. It may be a target of graffiti and this will
need to be removed as necessary. The hard standing area around the feature will need to be spot sprayed
with herbicide to prevent vegetation establishing and damaging the surface.
The deckchairs consist of railway sleepers built into deckchair shapes with the bases buried into the ground.
They have been solidly constructed and should not suffer structural damage. While it is not encouraged it is
possible to climb on them so they will need to be regularly monitored to ensure that the structure remains
sound and safe. As the vegetation develops around them it may be deemed necessary to strim around the
deckchairs. Again they may be targeted for graffiti and this will need to be monitored and removed as
necessary.




                                                       24
6.3.1        Seating

There are seating areas in eight locations around the site, particularly around features of interest. This is
particularly important as the site is intended to be an urban nature park and has been designed to be a place
for people as well as wildlife. It is hoped that the natural surroundings will enhance their experience of the
nature park.

General maintenance of the seating areas will be required especially if prone to vandalism. The vegetation
around the seats will need to be cut back to prevent the seats becoming unusable and the seats regularly
cleaned to remove bird droppings.




                                                      25
7.0           CULTURAL CONTEXT



7.1      Recreational usage
The site is intended to be used as an urban nature park with a mix of informal and formal recreation
activities as well as being a site with high potential conservation value. The network of paths and boardwalk
will provide visitors with a green space to walk around and enjoy, exercise or walk the dog. Centenary
Riverside has potential to be popular with wildlife enthusiasts due to the array of habitats and the ease of
which wildlife can be observed from the various seating areas and path network. This will be further
enhanced as the park will be used to provide education and activities for a range of people. Guided walks
around the site as well as practical management tasks will be undertaken. Training in practical conservation
skills, habitat management, wildlife skills and surveying are all potential activities. Pond dipping platforms
should attract school groups and/or provide half term activities for children.

Currently access by foot or bicycle can be difficult and may pose a barrier. Local footpaths leading to the
site follow main arterial roads and as such are not appealing. The events programme and positive publicity
should help establish the site as a quality place to visit and worth the effort of getting there. If the site can be
linked to Trans Pennine Trail, this will provide opportunities for better access especially for cycling and
walking to and from the park.

On site car parking may be possible with the development of the environmental and education centre. This
should reduce the barriers for those who will not access the site by walking, cycling or public transport.
However it will be desirable to promote and encourage sustainable methods of transport rather than cars.




7.2      Information and interpretation
Centenary Riverside Urban Nature Park has a wealth of opportunities for interpretation. The site has had a
varied history from a grazing marsh used for recreation in the 1800’s through its development as a leading
site for the steel industry to its present role in Rotherham’s flood defence scheme and natural habitat.
Rotherham MBC has an impressive archive of historical information of the Templeborough area from the
impressive Steel Henge and Deckchair sculptures to the pillwort and entrance interpretation panels there is
already existing interpretation on site.
Future interpretation can be developed through guided walks, structured events, engagement of local groups
and the development of the environmental and educational centre. Educational materials can be developed
for use by schools, colleges and universities covering a wide range of themes such as history, industry,
natural habitats, brownfield remediation and much more.
SWT will run an annual events programme for Centenary Riverside where much of its history and present
can be disseminated through a variety of public events.




                                                        26
7.3      Community
Centenary Riverside is located within the ward of Boston Castle. The ward has a population of 12,314 (2001
Census) and covers an area of 813 hectares. The ward includes Rotherham Town Centre and residential
areas to the south. This ward has a mix of deprived council housing, private housing, suburban semis and
the more affluent suburb of Moorgate. The ward is the most diverse in the Rotherham Borough with
extensive retail, commercial and industrial areas as well as deprived council estates, inner area flats, terraced
housing, affluent suburban areas and a high ethnic minority population. Also included within the ward are
Rotherham District General and Doncaster Gate Hospitals, the Magna Science Adventure Park, Clifton Park
and two colleges.

The ward contains 5% of the Boroughs population with 14.88% aged between 18-29 compared the
Rotherham average of 13.27%. The ward has a slightly higher than average population aged 60 and over at
21.76%, the Rotherham average was 20.82%. Boston Castle has a high Black and Minority Ethnic (BME)
population at 19%, the highest ranked ward in the Borough. Rotherham’s BME makes up 4.1% of the
Boroughs population whilst the national percentage is 13%. The largest ethnic grouping in the ward (15.1%)
are Asian.

Health of residents in the ward is below both the Rotherham and national average. The number of people
claiming to be “in not good health” is 13% compared to Rotherham’s average of 12.1% and the national
average at 9.0%. The percentage who describe themselves with a Limiting Long Term Illness (LLTI) is
23.6%, higher than the Rotherham Average, 22.4% and the national average 17.9%.

In 2001 there were 5,185 people identified as economically active (aged 16-74) with 442 unemployed. The
number of long term sick/disabled was 813. The number of people economically inactive was the third
highest in the borough at 40.54% compared to Rotherham’s average 36.02%. The unemployment rate was
also the third highest in the Borough at 5.07% with Rotherham’s average at 3.94%. The academic
achievements of Boston Castle residents is similar to the average for the borough with 36.7% having no
qualifications. The percentage with no qualification in Rotherham is 36.8%.

There were 5760 household spaces in Boston Castle recorded during the 2001 census of which 8.4% were
occupied by lone parents. Interestingly, the ward had the highest number of one person households
throughout the Borough at 36.2%, with 27.2% being the Rotherham average. 37.4% of Boston Castle
residents had no access to private transport (Borough wide average for no-car households was 29.7%)
resulting in reliance on public transport and access to local services.

Crime rates in Boston Castle are higher than the average for the Borough with Vehicle crime being the most
common. The community profile of the area will be re-visited following the 2011 census, once results
become available.




7.4      Education

There are 2 schools within walking distance of the nature park although access to the site on foot is not
straight forward. The closest school is Ferham Primary School which is located between Blackburn
meadows nature reserve and Centenary Riverside on Ferham Road. Educational attainment at all key stages



                                                       27
of compulsory education in Boston Castle are lower than the Rotherham average as are the attainment levels
at primary and secondary education. As the site will host educational events/activities it is expected that
most school visits will be organised visits by coach. The park has potential to attract schools from the wider
region.

The park has the potential to offer fantastic opportunities for young people to explore and learn about the
natural world, due to the relatively large size and variety of different habitats. The pillwort pond has a
dipping platform which always proves popular activity with children as well as providing an educational
value and there is scope to provide a whole host of other activities. Environmental education can be used as
an effective vehicle for delivering a range of National Curriculum targets at both primary and secondary
levels. It can provide pupils who perform better at practical tasks or outside of the classroom with the
motivation to do so. Learning about the natural world at a young age is vital to the long term environmental
well being at local, national and global levels.

There is concern that opportunities for outdoor learning by school students have decreased substantially
over the years. There are many benefits to using green spaces as outdoor classrooms as they allow students
to gain skills through a different approach in an environment different to an entirely classed based approach.
A study by the FSC revealed substantial evidence that outdoor classrooms can raise levels of attainment and
improve attitudes towards the environment. The sites history as a former steel works also has educational
value.

Central to the development of the park for educational purposes is the issue of safety and anti social
behaviour which can deter schools from visiting. This will need monitoring and addressing if it becomes an
issue. Motorcycle barriers have been put in place to restrict access from these types of vehicles. Rubbish left
on site can contain sharp objects and is not only a safety issue but is unsightly. Regular litter picks,
especially as part of a pre-event safety check should be carried out.
Initially schools should be approached to raise awareness of the nature park and to promote its credentials as
an educational facility.




8.0          ECONOMIC


8.1      Grant and schemes funding
The lease of Centenary Riverside Urban Nature Park has come with a sizable dowry that has been invested
so that the interest generated can be used for the maintenance and development if the site.
During the site’s creation and development several grant were secured for a range of activities including the
initial landscaping, creation of the pillwort pond, community engagement, interpretation, ecological survey
and consultation, publicity and project management. Grants have come from ERDF, SITA Trust, Biffaward
and RMBC.

For future larger scale projects funds such as the environmental and education centre funds will need to be
secured from external grant bodies, as they will not be able to be funded from the dowry interest alone.




                                                      28
8.2     Employment and training
Unemployment in the areas around the site is relatively high and academic attainment is lower than the
average for the borough. The park will offer excellent opportunities for training in practical, wildlife and
surveying skills using the site as a venue. Volunteers and trainees have carried at a large part of the work
already done at Centenary Riverside on practical workdays and continue to help manage the site through the
SWT land management team.
LANTRA have identified that the environmental conservation sector suffers from a lack of practical skills
amongst graduates coming into the sector. The opportunity for training and education at the park may in
some small way help to address this. SWT is an accredited centre for NVQ and Centenary Riverside can be
used by candidates to build up their portfolio.
There are future plans to build an environmental and education centre on site to host community activities,
events and school visits. At this stage plans are very much in there infancy and a lot of work will be needed
to make this vision a reality. A feasibility study will be needed to understand what a centre should offer and
what local needs there are that it could meet. The design and construction will need to be carefully
considered to ensure that best practice is used while creating a sustainable and inspiring vision.
 SWT will endeavour to make links with the two Sheffield universities, local colleges and schools to
encourage them to independently use the site as a venue for study as well as organised more formal visits
with specialist SWT staff.
Further links to local conservation groups should be pursued so that they are able to use Centenary
Riverside as a venue to further their interest and skills as well as providing valuable information for
Sheffield Wildlife Trust.




9.0          REFERENCES




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10.0          WORK PROGRAMME

The electronic version of this table is also on the Sheffield Wildlife Trust system, so that the work can be recorded and
the work programme updated as necessary. Compliance is recorded (whether the work has been done) and
explanations of the reasons why these elements of the work programme have not been undertaken. There is also a
column for condition monitoring – which gives the opportunity to record the results of the work and whether any
difficulties were experienced, or any useful information or observations that may help in future.




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