Multiple Measures of Teacher and Principal Effectiveness by t1mYG7

VIEWS: 9 PAGES: 98

									Teacher Evaluation Pilot II
     Allegheny Intermediate Unit
  November 30 and December 1, 2011




     Rosanne Javorsky and Dr. Patricia DiRienzo
            rosanne.javorsky@aiu3.net
             patricia.dirienzo@aiu3.net
Collaborative Code

  Silence electronic devices
  Minimize the use of those devices
   during presentations and activities
  Observe the time frames and signals
  Limit sidebar conversations
  Keep materials organized



                                         2
Project Development - Goal

To develop a teacher effectiveness model
that:
  •   will reform the way we evaluate teachers
  •   and identify critical components of teacher
      training and professional growth




                                                    3
Project Development - Background
   $800,000 Gates Foundation grant to facilitate the
    development of statewide policy, tools and processes to
    evaluate teachers and principals in which student
    achievement is a significant factor affecting
    performance ratings

   PDE is closely following the work of the Pittsburgh
    Public Schools – PPS recipients of $40 million Gates
    Foundation grant that is more comprehensive in scope
    but similar in redesigning evaluation policy, tools and
    processes


                                                              4
2010-2011 Pilot I Sites

The following were the pilot sites:

 Allentown School District
 Cornell School District
 Mohawk School District
 Northwest Tri-County Intermediate
  Unit (IU 5)


                                      5
6
Next Steps – Value-Added Models – (15%)
   Mathematica Policy Research Proposal
    ◦ Develop value-added models (VAMs) for estimating the
      contribution of individual teachers and principals to growth in
      student achievement.
    ◦ Provide estimates based on VAMs for teacher and principal
      evaluation.
    ◦ Assess the strength of relationships between VAM-based and
      observation-based measures of performance, to inform decisions
      about which observation-based measures should be included and
      how to evaluate teachers in non-tested grades and subjects.
    ◦ Develop and calculate summary performance indicators across
      value-added measures and between value-added and other
      measures.
    ◦ Synthesize the findings in annual reports that document the
      model’s continual development over time.

                                                                        7
Next Steps – Teacher Reports and Student-
Teacher Linkages (15%)
   Teacher value-added reports for individual teachers by grade/subject/year
    using a robust statistical report.
   Teacher diagnostic reports for insight on effectiveness with students by
    achievement level and subgroup.
   Administrator summary reports for authorized users in a particular school
    or district.
   Drill down capacity to individual student-level projections based on
    classroom rosters.
   Teacher-level value-added reports require student-teacher linkages, which
    capture the instructor(s) responsible for a student’s learning in the tested
    grade/subject. It is critical that this linkage system provide accurate
    information that is validated by individual teachers.
   Web-based teacher reporting for PSSA grades 4-8
   Web-based teacher reporting for PSSA grades 4-8 and Keystone Exams



                                                                                   8
Multiple Measures of Teacher Evaluation -
Anticipated Evidence (50%)
   Principal/Supervisor classroom observations,
    including evidence that demonstrates behaviors
    associated with improving student achievement:

   Domains

    ◦   Planning and preparation
    ◦   Classroom environment
    ◦   Instruction
    ◦   Professional responsibilities



                                                     9
Teacher Evaluation Rubric

   4 Domains
    ◦ 22 Components

   4 possible ratings for each component
    ◦   Unsatisfactory
    ◦   Progressing/Needs Improvement
    ◦   Proficient
    ◦   Distinguished


                                            10
 A Framework for Teaching:
 Components of Professional Practice

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation       Domain 2: The Classroom
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Content      Environment
 and Pedagogy                            •Creating an Environment of Respect
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Students      and Rapport
•Setting Instructional Outcomes          •Establishing a Culture for Learning
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources    •Managing Classroom Procedures
•Designing Coherent Instruction          •Managing Student Behavior
•Designing Student Assessments           •Organizing Physical Space
Domain 4: Professional                   Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                         •Communicating with Students
•Reflecting on Teaching                  •Using Questioning and Discussion
•Maintaining Accurate Records             Techniques
•Communicating with Families             •Engaging Students in Learning
•Participating in a Professional         •Using Assessment in Instruction
 Community                               •Demonstrating Flexibility and
•Growing and Developing Professionally    Responsiveness
•Showing Professionalism


                                                                                11
Next Steps – Pilot Schools
   Beginning in January
    ◦ One Formal Observation and One walk-
      through observation per participating teacher
      Can you reduce pilot size? YES
   Reporting out the Evidence
    ◦ After school is out
    ◦ Evidence collected to be shared with
      Mathematica – not PDE
      How? Still working out the details


                                                      12
Questions or Comments?




                         13
     Introduction to the Domains
OBJECTIVES: Participants will learn…

   How their thinking about good teaching
    compares to the framework we will use
   That the Framework represents good
    common sense, and much that we already
    know, about teaching
   The form and content of Domains 1, 2, 3,
    and 4

                                               14
Having an Impact
   If we want to impact student achievement
    and growth …

    ◦ Then we must impact teaching and learning,

    ◦ And, we have to agree on what good teaching
      is…




                                                    15
     Worksheet #1- Pg.3
     Participant Materials



Let’s begin by collecting our
thinking about good teaching




                                16
       Wisdom of Practice



What are the qualities of teaching most
   tightly tied to student learning?




                                          17
         The Domains

1.   Planning and Preparation

2.   The Classroom Environment

3.   Instruction

4.   Professional Responsibilities

                                     18
A Framework for Teaching:
Components of Professional Practice
 Domain 1: Planning and Preparation     Domain 2: The Classroom
 •Demonstrating Knowledge of Content    Environment
  and Pedagogy                          •Creating an Environment of Respect
 •Demonstrating Knowledge of Students    and Rapport
 •Setting Instructional Outcomes        •Establishing a Culture for Learning
 •Demonstrating Knowledge of            •Managing Classroom Procedures
  Resources                             •Managing Student Behavior
 •Designing Coherent Instruction        •Organizing Physical Space
 •Designing Student Assessments


 Domain 4: Professional                 Domain 3: Instruction
 Responsibilities                       •Communicating with Students
 •Reflecting on Teaching                •Using Questioning and Discussion
 •Maintaining Accurate Records           Techniques
 •Communicating with Families           •Engaging Students in Learning
 •Participating in a Professional       •Using Assessment in Instruction
  Community                             •Demonstrating Flexibility and
 •Growing and Developing                 Responsiveness
  Professionally
 •Showing Professionalism

                                                                               19
   Worksheet #2 – Pg. 4
   Participant Materials



Identifying the Domains:
  Extending our Learning of
        the Domains


                              20
A Framework for Teaching:
Components of Professional Practice


Domain 1: Planning and Preparation             Domain 2: The Classroom Environment
a. Demonstrating Knowledge of Content          a. Creating an Environment of Respect
   and Pedagogy                                    and Rapport
b. Demonstrating Knowledge of Students         b. Establishing a Culture for Learning
c. Setting Instructional Outcomes              c. Managing Classroom Procedures
d. Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources        d. Managing Student Behavior
e. Designing Coherent Instruction              e. Organizing Physical Space
f. Designing Student Assessments

Domain 4: Professional                         Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                               a. Communicating with Students
a. Reflecting on Teaching                      b. Using Questioning and Discussion
b. Maintaining Accurate Records                   Techniques
c. Communicating with Families                 c. Engaging Students in Learning
d. Participating in a Professional Community   d. Using Assessment in Instruction
e. Growing and Developing Professionally       e. Demonstrating Flexibility and
f. Showing Professionalism                         Responsiveness




                                                                                        21
               Features of
         A Framework for Teaching

   Generic: applies to all grade levels, content areas

   Not a checklist
    ◦ Evidence based/reflective

   Not prescriptive: tells the “what” of teaching, not “how”

   Comprehensive: not just what we can see

   Inclusive: Novice to Master teacher


                                                            22
                                                              DOMAIN 2: THE CLASSROOM ENVIRONMENT
      Figure 6.7                                       COMPONENT 2A: CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT OF RESPECT AND RAPPORT
                                                                                         Elements:
                                                                   Teacher interaction with students Student interaction



                                                       L   E V E L        O F       P     E R F O R M A N C E
                                                    NEEDS IMPROVEMENT OR
ELEMENT         UNSATISFACTORY                      PROGRESSING                            PROFICIENT                           DISTINGUISHED
Teacher         Teacher interaction with at least   Teacher-student interactions are       Teacher-student interactions are     Teacher demonstrates genuine
Interaction     some students is negative,          generally appropriate but may          friendly and demonstrate general     caring and respect for individual
with Students   demeaning, sarcastic, or            reflect occasional inconsistencies,    warmth, caring, and respect.         students. Students exhibit respect
                inappropriate to the age or         favoritism, or disregard for           Such interactions are appropriate    for teacher as an individual,
                culture of the students. Students   students’ cultures. Students           to developmental and cultural        beyond that for the role.
                exhibit disrespect for teacher.     exhibit only minimal respect for       norms. Students exhibit respect
                                                    teacher.                               for teacher.
Student         Student interactions are            Students do not demonstrate            Student interactions are generally   Students demonstrate genuine
Interaction     characterized by conflict,          negative behavior toward on            polite and respectful.               caring for one another as
                sarcasm, or put-downs.              another.                                                                    individuals and as students.




                                                                                                                                                                 23
 A Framework for Teaching:
 Components of Professional Practice

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation           Domain 2: The Classroom
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Content          Environment
 and Pedagogy                                •Creating an Environment of Respect
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Students           and Rapport
•Setting Instructional Outcomes              •Establishing a Culture for Learning
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources        •Managing Classroom Procedures
•Designing Coherent Instruction              •Managing Student Behavior
•Designing Student Assessments               •Organizing Physical Space


Domain 4: Professional                       Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                             •Communicating with Students
•Reflecting on Teaching                      •Using Questioning and Discussion
•Maintaining Accurate Records                 Techniques
•Communicating with Families                 •Engaging Students in Learning
•Participating in a Professional Community   •Using Assessment in Instruction
•Growing and Developing Professionally       •Demonstrating Flexibility and
•Showing Professionalism                      Responsiveness




                                                                                    24
Domain 3 Components

3a Communicating with Students

3b Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques

3c Engaging Students in Learning

3d Using Assessment During Instruction

3e Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness


                                                  25
          Worksheet #3a – Pg. 5
          Participant Materials


   Create a specific example of your
    assigned component: Ms. T says to Joey,
    “You dummy!”

   Do not restate the rubric: Ms. T is rude
    to a student.



                                               26
            Worksheet #3b – Pg. 6
            Participant Materials

   What do all the examples of unsatisfactory have
    in common?

   What do all the needs improvement/progressing
    examples have in common?

   Proficient?

   Distinguished?

                                                      27
          Conclusions: Levels of
             Performance

   Unsatisfactory: Potential for harm

   Progressing/Needs Improvement: Inconsistent,
    novice

   Proficient: Consistent, competent

   Distinguished: Unusually excellent, no one
    “lives”here permanently in all components


                                                   28
      Components of Domain 3:
          Engagement

3a:   Communicating with Student

3b:   Using Questioning and Discussion Techniques

3c:   Engaging Students in Learning

3d:   Using Assessment in Instruction

3e:   Demonstrating Flexibility and Responsiveness



                                                     29
Let’s Take a Break – 15 minutes




                                  30
  A Framework for Teaching:
  Components of Professional Practice

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation       Domain 2: The Classroom
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Content      Environment
 and Pedagogy                            •Creating an Environment of Respect
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Students       and Rapport
•Setting Instructional Outcomes          •Establishing a Culture for Learning
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources    •Managing Classroom Procedures
•Designing Coherent Instruction          •Managing Student Behavior
•Designing Student Assessments           •Organizing Physical Space


Domain 4: Professional                   Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                         •Communicating with Students
•Reflecting on Teaching                  •Using Questioning and Discussion
•Maintaining Accurate Records             Techniques
•Communicating with Families             •Engaging Students in Learning
•Participating in a Professional         •Using Assessment in Instruction
  Community                              •Demonstrating Flexibility and
•Growing and Developing Professionally    Responsiveness
•Showing Professionalism



                                                                                31
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation

1a: Demonstrating Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy

1b: Demonstrating Knowledge of Students

1c: Setting Instructional Outcomes

1d: Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources

1e: Designing Coherent Instruction


1f: Designing Student Assessments

                                                      32
Component 1a: Demonstrating
Knowledge of Content/Pedagogy

1.   Teacher wrote a scholarly article
2.   Lesson plans/structure/content/relevance
3.   Teacher explanation of probable Students’ misconceptions
4.   Teacher’s answers to student questions during class
5.   Teacher presented a workshop to faculty
6.   Teacher explains the structure of discipline prior to lesson
7.   Teacher tells observer how this lesson fits into the larger unit
8.   Teacher adjusts the lesson midstream based on students’ misconceptions
9.   Teacher poses different levels of content questions during the lesson
10. Teacher states how this lesson connects to content standards




                                                                             33
Component 1a: Demonstrating
Knowledge of Content/Pedagogy

1.   Teacher wrote a scholarly article
2.   Lesson plans/structure/content/relevance
3.   Teacher explanation of probable Students’ misconceptions
4.   Teacher’s answers to student questions during class
5.   Teacher presented a workshop to faculty
6.   Teacher explains the structure of discipline prior to lesson
7.   Teacher tells observer how this lesson fits into the larger unit
8.   Teacher adjusts the lesson midstream based on students’ misconceptions
9.   Teacher poses different levels of content questions during the lesson
10. Teacher states how this lesson connects to content standards




                                                                        34   34
      Worksheet #4 – Pg. 7
      Participant Materials


   Read the Domain 1 questions.

 Why   are they important?




                                   35
           Worksheet #4 – Pg. 7
           Participant Materials

   Lesson Plan Data Collection Tool

   Practice evidence collection

   Write what is said, not what you think
    about it.



                                             36
 A Framework for Teaching:
 Components of Professional Practice

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation           Domain 2: The Classroom
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Content          Environment
 and Pedagogy                                •Creating an Environment of Respect
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Students                     and Rapport
•Setting Instructional Outcomes              •Establishing a Culture for Learning
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources        •Managing Classroom Procedures
•Designing Coherent Instruction              •Managing Student Behavior
•Designing Student Assessments               •Organizing Physical Space

Domain 4: Professional                       Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                             •Communicating with Students
•Reflecting on Teaching                      •Using Questioning and Discussion
•Maintaining Accurate Records                 Techniques
•Communicating with Families                 •Engaging Students in Learning
•Participating in a Professional Community   •Using Assessment in Instruction
•Growing and Developing Professionally       •Demonstrating Flexibility and
•Showing Professionalism                      Responsiveness




                                                                                    37
Domain 2: The Classroom Environment


2a: Creating an Environment of Respect and
    Rapport

2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning

2c: Managing Classroom Procedures

2d: Managing Student Behavior

2e: Organizing the Physical Space
                                             38
              Worksheet #5 – Pg. 8
              Participant Materials

   Browse Domain 2 of your Rubric

   Reflect and answer questions on Worksheet #5
    ◦ Independently

   Table Share




                                                   39
A Framework for Teaching:
Components of Professional Practice

Domain 1: Planning and Preparation       Domain 2: The Classroom
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Content      Environment
 and Pedagogy                            •Creating an Environment of Respect
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Students                 and Rapport
•Setting Instructional Outcomes          •Establishing a Culture for Learning
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources    •Managing Classroom Procedures
•Designing Coherent Instruction          •Managing Student Behavior
•Designing Student Assessments           •Organizing Physical Space

Domain 4: Professional                   Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                         •Communicating with Students
•Reflecting on Teaching                  •Using Questioning and Discussion
•Maintaining Accurate Records             Techniques
•Communicating with Families             •Engaging Students in Learning
•Participating in a Professional         •Using Assessment in Instruction
 Community                               •Demonstrating Flexibility and
•Growing and Developing Professionally    Responsiveness
•Showing Professionalism




                                                                                40
Domain 4: Professional Responsibilities

4a: Reflecting on Teaching
4b: Maintaining Accurate Records
4c: Communicating with Families
4d: Participating in a Professional
    Community
4e: Growing and Developing Professionally
4f: Showing Professionalism



                                            41
        Worksheet #4 – Pg. 7
        Participant Materials

 Skim the rubrics in Domain 4.
 Have a table conversation about HOW these
  components might impact student learning.
 Self-select an “expert” group.
 Develop a Distinguished response for your
  component.




                                              42
Uses of A Framework for Teaching

     Self-Assessment
     Reflection
     Peer Coaching
     Teacher Evaluation
     Mentoring and Induction
     Professional Growth Plans


                                   43
      Benefits of Using a Framework
                for Teaching

   Common language
   Similar vision for good teaching and how
    it can be improved
   Greater validity and reliability in the teacher
    evaluation process
   Changes in novice thinking
   Opportunities for collaboration


                                                      44
    Doing Teacher Evaluation Right


             5 Rules

            Evidence







                                     45
Why Evaluate Teaching?


   Quality Assurance

   Professional Learning




                            46
    Doing Teacher Evaluation Right

OBJECTIVES: Participants will learn…

   The role of the Framework in teacher assessment

   Best practices in teacher evaluation

   How to conduct teacher evaluation to accommodate
    quality assurance and professional learning, too

   How to differentiate for novices, experienced teachers,
    and at-risk teachers

   How to create buy-in for all stakeholders.



                                                              47
        “The Widget Effect”
1.   Count off by “a, b, c, d”

2.   Read the following sections:
       a – p9 and pp 10-14
       b – p9 and pp 15-18
       c – p9 and pp 19-23
       d – p9 and pp 26-30

3.   Then identify the 3 most important
     facts from your section

                                          48
“The Widget Effect” – Share and Learn


     At your table, have each person share the
      three most important ideas culled from
      the reading.

     Mark your own copy accordingly.

     Discuss your thinking.

                                                  49
5 “Rules” for Teacher Evaluation

1.   Defensible definition of teaching
2.   Differentiation of evaluative processes
3.   Evidence-driven process
4.   The role of teacher learning
5.   Transparency



                                               50
Overarching Questions


   Who does the thinking?

   Who does the learning and growing?




                                         51
Rule # 1:
Defensible Definition of Teaching

             Start with a
         defensible definition
   of good teaching that is studied,
        and understood, by all
            stakeholders.


                                       52
A Framework for Teaching:
Components of Professional Practice
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation         Domain 2: The Classroom
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Content        Environment
 and Pedagogy                              •Creating an Environment of Respect
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Students        and Rapport
•Selecting Instruction Goals               •Establishing a Culture for Learning
•Demonstrating Knowledge of Resources      •Managing Classroom Procedures
•Designing Coherent Instruction            •Managing Student Behavior
•Assessing Student Learning                •Organizing Physical Space

Domain 4: Professional                     Domain 3: Instruction
Responsibilities                           •Communicating Clearly and
•Reflecting on Teaching                     Accurately
•Maintaining Accurate Records              •Using Questioning and Discussion
•Communicating with Families                Techniques
•Contributing to the School and District   •Engaging Students in Learning
•Growing and Developing Professionally     •Using Assessment in Instruction
•Showing Professionalism                   •Demonstrating Flexibility and
                                            Responsiveness




                                                                                  53
            Card Sort – p10
          Participant Materials

 Read your card
 Using a Post-It note, identify:
       • Domain
       • Component
       • Element
   Share with table mates as instructed; get
    consensus



                                                54
    Rewrite

   Select one scenario at your table

   Determine tentative Level of Performance

   Rewrite at higher and lower levels using
    rubric characteristics




                                               55
5 “Rules” for Teacher Evaluation


1.   Defensible definition of teaching
2.   Differentiation of evaluative processes
3.   Evidence-driven process
4.   Teacher learning integral
5.   Transparency


                                               56
Rule # 2:
Differentiation of Evaluative Process


     Differentiate the processes of
     evaluation for:
      ◦ novices
      ◦ experienced teachers
      ◦ teachers at risk



                                        57
            Differentiated Evaluation

  Novice/Untenured        Experienced/Tenured           At-Risk

Very close observation      Presumption of            Not punitive
   and assessment           professionalism
Formal and informal       Structured process      Intensive, extensive
   observation of         1/3yr. Other years:    team-based support
  teaching is key +      informals + teacher      based on persistent
teacher interviews +         interviews+             unsatisfactory
      artifacts           professional goal-      performance in one
                                 setting         or more components
 2 – 4 formal times       Professional Goal-          Clear goals,
 per year; multiple      Setting: Choose from     outcomes, evidence
      informal             a list of rigorous,   and timelines anchor
    observations          approved activities

  No self-directed        Activities produce     Designed for the
     activities           evidence which is      teacher who can, and
                           then evaluated        wishes, to improve


                                                                         58
Overarching Questions


   Who does the thinking?

   Who does the learning and growing?




                                         59
 5 “Rules” for Teacher Evaluation

1.   Defensible definition of teaching
2.   Differentiation of evaluative processes
3.   Evidence-driven process
4.   Teacher learning integral
5.   Transparency




                                               60
Rule # 3:
Evidence Driven Process


           Let evidence
           -not opinion-
        anchor the process



                             61
Evidence or Opinion?
1. The teacher has a warm relationship with the
   students.
2. The teacher said that the South should have won the
   Civil War.
3. The table groups were arranged in 2 x 2 pods.
4. The materials and supplies were organized well.
5. Wait time was insufficient for student thinking.
6. The teacher stated that students have learned to add
   2-digit numbers in preparation for today’s lesson.
7. 6 students, questioned randomly, did not know the
   day’s learning goals.

                                                          62
Evidence or Opinion?
1. The teacher has a warm relationship with the
   students.
2. The teacher said that the South should have won the
   Civil War.
3. The table groups were arranged in 2 x 2 pods.
4. The materials and supplies were organized well.
5. Wait time was insufficient for student thinking.
6. The teacher stated that students have learned to add
   2-digit numbers in preparation for today’s lesson.
7. 6 students, questioned randomly, did not know the
   day’s learning goals.

                                                          63
           Worksheet #6 – Pg. 11
           Participant Materials

                    EVIDENCE
•   is a factual reporting of events,
•   may include teacher/student actions and
    behaviors,
•   may include artifacts prepared by the teacher,
    students or others,
•   avoids personal opinion or biases,
•   and is selected using professional judgment by
    the observer and/or the teacher.


                                                     64
Observation-based Assessment:
    Process and Evidence

             Process                   Evidence
Pre-Observation            Standard Lesson Plan with
Domains 1 and 4            Components of Domain 1-
                           Evidence provided by Teacher
Observation:               Standard Evidence Collection
Domains 1, 2 and 3         Document – Shared with Teachers
Post-Teaching              Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics
Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4     and additions/correction of
                           evidence gathered
Collaborative Assessment   Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-
Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4      Assessment Rubric




                                                                65
         Worksheet #7 – Pg. 13
         Participant Materials

   Watch the pre-observation conference
   Collect evidence on your Lesson Plan form
   Write evidence only




                                                66
            Daily Lesson Plans

   1c: What will students learn?

   1e: How will I teach it to them?

   1f: How will I measure which students
        learned it?



                                            67
Evidence…Observation-based
Assessment: Process and Evidence

             Process                   Evidence
Pre-Observation            Standard Lesson Plan with
Domains 1 and 4            Components of Domain 1-
                           Evidence provided by Teacher
Observation:               Standard Evidence Collection
Domains 1, 2 and 3         Document – Shared with Teachers
Post-Teaching              Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics
Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4     and additions/correction of
                           evidence gathered
Collaborative Assessment   Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-
Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4      Assessment Rubric




                                                                68
    Types of Observation Evidence

   Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments:
    “Could one person from each table collect materials?”


   Descriptions of observed teacher or student behavior:
    The teacher stands by the door, greeting students as they enter.


   Numeric information about time, student participation,
    resource use, etc.:
    Three students of the eighteen offer nearly all of the comments during discussion.


   An observed aspect of the environment:
    The assignment is on the board for students to do while roll is taken.



                                                                                         69
          Worksheet #8 – Pg.14
          Participant Materials

   Watch the lesson
   Collect evidence of what you see and
    hear
   If you aren’t sure where to write the
    evidence, just write it
   This is practice; relax


                                            70
Points about Evidence
   All questions are not about 3b

   Engagement is about the nature of the
    work and who does it

   Formative assessments should assess
    whether EACH student met the
    objectives.

                                            71
Evidence…Observation-based
Assessment: Process and Evidence

             Process                   Evidence
Pre-Observation            Standard Lesson Plan with
Domains 1 and 4            Components of Domain 1-
                           Evidence provided by Teacher
Observation:               Standard Evidence Collection
Domains 1, 2 and 3         Document – Shared with Teachers
Post-Teaching              Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics
Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4     and additions/correction of
                           evidence gathered
Collaborative Assessment   Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-
Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4      Assessment Rubric



                                                                72
Mark Components of Agreement


   DO mark the components of agreement

   Do NOT mark components with which
    you are not in agreement




                                          73
 Conclusions about the Observation


Where did your group mark the lesson at
 or above proficient?

Where did your group mark the lesson
 below proficient?



                                          74
Concluding about the Lesson

Where did your group mark the lesson at
or above proficient?

Where did your group mark below
proficient?




                                          75
Evidence…Observation-based
Assessment: Process and Evidence

             Process                   Evidence
Pre-Observation            Standard Lesson Plan with
Domains 1 and 4            Components of Domain 1-
                           Evidence provided by Teacher
Observation:               Standard Evidence Collection
Domains 1, 2 and 3         Document – Shared with Teachers
Post-Teaching              Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics
Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4     and additions/correction of
                           evidence gathered
Collaborative Assessment   Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-
Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4      Assessment Rubric




                                                                76
    Types of Observation Evidence

   Verbatim scripting of teacher or student comments:
    “Could one person from each table collect materials?”


   Descriptions of observed teacher or student behavior:
    The teacher stands by the door, greeting students as they enter.


   Numeric information about time, student participation,
    resource use, etc.:
    Three students of the eighteen offer nearly all of the comments during discussion.


   An observed aspect of the environment:
    The assignment is on the board for students to do while roll is taken.



                                                                                         77
Building Evaluator Reliability

   Reliability refers to similarity of
    conclusion/consistency

   Consistency is a function of consensus-
    building activities

   Evaluators must practice consensus-building
    activities regularly



                                                  78
      Worksheet #10 – Pgs. 23-24
        Participant Materials

   Take your observation notes from the
    elementary lesson (Worksheet #8) and
    compare to the list contained in
    Worksheet #10

   Check off the evidence noted there that you
    recorded on your form



                                                  79
Assessing the Lesson

   On a clean copy of the rubric, highlight the
    phrases that match the evidence you
    collected while observing the elementary
    lesson.

   Remember – you can highlight phrases in
    multiple levels of the same component.



                                                   80
     Paradigm Shift

Who collects/provides evidence?
  Both teacher and evaluator

Evaluation is not done TO you;
it is done with you and for you



                                  81
Evidence…Observation-based
Assessment: Process and Evidence

             Process                   Evidence
Pre-Observation            Standard Lesson Plan with
Domains 1 and 4            Components of Domain 1-
                           Evidence provided by Teacher
Observation:               Standard Evidence Collection
Domains 1, 2 and 3         Document – Shared with Teachers
Post-Teaching              Teacher Self-Assessment, Rubrics
Domains: 1, 2, 3 and 4     and additions/correction of
                           evidence gathered
Collaborative Assessment   Evaluator Rubric and Teacher Self-
Domains 1, 2, 3 and 4      Assessment Rubric




                                                                82
            The Purpose of the
       Post-Observation Conference

   To discuss the components of difference
    (not yet marked by observer)

   To elicit any evidence that still remains to be
    added about the lesson

   To arrive at an assessment on the rubric for
    components of difference.

                                                      83
      Words NOT to Use in the
    Post-Observation Conference

   “Defend…”
   “Prove…”
   “Argue…”
   “Convince…”

     Avoid language that suggests opposition
    that might bring about a defensive response.


                                                   84
          Language for the
    Post-Observation Conference

   “Say more about. . .”
   “Comment on the evidence for. . .”
   “Let’s look at the rubric for. . .”
   “What is the best match for. . .”
   “What’s the backstory for. . .”


                                          85
5 “Rules” for Teacher Evaluation

1.   Defensible definition of teaching
2.   Differentiation of evaluative processes
3.   Evidence-driven process
4.   Teacher learning integral
5.   Transparency



                                               86
Rule # 4:
Teacher Learning Integral



       Conduct evaluations
 in such a way that they produce
         teacher learning.



                                   87
Professional Learning


“Learning is done by the learner;
     it is mental WORK.”
                       - Charlotte Danielson


 Who does the mental work in your
        evaluation process?


                                               88
    The Nature of Professional Learning:
         Mental Work for Teachers

   Reflection on practice
   Collaboration
   Self-assessment
   Self-directed inquiry (action research)
   Feedback based upon evidence



                                              89
“Narrative-Free”Evaluation
   The rubric contains the narrative.

   Select the language that matches the evidence.

   The teacher participates in language selection.

   The highlighter is the tool to use!

   A summative domain statement is optional.



                                                      90
      Supporting Teachers Correctly

    Directive        Collaborative     Non-Directive

From evaluator                        From teacher to
                    Back and forth
to teacher                            evaluator

Immoral, illegal,                     The teacher
                    Both have ideas
dangerous,                            deserves to take
                    to contribute
clueless                              the lead

                                      Championship
Drowning            Swimming
                                      Swimming



                                                         91
 5 “Rules” for Teacher Evaluation


1.   Defensible definition of teaching

2.   Differentiation of evaluative processes

3.   Evidence-driven process

4.   Teacher learning integral

5.   Transparency


                                               92
Rule # 5:
Transparency


    Teachers must learn the rubrics
           and the process.


  How might this happen in your setting?



                                           93
Involving All Stakeholders

Many teacher evaluation systems fail
due to resistance that comes from the
perception that the evaluation system
resulted from the secret efforts of an
elite few.



                                         94
Notification is NOT Communication



  Communication is two-way
      not one-way




                                    95
96
In Conclusion…

   Deeper meanings of the Framework for Teaching

   The nature of differentiated teacher evaluation

   How to collect accurate evidence of teaching and
    use it, with rubrics, to assess performance

   How to conduct teacher evaluations appropriately

   How to make changes in teacher evaluation that
    reduce suspicion and distrust


                                                       97
For additional information or support:


        Rosanne Javorsky
         rosanne.javorsky@aiu3.net
         412-394-5792

        Dr. Patricia DiRienzo
         patricia.dirienzo@aiu3.net
         412-394-5762


                                         98

								
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