How to Blog on Ipad effectivelly

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Check out this to get the most of your IPAD!
http://93c8ckdtpap7uv7900hhy9jdvv.hop.clickbank.net/

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How to Blog on Ipad effectivelly

Ever since I first saw the iPad, I thought it would be the perfect blogging companion.
Imagine having a full-service mobile workstation that lasts for days on a charge, weigh under two
pounds WITH a keyboard, and have all the polish and possibility of an iPhone for two hands. A
mere five years ago this kind of power (and battery life) would have been unimaginable: three
years ago it would have still seemed totally unreasonable.
So I excitedly armed my iPad with everything it needed to become the ultra-blogger.
But and Ill be totally honest posting with images pretty much sucked.
It wasnt even the iPads fault. Really.
Aside from the iPads inability to use upload buttons on websites (something I never actually dealt
with on the iPhone), the whole thing should have gone pretty smoothly: just use apps instead of
websites, right? WordPress has an app, as does the perennial bloggers favorite, Blogpress. So
why did it feel like pulling teeth?
I was appalled at the irrationality of the free WordPress app. Its quality was far, far below their
usual high standards. When it didnt crash (which is a rare event in a commercial app), it would
repeatedly tell me that it had recovered a document and asked if I wanted to view it. Sure, why
not? It would then proceed to do absolutely nothing, except keep asking.
When I wrote up a post and went to add images, I could browse my photos and click add but
again, nothing.
Then there was the exciting doubling and tripling of posts, or the arbitrary publishing of half-
finished drafts. At one point I hit a kind of existential moment in which I could watch my drafts
duplicate themselves and post on the side while I was typing, but as soon as I went to correct this
they would disappear from view. A quick check on my blog revealed that each draft had been
given arbitrary categories. Awesome.
Suddenly, I remembered that Dropbox allows public linking to your files, meaning that I could
simply import all my images from there. I grabbed myself a file link, convinced that this was the
way to go before finding that my WordPress website (at least in MobileSafari) refused to type, at
all, in the upload an image from URL field. Strike two.
Then I remembered that one could post by email to a WordPress blog. I tried to do so and found
that this feature was only available to hosted blogs (which live on WordPress.com). Strike three.
Undaunted, I considered my options. I could try a third-party image host like photobucket thinking
that perhaps the WordPress site just doesnt like URLs without a file extension but that too was a
failure. I couldnt believe it: all this technology, and I cant upload or link a single image.

In frustration, I tried Blogpress, which let me add images all I wanted, but would then crash if I tried
to remove them. It also wouldnt save anything unless explicitly told.
I found that, incredibly enough, there were no other WordPress blogging apps for the iPad. Had
Blogpress cornered the market?
I went back to my laptop for about a week in the hope that when I ultimately emerged from
hibernation, there would be a full-featured blogging app waiting for me somewhere.
When I tried iPad blogging again, there was an update available for Blogpress to fix the crash on
removal of images. Hooray! All is well. Now I can post anything I want, and it works perfectly. And
while I did have to pay $2.99 for an app that is seemingly the only legitimate way to blog on the
iPad, Im proud to support the lone developer capable of improving his app.

What can we learn from this?

First, that its important to be aware of workarounds you might be able to use (like Dropboxs public
URLs, or using post-by-email). It is always good to know multiple ways to do something: it means
that you have more resources if things go wrong.
Second, that the state of iPad blogging is incredibly out of sync with reality, with only a single app
that works properly (and only after a major, show-stopping bug was fixed). The WordPress app is
unusable and should be completely avoided until they can improve it.
Third, that web designers should test their work in MobileSafari, if only because it is the most
popular mobile browser in use. The WordPress website bug should have been uncovered, and
fixed, several months ago.
But fourth, and most importantly, that there is a massive untapped market for a good, solid iPad
blogging app. What do you want in a mobile blogging app?



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Check out this to get the most of your IPAD!
http://93c8ckdtpap7uv7900hhy9jdvv.hop.clickbank.net/

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