Supplemental Titles for Core English 7

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                       Supplemental Titles for Core English 7

After the Dancing Days, Rostkowski
Blizzard: The Storm that Changed America, Moore
The Call of the Wild, London
The Cat Ate My Gymsuit, Danzinger
A Christmas Carol, Dickens
The Double Life of Pocahontas, Fritz
Dreamland Lake, Peck
Edgar Allen, Neufeld
The Forgotten Door, Key
Homecoming, Voight
In My Father’s House, Rinaldi
The Lighting Thief, Riordan
No More Dead Dogs, Korman
Out of the Dust, Hesse
Plain Girl, Sorensen
A Single Shard, Park
Sojourner Truth, Krass
Something for Joey, Peck
Sounder, Armstrong
Tangerine, Bloor
The Watsons Go to Birmingham: 1963, Curtis
Weirdo, Taylor
Where the Red Fern Grows, Rawls
The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Speare
Wolfrider, Avi
A Wrinkle in Time, L'Engle
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                                                 Call of the Wild
Before Reading

   Have the students prepare to read the novel by brainstorming the words: wild, nobility,
    instinct, and civilization. Have the students work in small groups to create connotation webs
    for the words. Alternatively, have the students use the question cards to discuss the words.
    (Side 1 Cards and Side 2 Cards)

During Reading

   Have the students compare and contrast Buck throughout the novel.

   Have the students examine the use of personification throughout the novel. Have the
    students participate in a mini-lesson on personification by examining the opening description
    of Buck. Then, have the students use a chart to track examples of personification in the
    remaining chapters.

   Have the students write a comparison between the characterizations of Buck's various owners in
    The Call of the Wild. They should pay particular attention to the language used to describe each
    owner and look for ways the author showed characteristics rather than told them. Have the
    students use the Character Information Chart (see Reading Toolbox for suggestions of charts) to
    record information about the words used to describe all Buck's masters. Then, based on the
    information gathered, have them organize the material and write a paper describing one of
    Buck's masters. Consider having them organize their information using the format below.

     Thesis: In The Call of the Wild, John Thornton is characterized as a good master.

     List specific examples with page numbers.




   Have the students discuss the literary elements in the novel by responding to the questions on
    the literary analysis bookmark.

   Have the students use a setting chart (see Reading Toolbox) record how an author uses the
    setting to establish the mood of a piece of literature. The students may use this chart with
    short stories, poems, and novels.

   Have the students keep a reading journal as they read The Call of the Wild. At the end of each
    chapter, ask them to complete the following:

    Chapter 1: Into the Primitive
            Why did the author choose the title “Into the Primitive” for this chapter?
            Describe the setting at the judge's house.

    Chapter 2: The Law of Club and Fang
            Explain the meaning of the title of the chapter.


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            Name some of the adaptations made to his new environment by Buck.

    Chapter 3: The Dormant Primordial Beast
            Why did the author use the word dormant in the title of this chapter?
            Do you think this word is important to the understanding of what is happening to Buck?

    Chapter 4: Who has Won to Mastership?
            Explain the differences among Buck, Dave, and Sol-leks.
            What is the author trying to communicate by his use of the vision of th

    Chapter 5: The Toil of Trace and Trail
            Why did the author include the characters of Charles, Hal, and Mercedes?
            What do they represent?

    Chapter 6: For the Love of a Man
            Explain the relationship between Buck and John Thornton.

    Chapter 7: The Sounding of the Call
       Explain the meaning of the title of the chapter and its relationship to the title of the book.

After Reading

   Have the students view selected scenes from the videotape Call of the Wild for the purpose of
    comparing the book with the film. While viewing, have refer to the scene from the text.

   Have the students discuss the ways Jack London symbolizes leadership in the novel.

   Have the students identify the major symbols in the story: club, hairy man, call, fang, fire, pack,
    howl, etc.

   Have the students keep a dictionary of new words as they read the book. Ask the students to
    keep this dictionary in their notebooks. As they record the words, ask them to note the page and
    line on which they find the words, the definitions from context, and the dictionary definitions.
    Then every third chapter, have the students participate in a Password activity using the words
    from their lists. When they finish the book, have the students take a quiz on the words that they
    had the most difficulty with while playing the Password game.

   Have the students collect news articles about the topics covered during the course of the reading
    of the book using the following list to guide their selection. Have the students keep a parallel
    reading journal.

    -   stories about domesticated animals stolen,
    -   animals that survive in the wilderness,
    -   information about Alaska,
    -   articles about leadership,
    -   articles about genetics, and
    -   articles about wolves.


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  Call of the Wild Question Cards
              Side 1




  WILD

NOBILITY

INSTINCT
CIVILIZATION

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         Call of the Wild Question Cards
                     Side 2




  What does it mean to be wild? Are
       animals always wild?



How is nobility different from common
 society? What qualities does a noble
             person have?



What natural instincts do humans have?
  Do you believe that humans have
        animalistic instincts?



    What is the difference between
      civilized and uncivilized?




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                         Personification in The Call of the Wild


Read the following description of Buck from Chapter 1.

His father, Elmo, a huge St. Bernard, had been the Judge’s inseparable companion, and Buck bid
fair to follow in the way of his father. He was not so large- he weighed only one hundred and
forty pounds- for his mother, Shep, had been a Scotch shepherd dog. Nevertheless one hundred
and forty pounds, to which was added the dignity that comes of good living an universal respect,
enabled him to carry himself in the right royal fashion. During the four years since his
puppyhood he had lived the life of a sated aristocrat; he had a fine pride in himself, was even a
trifle egotistical, as country gentlemen sometimes become because of their insular situation. But
he had saved himself by not becoming a mere pampered hose dog. Hunting and kindred outdoor
delights had kept down the fat and hardened his muscles; and to him, as to the coldtubbing races,
the love of water had been a tonic and a health preserver.




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                         Literary Bookmark for The Call of the Wild

               The Call of the Wild                                 The Call of the Wild

Chapter 1                                            Chapter 1
   Who surfaces as the antagonist? Why?                Who surfaces as the antagonist? Why?
   What conflict arises because of the                 What conflict arises because of the
      antagonist’s actions?                                antagonist’s actions?

Chapter 2                                            Chapter 2
   The chapter opens with the simile, “Buck’s          The chapter opens with the simile, “Buck’s
      first day on the Dyea beach was like a               first day on the Dyea beach was like a
      nightmare.” Why is this an example of a              nightmare.” Why is this an example of a
      simile?                                              simile?
   What events in the chapter support the              What events in the chapter support the
      description in the simile?                           description in the simile?

Chapter 3                                            Chapter 3
   Buck is referred to as a “primordial beast.”        Buck is referred to as a “primordial beast.”
      What events from the story support this              What events from the story support this
      description? How does this description               description? How does this description
      make Buck a dynamic character?                       make Buck a dynamic character?

Chapter 4                                            Chapter 4
   One of the themes of novel deals with               One of the themes of novel deals with
      instinct. Explain what instinct is. What             instinct. Explain what instinct is. What
      details support this explanation?                    details support this explanation?
   What theme is the author trying to develop          What theme is the author trying to develop
      around the subject of instinct?                      around the subject of instinct?

Chapter 5                                            Chapter 5
   Setting plays an important part in the novel.       Setting plays an important part in the novel.
      What details in the chapter help to develop          What details in the chapter help to develop
      the setting?                                         the setting?
   Is it possible for setting to a character in a      Is it possible for setting to a character in a
      story?                                               story?

Chapter 6                                            Chapter 6
   How do the events in the chapter present a          How do the events in the chapter present a
      turning point (climax) for Buck?                     turning point (climax) for Buck?

Chapter 7                                            Chapter 7
   What traits does Jack London find                   What traits does Jack London find
      admirable? How is this evident in the                admirable? How is this evident in the
      character of Buck?                                   character of Buck?



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                                    “A Christmas Carol”
Before Reading

   Have the students work in small teams to create a classroom newspaper or magazine on
    Victorian England. Assign each group one of the topic cards to research and write about for
    the newspaper. Have the students participate in a mini-lesson on how to write a newspaper
    article. Then, have the students examine various newspapers to identity the components of
    an article: headline, byline, lead, cut, cut line. etc.

   Have the students conduct background research on Victorian England and Charles Dickens.
    Have the students use the Internet to locate information pertaining to child labor laws and
    public workhouses. Then, have the students work in teams to create a Webquest, a
    crossword puzzle, or a trivia game to share their information with other groups.

   Have the students complete a KWL for the story. Most students should be familiar with
    some aspect of the story since its allusions have permeated main-stream American culture.

   Have the students use MABE statements to define key vocabulary from the text.

During Reading

   Have the students work in small groups to present short, dramatic segments from the various
    scenes.

   Have the students analyze the dynamic characterization using a chart to record information.
    Have each group share their ideas with the class. Then, have each group complete the chart
    and share their responses with the class as a means of discussion.

   Have the students participate in three views of the story.
     View Film Clip of Stave 1
     Read Portion of Play that Stems from Stave 2
     Read Stave 3
     View Film Clip of Stave 4
     Read Stave 5
    Then, have the students discuss the similarities and differences between the drama and the
    actual text. In addition, have the students discuss how the text translates into film.

After Reading

   Have the students return to their MAB/E statements and connect the terms with associations
    from the events and characters in the story.

   Have the students discuss how Scrooge, Tiny Tim, the Ghosts, Bob Cratchitt, and the play
    have become part of our modern-day culture. Have the students locate examples of
    television commercials, magazine ads, etc. that use the characters or the play.



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   Have the students participate in a guided seminar discussion that leads students to understand
    how the various levels of meaning develop through a reader’s interaction with the text.
    Procedure:
         Examine the four questions for each category: setting, dynamic character, theme, and
          transformations. The questions are leveled into three categories: See and Connect,
          Think and Connect, and Judge and Connect (student version and teacher version).
         Teachers should determine those students who have difficulty with textual analysis.
          Assign the groups according to ease with literary analysis: Group S- difficulty; Group
          T- learning; Group J- mastered.
         Introduce the discussion by clarify the four categories of questions for the students.
          Then, give each group its questions.
         After ample time for discussion, come together for a whole group discussion. Each
          group will be able to contribute to the General Discussion Question using evidence
          from their small group discussions.

   Have the students write a character analysis of Scrooge. Have the students gather information
    on the character and write a paper explaining how Dicken's use of vocabulary influenced the
    reader's opinion about Scrooge.
     Thesis: In the first part of A Christmas Carol, Dicken's use of certain words to describe
     Scrooge makes the reader aware of his selfish and insensitive nature.

     List specific examples with page numbers.
         1.
         2.
         3.
         4.




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                                              A Christmas Carol
                                    Victorian England Newspaper Project
                        Child Labor                                                 Victorian Architecture

You are an investigative reporting team for the Victorian          You are a real-estate development and architecture
Times. You have received numerous calls from local                 company that specializes in the unique and popular interior
residents concerned with the number of children who are            design of the Victorian era. Your company will be placing
working in poor conditions for long hours. Your team is to         an advertisement in the Victorian Times announcing the
investigate and report on the status of child labor and child      sale of a Victorian home. The advertisement should
labor laws. You should also report on the food, pollution,         include information on the characteristics of the
punishment, and accidents in the factories in which the            architecture of the home and a description of the interior
children work. Be prepared to expose the cruel and harsh           that identifies the types of furniture and accessories.
treatments of children.

                     Fashion and Dress                                                 Charles Dickens

You are the fashion editors for the Victorian Times. You           Charles Dickens, a famous author, recently published a
recently have attended a fashion show that highlighted the         new story, A Christmas Carol. This and many of this other
popular fashions for men, women, and children. You are to          stories stem from his experiences during his childhood.
write a fashion column describing what you have seen at            Your team is to interview Mr. Dickens about his life
the show, telling readers what the well-dressed person             experiences and how these experiences influenced his
should be wearing. Sketches should be included.                    writing. You are to prepare interview questions and submit
                                                                   both the questions and the responses of Mr. Dickens for the
                                                                   “Up Close and Personal” section of the Victorian Times.



                    Victorian Christmas                                                 Famous Names

You realize that the Victorians just might be trendsetters for     Your team reports on crime for the Victorian Times. You
others in the way that they celebrate Christmas, including         have been following the cases involving Jack the Ripper, a
the reestablishment of the pagan tradition of bringing             murderer who is terrorizing women on the dark streets of
evergreens into the home. In order to learn of other               London. You are to research the facts surrounding the case
customs and traditions that they follow, you spend                 and then write an article that tells about the police
Christmas Day with the Halliwells, a prominent British             investigation, the conditions in the slums of London, and
family, in order to prepare a feature article for the Victorian    the reaction of the people to the horrific crimes.
Times that details the customs/traditions that are followed in
their home in their celebration of Christmas.



                       Queen Victoria                                                     Inventions

Under Queen Victoria’s reign, Great Britain has become a           Your team investigates new inventions that are occurring
British Empire, and it controls lands throughout the world.        during this time of the Industrial Revolution. You are to
Since you are a team of reporters that exclusively covers          prepare an article for the Victorian Times that briefly
news of the monarchy for the Victorian Times, you will             describes some of these inventions and then focuses in on
write an article that highlights the political topics of the day   introducing one of the inventions more fully. Sketches
as well as Queen Victoria’s contributions to her country.          may be included.




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                     A Christmas Carol

What I   Know       What I   Want to Know            What I   Learned

                       A Christmas Carol
                 What is the subject of the story?
                      What is the setting?
                  Why is this story still popular
                              today?
                  How did this story influence
                     Christmas traditions?


                      Charles Dickens
                     When did he write?
                  What stories has he written?
                  Why did he write this story?




                           Scrooge
                What image comes to mind when
                      you hear this word?
                What words/lines are associated
                        with Scrooge?



                          Tiny Tim
                What image comes to mind when
                      you hear Tiny Tim?
                What words/lines are associated
                        with Tiny Tim?




                 The Ghosts of Christmas Past,
                     Present, and Future
                How is the story organized around
                       these three figures?
                    Why are they included?




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                                   Vocabulary for “A Christmas Carol”

 Vocabulary Word       Means              Is Associated             Because                        Example
                                              With
Abundance

Anonymous

Charitable

Currency

Destitute          Not possessing the                           They have very little   The stock market crash left people
                   necessaries of life   The Cratchit family   money on which to life              destitute.

Emerge

Endeavor

Finale

Incoherent

Macabre

Mortal




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 Vocabulary Word   Means   Is Associated   Because   Example
                               With
Odious

Pledge

Provision

Reassurance

Solitude

Summon

Surplus

Transform

Welfare




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                                           Christmas Carol
                                      Methods of Characterization

What I Learned        Through Stage        Through the           Through the        Through the
  About…                Directions       Character’s Words     Statements Made   Character’s Actions
                                                                   by Other
                                                                  Characters

  Scrooge’s Past




 Scrooge’s Present




 Scrooge’s Future
    Before His
 Transformation



Scrooge’s Future As
 He Wants It To Be




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                                                    Seminar Questions for A Christmas Carol

Topics & Questions                GROUP S                         GROUP T                         GROUP J                     ALL GROUPS
to Begin the Whole                  See                            Think                           Judge                        Connect
 Group Discussion


      Setting             What details reveal the         What impact does the setting    What comment is Dickens        How is the world of A
What have we learned      setting?                        have on the life of the         making to his readers about    Christmas Carol like much
 about the setting?                                       Cratchits?                      the quality of life for “the   of our world today, both
                                                                                          masses” during his time?       inside and outside of the US?


   Dynamic       What words does Dickens                  What effect does each of the    When Scrooge says, “I am       Often characters come to
                                                                                          not the man I was,” what
Characterization use to describe Scrooge                  three visits have on                                           represent whole groups in
                          during each of the three        Scrooge’s desire to transform   does he mean? How has his      society. What part of our
  Who is Scrooge?
                          visits? Do these words          his attitude toward             experience led him to          society today does Scrooge
                          reflect who he is each period   humanity?                       change?                        represent? Tiny Tim?
                          of his life?


      Theme               What characters in the story    How do the words of             How does Dickens use the       How would you explain the
What have we learned      represent the belief that we    Scrooge in Stave 1 reveal the   children under the robe of     concept of humanity? How
 about people from        have a commitment to help       poverty and hardships of the    the Spirit of Christmas        does this story continue to
 reading the story?       others? How do they             people in London?               Present to symbolize the       reflect man’s responsibility
                          demonstrate this belief?                                        state of humanity?             to humanity?


Transformations How does Dickens help the                 Scrooge promises to honor       Why does Dickens use           Does the story change your
  Why is Christmas        reader to visualize Christmas   Christmas all year long.        Christmas as the backdrop      view of “the Christmas
important in the story?   traditions during this time?    How does Scrooge see this       for Scrooge’s                  spirit?” How can all
                                                          promise as a way to alter his   transformation?                religions and cultures honor
                                                          life?                                                          this idea?




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Group S
What details reveal the setting?      What words does Dickens use to       What characters in the story           How does Dickens help the reader
                                      describe Scrooge during each of      represent the belief that we have a    to visualize Christmas traditions
How is the world of A Christmas       the three visits? Do these words     commitment to help others? How         during this time?
Carol like much of our world          reflect who he is each period of     do they demonstrate this belief?
today, both inside and outside of     his life?
the US?                                                                  How would you explain the                Does the story change your view
                                      Often characters come to represent concept of humanity? How does            of “the Christmas spirit?” How
                                      whole groups in society. What      this story continue to reflect man’s     can all religions and cultures
                                      part of our society today does     responsibility to humanity?              honor this idea?
                                      Scrooge represent? Tiny Tim?

Group T

What impact does the setting have     What effect does each of the three How do the words of Scrooge in       Scrooge promises to honor
on the life of the Cratchits?         visits have on Scrooge’s desire to Stave 1 reveal the poverty and       Christmas all year long. How
                                      transform his attitude toward      hardships of the people in London? does Scrooge see this promise as a
How is the world of A Christmas       humanity?                                                               way to alter his life?
Carol like much of our world                                             How would you explain the
today, both inside and outside of     Often characters come to represent concept of humanity? How does        Does the story change your view
the US?                               whole groups in society. What      this story continue to reflect man’s of “the Christmas spirit?” How
                                      part of our society today does     responsibility to humanity?          can all religions and cultures
                                      Scrooge represent? Tiny Tim?                                            honor this idea?

Group J
What comment is Dickens making        When Scrooge says, “I am not the     How does Dickens use the               Why does Dickens use Christmas
to his readers about the quality of   man I was,” what does he mean?       children under the robe of the         as the backdrop for Scrooge’s
life for “the masses” during his      How has his experience led him to    Spirit of Christmas Present to         transformation?
time?                                 change?                              symbolize the state of humanity?
                                                                                                                  Does the story change your view
How is the world of A Christmas       Often characters come to             How would you explain the              of “the Christmas spirit?” How
Carol like much of our world          represent whole groups in society.   concept of humanity? How does          can all religions and cultures honor
today, both inside and outside of     What part of our society today       this story continue to reflect man’s   this idea?
the US?                               does Scrooge represent? Tiny         responsibility to humanity?
                                      Tim?




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                                        Out of the Dust
Before Reading

   Have the students gather background information on the Dust Bowl using the following
    guiding questions. Have the students use the topics to construct a class research project.
    1. What region of the United States did the Dust Bowl affect? In what part of American
       history did the Dust Bowl occur? Why is the time frame significant?
    2. What happened during a dust storm?
    3. How did the dust storms affect the land and the people?
    4. How did farming practices contribute to the dust storms?
    5. How did the weather contribute to the dust storms?
    6. What measures were taken to improve the land? Who was responsible for trying to
       “save” the land?
    7. What is the condition of the Dust Bowl today? Are the lives of the people in the region
       still affected by the dust storms of the past?

   Have the students conduct background research on the Dust Bowl using the questions above
    for a Web Quest. Have the students access the PBS web site at www.pbs.org. The site
    contains an interactive presentation of “Surviving the Dust Bowl.”

   Have students look over the cover and the title. What does the title mean? Have students
    make predictions about what they think the story will be about. Make sure to have students
    save the predictions for discussion after the class has completed the novel.

   Have each student complete a pre-reading overview on Out of the Dust. Divide the students
    into groups based on their answers and have them write a cooperative report on one of the
    topics listed. Each group will be responsible for teaching the rest of the class one piece of
    information by creating a learning center in one section of the room would be a creative and
    interactive way to present the information.

   Have the students examine artifacts that relate to the story, such as dishes and farm tools.
    Then, the teacher will bring in a bucket of sand and sprinkle the sand over the items. Leave
    the bucket of sand out on the table as well. Next, have the students write a story about the
    objects that they see on the table and share these as a class.

   Have the students prepare for the vocabulary of the text by dividing the class into five
    groups. Assign each group one list of words and have them use index cards to create a
    concentration game to share with the other groups. On one card, have the students record the
    word and a symbol/picture that represents the meaning of the word. On the second card,
    have the students record a definition, NOT the dictionary definition but a definition that
    makes sense to the students. Also, have the students record a synonym and an antonym.
    Then, have the each group swap Concentration Sets and try to match the symbol to the
    definitions, synonyms, and antonyms. As students read the story, have them locate these
    words in the text and explain how the word relates to the story, not how it is used in the text,
    but how it connects, represents, describes, etc. some aspect of the story.



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   Have the students examine the famous National Geographic photograph, “Migrant Mother.”
    Have the students discuss or write about hardships. What is a hardship? How does the
    struggle shape the person? How do we know that this woman has struggled? What is your
    experience with hardship?

   Have the students examine pictures from the depression era. Then, have students answer the
    following questions as they discuss the pictures as a class. The teacher may want to use
    Think-Pair-Share to discuss the questions.
           o Speculate as to when and where these photographs may have been taken.
           o Which image “speaks” to you and why?
           o If every picture tells a story, what story do these photographs convey?
           o What questions do these images evoke?

   Have the students participate in a mini-lesson on free verse – a form of modern poetry that
    has variable lines with no rhyming and no set rhythm pattern. Have the students flip through
    the book and point out that even though the story is written in poetic verse, there are still
    elements of plot such as a climax to the story. Then, have students compete a Pointed
    Reading of the first poem. After completing the Pointed Reading, have the students discuss
    the following quote and how the use of free verse. Have students return to this quote
    periodically as they read the story.

     “…when I tried to put my finger on who Billie Jo was, and how she would speak, I
     realized she lived a very spare life. And everything she did was considered, because it
     took so much to survive – to get through one day living with parents who were struggling.
     And it seemed the only way to get at that sparseness was to tell it through poetry.” --


     Directions for Pointed Reading

     Beers compares this to the Gregorian chants where important words/phrases are stressed.

     Procedures
     1. Teacher reads the poem aloud.
     2. Students underline five words/phrases/lines that are meaningful.
     3. As the teacher reads the poem aloud, the students read aloud their underlinings.
     4. In small groups, share what they underlined and choose the one most meaningful word.


During Reading

   Have the students keep a reading journal as they read the text.

   Have the students use an Observation Chart to record their thoughts as they read.

   Have the students complete a guided reading journal as they read.



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   Have the students discuss the story at strategic points as a whole group, small group, or pairs.
    Note to the Teacher: Questions are NOT provided as a means of assigning reading
    questions to students. These questions are for discussion after reading.

   Have the students listen to music from the Great Depression (see
    http://f99.middlebury.edu/AC200A/depression-era_music.htm and other web sites for Real
    Audios of music). Have the students discuss how the music develops a mood. Discuss how
    mood may be developed in a story. Then, have the students analyze how the mood was
    developed as they read the story.

   Have the student use 3-2-1 to focus on the setting and mood at any point in their reading.
    Note to the Teacher: ideas for sounds could be machines, voices, wind, animals, footsteps,
    music; ideas for feelings could be anger, sadness, joy, happiness, sorrow, jealousy; ideas for
    scenery could be location, surroundings, town, city, country, trees, bushes.

     3          Sounds you heard
     2          Thing you “saw” as you read
     1          Ways you felt during reading and tell why

   Have the students quickly review the characters in the story as a means of monitoring their
    reading comprehension. Have the students write the name of a character from the story on a
    post-it note and attach it to the back of another student. The students should not know which
    character is attached to their backs. Then, have each student go around the room asking other
    students YES or NO questions about their character. Limit the questions to one question per
    classmate. Have the students continue for a few minutes until everyone has discovered
    which character is attached to their backs. Then, have the students individually record the
    name of the character and explain how they figured out who they were.

   Have the students select a scene from pp. 150-189 to transform into a poster. The students
    should decide on a message they would like to portray in the scene and use the poster to
    “sell” the message to an audience. Suggestions for scenes include help for the Panhandle
    people, an advertisement for the story, an advertisement of the Black Mesa Boys with Billie
    Jo playing, or something related to the themes of forgiveness, loss, nature’s wrath, or family
    relationships. This would be an excellent opportunity to introduce students to persuasive
    techniques. Have the students select a technique and reflect on how they used the technique
    in their posters.

   Have the students create a dual timeline recording the events from the story on one timeline
    and actual events from the Depression on a second timeline. Have them discuss how the
    author used the actual facts to create historical fiction.

   Have the students use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast Billie Jo with themselves or
    throughout the story.

   Have the students compare and contrast “Birth” on p. 123 with what happened when Billie
    Jo’s mother gave birth.


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   Have the students write their own poem in blank verse after reading “Thanksgiving List.”

After Reading

   Have the students review the five stages of grief (shock, denial, anger, depression,
    acceptance) and have them locate examples of Billie Jo’s reactions and behavior. Have the
    students discuss her transformation and what causes helped her to come to acceptance.

   Have the students discuss how Hesse used old newspaper articles to gather ideas for the
    story. Then, have the students complete a parallel reading activity by locating articles on
    forgiveness, loss, family strife, nature’s wrath, or other connections they find to the story.
    Then, have the students use the article to write a free verse poem about it. Criteria for
    consideration includes:
           o Title- catches attention and adds to the free verse
           o Capitalization- does the use of capitalization add emphasis to key words
           o Repetition- do key words or phrases repeat and why
           o Form- do all lines begin in the same spot or is there a different pattern
           o Ending- should not fizzle or die; leave an impression

   Have the students work in pairs or small groups to create conversations that may have
    occurred. Students may choose to perform these conversations as Reader’s Theatre.

   Have the students examine the three levels of meaning in the text by writing a letter to Hesse
    voicing their reaction to the story. Have the students discuss the situations from the story
    that surround each of the subjects using a Plot-Subject-Theme Chart. Then, have the students
    write a statement that expresses the theme developed for each subject. Next, have the
    students work in small groups to discuss how the themes can apply to the reader (text-to-
    self/text-to-world). Finally, have the students craft a letter to Hesse using their discussion
    and charts to guide their thinking. Have students discuss how the letter should include details
    that indicate their understanding of all three levels of meaning: plot, themes, and connections
    to self, world, and history.

       Literal- Plot       Subject           Interpretative- Theme                 Applied
                             Loss
                         Forgiveness
                            Nature
                            Family
                         Relationships

   Have the students respond to significant quotes from the story as a means of assessing their
    reading comprehension.

   Have the students examine character development from the story and how the characters
    transformed due to the land, the Depression, and the people around them. Then, have the
    students select one “character” from the story and create a RAFT writing assignment.


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   Have the students work with pairs or small groups to form reactions to the story by
    participating in a Walkabout. Walkabout prompts may include:

           o   Three words that connect with the story
           o   This book is hopeful because…
           o   The main problem facing Billie Jo is… because…
           o   Billie Jo can control…, but … is out of her hands.
           o   Billie Jo learns…
           o   Billie Jo’s future may…
           o   The story is important for today’s reader because…
           o   One lesson learned from reading the story is…
           o   This book won the Newbery Medal because…

   Have the students examine pictures of four objects important to the story. Have the students
    select one and write a poem explaining how this image is important to the story. Students
    may elect to write the poem from the perspective of a character in the story.

   Have the students complete “Is This Book My Life?” to compare and contrast Billie Jo’s life
    with their own.. Have the students discuss applied meaning of stories where the reader
    considers connection to self and world.

   Have the students take a Virtual-Fieldtrip by visiting the American Life Histories web site at
    http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/wpaintro/wpahome.html. Have the students compare and
    contrast stories found on the site with Billie Jo’s story.

   Have the students divide a piece of paper into four sections and have the students illustrate
    important parts of the novel based on the seasons indicated. Then, have the students discuss
    how the seasons symbolize the passing of time for Billie Jo.




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                           Prereading List for Out of the Dust
Place a “T” next to the items that you know well enough to teach someone else.

Place an “H” next to the terms of which you have heard.

Place a question mark “?” next to the items that are new to you.


                      _____ The Dust Bowl

                      _____ free verse poetry

                      _____ Oklahoma Panhandle

                      _____ migrant workers

                      _____ The New Deal

                      _____ wheat farming

                      _____ music

                      _____ forgiveness

                      _____ tenant farmers



Write sentences that include terms you know from the list. Make certain that your sentences
show that you know the meaning of the terms.



When a signal is given to move from your seat, find someone in the class who can tell you what
a term you are uncertain of means. Write that explanation down.




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                             Concentration Vocabulary for
                                      Out of the Dust

List One (pp. 1-51)
bittering     dazzled         pledged      rippling     sorghum
bounty        fidgeting       plowboy      roughs       spindly
cast-off      oilcloth        ratcheted    scowling     wisp
dazed         pestering       riled        slants

List Two (pp. 52-95)
Cereus        grizzled        quench       stubble      untamed
Chafed        irritated       revue        stupor       writhed
Descending obligated          sod          trickling
Desperate     octaves         squirreled   tufts

List Three (pp. 96-149)
Average       festered        gullies      pandowdy     suffocated
Bleary        forsaken        infantile    ponging      tempo
Chaos         frail           jittery      scarred      thistle
Duster        grit            moonshine    scuff        tracings

List Four (pp. 150-189)
Crank          fleeing        parcel       plunged      sparse
Divining       gummed         parched      procession   swarmed
Drenched       idled          pitching     puddle       whooping
Featured       knoll          plaster      rickety

List Five (pp. 190-227)
Applied        cottony         latch       ringed       smothering
Betrothal      diversification mottled     sassy
Busted         drifts          nourished   shifting
Comical        flinch          reserves    slat




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                    Journal Ideas for Out of the Dust

 How do you think living with all that dust would affect how you would feel?
 Can you think of a time in your life when you felt as alone as Billie Jo did
  after the accident? What did you do?
 Describe Billie Jo’s relationship with her dad. What do you think could be
  done to improve their relationship?
 Billie Jo seems to like Mad Dog. How do you think Mad Dog feels about
  Billie Jo? Support your opinion.
 If you were Billie Jo’s friend, what would you do as soon as you had learned
  of the accident? Who are Billie Jo’s friends?
 Describe a time in your life when you felt like you needed to talk and you
  did not have anyone to listen to you.
 Pretend that it is the year 1934. Imagine that you are the President of the
  United States. What would you say to the country?
 What are some ways that you have of coping with problems, disappoints, or
  trials? Which ones were the most helpful?
 What is forgiveness? Why is it important in our relationships to forgive one
  another? Think of another character or another book you have read where
  forgiveness plays a key role in the story. Explain what happened. How does
  Billie Jo’s life change as she begins to forgive?
 Would you like Billie Jo for a friend? Why or why not?
 Pretend the year is 2010. What might the problem be instead of dust?
 Pretend you’re the author and explain why you chose the title.




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                 OBSERVATION CHART for OUT OF THE DUST
Pick one section of the novel and complete the observation chart based on the descriptions and
imagery provided by Billie Jo’s journal entries. Use examples from the novel.

Event or Subject Observed



Visual Details




Sounds




Smells




Tastes



Feel/Texture




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                         Guided Reading Journal

   Category       Page                      Passage

  School Life




Community Life




  Family Life




  Agriculture




  Landscape




Assistance from
    Others




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                                                Discussion Questions for Out of the Dust
                                 See                                               Think                                          Judge
pp. 1-51       How does Billie Jo get her name?             How does the dust come between Billie Jo’s           What do think about Billie Jo as a
               What is Ma’s suggestion about what to         parents?                                              person?
                do when the wheat will not grow?             What makes Billie Jo feel as “foul as maggoty        What is the mood of most of the
               What word do all the songs that Billie        stew?”                                                poems?
                Jo picks to play with the Black Mesa         When the rain finally comes down hard and fast,      Many of the poems contain similes.
                Boys contain?                                 why aren’t the people happy?                          Locate a few examples and discuss
                                                             Why won’t Ma let Billie Jo play the piano for         what is being compared.
                                                              the show Sunny of Sunnyside?
                                                             How do the Kelbys show they are good
                                                              neighbors?
pp. 52-95      Describe the accident. What caused it?       How does Billie Jo’s relationship with her father    How is the loss of her hands another
               What does Billie Jo name the baby?            change?                                               kind of death for Billie Jo?
               Where does Billie Jo’s dad get a job?        Why is the blooming cereus plant at Mrs.             Why does the author repeat the
                                                              Brown’s house so moving to Billie Jo?                 phrases in the poem called “The
                                                             Why does the art exhibit move Billie Jo?              Accident”?
                                                             Why does Billie Jo feel the Reverend had to hear     What mood does the poem “Real
                                                              Ma play the piano to truly know her?                  Snow” suggest?
pp. 96-149     What was the President’s Ball?              Why is Billie Jo suspicious about her father’s        Is Billie Jo a proud person? How do
               Who were the “guests” at the school?          interest in night school?                             you know?
                How do they affect Billie Jo?               How does the weather affect Billie Jo’s feelings?
               What was the dust storm like when           In the poem “Motherless,” Billie Jo says she is
                Billie Jo went to watch the show?             eager to go. Where will she go? Why?
pp. 150-189    What does Billie Jo think of the            What do the people hope to gain by migrating          Why is Billie Jo so angry with her
                invitation she receives in the mail?          out of Oklahoma?                                      father?
               What happens when Billie Jo tries to        What is Mad Dog’s feeling about Billie Jo?
                play piano for graduation?                  Why does it take Billie Jo’s dad so long to see
               Who do they hear on the radio? How            the doctor about his spots?
                does everyone feel?
               What is left at church? What does Billie
                Jo want to do with it?
pp. 190-227    What does Billie Jo take on her journey?    What is Billie Jo’s reaction to Louise?               In what way is Nature a character in
               What occurs on the train?                   What does Billie Jo learn about her parents when       the story?
               What things are significant on Billie        she runs away?                                        Who has to be forgiven in the story?
                Jo’s Thanksgiving list?                     What does Billie Jo learn about her father ?


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                            Problem-Solving Situations

   You have plans to go and watch a movie tonight. You have made arrangements for
    friends to come with you. As you get ready to walk out the door, your mom reminds you
    that you had promised another family that you would baby-sit for them tonight. What do
    you do?

   You got in a fight with your best friend. He thinks that you do not like him as much
    anymore. He tells you that you are always hanging out with somebody else. You explain
    to your friend that this is not true. You promise to meet him after school today to hang
    out together. After school you are invited to play basketball with a popular group of
    students. You are excited. You forget all about your promise to your friend until you see
    him walking into the gym two hours later. What do you do?

   You are sitting down with your family for a discussion about family problems. You are
    informed that your dad has just been laid off from his job. This is just three weeks before
    the last payment of your fee to attend camp in the summer is due. You have been
    planning this trip for months. What do you do?

   You are excited to be invited on a trip with friends to see the Grand Canyon. When you
    get home, you realize that your parents have already planned a family trip to see your
    dying grandfather the same weekend. What do you do?




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              Potential Conversations in Out of the Dust



 Billie Jo says goodbye to her friend Livie at her going away party.

 Mr. Noble and Mr. Romney argue about who can get the most
  rabbits.

 Billie Jo overhears the women of the town talking about the
  accident with Billie Jo and her Ma.

 Mad Dog tells Billie Jo how he got his nickname.

 Arley tries to get Billie Jo to do a show at the school after Billie
  Jo’s accident and after the contest.

 Dad and Billie Jo discuss the invitation from Aunt Ellis to come
  and live with her.

 Mad Dog comes to say goodbye to Billie Jo as he leaves for
  Amarillo.

 Billie Jo talks to the homeless man on the train to the west.

 Upon Billie Jo’s arrival home, she and Daddy discuss their lives
  and the things they need to change and improve.

 Billie Jo tells Louise of their life together before she came long.




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           Significant Lines from Out of the Dust



- I hollered myself red the day I was born. Red’s the color I’ve
  stayed ever since.

- When I point my fingers at the keys, the music springs
  straight out of me.

- …I glare at Ma’s back with a scowl foul as maggoty stew.

- I wish the dust would plug my ears so I couldn’t hear her.

- They only said, Billie Jo threw the pail of kerosene.

- I dropped right inside the music and didn’t feel anything.

- My fingers leave sighs in the dust.

- “It’s best to let the dead rest,” he says.

- But mostly I’m invisible. Mostly I’m alone.

- I go, knowing that I’ll die if I stay, that I’m slowly, surely
  smothering.

- …when she smiles, her face is full enough of springtime, it
  makes her hat seem just right.




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                                                 RAFTS for Out of the Dust
Much of the meaning of the story is reflected in the title, Out of the Dust. It is truly a remarkable title in that it takes on
multiple levels of meaning. Select one of the following RAFTS assignments to demonstrate your understanding of the title
and its relation to the story. In your discussion, explain what the title means to the character identified in the role.

            Role                           Audience                          Format                             Topic

           Billie Jo                         Herself                       Poem or letter

                                                                                                            Out of the Dust
       Billie Jo’s father                    Himself                        Monologue


          A scientist                        Public                      Science lab report


     Politician of the Era          The Federal Government            Speech to aid the people


  People of the Era from the             Public viewers            Script for a PBS documentary
      Panhandle AND                                                   including questions and
  A historian (paired work)                                                    answers


           A reader                     Potential readers                   Book review




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Images from Out of the Dust




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                              IS THE BOOK MY LIFE?
Sometimes what we read in a book will have similarities to our own lives. What do you
have in common with Billie Jo? Read the statements on the left and describe how your
life may be similar in the column on the right.

 IN THE BOOK                                    IN YOUR LIFE
                                                What do you do when you get frustrated
 1. Billie Jo is able to escape her everyday    with your life?
 problems by playing the piano. Playing the     ________________________________
 piano helps her deal with her troubles.        ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________

                                                Have you ever said goodbye to someone
 2. Billie Jo was sad to see her friend Livie   whom you have loved? How did you
 leave. She could not talk much as they said    handle it?
 goodbye because she had a lump in her          ________________________________
 throat.                                        ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________

                                                Has anyone ever wanted you to be
 3. Billie Jo’s father wanted to have a boy     something that you are not? How did you
 instead of a girl when she was born. That      feel about it?
 was why he named her Billie Jo.                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________

                                                Do you wish you had a better relationship
 4. Billie Jo’s relationship with her dad is    with a member of your family? Why or
 not a healthy one. They have a hard time       why not?
 talking.                                       ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________
                                                ________________________________




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                                       A Single Shard
Before Reading

   Have the students work in small groups to research topics for background information for the
    novel and create a class research paper. (Note to the Teacher: This information is not
    required for students to understand the story. Therefore, it is recommended that the class
    paper be written while students are reading the book. Ideally, twenty minutes could be given
    daily to the class-research paper.      In addition, this procedure can be used with any
    background research. This may be a procedure for students on your team to use in social
    studies or science class. The social studies and/or science teacher may be responsible for the
    topics, the research, and the notetaking lessons. The English teacher may be responsible for
    the revision and editing processes. Ideas for other novel/research paper topics appear in
    subsequent units.)

   Have the students read the two descriptions of the names of the two main characters, Tree-ear
    and Crane-man. Have students discuss what they now about the Asian cultures reverence for
    nature and how this belief system may influence the naming of children. Then, have the
    students create names for themselves based on some aspect of their physical appearance,
    heritage, or personality. Also, discuss with students that Crane-man is without family and
    Tree-ear is an orphan. Ask students to consider why a surname would not be given to these
    characters in 12th century Korea. After the students finish reading the book, have them return
    to the question of names, and ask them why it would be significant for Tree-ear to have been
    given a new name.

     “Tree-ear was so called after the mushroom that grew on tree trunks without benefit of
     parent seed.”

     Tree-ear shared the space under the bridge with Crane-man, a man born with a shriveled
     and twisted calf and foot. “When they saw my leg at birth, it was thought I would not
     survive…then, as I went through life on one leg, it was said that I was like arcane. But
     besides standing on one leg, cranes are also a symbol of long-life.”


   Have the students research Korea and Celadon pottery on the Internet at
    http://www.pbs.org/hiddenkorea/intro.htm. The PBS web site links to an online reference
    section entitled, Hidden Korea. Also, students can find background information on the
    author and the book at the author’s web site www.lindasuepark.com. The teacher should
    review these sites prior to student use in order to determine whether or not the site is still
    functioning.

   Have the students research the apprenticeship model and compare it with our current system
    of formal education. Have the student locate examples of the apprenticeship model used
    writing our schools today, such as vocational schools.




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   Have the students work in small group to complete connotation webs (see Reading Toolbox)
    on the words honor, honesty, perseverance, pride, patience, and family. This works well as a
    Walkabout activity. Have the students discuss how the words have multiple meanings.
    Then, have the students return periodically to the terms as they are reading the story to
    discuss how the term applies to the story.

   Have the students review the ways in which context clues reveal the definition of a word.
    Then, have the students keep a vocabulary journal as they read. One suggestion is to have
    the students use a spiral-bound index card file to keep track of vocabulary they encounter.
    Have the students use the following procedure for keeping a vocabulary journal. (Note to
    teacher: The page numbers on The Single Shard Context Clue Review come from the 2001
    edition published by Clairon Books.)
    1. list the word
    2. write the sentence from the text
    3. predict the definition
    4. identify any context clues that helped to define the word
    5. record the actual definition on the back of the card
    6. record any structural information about the word on the back of the card (part of speech,
        prefix, suffix, root)
    7. use the word in a new sentence on the back of the card

During Reading

   Have the students analyze dynamic characterization of Tree-ear. Have the students complete
    a Think-Write-Pair-Share using the following prompt: Think about your years in middle
    school. Describe all of the ways that you will change during these three years. Connect the
    students’ ideas with the ways in which Tree-ear will change (physical changes, situation,
    skill with pottery, location, and personal growth). Then, have the students track the changes
    in Tree-ear on a graphic organizer as they read the story.

   Have the students participate in a modified-version of Literature Circles as they read the text.
    For this version of Literature Circles, students will be grouped twice for each discussion.

   Have the students refer to professional writing as a tool to improve their own writing. First,
    identify skills that are of concern in the areas in revision and editing. Have the students
    participate it the mini-lesson. Then, have the students select a piece of writing from their
    Works in Progress folder to revise and/or edit to demonstrate understanding of the skill
    discussed in the mini-lesson. (sample mini-lesson on apostrophes from A Single Shard.)

   Have the students locate a map of Korea and track Tree-ear’s trip. Students will find usable
    maps on the Internet at www.geocites.com. Students may work collaboratively with the
    math teacher to estimate the time it would take to walk the journey.




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After Reading

   Have the students examine the three levels of meaning in the text by creating a critical review
    for the story. Have the students discuss the situations from the story that surround each of
    the subjects using a Plot-Subject-Theme Chart. Then, have the students write a statement
    that expresses the theme developed for each subject. Next, have the students work in small
    groups to discuss how the themes can apply to the reader (text-to-self/text-to-world).

       Literal- Plot       Subject           Interpretative- Theme                 Applied
                            Honor
                             Pride
                         Perseverance
                           Patience

    Have the students discuss the wisdom that is revealed to Tree-ear directly from Crane-man
    and indirectly though his experiences. Have the students select one “wisdom” to use a
    catalyst for creative writing. Have the students place the writing in their Works in Progress
    folders.

   Have the students participate in a closing seminar. (Note: The quality of the seminar will
    improve if students are provided the seminar topics prior to reading the text. Have the
    students use the topics as guiding questions and have them gather support as they read. In
    order to involve the student in the development of the seminar, have the students select three
    or four questions and have them generate new questions that stem from the original question.
    During the seminar, have each student offer an additional question for the group.)




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                                            A Single Shard
                         Procedures for a Class Research Paper

Topic Selection
1. Have the students work in groups of four to research a topic on Korea that relates to the
   story.     Topics for Small Groups
                  Celadon pottery
                  The Rock of Falling Water
                  Thousand Crane Vase
                  the government of the Koryo era (A.D.- 918-1392)
                  ancient region of Puan (where Ch’ul’o was located)
                  ancient city of Songdo
                  Hyung-pil, donor of many of the finest pieces of Korean celadon

Research
2. Require that the students use two sources to collect their information. One must be web-
   based and the second must be from a reference book. Divide each group of four into two
   pairs. One pair should use the web and one pair should locate a reference book.
3. Have the students use a graphic organizer to record their information. Require that no
   complete sentences may be used on the graphic organizer UNLESS there are quotation marks
   around the sentence. For each note, there must be a page number (if given on the website).
   Prior to conducting the research, give a mini-lesson on the difference between summary,
   paraphrase, and quote.
Works-Cited
1. Provide each group with a style sheet for a Works-Cited (see The Language Network
   Handbook). Have each group create the two entries for their works-cited. Then, have each
   group select one student to type their entries into a master word document that will contain
   all entries.
Drafting and Revision
2. Have the students participate in a mini-lesson on topic sentence, supporting details, closing
   sentence, and in-text citation from MLA. Then, have each group write a paragraph on its
   topic. Require that the paragraph use two in-text citations since there are two sources.
3. Have the students elicit feedback by posting each paragraph on the wall. Have the students
   participate in a walkabout and offer suggestions for revision for each paragraph. Then, have
   each group submit the revised paragraph to the teacher for immediate feedback on revision.
   Have the groups complete a second revision the following day. Have each group select one
   student to type the revised paragraph into a master word document that will contain all seven
   body paragraphs.
4. Next, provide each group with a copy of the research paragraphs. Have the groups read each
   paragraph and make any final comments.
5. Next, assign each member of the group a new role: (1) introduction, (2) closing, (3)
   organizer, and (4) Works-Cited editor. If there is an odd number of students in the class,
   have the 2-3 extras become Group 5-Title Page.
6. Have ALL students participate in a mini-lesson on introductions and closings.

7. Have Group 1 work together to write an introduction for the paper.
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8. Have Group 2 work together to write a closing for the paper.
9. Have Group 3 read through the body paragraphs, cut them apart, and organize them in a
   logical fashion. Then, the group should then revise the body of the paper to include
   transitional devices between paragraphs.
10. Have Group 4 alphabetize and revise the entries. Either the teacher or the students may
    return to the document to update it and print a Class-Works-Cited Page.
11. The teacher will compile the title page, the introduction, the new body, the conclusion, and
    the Works-Cited page into one research paper.

Editing
12. Divide the class for a third time. This time the class will be divided by readiness level.
    Using their level of proficiency with grammatical and language skills, group the students into
    three categories: Control, Developing Control, No Control. Each group should have
    approximately four students. Assign each of the groups the following editing items. Each
    group should be provided an individualized mini-lesson on what they are to look for as they
    edit.
                               Control                  Developing Control              No Control

     Members 1 and 2   o   Revise run-on            o    Commas with             o   Correct capitalization
       (maybe 3)           sentences and                 coordinating            o   Check for correct end
                           fragments                     conjunctions                punctuation

     Members 3 and 4   o   maintaining verb tense   o    Commas with             o   Eliminate contractions
       (maybe 5)       o   correct subject-verb          introductory phrases        (in a formal paper)
                           agreement                o    possessives (singular   o   Homophones
                       o   correct pronoun-              and plural)
                           antecedent agreement

13. Provide each group with a copy of the research paper and have the students edit the paper in
    red pen. Have the whole group convene to review the editing changes.
14. Then, have each group present its changes to the class on the overhead projector. Have the
    class discuss the accuracy of the changes, alternative changes, and additional changes.
Publishing and Individual Assessment
15. Have each student map out the research process.
       “If you have to write a research paper on your own, what process will use?”

16. Provide each student with a copy of the research paper. Have the students individually
    reflect on the process, using questions similar to those the following prompts.
     What have you learned about the research process?
     What is the most difficult part of writing a research paper?
     Why is formal language important when writing a research paper?
     What have you learned about the organization of a paper?
     Why is the introduction important?
     What is plagiarism? Explain why this paper is not plagiarized.




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                                                     The Single Shard Context Clue Review
                         Example                            Type of Clue Predicted Definition   Actual Definition      Structural Clues
Crane-man’s normally placid expression was                    Clues from
replaced with a frown of worry when Tree-ear               synonyms and
stumbled into the space under the struts and collapsed         antonyms
in a heap on the ground. (p. 22)
This time he did not zigzag between rubbish heaps but            Clues
strode purposefully toward a small hours set apart fro       contained in
t the others at the curve in the road. (p. 10)              comparisons
                                                            and contrasts
Ahead of him a man carried a heavy load on a jiggeh,             Clues
an open-framed backpack made of branches. (p. 4)           contained in a
                                                              definition,
                                                           description, or
                                                                a series
It was the old potter. “Thief!” He screamed. “How          Clues provided
dare you come here! How dare you touch my work!”                 by the
Tree-ear did the only thing he could think of. He          situation, tone,
dropped to his knees and cowered in a deep formal             and/or and
bow. “Please! Please, honorable sir, I was not                  setting
stealing your work- I came only to admire it.”
In recent years the pottery from the village kilns had      Clues derived
gained great favor among those wealthy enough to              from cause
buy pieces as gifts for both the royal court and the           and effect
Buddhist hemps, and the potters had achieved new
levels of prosperity. (p. 12)
Like most of the potters’ villages, Ch’ulp’o had a          Clues derived
communal kiln. Set on the hillside just outside the          from signal
center of the village, it looked like along, low tunnel          words
made of hardened clay. The potters took turns using
the kiln and keeping up the supply of fuel. (p. 19)
The potter waved one hand to cut off the boy’s words        Clues derived
and spoke with derision. “Turn the wheel! Ha! He           from inference
thinks h can sit and make a pot- just like that!” (p. 18)


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              Dynamic Characterization
             Of Tree-ear in A Single Shard


Physical Changes                       Skill with Pottery




                     TREE-EAR


Personal Changes                    Situation and Location




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                  Mini-Lesson on Apostrophes from A Single Shard

Procedures

1. Have the students reread passage on page 26 (2001 Clarion edition) from A Single Shard and
   have them note the use of the apostrophe.

2. Have the students participate in an interactive discussion of the skill by placing a copy of the
   passage on the overhead. Have students locate examples of apostrophes and whether they
   are used as contractions or possessives. Then, have the students discuss what they “see”
   about the use of the apostrophe. Provide them with guiding questions. For example, discuss
   the use of informal vs. formal language using the questions and example in text box below.
   The teacher should record the students’ thoughts “around” the passage.

                       Example of Interactive Discussion                                  Can you
                                                                                          make this
             Was he expected to read Min’s mind as well?                                  into a
             But the shame won out in Tree-ear. He feared being sent way before           contraction?
    he could learn to make a pot.                                                         Why would
             “I am sorry that I displeased the honorable potter,” Tree-ear said. “If      an author
    he would be so good as to give me another chance, he will not be                      choose to
    disappointed.”                                                                        not use a
             “Hmph.” Min turned and walked toward the side of the house. Tree-            contraction?
    ear stood still for a moment, unsure of what to do.
             “Well?” Min turned back impatiently. “Are you coming, beggar-boy,
    or are you a statue with your feet frozen to the ground?”
             Tree-ear’s joy at being forgiven was like a wisp of smoke; Min’s
    orders for the day blew it into nothingness. His task was the same as the
    previous day’s-to fill the cart with wood, and this time unload it at the kiln
    site.
             Each day, Tree-ear appeared at Min’s door eagerly. Each day, Min
    sent him up the mountain with the cart to chop more wood. At night, with
    Crane-man’s careful ministrations, the wound on Tree-ear’s hand would begin
    to heal, the tender pink layer toughening slightly. But at the start of the next
    day’s work it would spit and bleed again. Tree-ear came to expect he pain; the
    throbbing was like an unwelcome companion who appeared daily after the
    first few strokes of the ax.

3. Provide students with a brief yet thorough lesson and/or notes on the apostrophes. Students
   may refer the Language Network Handbook, the “Grammar Handbook” from Language of
   Literature, and Grammar Transparencies and Copymasters for notes, examples, or practice.

4. Have the students select a piece of writing from their Works in Progress folders to edit for
   the use of apostrophes.




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                                Literature Circles for A Single Shard

   1. First, students will be grouped according to their roles. Divide the class into six groups.
      Assign each group one role: Discussion Director, Literary Luminary, Word Wizard,
      Connector, Artful Artist, and Travel Tracer (see Activities Section, pp. ). The teacher should
      provide each member of a group with the same role sheet but should record a different letter
      in the upper right-hand corner of each role sheet. For example, a student may be Discussion
      Direction- A while another student may be Discussion Director- B. Provide the group with
      sufficient time to complete the role sheet.

   2. After the group has completed the role sheet together, the students regroup according to their
      letters. Ideally, the second grouping should be comprised of each of the six Literature Circle
      roles. For example, all of the students with an A will be grouped together. The purpose of
      having the students grouped twice is to provide scaffolding or assistance with completing the
      role sheets in order to encourage a deeper, richer conversation in the Literature Circle.

   3. Have the students complete role sheets and regroup for the Literature Circle five times during
      the story. For each of the five “chunks” of text, have the students participate in a mini-
      lesson, complete the role sheet in their first group, regroup to hold a “literature circle,” come
      back together for a whole group wrap-up, and then close with an individual assessment. For
      mini-lessons, the teacher may choose to find and share a short excerpt from contemporary
      literature that appeals to students (i.e. Stephen King), comic strips, or prior readings from
      class.

            Text Selection                        Mini-Lesson                              Closing
             Chapters 1-4               Discuss the role of a             What have we learned so far in the
(intro to characters and story/ Tree-   protagonist and how the initial   story? What has Tree-ear learned so
       ear learning new skills)         conflict is experienced by the    far? What conflicts/ situations must
                                        protagonist                       Tree-ear face?
          Chapters 5-7                  Discuss how plot is a series of   How did this section center around a
   (Kang’s new inlay technique;         cause and effect.                 series of cause and effect?          What
        emissary arrives)                                                 predictions and inferences can we
                                                                          make?
           Chapters 8-9                 Discuss how a character’s         What actions did Tree-ear take and how
 (Tree-ear’s decision to travel and     actions lead the reader to make   are they significant? What inference
        conflict with Min)              inferences about the character    can we make about Tree-ear?
          Chapters 10-11                Discuss the role of climax in a   What was the climax of the story? Why
   (Tree-ear’s travel and attack)       plot and how the climax is the    is this event important for Tree-ear as he
                                        turning point headed toward       begins his “journey” toward resolution?
                                        resolution
         Chapters 12-13                 Discuss resolution and how it What was the resolution to Tree-ear’s
   (Tree-ear’s return and Min’s         helps to reveal the theme       situation? What does he learn from this
  commission; Tree-ear’s future)                                        “journey”? What comment is revealed
                                                                        to the reader?

   Individual Assessment: 3-2-1
   3 Points you make about the reading
   2 Contributions you made to the literature circle
   1 Prediction you can make about the next section


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           Seminar Questions for A Single Shard


Opening           What is an apprenticeship? Can the definition be expanded
                   beyond vocational models?


 Core             What does the reader learn about the culture, customs, and
                   beliefs of ancient Korea?
                  Why is Tree-ear’s apprenticeship significant?
                  What do Min’s work habits reveal about his character?
                  In addition to imparting the skills of pottery to Tree-ear, what
                   else does he learn from his apprenticeship under Min?
                  How did Linda Sue Park use artwork as a inspiration for the
                   story?


Extended          How would define courage as it is revealed in this story?
                  Is Tree-ear an ethical person?
                  In what way does Tree-ear’s time with Crane-man serve as a
                   form of an apprenticeship?
                  Why is Min’s art work superior to others?
                  How do Tree-ear’s experiences influence his transformations?


Closing           Do apprenticeships exist today?
                  How does the idea of mentorship compare with an
                   apprenticeship?
                  How can mentors transform an individual?




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                                  Levels of Meaning
                            Wisdom Found in A Single Shard

Throughout the story, Tree-ear gains much wisdom from his experiences and from Crane-
man. Read the following statements from the story that each express wisdom acquired by
Tree-ear. Discuss how Tree-ear cam to acquire the wisdom. Also, discuss how these
statements relate to the ideas developed in the story about honor, perseverance, patience,
and pride.

1. “Work gives a man dignity, stealing takes it away.”

2. “Scholars read the great words of the world. But you and I must learn to read the world
   itself.”

3. “But I think it is a waste for either of use to spend too much time in sorrow over something
   we cannot change.”

4. “Your mind knows that you are going to Songdo. But you must not tell your body. It must
   think one hill, one valley, one day at a time. In that way, your spirit will not grow weary
   before you have even begun to walk.”

5. “Why was it that pride and foolishness were so often close companions?”

6. “Leaping into death is not the only way to show true courage.”


Select one of the statements to develop into a theme for a piece of writing.

1. Write a biographical sketch that explains how someone you know or admire came to believe
   or represent this wisdom.

2. Write a personal narrative that expresses how you came to belief or represent one of the
   statements.

3. Write a short story that expresses a theme based on one of the statements.

4. Write a poem that expresses a theme based on one of the statements.

5. Write an essay that explains how the statement relates to story and what relevance it has for
   the reader.




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                              The Watsons Go to Birmingham

   Have the students conduct mini-research projects for background topics from the novels that
    will connect historical, geographical, or cultural information to the setting of the stories.

   Have the students read the “Ballad of Birmingham” and discuss its connection to the story.

   Have the students prepare to read the novel by brainstorming what they know about four
    subjects of the story. Have the students work in small groups using the Subject Cards and
    Question Cards to make predictions. After reading, have each student individually select one
    subject and complete a Plot-Subject-Theme chart.

                Plot                         Subject                            Theme


   Have the students create a vocabulary journal, using their word analysis skills to discern the
    meaning of unfamiliar words.

   Have the students select a Characterization Project based on interest and learning style.

   Have the students participate in a Walkabout after reading the story, responding to the
    following prompts.

                       Personal Reaction Walkabout
        This book made me wish that . . .
        This book made me realize that . . .
        This book made me decide that . . .
        This book made me wonder about . . .
        This book made me see that . . .
        This book made me believe that . . .
        This book made me feel that . . .
        This book made me hope that . . .




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            Ballad of Birmingham
              by Randall Dudley



       "Mother dear, may I go downtown
             instead of out to play,
      and march the streets of Birmingham
          in a freedom march today?"

         "No, baby, no, you may not go
         for the dogs are fierce and wild
       and clubs and hoses, guns and jails
           ain't good for a little child."

         "But, mother, I won't be alone.
        Other children will go with me,
      and march the streets of Birmingham
           to make our country free."

        "No, baby, no, you may not go,
         for I fear those guns will fire.
       But you may go to church instead,
        and sing in the children's choir."

 She has combed and brushed her night dark hair,
           and bathed rose petal sweet,
and drawn white gloves on her small brown hands,
           and white shoes on her feet.

      The mother smiled to know her child
            was in the sacred place,
        but that smile was the last smile
             to come upon her face.

       For when she heard the explosion,
          her eyes grew wet and wild.
  She raced through the streets of Birmingham
              calling for her child.

   She clawed through bits of glass and brick,
             then lifted out a shoe.
       "O, here's the shoe my baby wore,
           but, baby, where are you?




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Subject Cards




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                                Question Cards
                       (for opposite side of Subject Cards)



                How can diversity create a stronger community?




                    What does family mean to an individual?




How can a person make good choices without knowing the consequences in advance?




         How can change in a person’s life be both positive and negative?




                   Why do we need relationships with others?




 What can we learn about ourselves from other generations or from our heritage?




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                                     Vocabulary Journal
Directions: Find 20 words that are new to you. Keep a vocabulary journal that is organized in a
manner similar to the following example. Write the word, define and identify synonyms, record
the sentence from the text, and draw a picture or symbol that will help you understand the word.


                            Word                           Definitions/Synonyms


                    Sentence from Text                              Visual




                         CONJURE                                    evoke
                                                                bring to mind
                                                                   imagine
                                                                   picture


          I tried for a long time to conjure up an
          image of her before that, just a sliver of
          something, like her tucking me into
          bed, reading the adventures of Uncle
          Wiggly, or hanging my underclothes
          near the space heater of ice-cold
          mornings. (p. 5)


Directions: Create a comic strip for your novel, using a minimum of 10 of the words from your
vocabulary journal.




                          Lily lived in South Carolina with her father
                          and nanny. During her summer days, she
                          worked in her father’s peach stand by the
                          road side and conjured images of her mother
                          who had died years ago.




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                                               The Watsons




          Mama                                                                           Joetta


Select a famous poem or song that one                            Locate an important article from the newspaper
   of the characters would like and                              where a person had to make a decision. Then,
    explain why the poem or song                                     select a character and explain how the
       represents the character.                                 character would react to the situation and why.




                             Look through a high school yearbook and create a
                             yearbook page for one of the characters. You may
                            consider creating a superlative (i.e., Most Dramatic),
                             list of clubs, famous last words, future goals, most
                             memorable school moment, thanks to friends, etc.


   Create a paper doll for one of the                            Create a time capsule for one of the characters.
 characters with three different outfits                           Include five items in the time capsule and
and explain why each outfit represents                           explain how the items represent the character.
             the character.


                             Create an ABC book for all of the characters. For
                              example, A is for Academic Bowl. Include an
                            explanation of how the item relates to the characters
                                               and a visual.


   Design a bedroom for one of the                              Research different astrological signs and
 characters and explain why the layout                          identify which sign one of the characters best
and items represent the character. You                          represents. Then, explain your selection and
  may use a computer, magazines, or                             reasoning.
               drawings.


                                     The Watsons Go To Birmingham
            Kenny


                                                                                     Bryon




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                                      A Wrinkle in Time

   Have the students define science fiction and fantasy. As they the read the story, have the
    students record details that place A Wrinkle in Time in both categories.

   Have the students research time travel. Have the students the Internet to locate credible
    souces about space and time travel. Have the students use NOVA’s website as a beginning
    source at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/. Students may research Einstein, Sagan, and others
    who theorized the possibility of time travel. Then, have the students record any sceinctic
    facts that surrounds the theory of time travel. As the students read the story, have them
    record any scientific evidence or fact used in the story.

   Have the students keep a reading journal from the point of view of one of the characters in A
    Wrinkle in Time. Explain to the students that they should have a journal entry for each chapter.
    In that entry, explain that they should react to the events as if they were the chosen character.
    They may react only to those events of which they have knowledge.

   Have the students use the literary glossary to define allusion. Then, have the students read the
    allusion from Macbeth. Share the role of the three witches from Macbeth and have the students
    discuss how the allusion is effective in A Wrinkle in Time. Then, have the students locate other
    examples of allusions as they read the story.
                               “When shall we three meet again,
                               In thunder, lightning, or in rain,”

   Have the students use structural and contextual clues to define unfamiliar words from the
    story. Have the students use the chart and list from chapter 1 as an example for the
    remaining chapters.

    Unfamiliar Word          Roots       Affixes      Part of                Definition
                                                      Speech
Antagonistic
Assimilate
Diction
Ephemeral
Preliminaries
Relinquish
Tangible
Tractable
Wraithlike




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