secondary lesson plans by CRFe4IU

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									Introduction

No Pens Day Wednesday lesson plans and activity templates have been created by practising mainstream teachers and speech and language therapists
and quality assured by a specialist speech and language therapist.

Lesson plans
These were developed using last year’s No Pens Day Wednesday lesson plans as a template. The first 6 lesson plans are new plans for this year’s campaign
and the rest of the plans developed for No Pens Day Wednesday last year, which are still current. As all schools will be covering different topics and have
different ways of planning, the lesson plans provide an example for schools to adapt, though they can be used as they are if this fits in with your planning.
Plans are available for year 7 across all subject areas and a number of plans for year 9. This is not to limit your No Pens Day Wednesday to these years only,
but to provide examples which you can use and adapt for different year groups.

Lesson plans aim to follow good practice principles; e.g.

      They identify explicit learning objectives
      Support use of questioning, using Blooms taxonomy, to support learning
      Include plenary sessions that encourage pupils to reflect on their learning

Some lessons include reflection on how the “no pens” theme of the day has affected learning. This could be a discussion you could have in any lesson in
order to gather pupils’ views on how an emphasis on talk in the classroom has impacted on their learning and enjoyment of lessons.

Each lesson plan also has key vocabulary identified, signposting to the vocabulary section of the activity templates. Vocabulary is key to all pupils, particularly
those whose language is not at an age appropriate level or pupils learning English as an additional language. Teaching vocabulary explicitly as part of the
lesson, using tried and tested strategies can make a significant difference to these pupils in particular.

A speaking and listening objective has also been identified for each lesson. Some have been taken from QCA guidelines, whilst others have been taken from
our Universally Speaking guides (available to download and order for free from www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk/resources/resources/resources-for-
practitioners/universally-speaking.aspx), which track language development throughout the primary years.

Activity templates
In addition to lesson plans, we’ve provided activity templates (separate download on www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk/nopensdaywednesday), which are
more generic and can be adapted to any lesson. These give some information about the activity and how it can be implemented, highlighting any resources /
links that might be useful to support that activity. These activities can be used within any element of a lesson - as a starter activity, main activity, plenary or as
methods of recording learning.
  Science (Chemistry)
Year/Class: 9          Teacher:                  Date:                    Scheme of Work: Atoms and electricity
                                                                          Lesson Topic: Introduction to conductivity, voltage and current
Learning objectives:                                  Speaking and listening objective:
  To know what conductivity is                       Explain the a sequence of events in a simple but accurate way, using appropriate terminology
  To understand how electrons affect
    conductivity
  To know what voltage and current are
Key Questions / Concepts:                             Resources:
  What does conductivity measure?                      Several sets of dominoes
  What happens when electricity passes                 Circuit game templates from http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Electricity-game-3001290/event/22/
    through a material?                                 Additional teacher information at http://seaperch.mit.edu/science_electricity.php
  How does atomic structure alter
    conductivity?

Activities
Starter:
Dominoes demonstration
  Line up the dominoes closely (standing on end). Apply force (‘current’) to the outside domino – the dominoes (electrons) should not fall over! Now re-position the dominoes
     with spaces between and repeat the exercise – this time the dominoes should tumble in sequence
  Teacher describes how the initial force is the ‘current’ and the dominoes represent the electrons in a material
  Students discuss which demonstration represents the best electrical conductor and why, and describe what is happening
  What would happen if the dominoes were placed on an uphill slope? (‘resistance’)
  Teacher recap and reinforce concepts

Vocabulary: atom, electron, conductivity, voltage, current, resistance, parallel circuit
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials from the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Practical
Divide students into numbered mixed ability groups, each with a set of dominoes
Each group is tasked to create their own presentation using the dominoes to teach the concept of conductivity, current and voltage to a younger group of students; suggest they
can re-produce and ‘talk to’ the dominoes demonstration, use role play or physical theatre, make a picture PowerPoint as a prompt for talk – or any other method they wish

Differentiation: students supported in mixed ability grouping

Extension task:
Can students demonstrate the effect of higher/lower voltage?
Can the students introduce a switch or resistance into their domino circuit?
Try physical theatre instead of the dominoes

Feedback to whole class group
  Use random number generator (http://www.mathgoodies.com/calculators/random_no_custom.html) to select group to show their presentation
Plenary/assessment for learning:
  Re-make groups
  Each group completes circuit game cards http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Electricity-game-3001290/event/22/

How confident am I in understanding the concepts of conductivity, current, resistance – thumbs up/down/neutral?
Which group’s ‘lesson’ was most meaningful for me? Why?
Differentiation / Strategies:
  Mixed ability grouping to support
  Visual and simple definition of keywords clearly displayed
  Whole class ‘think time’ before answering questions
  Use any additional adults to encourage all students to participate in group
  Reduce number of game cards in circuit game for target students


 Resources:

 Additional teacher information from       http://seaperch.mit.edu/science_electricity.php

 Science Concepts - Electricity Overview
 Electricity is all about moving really tiny stuff, really fast. It is contained in almost everything around you all the time. Your computer, lights, telephone, and even your own
 cells, are all charged with electricity at this very moment. Excited about this? Don't get too amped up just yet, there is a lot to know about this stuff, and it keeps getting more
 interesting as you go.

 The Atom




                                                                                       An Atom

 The atom is the building block of the universe. Everything is made of them, everything uses them, and everything would disappear with out them. So what is an atom made
 of? Electrons, protons, and neutrons, really tiny stuff, connected together with magnetism and electric fields, in a volume of space. But before this turns into a description of
 matter, lets stop and focus on the relevant parts of atoms to electricity. If you want more info on atoms and sub atomic particles, check out Wikipedia - "atom". The component
 we are interested in is the electron, the charged particle that helps define the material the atom is going to make.

 Depending on how many electrons there are in an atom, how densely packed they are, and how free they are to move around, an atom and the material it makes can be hard
 or soft, flexible or rigid, and conductive or nonconductive (conductivity is the measure of whether or not electricity will travel through the material). Since we are interested in
 electricity, not material properties, we will look at what makes a material more conductive at the atomic level.
Conductivity
Conductivity is the measure of how easily electricity moves through a material. Materials like copper, gold, and iron are easy to pass electricity through, while materials like
wood, glass, and plastic are not. Why is this? It is all about freedom of movement of electrons. From the human perspective, a grey piece of plastic is not all that different form
a piece of aluminum. Both are hard, can be dented, can bend a little then break, can be shiny or not, and can come in any shape or size. So why is it that the aluminum is a
good conductor, but the plastic is not? You have to look at it from an atomic level to understand this.




You can see from the image that electrons in the atomic view of the plastic are stuck in place and have no ability to move around, and the electrons of the metal can move
around freely. This is the fundamental difference between something that will carry electricity, and something that wont. It works a lot like dominoes. If you line up 1000
dominoes on end back to back with no space in between (analogous to the plastic) and tap the first domino in line, what will happen? Nothing. The dominoes are not free to
move and they just stand there as though nothing happened. Now if you were to line them up again on end, but leave an inch or so between each domino (analogous to the
aluminum) and then tap them again, would they just stand there? No, they would obviously fall down, one after another, until the last domino has fallen over at the end of the
line.
This is exactly how electricity works, and understanding this will make understanding the rest of the topic much easier. Electricity happens when a force moves the first
electron on a surface where electrons are free to move, and this moving electron bumps into the next electron, and so on until the last free electron moves, and since the
electrons can't fall over, they are instantly ready to repeat this process. If the last electron happens to come in contact with the initial pushing force, the cycle continues until
there is no energy left.



Voltage, Current, and Table Top Games
Current and voltage are the primary descriptors of an electric circuit, but what exactly are they? Voltage is similar to a pump; it creates an electrical "pressure" that can apply a
force on electrons. In the domino example, voltage is the initial force that pushes the first domino over, starting the chain reaction. Imagine if the domino chain were to have
one part that went up a hill. As each domino falls over going up the hill, they will slow down since it takes extra work to go up hill (just like a car will slow down when coasting
up a hill). If the hill is large, or the speed and force of the domino is low, there may not be enough power to push all of the dominoes over, and you will have to exert another
force at the place they stopped falling over, or try again and make the initial force stronger. This is just like voltage. If you are simply trying to send electricity from one side of
a battery to the other, there will always be enough energy regardless of the voltage to do this. However, if you put a hill (a power consuming device such as a light) in the path
of electricity, you will need to have a strong enough initial push to ensure that the energy can make it up the hill.
The other aspect of dominoes you can observe and control is how many dominoes fall over in a given amount of time. If you have one column of dominoes, no matter how
hard you push the initial domino, they will fall over at about the same rate as a result of how gravity works. If you want more to fall over in the same amount of time, you will
need to have additional parallel columns of dominoes. This is analogous to current. Current is a measure of how many electrons pass through cross section of a material in a
                                                  18
second, where one amp is equal to 6.24x10 (624 followed by sixteen zeros) electrons per second. That's a lot of electrons.
Electricity game resources – from http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Electricity-game-3001290/event/22/

Electricity Game Instructions:

You need:

   2-5 players
   1 Electricity game card
   1 set of Question Cards
   ‘Electron’ counters
   Energy units

Objective:

The winner is the person who has the most energy units when the game is stopped.

The Game:

The board represents an electric circuit and each player is an electron travelling around the circuit.

Throw the dice to see who goes first, the person with the highest score wins.

If you land on a junction you throw again and follow the given direction.

If you land on a component you must put the required number of energy units into the bank.

If you land on a ‘Question!!’ square the person next to you picks up a ‘Question Card’ and reads the question to you. If you get the question right you win 5 energy units, if
you get the question wrong you have to put 5 energy units into the bank.

You continue playing around the board, following the direction of the arrows until you are told to stop or until you run out of energy units.
Art
Year/Class: 9              Teacher:                                  Date:                     Scheme of work: Urban art Lesson Topic: Graffiti
Learning objectives:                                                                                    Speaking and listening objective:
  To have an introduction to the origins of urban art and graffiti                                     To clearly express an opinion on urban art
  To describe one piece of work by a graffiti artist and to give own opinion about it
Key Questions/ Concepts:                                            Resources:
  What is urban art?                                                   4 - 6 graffiti images made into simple jigsaws , with sufficient total pieces for 1 per student
  When was graffiti first seen, used?                                  History of graffiti powerpoint at http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Graffiti-History-6022612/
  What is the purpose of graffiti                                      Statement sentence starters/end sufficient for the whole class group
  What do you think about it?



Activities
Starter: History of graffiti powerpoint
Show PowerPoint. Prompt students to be prepared to say one thing that they find striking, memorable from the presentation

     Vocabulary: Propaganda, sgraffito, medium, tags

Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials from the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Statement memory activity
Allocate a numbered statement about an aspect of graffiti to each student; select a random number to begin. The student with that number reads their statement and
chooses another number; the student with that number recalls the previous fact, reads their own and chooses another number. Continue until all the students have read
their facts
Group activity
Give each student a piece of jigsaw. Students must work cooperatively to find the other parts of their picture and to assemble the jigsaws.
Once assembled in groups
      What does the picture represent?
      What message does it convey (if any)?
      Is it art?
      As a group decide on a spokesperson and agree ‘I see.............’, ‘I feel....’ and ‘I think...............’
Whole class feedback
  Display target images on IWB; invite each spokesperson to share the groups’ interpretation of graffiti images
  use language of senses and emotions (I see.............’, ‘I feel....’ and ‘I think...............’)

Plenary / Assessment for learning:
 Whole class v. teacher – teacher holds all the facts used for the starter activity; class try to recall all the facts and to take them from the teacher
 Consider what you have learned today about graffiti? Has your knowledge and understanding been extended? How? Why? Why not?
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Visuals, such as pictures and symbols to support simple definition of keywords – see suggestions in the “activity template” section for different ways to support learning
     of vocabulary
  Allocate shorter and more concrete fact statements to less able students in memory game; encourage them to visualise
  ‘Adult facilitation to encourage all students in small group to take turns/ participate
  Support ‘I see.........’, ‘I feel.............’, ‘I think...........’ with visuals or sentence starters
Statements for starter memory activity

"graffiti" derives from the Greek word graphein meaning: to write                            Graffiti in found in Pompeii, includes Latin curses, magic spells, love
                                                                                             messages, political slogans and famous literary quotes.

Modern graffiti dates from New York City in the 1970's.                                      Pompeii’s graffiti has helped provide historians with insight into ancient
                                                                                             Roman street life.

Hip hop is associated with emergence of new artistic style of Keith Haring                   There are examples of graffiti occurring in American history, such as
                                                                                             Signature Rock, a national landmark along the Oregon Trail.

The artist Keith Haring began using posters to display his unique style of artwork           French soldiers carved their names on monuments during the
                                                                                             Napoleonic campaign of Egypt in the 1790s.

Haring began to paint directly on walls instead of on posters                                During World War II and after, the phrase "Kilroy was here" was widespread
                                                                                             throughout the world, due to its use by American troops

Haring’s graffiti art was legitimised when it began to be displayed in galleries             Tagging is by far the most common form of graffiti)

Graffiti was part of the Hip Hop culture which also saw the start of rapping and break       In modern times spray paint, and marker pens have become the most
dancing .                                                                                    commonly used graffiti materials.

A delivery messenger is credited with being the initiator of ‘tagging’                       Graffiti may also express underlying social and political messages

The message left by the delivery messenger was Taki 183                                      Graffiti is writing or drawings scribbled, scratched, or sprayed illicitly on a wall
                                                                                             or other surface in a public place.

Graffiti began to die out in early 1980s but became popular again after a TV programme       Graffiti ranges from simple written words to elaborate wall paintings,
about it in mid 1980s.

Gangs use their own form of graffiti to mark territory or indicate gang-related activities   The earliest forms of graffiti date back to 30,000 BC in the form of
                                                                                             prehistoric cave paintingsand pictographs
Citizenship
Year/Class: 9           Teacher:                   Date:                          Scheme of work: Media       Lesson Topic: Power of advertising
Learning objectives:                                                              Speaking and listening objective:
    understanding of the influence of advertising                                    Identify the underlying implied meaning
    awareness of how they might be influenced by advertising

Key questions / concepts:                                                         Resources:
  Who are advertisements aimed at?                                                 PowerPoint of advertisements visuals
  What different types of advertising are there?                                   Recording of some advertising ‘jingles from TV and/or radio
  How do advertisements set out to influence?                                      Ratings chart and student name labels / Blutac
  What techniques do they use?                                                     Agree/disagree labels and statements
                                                                                    Teen magazines
                                                                                    Advertising strategy labels
Activities
Starter:Stand up!
     Play advertising jingles/visuals – stand if you know the advertisement
     Students put a name label on a ratings chart – how aware am I of the power of advertising?
Vocabulary: consumer, strategy, promotion, demographic
Teach these key words using activity templates for teaching vocabulary from the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday.
Main:
Agree/disagree
Label one side of the classroom ‘agree’ and the opposite side ‘disagree’. Read statements about advertising and ask students to place themselves on a line (‘agree’ to
‘disagree’); individual students should be asked why they have made these decisions
In groups
Brainstorm advertisements that they have seen recently on TV. Focus on 3 to discuss –
      What is this advertisement selling?
      Who is this message intended for?
      Who wants to reach this audience, and why?
      What story does this advertisement tell?
      Is the story accurate and complete? If not, what information is absent and why?
      How does this story influence you?
Feedback
Teacher introduces idea of promotional strategies – tricks of the trade to influence viewers/readers
In pairs - Give each pair a selection of teen magazines and a strategy card to find advertisements that use that strategy
What’s the link? - Randomly select a pair to describe the advertisements they have selected; other students try to identify the link strategy that they all have in common

Plenary / Assessment for learning
     Re-prise agree/disagree activity. Have your responses changed?
     Revisit ratings activity – has my response changed and why?
     Am I more aware of advertising influence?
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Teaching and display of key vocabulary; make links between new vocabulary and current knowledge/ experience.
  Peer support through mixed ability / group work.
  Pair weaker readers with stronger readers for paired work reading strategy cards
Resource:
Statements for ‘agree, disagree’ activity



                                                                      I can ignore most advertising


                                                               Songs from commercials stick in my head


                                            I have made a conscious effort to look like someone specific I have seen in an ad


                                  Some ads make me feel that I really need to lose weight, change my hair or change my clothes


                                                                Advertising does not really influence me


                                                 I have asked my parents to buy me things that I have seen advertised


                                                      I don’t think teenagers are especially targeted by advertising


                                                                    I find it hard to resist advertising


                                                                      I always watch the ads on TV


                                                        I have been influenced to try a brand by the advertising
Drama
Year/Class: 9              Teacher:                    Date:                     Scheme of work: Drama Techniques Lesson Topic: Thought tracking
Learning objectives:                                                             Speaking and listening objective:
  To identify how thought tracking helps inform an audience about a             To use spoken language to describe inner thoughts and feelings
    character
  To create an improvised scene using thought tracking
Key questions / concepts:                                                        Resources:
  What is thought tracking/                                                      Visuals for ‘emotions’ vocabulary
  When is it used as a technique and why?                                       Icons/graphics for feelings words can be found here:
  How can character be developed through thought tracking?                      http://teachfind.com/national-strategies/seal-resource-sheet-words-core-feelings
                                                                                       Photo cards of emotions can be found here:
                                                                                 http://teachfind.com/national-strategies/seal-curriculum-resource-photo-card-collection
                                                                                       situation pictures
                                                                                       situation cards
Activities
Starter: It’s not what you say.....
     Seated in a circle – students are each given a card with a context (gossip, news report, fact, disbelief, delight, sadness) and say in turn ‘Sylvia is dead’ according to
          the context.
     Other students guess the word on the context card.
     Repeat the exercise but students add in a clause to the 3 words – e.g. ‘Sylvia is dead – she was my greatest friend.’
     Vocabulary: emotion, inner thoughts, thought tracking, freeze frames, character development
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Shout it out!
Students sit in a circle with heads bowed; one student walks around the outside of the circle. When a student is touched on the shoulder they look up and shout out the
thought/emotion in their mind at that moment
Whole Group discussion – do inner thoughts always reflect the expression, context, the moment?
     What is my initial feelings on the situation I am in?
     Is this what I expected?
     How do I feel about the other person/people?
     Does what I feel reflect what I am saying?
Teacher input – describing thought tracking as a device; stepping out of the scene to directly speak about their thoughts and feelings at that moment
Group work –
Break in to groups –
Give each group a selection of situation pictures. As a group discuss different thoughts for the characters in the pictures. Consider different personality traits and how
thought tracking can reveal different characters.
Practical –
In groups of 3 / 4 – take one of the situations and device a short performance (1 – ½ mins). One by one the actors freeze the scene, step out of the situation to speak
directly to the audience about their thoughts and feelings. All actors must take a turn to thought track
Plenary/assessment for learning
     Selected groups perform their piece. What do we learn additionally of the character through the thought framing?
     How well was I able to use thought tracking to develop a different character? Peer assess in pairs
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Key words taught, displayed and visually supported
  Allow students to pass once in circle activity or to repeat a response modelled by another student
  For lower achieving students, give two / three pictures to illustrate emotions in ‘Shout it out’ activity, suggest emotions that are easier, e.g. nervous, happy, excited etc.
     For higher achieving students, they should be challenged to include more complex or subtle feelings and thoughts , e.g. trepidation, indifference, elation
  Adult facilitation to encourage all students in small groups to contribute and to participate
  Make available visuals for ‘emotions’ vocabulary


Resources:
Situations
Waiting in doctor’s waiting room
In the queue at the supermarket
Parent opening a letter from school
A family mealtime
Design and Technology
Year/Class: 9                Teacher:                  Date:                 Scheme of work: Structures Lesson Topic: Bridge building
Learning objectives:                                                                                 Speaking and listening objective:
  To know how structural strength can be added to light materials                                   Use language to hypothesise, share ideas and problem solve
  To identify the main characteristics of some bridge designs
  To identify 4 main bridge types
Key questions / concepts:                                            Resources:
  Why do bridge types vary from site to site?                         IWB
  What materials can be used in bridge building?                      Bridge pairs matching cards – printed and laminated
  Why do some bridges fail?                                           Bridges PowerPoint
  How can bridges be made stronger?                                   Collage of bridge designs – Google images
                                                                       Keywords display
                                                                       access to a computer for each group
                                                                       paper, scissors, glue sticks, weights, paper clips, string and a pile of pennies for each group
                                                                       digital camera (to capture design process and completed bridges)
Activities
Starter:
Guess which bridge?
   Work in pairs
   Each pair has one picture or a label from the matching activity; working together they find the couple who have the picture or label to complete their pair
   Show complete powerpoint of bridges and labels for checking.
   Discuss the age, materials and design of the bridges
Vocabulary: arch, beam, suspension, cable stayed, corrugated, abutments, compression, horizontal, span, tension
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Introduce bridge design activity
Hold a single piece of paper. Ask: How many pennies do you think a bridge made out of this paper can hold? After students make some guesses, lay the sheet of paper
flat across two books placed approximately 20 cm apart, place pennies on the bridge one by one, near the middle, until the bridge fails. Discuss how the single sheet could
be made stronger.
Show ‘Shape Lab’ at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/buildingbig/lab/shapes.html to review shapes and strength information with class group
   Now introduce the activity challenge.
   Divide students in to 4 groups named ‘arch’, ‘beam’, ‘suspension’ and ‘cable stay’, each with access to a computer, paper, scissors, glue sticks, weights, paper clips ,
      string and a pile of pennies/counters
   Each group uses http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/build-bridge-p3.html to research one design feature – arch, beam, suspension, cable stay – including trying the
      online activity provided to demonstrate the design feature.
   Having researched the information they are then tasked with designing a bridge in that style to cross a 20cm gap, holding as many pennies as possible. They will
      need to present their design to the class at the end of the lesson, justifying their use of materials and design based on what they have learned about their allocated
      bridge type, and with each group member making a contribution to the presentation
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
Presentation
  Each group presents their bridge design
  What was the target design?
  Key features
  Problems encountered and solutions
Round Robin –
Name one thing – each student names one thing learned from the experience
How well did I contribute to the group work? What changes would we make next time?
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Mixed ability grouping for bridge naming and design activity
  Visual + simple definition of keywords. Display, explain and refer to these
  Provide prompts with visual cues to points to be considered during design task, and for presentation
  Actively assign roles within groups to specific students



Resources:
Bridge pairs matching activity

                                                                                                            Tower Bridge, London




                                                                                                          Millennium Bridge, London
   Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco




       Rialto Bridge, Venice, Italy




     Ponte Vecchio, Florence, Italy




Sydney Harbour Bridge, Sydney, Australia
          Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol




          Forth Railway Bridge , Scotland




          Victoria Falls Bridge across the
                   Zambezi River




      Millau Viaduct – Millau, Southern France




Second Severn Crossing – between Wales and England
     Clapper Bridge, Dartmoor




Pooh Sticks Bridge, Ashdown Forest
English
Year/Class: 9             Teacher:                   Date:              Scheme of work: Evaluating evidence, considering bias        Lesson Topic: Animal testing

Learning objectives:                                                    Speaking and listening objectives:
  To recognise stance and purpose of speaker                           To Identify the underlying themes, implications and issues raised by a reading
    To move beyond literal understanding and recall to interpret
    what is said.

Key questions / concepts:                                             Resources:
  What is the main theme of each article?                              Copies of news articles (found at
  What is the job of each writer – what do they do?                  http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2005/aug/24/highereducation.uk1 (Scientists back animal
  What is the key stand point of each writer?                        testing) and http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2006/may/05/highereducation.uk (Animal testing
  What techniques does each writer use to promote their              failing to predict human side effects)
     argument?                                                               quotations sheet laminated and cut up (1 x set per group) + headlines
  Are there common techniques?                                              character cards
  How can you identify bias?
Activities
Starter: “One thing I think about...”
   Students to say one thing they think about animal testing – emphasise that all views are to be heard and respected

Vocabulary: stance, bias, implicit, characteristic, stereotypical, features, geneticist, pharmaceutical
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
 Main:
 In groups - give each group a set of quotations + headlines
 Group discussion- which headline fits the quotations? Feedback and justify reason. Check against a copy of the articles
 Jigsaw activity - Assign a role to each group -
           Geneticist
           pharmaceutical company rep
           experimental scientist
           animal rights activist
           Aids patient
           parent of child with cancer
 Provide group with discussion questions to work together to identify what the standpoint, arguments and attitude of your ‘character’ will be; use the evidence from the
    articles where applicable. Tell students they will need to remember the key points from the discussion
 Teacher explains notion of literary conventions and refers to key words
 Re-allocate students into mixed groups made up of one person from each of the expert groups
 Have them share their perspectives in a ‘hot seat’
 Feedback to the whole class to share key perspectives
 Plenary / Assessment for learning:
 Round Robin – revisit “One thing I think about ...’ from starter activity.
 Think if your perspective has changed, or what has influenced your perspective
 Differentiation/Strategies:
 Differentiated groups for jigsaw activity
 Record newspaper articles and quotations, use text speak technology (see resources referenced at http://www.dyslexia.com/helpread.htm) or pair weaker with better
     readers
 Reduce number of quotations for some students
 Check understanding of questions
 Adult to facilitate group work for lower achieving students


Resource – Article quotations

As a geneticist who has worked in pharmaceutical development...                            More than 500 leading UK scientists and doctors have signed a
                                                                                           declaration pledging their support for animal testing in medical
                                                                                           research.
I am grateful to the doctors and patients who went before me: not to animals.              The Research Defence Society (RDS) declaration states that a
                                                                                           "small, but vital" part of medical research involves animals.
Aspirin, the world's most common medicine, owes nothing to animals: nor do antibiotics,    The society says it has been signed by three Nobel laureates, 190
anaesthetics, Aids drugs, antidepressants                                                  fellows of the Royal Society and the Medical Royal Colleges and
                                                                                           more than 250 academic professors.
nine out of 10 drugs that pass animal tests fail in human trials                           Simon Festing, the executive director of the RDS, said: "We are
                                                                                           delighted to have gathered over 500 signatures from top UK
                                                                                           academic scientists and doctors in less than one month. It shows the
                                                                                           strength and depth of support for humane animal research in this
                                                                                           country."
examples abound of drug catastrophes where many people have been killed despite            Nancy Rothwell, the vice-president for research at University of
extensive "proof" from animal tests that the drug was safe                                 Manchester and the chairwoman of RDS, said: "It's vitally important
                                                                                           that the research community sends the message that animal
                                                                                           research is crucial for medical progress,
Animal tests are failing to protect us                                                     A university spokeswoman said Oxford ... said... "We feel it is vital for
                                                                                           a university like Oxford to be able to continue potentially life-saving
                                                                                           research, and it is important for society as a whole."
Animal research misleads ...our understanding of human disease
people have to be the ultimate guinea pigs for testing new treatments
Geography
Year/Class: 9           Teacher:                     Date:                  Scheme of work: Globalisation Lesson Topic: World trade
Learning objectives:                                                        Speaking and listening objectives:
  To know what a world trade is                                                Active listening to learn key information; communicate opinions and justify reasons
  To understand how world trade works                                          Use oral language skills to work cooperatively and problem solve
  To understand some of the views for and against world trade
Key questions / concepts:                                                   Resources:
        What is world trade?                                                   IWB
        How does it work?                                                      PowerPoint – To understand what world trade is and how it works -
        Who benefits from world trade and who does not?                          http://www.tes.co.uk/ResourceDetail.aspx?storyCode=6050268
                                                                                Instructions for the Trade Game
                                                                                Paper, scissors, rulers (as described in Trade Game instructions – but no pencils!
                                                                                Topic relates ‘answers’ list for plenary session
Activities:
Starter:
‘I went shopping .........’
  Teacher to model an example – I went shopping and I bought (naming a consumer item)’- e.g ‘I went shopping and I bought a TV’
  Next student repeats, and adds an item of their own – e.g. ‘I went shopping and I bought a TV...and some trainers.’
  Continue until a mistake is made or the list cannot be remembered – then start a new list
Vocabulary: primary, secondary, tertiary, service sector, fair trade, third world, LEDC, MEDC, NIC,GDP
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
     Put MEDC, LECD and NIC up on whiteboard – ask students to recall the meaning of the acronyms
     Brainstorm ideas of how trading might be affected in each of the different types
     Divide students into groups and play the adapted version of the Trade Game as per instructions (10 to 15 minutes)

Whole class discussion:
   How did students feel about the game – was it fair?
   Did the scissors remain with the original groups, were they traded, did the scissor owning ‘countries’ stick together?
   Does the game represent what goes on in real life in global trading?
   What did the different resources represent?
   What was their team – MEDC, LEDC or NIC?

PowerPoint - To understand what world trade is and how it works - http://www.tes.co.uk/ResourceDetail.aspx?storyCode=6050268– to summarise points raised
Plenary/assessment for learning :
Here is the answer, what is the question?
  Teacher compiles list of topic related ‘answers’ from the topic (differentiate for lower achieving pupils)
  students talk to a partner and then take turns to provide questions to go with the answers in the style of the game ‘Jeopardy’

Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Teaching and display of key vocabulary, using templates provided in the activity template pack and use fewer examples of technical vocabulary for lower achieving pupils
  Peer support through pair/group work, using mixed ability groups and giving lower achieving students specific roles
  Giving additional thinking time during plenary game for lower achieving pupils
  Information presented visually
Resources:


                                                 The trade game- A version of a game originally devised by Action Aid
Resources required:
Whistle
Banker: various play money items
Quality control representative: ruler, dustbin

MEDC (2 groups)
2 scissors
2 rulers
1 A5 sheet plain paper
1 A5 sheet coloured paper

LEDC (2 groups)
1 short ruler
5 sheets A4 plain paper

NIC
1 scissors
1 ruler
2 sheets plain paper A4

Introduction to the game
Divide class into six equal groups, and keep two volunteers separate to be the banker and the quality control rep.
Remind students of the meanings of MEDC, LEDC and NIC and how trading might be affected in these countries. (5 mins)
The game
Students use the resources given to their group to create perfect squares and triangles of different sizes, which will then be ‘sold’ to the bank. The teacher (‘government’ )
decides what values will be given to each size and colour of square/triangle and may change those values at will.
If students ask why different groups have differing resources explain that they represent a particular level of development.
Playing the game
Students start making their squares; remind the group with lots of paper but few tool that it is a trading game.
The teacher may change the value of the shapes if and when they wish.
The quality control rep must destroy any squares that are not perfect, or damaged.
Students can trade, beg, borrow or steal (this will be picked up in the plenary to discuss in the context of real life).
Debrief
After 15 - 20 minutes stop the game and ask the teams to add up their money; write totals on the board.
The teacher can decide the winner on the basis of most money, best product (most perfect shapes), best traders.
Plenary:
How did students feel about the game – was it fair?
Did the scissors remain with the original groups, were they traded, did the scissor owning ‘countries’ stick together?
Does the game represent what goes on in real life in global trading?
What did the different resources represent?
What was their team – MEDC, LEDC or NIC?
History
Year/Class: 9           Teacher:                      Date:                     SOW: World War 1 Lesson Topic: Women at work
Learning objectives:                                                            Speaking and listening objective:
  To learn about how the war changed women’s role in the work place            Describing , reporting, presenting information
Key questions / concepts:                                                        Resources:
  What work did women do pre-WW1?                                                http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Wfirst.htm
  Did all classes of women work?                                                 http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/firstworldwar/document_packs/women.htm
  Why did women take on work during WW1?                                         http://www.iwm.org.uk/history/womens-war-work-during-the-first-world-war
  What roles did women take on in WW1?                                           Reference books for women in war
                                                                                  Access to computers and printers (for collage work and powerpoint presentations if
                                                                                    needed)
                                                                                  Scissors, glue sticks
Activities
Starter:
   Verbal ping pong – students sit in circle, taking it in turn to say any word connected with WW1 work when a ball/beanbag is thrown to them
   Students may pass but not repeat a word already given
Vocabulary: munitions, workforce, traditional, contributions, war effort
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Group activity -
 Divide students in to 6 groups and task each group to research women’s work before and during WW1, using resources and websites above
- Did women work before the outbreak of war? – If so, which women and what work?
- What work did women do after the outbreak of war?
- Why did women go out to work?
- What were their working conditions?
- What happened at the end of the war?

   After researching the groups must plan to present their information to the rest of the class as
    - A picture slide show (PowerPoint) with commentary
    - A role play / drama piece
    - An art piece – collage or poster
    - A group presentation
    - A radio broadcast or news piece

Whole class –
Groups take it in turns to present their research findings ; the remaining students as the audience
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
I learned –
Students take turns to say one thing they have learned from their own or peer research, and something they want to know more about
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Display, explain and refer to key words; provide visual support
  Pair work for peer supported reading in research task
  Guide groups of students and individuals to use a presentation style that suits their learning profile
  Adult support to facilitate group work
  Consider assigning roles to individual students in group work – e.g. spokesperson
 Maths
Year/Class: 9              Teacher:                      Date:                Scheme of work: Problem solving Lesson Topic: Murder mystery
Learning objectives:                                                          Speaking and listening objective:
  To use given information to calculate times, distance and speed              Reasoning skills; justifying opinions
  To use the information to decide which suspect had the opportunity to        Active listening within a group
    commit the crime
Key questions / concepts:                                                     Resources:
  Where are the named gates to the castle?                                       Murder Mystery powerpoint from http://www.suffolkmaths.co.uk/pages/1Mysteries.htm
  Which roads connect to the gates?                                              Who killed Lord Mortimer? Cards from http://www.suffolkmaths.co.uk/pages/1Mysteries.htm
  Who was travelling on the roads?                                               Copies of map per team
  What speed were they travelling at?                                            Gate labels per team
  What is the distance between the gates?                                        Road labels per team
  Who had the opportunity?                                                       Calculators
                                                                                  Counters to represent ‘suspects’
Activity
Starter: Number Me (whole class)
  Put a numbered sticker on each student’s back – each sticker has a time, distance or speed
  Students must move around the class asking questions of each other to discover whether their sticker relates to time, distance or speed and to get into the correct group.
     Once in the group they must get themselves into rank order – again by asking questions of each other
  Students may NOT ask ‘what is my number?’ but can ask ‘is my number X?’
                                 st
Vocabulary: Order / sequence, 1 / nth / last, before / in front / ahead, after / behind / followed by, between / middle of, odd/even, less than/more than
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Murder Mystery activity (from http://www.suffolkmaths.co.uk/pages/1Mysteries.htm)
 Whole class – introduce activity using powerpoint. Tell the students that they will work as teams of detectives to see who can solve the mystery first. They must use labels for
   the castle gates and road numbers (no pens!) and use calculators to check their calculations. They can use counters to represent and place ‘suspects’ on the map if required.
 Remind students that this is a ‘no pens’ activity so they will need to organise their groups to have people responsible for holding an remembering key information if necessary
   – it cannot be written down!
 Count off class group by 1 -5 sequence, then form groups of all 1s, 2s, etc
 Give each group clue cards, map, labels, counters and calculators – and begin.

Students have 20 minutes to solve the mystery

Feedback – what is the solution to the crime mystery? What are your reasons? How did the groups manage the ‘no pens’ calculations?
Plenary/assessment for learning : Mystery numbers
  Each student to answer ‘mystery number quiz’ questions, but focus on how to get to the answer – how to solve the mystery. Allow 1 pass per student.
  How well can I calculate speed, distance and time?
  Can I use that information in context of a problem?

Differentiation/ Strategies:
 Mixed ability groups, with higher achieving pupils supporting lower achieving
 Chunk information when introducing ‘mystery’ task; print off the instructions to give to each group
 Whole class ‘think time’ before answering question asked
 In plenary task – select questions based on knowledge of student ability
Resources:
Mystery number quiz questions

Square of 13                                                                                                                                      169

25% of 420 miles                                                                                                                                  105 miles

3 x degrees in a right angle                                                                                                                      270 degrees

Sum of February days in 4 years                                                                                                                   109

Total dots on a die                                                                                                                               21

Sum of numbers 1-20                                                                                                                               190

Next prime number after 13                                                                                                                        17

(Days in a week) + (seconds in an hour) x (a decade)                                                                                              670

Square root of 529                                                                                                                                23

What is the mph if I cover 7 miles in 90 seconds?                                                                                                 90mph

Number of blackbirds baked in 3 pies                                                                                                              72

Common factors of 6,12,18,24                                                                                                                      2,3,6

A spider’s legs minus a fly’s legs                                                                                                                2

674- 712                                                                                                                                          -38

A cyclist covers nine kilometres in twenty minutes. Express his speed in kilometres per hour.                                                     27kph

A plane travels the 2000 miles from London to Istanbul in 3 hours. What is its approximate speed in miles per hour.                               666.6mph

What is the next number 8...9...11...14...18...                                                                                                   23

A car is travelling at eighty kilometres per hour for one hour and fifteen minutes. How far has it travelled?                                     100 miles

A bus travels at sixty-five miles per hour for one and a half hours. How far has it travelled?                                                    97.5 miles

The scale on a map is one centimetre to ten kilometres. On the map two towns are five and a half centimetres apart. What is the actual distance   55 miles
between the towns?
Modern Foreign Languages (can be adapted for all modern foreign languages)
Year/Class: 9                              Teacher:            Date:             SOW: MFL
                                                                                 Lesson Topic: Preposition carousel
Learning objectives:                                           Speaking and listening objective:
    To learn/consolidate vocabulary of prepositions of           Learn and use vocabulary
    place
  To use vocabulary in context
Key questions / concepts:                                      Resources:
  Prepositions of place                                        labels for prepositions of place in English and target language– large (A4)
                                                                Rules for Quiz Quiz trade from http://mflideasfactory.wordpress.com/category/plenary-2/
                                                                Cards with preposition vocabulary in the target MFL for the Quiz Quiz trade game (e.g Where is the .........?
                                                                It is in/on/under/next to............’)
                                                                Preposition icon cards
                                                                Squared paper, coloured counters
                                                                Picture baseboard, picture cards and stop watch or timer
Activities
Starter:
  Word wall – students call out prepositions of place in English and target language and teacher places labels on board
Vocabulary: prepositions of place – in, on, under, next to , between, beside, in front, behind
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday


Main: Carousel activities
Students work in groups of 6 , taking 5 minutes at each activity; after 5 minutes the teacher signals to move on to next activity

Activity 1 – Quiz Quiz trade (from MFL ideas factory at http://mflideasfactory.wordpress.com/category/plenary-2/ and http://issacgreaves.eu/c/mfl-ideas-factory/)
Each student has a card with a question and preposition phrase in response , with translation underneath. They move around the class meeting other students; first student
says their phrase in target language for the second student to translate then vice versa. If both translate correctly they swap cards and move on; if incorrect move on without
swapping cards
Activity 2 – Barrier game (from an original idea at http://community.tes.co.uk/forums/t/531362.aspx )
Student group work in pairs sitting back to back. Each student has a sheet of large squared paper 6 x 6 and a selection of coloured counters each. The first student places their
counters randomly across their squared paper before describing to their partner where they are placed, using prepositions of place – under, over, on, next to, between. The aim
is for the second student to re-create the same pattern of counters. Repeat changing roles.
Activity 3 – Snatch
Student group work in 3s, each 3 with a set of preposition icon cards. Spread the cards in front of the group face up. 2 students sit with one hand behind their back and one on
                 rd
their knee; the 3 student calls out a preposition word and the other 2 try to be first to ‘Snatch’ it. Change roles so that all 3 take turns as caller.
Activity 4 – Picture game
The picture game baseboard is placed in front of the student group. Each takes it in turn to take a picture card and describe as quickly as possible where it appears in the main
picture. Time how long to place all the pictures. Repeat, seeing if the group can improve on their time.
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
  Build up – students sit in a circle with a chair in the middle. The teacher calls a name and a preposition – the student must sit/stand according to the preposition (e.g on
     the chair) then call name of another student and preposition, who must sit/stand according to the instruction (e.g on the lap of, next to, behind.....) Continue till all students
     have had a go
  How many prepositions of place can you remember? What strategy will you use to remember them for next lesson and / or remember more? What was the most helpful
     activity for you to remember the prepositions?
Differentiation / Strategies:
  Activities provide modelling opportunities



Resources – preposition symbol cards

                                        on                                                     under




                                        over                                                   in




                                        behind                                                 In front




                                        between                                                Next to
Picture game board
Picture game cards
Science (Chemistry)
Year/Class: 7        Teacher:                Date:                    Scheme of Work: Chemical Reactions
                                                                      Lesson Topic: What are chemical reactions?
Learning objectives:                              Speaking and listening objective:
  To recognise the differences between a         Explain the a sequence of events in a simple but accurate way, using appropriate terminology
    chemical and physical change
  To identify the main features of a chemical
    reaction
Key Questions / Concepts:                         Resources:
  What is happening in the reaction?               PowerPoint on ‘Reversible and Irreversible Reactions, Physical and Chemical Changes’ by Cressida Bowden
  Can you change it back?                            http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Reversible-and-amp-Irreversible-Physical-and-amp-Chemical-6081216/
  What product is formed?                            See ‘Activity, Chemistry in Everyday Life’
  Is it a chemical or physical change? How do      ‘King Kong’s Hand’ resources. See ‘Activity’ http://www.tes.co.uk/ResourceDetail.aspx?storyCode=6046213
    you know?                                       Resources for practical per ’Reversible and Irreversible Reactions, Physical and Chemical Changes’ by Cressida
                                                      Bowden
                                                      http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Reversible-and-amp-Irreversible-Physical-and-amp-Chemical-6081216/
                                                      See ‘Activity, Experiment Cards’
                                                    Dice
Activities
Starter:
King Kong’s hand demonstration
  Students to describe what’s happening
  Teacher recap and reinforce features of chemical reactions observed

Chemical or physical changes?
  Pictures of everyday activities (per PowerPoint)
  Students to remain seated for physical changes, stand up to indicate chemical changes
  Teacher led discussion about features of chemical changes / reactions e.g. frying an egg, boiling water, fireworks, ice cream melting, barbecue, bonfire etc
  Reinforce that chemical reactions can be reversible or irreversible
Vocabulary: Changes, reaction / chemical reaction / physical reaction, reversible / irreversible, state / temperature, substances / reactants / products
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials from the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Practical (per Experiment Cards)
  Divide students into 6 mixed ability groups. Each group to carry out one of the experiments
  Students to decide amongst group members who will feedback to whole class group re. description of experiment, the group’s hypotheses, what changes took place,
     decision whether chemical or physical reaction took place / whether reversible or irreversible reaction and what evidence for these judgements
Feedback to whole class group re. practical
  Listeners to agree / disagree with group’s decisions / judgements and whole class discussion on how a chemical reaction can be reversed (or not)
Plenary/assessment for learning:
‘Round Robin’ with dice (whole class)
   Odd number – student describes one feature about chemical reaction or when this takes place
   Even number – student describes one feature about physical reaction or when this takes place
Ask students to talk to a partner and decide which of these they can now do, and what they need to learn next:
  Recognise the differences between a chemical and physical change
  Identify the main features of a chemical reaction
  Identify whether a chemical change is reversible and /or how it can be reversed

Differentiation / Strategies:
  ‘What’ concrete questions, give alternatives if needed
  Visual and simple definition of keywords
  Whole class ‘think time’ before answering question asked
  Adult facilitation to encourage all students in small group to take turns / participate
  Pair weak reader with better reader as ‘buddy’ when reading instructions for practical
  Assign roles and responsibilities to specific students in practical if needed
  Allow repetition of answers already given and / or give clues about an alternative answer
Art

Year/Class: 7             Teacher:                               Date:                    Scheme of work: Drawing/ Painting Lesson Topic: Colourful Klee
Learning objectives:                                                                                 Speaking and listening objective:
  To define what are primary, secondary and tertiary colours                                        To use objective and clear “dictionary type” definitions of the words
  To mix secondary colours                                                                          primary, secondary and tertiary
  To describe one piece of work by Paul Klee and to give own opinion about it
Key Questions/ Concepts:                                       Resources:
  What are the primary colours?                                 ‘Playing card’ sized Paul Klee paintings
  What are the secondary colours? How are these made?           Large colour wheel (for demonstration)
  What are the tertiary colours? How are these made?            Large colour wheel with names of colours clearly labelled
  What do you think the painting is about?                      PowerPoint slides re. Paul Klee paintings
  What mood or emotions come across?                            Visuals for ‘emotions’/ adjectives vocabulary:
                                                               http://www.lancsngfl.ac.uk/nationalstrategy/ks3/behaveattend/getfile.php?src=242/feelingscard.pdf

                                                                  Icons/graphics for feelings words can be found
                                                                  http://teachfind.com/national-strategies/seal-resource-sheet-words-core-feelings

                                                                  This is the link for photo cards of emotions
                                                                  http://teachfind.com/national-strategies/seal-curriculum-resource-photo-card-collection
Activities
Starter: Pairs Memory Game
Use a selection of Paul Klee pictures. Work in pairs. Lay all pictures face down, take turns to turn over and match the pictures – name a primary and secondary colour in
the paintings in order to win the pair
Vocabulary: Primary / Secondary / Tertiary colours, spectrum, mixing, abstract, interpret, conveyed, mood / emotions, colour properties / association
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials from the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Demonstration re. secondary and tertiary colours
  Questions to re-cap on primary/ secondary/ tertiary colours
  In groups decide on a definition for each of the terms primary, secondary and tertiary; groups pair up and agree on a definition – all feedback and discuss
  Discussion re. colour properties/ associated emotions
Students to continue with own colour wheel (from previous lesson)
  Mix and colour in secondary colours on colour wheel
  For higher achieving students mix tertiary colours also
Paul Klee paintings discussion (whole class)
  Individuals’ interpretation of abstract paintings
  The use of colours to convey mood/ emotions
  Reinforce a range of adjectives to describe the work. Support with visuals for vocabulary
Paul Klee paintings discussion (in pairs)
  Each student selects one work from paintings used in Pairs Memory Game.
  Discuss: What do you think the painting is about? What mood or emotions comes across? How does Klee convey that mood?
Each student goes to find another student with the same picture – compare ideas and think of adjectives to describe the work
Each pair feeds back their findings to the class and compares pictures where similar adjectives have been used. What can you say about the similarities and differences in
these pictures?
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
Play a memory game, asking pupils to name a colour and an adjective associated with it, the next student copies the first and adds their own – e.g. I fell into a Paul Klee
painting and saw midnight blue....I fell into a Paul Klee painting and saw midnight blue and vibrant pink...I fell into a Paul Klee painting and saw midnight blue, vibrant pink
and pale yellow ....etc. Differentiate by choosing lower achieving pupils first, higher achieving pupils last
Assessment for learning :
  How confident are you in naming the primary colours – use traffic lights to indicate
  The secondary colours
  In pairs, give a definition of primary, secondary and tertiary colours; peer assess for accuracy
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Visuals, such as pictures and symbols to support simple definition of keywords – see suggestions in the “activity template” section for different ways to support learning
     of vocabulary
  Thinking time – tell student X you will ask him/her after you’ve asked student Y
  ‘Talk then paint’ – adult to check with student re. what colours to mix before painting on colour wheel
  Adult facilitation to encourage all students in small group to take turns/ participate
  Support ‘What mood or emotions comes across?’ with visuals for ‘emotions’/ adjectives vocabulary
  Citizenship
Year/Class: 7           Teacher:                    Date:                         Scheme of work: The Justice System Lesson Topic: Laws and Crimes
Learning objectives:                                                              Speaking and listening objective:
  To know what a law is                                                          See someone else’s point of view when ‘arguing’, whilst being able to present clear argument from a
  To know how laws are made                                                      different perspective
  To consider why we have laws
Key questions / concepts:                                                         Resources:
  What do we mean by rules and laws ?                                              Whiteboard
  Consider why societies and communities all have laws and rules                   Law making sequence cards
  What would happen if we didn't have laws?                                        “Why do we have laws?” cards + page pre-loaded on whiteboard (supplied below)
                                                                                    Blank ranking outline for whiteboard
Activities
Starter:
What do you know...?
   Divide into 6 groups – 2 groups discuss crime, 2 discuss punishment and 2 discuss people who work in the legal / justice system. Groups discussing the same thing join
      together and pool ideas
   Each bigger group feedback to the class. Teacher adds to spider grams on whiteboard on the 3 topics
Vocabulary: Legal, justice, parliament, punishment, enforce, Bill, MP, sentence
Teach these key words using activity templates for teaching vocabulary from the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday. At
intervals throughout the lesson , call out a definition and see if pupils can give you the right word. Have groups choose one of the words and ask another group for the
definition. Highlight the difference between similar sounding words –e.g. parliament and punishment – with pictures of each.
Main:
Teach the sequence of law making
     Identify pairs of students to represent the different sequences of law making. Once they have been identified, have them place themselves in the correct order at the front
      of the class. Once agreed, other pupils should decide whether they order is correct and if not, make suggestions.
     Whole class should feedback; select pupils to retell the sequence in order – first while looking at the other pupils, then without looking (receiving help from others if
      needed).
     Brief brainstorm - Why do we have laws? Go through “Why do we have laws?” Reasons on cards
     Individual thinking time then group work. Ranking exercise “Why do we have laws?” Ranking doesn't have to be vertical – can have reasons of equal value. Ideally it will
      end up as a diamond shape.
     Whole class feedback for consensus.
     Teacher records rank on to pre-loaded diagram on whiteboard.
     Group/pair discussion work - “What do you think is the worst crime and why?” “What would be a suitable punishment and why?” Emphasise it's OK to disagree as long as
      you have reasons.
Plenary / Assessment for learning
Whole class to feedback, identifying what they think is the worst crime and giving strong and convincing arguments. The class should then vote on worst crimes and suitable
punishments. Teacher to model giving a clear and strong argument for what is the worst crime (choose something minor – e.g. spitting, with a harsh punishment e.g. prison, to
demonstrate how to argue your case).

Assessment for learning: How confident are you in remembering the sequence of law making – talk with your partner about what would help you remember
How strong was your argument for the worst crime? What could you do to improve your argument?
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Teaching and display of key vocabulary; make links between new vocabulary and current knowledge/ experience.
  Visual and kinaesthetic activities -sequencing and ranking.
  Peer support through mixed ability / group work.
  Thinking time.
  Make an audio recording of the text of Law making sequencing cards and Why do we have laws card, using single message ICT devices such as Talking Tins, Talking
     buttons, talking postcards or tell-a-story cards (www.speechbubble.org.uk)
Resource: Why do we have laws?
Diamond ranking
To suppress the people so the government can have control.

     To protect innocent people and keep them safe.

                   To prevent anarchy.

              To tell people how to behave.

               To protect our human rights.

        So people can keep what belongs to them.

                   To keep people safe.

               To give justice to the people.

               So people don't live in fear.

                 So rules can be broken.
Resource: Sequencing of law making



      A bill is introduced into the House of Commons – they have the 1st reading.

      MPs debate the bill during the 2nd reading.

      A committee of MPs analyse the bill and send it back to the House of Commons.

      The MPs in the House of Commons have a 3rd reading and vote on the proposed law.

      If the MPs vote for the law it goes to the House of Lords.

      The Lords debate the bill – they usually accept it. They can only reject it 3 times.

      The bill goes to the Queen and she signs it. This is called the Royal Assent. The bill becomes a law.
Drama
Year/Class: 7                Teacher:                   Date:                    Scheme of work: Drama Techniques Lesson Topic: Mime and Characterisation
Learning objectives:                                                             Speaking and listening objective:
  To identify how body, gesture and facial expressions are used to convey       Follow spoken directions which are quite complex – so a possible combination of longer
    the intended messages in mime                                                sentences with more information, maybe new vocabulary and more complex grammar.
  To identify and show a range of contrasting facial expressions
  To create a mimed scene
Key questions / concepts:                                                        Resources:
  What is tableau?                                                               Clapper board
  How is tableau different to mime?                                              Pictures/ PowerPoint slides of items that elicit different reactions
  What do facial expressions show?                                               Postcards for Pair It Up miming game
  What else shows you how the person is feeling?                                 Visuals for ‘emotions’ vocabulary
  Why is body language important?                                               Icons/graphics for feelings words can be found here:
  Explain how body language and facial expression can be interpreted in         http://teachfind.com/national-strategies/seal-resource-sheet-words-core-feelings
    different ways by different people                                           Photo cards of emotions can be found here:
                                                                                 http://teachfind.com/national-strategies/seal-curriculum-resource-photo-card-collection
Activities
Starter: Clapper board Tableau
  Introduce the idea of a ‘Tableau’. Have a mime area of class and tableau area – give different descriptions and have students run to the area they think represents
     either mime or tableau. Ask students to summarise the difference between a tableau and a mime.
  Teacher shows pictures/ PowerPoint slides of different items that elicit different reactions, e.g. a winning lottery ticket, a snake, a bomb, Justin Bieber, a kitten, a
     rollercoaster etc.
  On the count of 3-2-1 + clapper board, students mime and hold their reactions.
  Teacher identifies 1 good example, who then identifies another good example etc.
                         st

  Highlight the use of body language as well as facial expressions.
Vocabulary: Mime, facial expressions, emotions, gesture, body language, exaggeration/ dramatic
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Mime demonstration
  Volunteers to improvise and mime:
  ‘It’s George’s birthday. Grandma and Grandpa arrive with a present. George unwraps the presents. It’s the latest WII Sport game that he wanted’.
  Repeat the script but the present is a pair of Justin Bieber slippers.
  Can you compare the first and second scenes; Discussion re: similarities and differences between the two scenes.
  How do you know how he/she feels? Highlight the contrasting body language, gestures and facial expressions.
Students’ mime (groups of 4)
  In groups of 4, students to create a mime lasting 1-2 minutes that includes contrasting emotions.
  Encourage students to think carefully about a character and how they would respond to different situations
Show mime to class
  Audience (students) to identify effective use of body language/ gesture/ facial expressions.
  Audience (students) to identify what to change/ work on.
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
Pair it Up mime
  Students are given either a ‘mime + emotion word’ (e.g. mime bored) card or ‘emotion word card’ (e.g. bored).
  Students with ‘mime+ emotion word’ card take it in turns to mime emotion to whole class.
  Student with the matched ‘emotion word’ card identifies what the emotion is.
  AfL – in groups; in what way did people manage to stay in character during mimes; what would help to do that more effectively.
  How well did you follow directions at the beginning of the lesson; consider what you could do to help you listen and understand spoken directions.
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  For lower achieving students, give two / three pictures to demonstrate emotions to support the mime, suggest emotions that are easier, e.g. happy, excited etc. For
     higher achieving students, they should be given a range of more emotions to demonstrate, including those that are more complex or subtle, e.g. bored, frustrated,
     indifferent, elated
  Thinking time – tell students you will ask them after you’ve asked student x
  Adult facilitation to encourage all students in small groups to contribute and to participate
  Adult to support use of simple ‘wh’ (who/what/where/why) questions to guide planning for group mime
  Make available visuals for ‘emotions’ vocabulary
Design and Technology (Textiles)
Year/Class: 7                Teacher:                    Date:                  Scheme of work: Fibres and Fabrics Lesson Topic: Fibres and Fabric Constructions
Learning objectives:                                                                                  Speaking and listening objective:
  To give examples of natural and manmade fibres and to identify where they come from                Talk using sentences of around 7-11 words
  To identify the main characteristics of some of the fibres
  To identify 2 different constructions of fabric
Key questions / concepts:                                              Resources:
  What do we mean by textiles?                                          Photos of a range of familiar textiles made from a variety of fibres (complete/ partial images)
  Why are textiles important to society?                                The Fabric of Society by Mrs Zubairy, Edenham High www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCqsEaYv70s
  What do we mean by natural fibres                                     Range of fabric samples made from a variety of fibres
  What do we mean by man-made fibres?                                   Optionally – a favourite item of clothing each student has been asked to bring from home
  What are the characteristics of this fibre?                           Flashcard sized cards; name of fibre, description of where it comes from and/or main characteristics
  Where do natural/ manmade fibres come from?                           A/B/C/D cards for multiple choices
  How are fibres made into fabrics?                                     Keywords display
Activities
Starter: Guess What? Work in pairs
  Identify what the item is from a photo that shows only a part of it e.g. towel, leotard, swimming shorts, sports fleece, sock, gloves, rucksack, jumper, scarf, cap,
     curtains, table cloth, pillow, flag, teddy bear etc. Sort into three piles whether the item is made from ‘man-made fibres’, ‘natural fibres’ or ‘either’
  Show complete photo of items (on slides). Discuss which category each belongs to.

Vocabulary: Textiles, natural, man-made / synthetic, chemicals, fibres / yarn, fabric / fabric construction, woven / knitted, characteristics/ properties
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Introduce ‘textiles’
Find a common link between all the photos shown – the word ‘textiles’ refers to any item made out of fabric. Highlight and refer to keywords display.

YouTube presentation: The Fabric of Society
Reinforce information using ‘Who Wants To Be A Millionaire’ format quiz.
Questions to highlight information relating to:
  Why are textiles important to society?
  What are natural fibres/ man-made fibres?
  What are the characteristics of this fibre?
  Where do natural/ manmade fibres come from?
  How are fibres made into fabrics?
Students work in groups of 5’s. Each question to be answered by a different student – hold up either A/B/C/D card. If unsure, can ask team members; ‘phone a friend’ or
‘ask the audience’ or to request answers card for 50:50. Students hold up answer card when asked ‘What’s your final answer?’

What is it made out of?
Work in pairs to decide what fabrics/fibres the favourite items of clothing brought from home are made of , and the features of the fabric e.g. This is made of natural fibres
so it doesn’t make me feel hot when I’m dancing, or match name of fibre to description of where it comes from / characteristics and to each fabric sample supplied by
teacher (linen, cotton, nylon, wool, silk, viscose, Lycra, acrylic, polyester)

Whole class feedback to include whether the fabric is knitted or woven

Going shopping! In pairs
You are planning to buy a new item of clothing – jumper/coat/trousers etc. Explain to your partner what fabric would you want it made of and why – justify why you want that
fabric
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
Guess Which One? (whole class)
  Teacher describes a specific fibre, students to identify what the fabric sample is e.g. “This is manmade. It’s very strong and light weight. Kites and tents are made out
      of this” (nylon)
  Each pair gives a description of a fabric for others to guess
  Peer assessment on the speaking and listening objective – how well did people do in using longer sentences for their descriptions of fabrics
  Say which activity in the lesson you found most useful and why
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Demonstrate and model examples
  Visual + simple definition of keywords. Display, explain and refer to these
  Whole class ‘think time’ before answering the questions asked
  Differentiated questions in quiz, e.g. using Bloom’s taxonomy for questions:
     Can you name the . . .? Can you tell why . . .? Find the meaning of . . .? What is . . .? Which is true or false . . .?
     Can you explain in your own words . . .? Can you distinguish between . . .? What differences exist between . . .? Can you provide a definition for . . .?
  Select from a choice of 3 fabrics (re. Plenary activity)
English
Year/Class: 7            Teacher:                    Date:               Scheme of work: Reading and writing folk tales and fairy tales
                                                                         Lesson Topic: Folk Tales and Fairy Stories
Learning objectives:                                                     Speaking and listening objectives:
  To recognise shared features                                          Follow spoken directions which are quite complex – so a possible combination of longer sentences
  To recognise conventions of traditional stories                       with more information, maybe new vocabulary and more complex grammar
Key questions / concepts:                                                Resources:
  Fairy tales and folk tales are a genre                                 Whiteboard
  Comparisons and parallels                                              Short version of any well known fairy tale
  What are the common themes?                                            Question sheet “Folk Tales and Fairy Stories” (supplied below)
  Stereotypes                                                            Dictionaries
Activities
Starter: “One thing I know about...”
   Students to think of a fairy story and say one thing about it – character, place, key object, event, e.g. Cinderella and a glass slipper; Red Riding Hood and the forest
   Teacher to list the stories on the whiteboard
Vocabulary: Similarities, convention, genre, representative, characteristic, stereotypical, features
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
 Teacher reads a traditional story and discusses familiar features
 Main activity: jigsaw
 Split the pupils into 6 differentiated groups. Tell pupils that each group is going to become experts on one aspect of folk tales and fairy stories. The six aspects are:
       1. Heroes and villains
       2. Memorable phrases, chants or rhymes
       3. Quests/tasks/puzzles
       4. Special numbers
       5. Characters/stereotypes
       6. Settings
 Teacher explains notion of literary conventions and refers to key words
 Provide each group with their discussion questions. Tell them they need to remember the key points from the discussion, so that they share their expert knowledge with
   a mixed group, made up of experts on each of the six aspects, at the end
 In groups students discuss selected questions on the sheet
 Re-allocate students into mixed groups made up of one person from each of the expert groups
 Have them share their information
 Feedback to the whole class to share key features of traditional stories
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
 Round Robin – revisit “One thing I know about” starter activity. Go round the class with pupils choosing a story and describing one thing they know about it. Encourage
   them to think of as many different stories and key information as possible , e.g. The glass slipper was an important object in Cinderella, the apple was an important
   object in Snow White, the beans were important in Jack and the Beanstalk etc.
 How well do you know the features and conventions of traditional tales? Which activity has helped you learn about traditional tales? Talk with your partner about how
   you will remember what you have learned today. Where would being able to write things down help further?
 Think of how well you followed instructions of what to do – anything you could do to improve how you listened and understood instructions?
 Differentiation/ Strategies:
 Differentiated groups for jigsaw activity
 Record jigsaw activity discussion questions , or pair weaker with better readers
 Lower achieving groups given jigsaw activity discussion areas that are more concrete and well known, e.g. heroes and villains
 Check understanding of questions
 Chunk information, giving information step by step for lower achieving pupils
 Adult to work with lower achieving group to model and rehearse a format for them to take back their information to the mixed group
Resource: Folk Tales and Fairy Stories

Many traditional stories share the same features. Start by naming the fairy stories and folk tales you know in your group.

Heroes and villains discussion questions: Many stories include a bad person or creature who threatens the hero or heroine of the story. Who are they?
What do they look like? Is there anything similar about the bad people in different stories?
The main character, hero or heroine often appears innocent or vulnerable. How is this impression created by the story?


Memorable phrases, chants or rhymes discussion questions: Many of these stories were passed on orally (they weren’t written down), so they often contain
memorable phrases, chants or rhymes. Can you think of any rhymes or phrases in any of the stories? (Clue: Mirror, mirror.....) Count up how many your group
can think of and try to remember in order to feedback.


Quests/tasks/puzzles discussion questions: Which stories can you think of in which the hero or heroine has to complete a task, go on a quest or solve a
puzzle?

Special numbers discussion questions: Think of as many examples as you can in the story with being in groups of three the significant part of the story, e.g.
sets of three people, three wishes, three tasks, three words. Are there any other numbers that are often used (e.g. seven)?

Characters/stereotypes discussion questions: The characters are usually simple, representative and stereotypical. Use a dictionary to find out what these
words mean and then say whether you agree or not. Can you think of some examples (clue: look at the way men and women are represented in these
stories). Think about the men in the stories. What are they like? What do they do? Then think about the women. What are they like? What do they do?
How are the men and women different?

Settings discussion questions: Many of the stories are set in the past, or in settings which are very different from our own world. Think of examples of jobs
done by people in these stories. What sort of homes do the people have?
Geography
Year/Class: 7           Teacher:                         Date:              Scheme of work: Maps and locations Lesson Topic: GPS
Learning objectives:                                                        Speaking and listening objectives:
  To know what a GPS is                                                    Explain a sequence of events in a simple but accurate way
  To understand how a GPS works
  To know the uses of a GPS
Key questions / concepts:                                                   Resources:
        How GPS works                                                        Whiteboard
        How GPS is used                                                      Film and quiz from http://www.tes.co.uk/ResourceDetail.aspx?storyCode=6077230
                                                                              Question cards (supplied below)
                                                                              Number cards 1-4 for interactive quiz
Activities:
Starter: “Where am I?”
  Teacher to model a couple of examples
  Students must give 3 clues so the students can guess the familiar local location e.g. I can see, I can hear, people are
Vocabulary: Satellite, precise, global, location, vague, position, intersect, orbit, horizon
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
  Brainstorm how else we can find out where we are and how to get somewhere. Prompt for GPS
  Introduce short film on a GPS system
  Explain there will be questions after the short film, so they should listen out for the answers
  Hand out question cards to pairs/groups
  Play film
  Pairs/groups discuss questions and feedback to class
  Teacher puts up interactive quiz (use “review quiz” option) on whiteboard
  Pairs/groups to discuss and agree answers to interactive quiz on white board. One member of group to hold up the card for the number they have chosen, choose pupils to
      tally, teacher enters majority choice on interactive quiz
  In groups think about how you would get from where you are now to another part of the school. Each person in the group takes a role; four are satellites sending messages,
      one the receiver and one the person moving. Consider how you are going to make your human GPS system work. What will you need to consider? What might be the
      difficulties? Plan out your route, then work out how the satellites will pass messages to the receiver and the receiver to the person moving. How successful was your plan?
      How well did communication work between you? What could you do to improve it? Summarise your evaluation of the task to feedback to class in a concise way.
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
Play: Here is the answer, what is the question?
  Teacher compiles list of topic related ‘answers’
  Differentiate for lower achieving pupils
  Pupils talk to a partner and then take turns to provide questions to go with the answers in the style of the game ‘Jeopardy’
Reflect on what you know about the GPS system. With a partner consider what are the key features of the GPS system? How successful were you at feeding back your findings
of the group task to the class? How clear, well organised and accurate was it? What about your use of technical words to describe things? What could you do to make it better?
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Teaching and display of key vocabulary, using templates provided in the activity template pack and use fewer examples of technical vocabulary for lower achieving pupils
  Peer support through pair/group work, using mixed ability groups and giving lower achieving students specific roles, for example one of the satellites
  Giving additional thinking time during quiz for lower achieving pupils
  Information presented visually
  Differentiated questioning, choosing more concrete questions in the plenary session and a specific number of points in reflection task
Resource: Question Cards



What does GPS stand for?




How many satellites orbit the earth?




What does ‘altitude’ mean?




How many satellites are above the horizon at any one time?




What does the 4th satellite do?




What do many receivers have built in?
Voting cards




               A   B


               C   D
Questions

  1. What does GPS stand for?

  2. How many satellites are there?

  3. Where do satellites orbit?

  4. How many satellites doe the GPS receiver receives information from?

  5. What 3 things do the satellites provide information about?

  6. How do they transmit the information?

  7. What is special about the information that is transmitted? The information is transmitted in special ______ which the receiver understands.

  8. What are built into many receivers?

  9. What word would we use to describe the exact place we are in?




Answers to the questions



                                                                            space
                                                                              30
                                                                            codes
                                                                           location
                                                                  Global Positioning System
                                                                  latitude longitude altitude
                                                                              4
                                                                            maps
                                                                         radio waves
History
Year/Class: 7              Teacher:                         Date:               SOW: Medieval Britain Lesson Topic: How did William of Normandy grasp control of
                                                                                England?
Learning objectives:                                                           Speaking and listening objective:
  To learn about William the Conqueror's victory at the Battle of Hastings    Explain a sequence of events in a simple but accurate way
  To learn about some of the characteristics of successful medieval
    rulers
  To select evidence from the Bayeux Tapestry to support an argument
Key questions / concepts:                                                         Resources:
  Where is Normandy?                                                               Whiteboard
  Who was William?                                                                 Images of Bayeux tapestry http://www.bayeuxtapestry.org.uk/Index.htm (explanation,
  1066 on timeline                                                                    scenes and descriptions)
  Sequence of main events                                                          Images on cards to sequence - website provides printable resource
  Bayeux tapestry as source of information                                         Caption cards to match to pictures - website provides printable resource
  Bayeux tapestry illustrates several aspects of William's personality
  Forward planning
  Strategy
Activities
Starter: Word Wall
  Ask students to contribute words connected with William the Conqueror
  Teacher types onto word wall on whiteboard and saves. See example below
Vocabulary: Tapestry, medieval, monarchy, source, nobility, strategy, feudal, conquest
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
    Introduce the Bayeux Tapestry as a source of information about the events surrounding the Battle of Hastings. Show and explain the scenes on the tapestry.
    Ask the whole group to identify key points in the sequence of events. Choose a pupil to represent each key point and stand in a line representing the sequence. When
        the sequence (and pupils) is in place, retell the narrative of the sequence of events
Consider William the Conqueror as an example of a 'successful' monarch
    Reporter’s activity - What makes a successful king?
    Students work in pairs as interviewer and interviewee and then swap roles. They need to find out what is needed to be a successful king? Feedback to the class should
        be in the form of a news bulletin
    ‘This morning I spoke to William the Conqueror about what makes a successful king and this is what he told me...’
    Class feedback to establish a working list, e.g. intelligence, bravery, military skill, support from others, forward planning and put on whiteboard
    Return to the Bayeux Tapestry account of the Norman Conquest
    Distribute pictures and ask students to work in groups, to identify aspects of the tapestry that show the qualities needed by a successful king
    Ask pupils to think of any qualities that the Bayeux Tapestry does not identify and to speculate what kind of sources might contain such information
    Discuss the findings and produce a class list of qualities
    Locate William the Conqueror on the class timeline and family tree

Plenary / Assessment for learning: Back to the wall
In pairs – each pair adds one word to the wall and makes a statement using that word or another from the wall
Revisit the sequence by bringing the pupils who were involved in the sequencing activity back to the front of the class – whole class to help them get into the right order and
retell the sequence of events
Reflect on how able you would feel to recount the sequence of events in a simple but accurate way – use traffic lights to indicate
What conclusions can you draw about what makes a good king? How will you remember this in relation to William?
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Display, explain and refer to key words, identify fewer key words for lower achieving pupils
  Differentiated interview activities; lower achieving pupils given specific information to find out through differentiated questioning. More able pupils to provide a deeper
     analysis
  Pair work for peer supported learning
  Visual support or sound caption cards using single message recording devices given with pictures to support analysis of the tapestry
Medieval Word Wall
  ICT
Year/Class: 7          Teacher:                      Date:               Scheme of work: E-safety Lesson Topic: E-safety assembly
Learning objectives:                                                     Speaking and listening objectives:
  To understand what E-safety means                                       Change the style of their language to suit the situation and the listener
  To understand how to stay safe                                          Be aware when someone doesn’t understand, and try another way to get information across
  To create a demonstration of dangers and how to stay safe
Key questions / concepts:                                                Resources:
  What does E-safety mean?                                                PowerPoint on E-Safety (with visuals to support keywords)
  What dangers are there?                                                    http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/E-safety-Outstanding-Lesson-6047127/ see ‘Game,
  What can you do to stay safe?                                              Puzzle, Quiz’
  Who is the poster aimed at?
  What message or information are you trying to get across?
  How are you going to get the message across?
Activity
Starter: Call My Bluff
  Work in groups of 4s
  One person says something about him/herself (e.g. “We’ve got 3 dogs and a cat”). Others have to decide if it’s true or not. One point for each correct answer
  Go round the group a few times
Vocabulary: Internet, chat rooms, cyber bullying, audience, caption, message, presentation
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Discussion to introduce E-Safety: Who are you talking to on the Internet? How do you know what the person saying is true? Relate back to Call My Bluff game.
  PowerPoint and discussion on E-safety: what dangers and how to stay safe re. internet, chat rooms, cyber bullying
Plan, do, review – group work:
  Set a task for pupils to plan part of an assembly for the rest of their year group on understanding what e safety means. Each group focuses on a different area of e safety as
     directed by the teacher, e.g. some of the dangers of the internet; chat rooms, cyber bullying, sharing information and how to stay safe
  Pupils to consider how they will make information interesting, engaging and understandable to the audience
  Pupils must agree a plan of what the assembly will cover and who will do which elements. They should be encouraged to include a short scene showing the dangers of the
     internet / how to stay safe
  Demonstrate their assembly section to other pupils; the rest of the class watch and suggest ways dangers can be avoided and other ways to stay safe
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
  Round Robin – one thing I know about the dangers of the internet and how to stay safe – go round the class with each person giving one example, choose lower achieving
     students first, higher achieving last
  Reflect on how well you did in making the assembly good for your audience; peer assessment – what did each group do well in their assembly and what could be improved.
     Focus on content and presentation; tone of voice, use of words, use of scenes, organisation, ensuring the audience could understand
Differentiation/ Strategies:
     Demonstrate examples using students
     Ensure understanding of true and false for starter activity – pre teach this vocabulary if needed
     Visual + simple definition of keywords. Display, explain and refer to these, using activity pack
     Whole class ‘think time’ before answering question asked and specific narrower questions for lower achieving pupils
     Visual support (PowerPoint)
     Differentiated task sheet with increased ‘step-by-step’ instructions/ what to consider
     Adult support and model good and poor examples of collaborative talk and presentation skills to support pupils understanding and skills
  Maths
Year/Class: 7                Teacher:                         Date:               Scheme of work: Numbers Lesson Topic: Ordering
Learning objectives:                                                              Speaking and listening objective:
  To understand the relevance of ordering to everyday life                         Pick up new vocabulary and use in context within the lesson
  To describe relative positioning within an order
Key questions / concepts:                                                         Resources:
  What is an order?                                                                Whiteboard
  How is it ordered?                                                               Colour paper (6 different colours)
  Why is the order useful?                                                         Grand Prix running commentary (YouTube)
  How can you describe the order?                                                  Visuals to support examples of everyday life occurrences where order is important/useful
  How else can you describe the order?
  Can you suggest some good words for describing order?
Activity
Starter: Use it Once (whole class)
  Tell students you will be creating a number line using all the students in the class – the number line will be 1-26 (number of students in class)
  One student rolls the dice; even number = add, odd number = subtract
  Make up a sum involving the operation as indicated by dice. The answer has to be one of the numbers on the number line – this is their number and they must stand up and
     place themselves in the number line
  Another student has a turn and must place themselves in a position relative to the first on the number line
  Go round the whole class until all numbers on number line have been taken
  Allow lower achieving pupils to have a turn towards the beginning of the activity
                                   st
Vocabulary: Order / sequence, 1 / nth / last, before / in front / ahead, after / behind / followed by, between / middle of
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main: Visuals + discussion re. ordering in everyday life (sizes, house/ building numbers, dictionary, library, calendar races etc)
Grand Prix (work in groups of 6)
  Each student is the driver of a Grand Prix racing car, each with a different colour paper bib indicating the colour of car.
  As each ‘running commentary statement’ is called out (by the teacher), students to order themselves in the correct position e.g. “And they’re off. Red is overtaking Green and
     Yellow. Now Green is in the lead. Blue is stuck between Yellow and Orange ----------------“
Grand Prix continuation
  In small group (of 6), 1 person is the race commentator. Others are different colour racing cars. Task as above but students make up their own running commentary
     statements.
  Each group to present and act out this to the whole class.
  Freeze frame – at different points in the grand prix, the teacher will shout out “freeze frame” and pupils should stop. Select one or two pupils from each group to describe
                                                           th
     where they are in relation to other pupils e.g. I am 4 in the race, in front of Jack but behind Zoe and in between Kyran and Imran. Set a challenge for pupils to use as many
     of the key words in the freeze frame as possible – which group are the winners?
Plenary / Assessment for learning: Order, Order
  Each student to give a statement about self that involves an order word e.g. “I’m before Jai on the register”, “I came first in high jump in Sports Day last year”
  How confident are you in using key words – thumbs to show
  In groups - What activity best helped you understand the importance of ordering; summarise the elements you are most confident with and identify one aspect you are less
     sure about. How does your knowledge of ordering apply to your everyday life. Gather examples from groups.
Differentiation/ Strategies:
 More able students to generate sums towards end of task when less numbers are available on number line, lower achieving students to have a turn towards the beginning
 Mixed ability groups, with higher achieving pupils supporting lower achieving
 Chunk information or give limited instructions during the grand prix activity, before instructions are given, say the name of lower achieving pupils
 Visual support, such as a coloured card to represent the car in the grand prix, symbols to represent positional words
 Whole class ‘think time’ before answering question asked
 Sentence starters and/or selection of ‘order’ words to be used (for students’ running commentary)
 Identify specific words to be used in the freeze frame activity
Music
Year/Class: 7               Teacher:                     Date:              Scheme of work: The Instruments of the Orchestra
                                                                            Lesson Topic: Identifying instruments
Learning objectives:                                                        Speaking and listening objective:
  To identify the four sections of the orchestra                             Pick up new vocabulary and use in context within the lesson
  To know the positions of the instruments in the symphony orchestra
  To name instruments
  To identify some instruments by sound
Key questions / concepts:                                                   Resources:
  Families of instruments                                                    Whiteboard
  Instruments produce sound in different ways                                Blank orchestra layout diagram http://www.musicatschool.co.uk/year_7/instruments.htm
  Roles of different instruments                                             Completed orchestra layout diagram
                                                                              Musical excerpts of different instruments
                                                                                http://www.musicatschool.co.uk/year_7/instruments.htm
                                                                              http://www.musicatschool.co.uk/year_7/instruments.htm
                                                                              Pictures of instruments
                                                                              Section labels (supplied below)
Activities
Starter:
  Brainstorm musical instruments – put on whiteboard
  Play “I went to a concert and I heard a.......” each pupil repeats previous and adds an instrument to the list (start again when the list gets too long to remember)
Vocabulary: Orchestra, percussion, woodwind, symphony, brass strings, conductor, baton
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
Learning the instrument families and positions
  Teach families of instruments
  Working in pairs/groups students sort cards into families
  Teach positions – give pupils an instrument each – they must organise themselves into the correct positions – peer assessment – did they get it right?
Barrier game
  Students should sit back to back or put up a physical barrier between them, such as standing up a large book or folder. Working in pairs, student A has a completed
     orchestra layout diagram and student B has a blank.
  Student A has to give verbal instructions to student B to put correct labels on the diagram (on the left, next to, behind, etc. – no pointing or peeping allowed!)
Name the Instrument / family
  Play examples of instruments and identify by name
  Ask students to name family
  Here’s the answer, what’s the question
  Play in groups
  The teacher gives an answer for each group – e.g. flute, cello, guitar, triangle, trumpet etc. Pupils must make up a question in groups – class to work out whether the
     question leads you to the right answer or whether there could be alternatives
  Teacher then plays an instrument and pupils decide whether the teacher has got it right or wrong – i.e. whether it is the instrument identified in the answers above
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
  Quiz http://www.musicatschool.co.uk/year_7/instruments.htm
  What have you learned; summarise the key “ingredients” needed for an orchestra, instruments, families and positions – feedback in groups
  How confident are you in recognising instruments – which are easy / more difficult. What would help you recognise more?
  Think about the key words, how well are you able to use them in sentences appropriately
Differentiation / Strategies:
  Lower achieving pupils to go first in starter activity
  Teaching and display of key vocabulary
  For barrier game, give lower achieving students simpler drawings, fewer labels and give symbols to represent positions – next to, behind etc. Encourage partners to
     ask questions to clarify
  Give pictures of instruments and categories to lower achieving pupils
  Peer support through mixed pair / group work , pairing e.g. better with weaker readers
Resource: Section labels

                           woodwind        brass


                            strings     percussion


                            timpani         harp


                            oboes        1st violins


                           bassoons      2nd violins


                             horns     double basses


                           trombones       cellos


                           trumpets        flutes


                             tuba          violas
PHSE
Year/Class: 7                Teacher:                        Date:                 Scheme of work: Relationships Lesson Topic: Bullying
Learning objectives:                                         Speaking and listening objective:
  To recognise different types of bullying                  Use different ways to help discussions move forward, including summarising the main points, reviewing what has
  To learn ways of dealing with bullying                    been said and clarifying main points.
  To recognise how it feels to be bullied
  To know school policy
Key questions / concepts:                                    Resources:
  What is bullying?                                            Whiteboard
  Different types of bullying                                  Power point ‘film’ and interactive quiz – (select “review” option when using the quiz) both found at:
  Bullying can and should be dealt with                           http://www.brainpop.co.uk/psheandcitizenship/pshekeepingsafe/bullying/
  School policy                                                Answer cards for quiz (supplied below)
Activities
Starter:
 Word wall on whiteboard
 Consider “what does bullying mean?”
 Brainstorm examples of bullying in films, books or soaps.
 Brainstorm words / phrases to do with bullying
Vocabulary: Victim, confide, self esteem, tackle, cyber bullying, isolated, confidential, solution
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
 Teach / reinforce key words. Display with definitions for reference
 Introduce power point ‘film’
 Play first scene showing letter from Charlotte pause at 16 seconds
 Ask students to “think, pair, share” solutions and ask some for feedback
 Continue with film – pause at 43 seconds
 Ask students to “think, pair, share” different types of bullying and select some for feedback
 Continue with film – pause at 1:29 minutes
 Ask for suggestions from whole class – repeat and ask who agrees / disagrees and ask for reasons for disagreeing. Use different levels of questioning to support
   thinking. Model ways in which paired discussions could take place , for example rmodelling eviewing what has been said and clarifying main points
 Continue with film
 “Think, pair, share” the four solutions given in the film.
 Do interactive quiz – class work in groups to decide option in multiple choice and hold up answer card. Select a pupil to tally how many groups chose which answer.
 Teacher enters choices
 Class discussion “Why do some people bully?”
 Teacher explains school policy
Plenary / Assessment for learning
 Recap the different types of bullying.
 Say statement “Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me”. Ask pupils to put hands up for true or false. Give reasons.
 Reflect on what you know about bullying; in what way have your views changed. Consider how you discussed the issues with your partner – peer assess and identify
   ways in which you were successful and ways you could improve
Differentiation / Strategies:
  Teaching and display of key vocabulary
  Repetition and reinforcement
  Mixed ability groups with peer support through pair / group work
  Differentiate questioning, give alternatives for types of bullying – ‘is this bullying or not?’. Narrow questioning so that pupils can answer one aspect at a time. Suggest
     areas to look for solutions and request fewer from lower achieving pupils
  Thinking time
Resource: Answer cards for quiz




                             A    B

                             C    D
Religious Education
Year/Class: 7               Teacher:                    Date:                 Scheme of work: Children’s Rights Lesson Topic: Wants versus needs
Learning objectives:                                                          Speaking and listening objective:
  To understand the difference between a WANT and a NEED                       Present a clear argument and see someone else’s point of view when ‘arguing’
  To consider the needs versus the wants of self and others
Key questions / concepts:                                                     Resources:
  What is the difference between a want and a need?                            UNICEF ‘Wants and Needs’ cards
  Do wants / needs change depending on where the person lives?                   http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Wants-and-Needs-Cards-6041097/
  Why are countries in the West seen as materialistic?                         Diamond ranking template

Activities
Starter:
Sorting and Snowball Activity
   Divide the UNICEF cards into categories: most important/ important/ least important.
   Work in pairs, discuss any differences of opinion about the categories
   Then, each pair joins another pair – compare and discuss any differences
   In the groups of 4, re-arrange the cards into 2 categories; Need/ Want. Discuss any differences
Vocabulary: Wants, luxury, needs, essential, survival, materialism , materialistic, poverty, inequality
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
‘I’m a celebrity, get me out of here’ Charades
   Task: ‘You’re going into the jungle for 2 weeks, what do you NEED to take?’
   Divide class into teams of 5. One person mimes the ‘need item’ to the rest of the team.
   Allow 1 minute for this. After this, the rest of the class is allowed to guess what the item is.
   Go round each group twice.
   From the objects identified, rank them as most important using diamond ranking template on the whiteboard
‘I’m going on holiday to Disney Land’ Charade (whole class)
   Task: ‘You’re going on holiday to Disney Land for 2 weeks, what do you NEED to take?’
   One person mimes a ‘need’ item to the rest of the class
   From the objects identified, rank them as most important using diamond ranking template on the whiteboard
   In groups discuss how the different ranking varies, what are your thoughts on this. In the second example, highlight what you might change from a need to a want and
      justify your decision
For and against
   Students are given the following statement – countries in the western world are materialistic
   In groups, students discuss the statement given. Within each group, half of the students agree with the statement and half of the students disagree. Each has to explain
      reasons for agreeing/ disagreeing. Also, they should challenge the other side’s explanations.
   Encourage students to focus on arguments related to needs and wants. Take discussions further with other students by forming two circles - an inner and an outer - those
      who agree in one circle, those who disagree in another.
   Pupils walk round and round until the teacher gives a signal to stop – they then have to try to persuade the person they have ended up facing of the merits of their ‘for’ or
      ‘against’ position
Need Vs Want cards
   In groups of 4, two take on the perspective of living in a rich country and two take on the perspective of living in a poor country. Each pair to identify 6 items that are the
      most important for them. Compare and discuss any differences.
   What are some of the problems when we try and compare needs and wants in different countries?
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
One student names either a ‘need’ or ‘want’ item, next student has to identify whether it’s a ‘need’ or ‘want’ or ‘depends’ + explain answer. Go round the whole class. Can you
defend your position? How well do you feel you presented your arguments and listened to others – what could you do to improve?
     ‘If you had to be less materialistic and had to give up one thing, what would be the hardest thing for you to give up?’ Go round the whole class
     Summarise what you feel your needs are and compare to your wants; how does this compare with people in other countries. What are your thoughts
Differentiation/ Strategies:
  Decrease number of UNICEF cards used. Select the more ‘concrete’ ones
  Visual support for ‘most important’, ‘important’, ‘least important’ prompt cards
  Whole class ‘think time’ to generate item for miming before commencing charade
  Sketch on whiteboard items mimed for discussion later
  Adult facilitation to encourage all students in small group to take turns / participate
  Sentence starters to support thinking of decisions in for and against task
Resource: Diamond ranking
Spanish (can be adapted for all modern foreign languages)
Year/Class: 7                         Teacher:         Date:           SOW: Hola NC Unit1 section 5
                                                                       Lesson Topic: Months and birthdays
Learning objectives:                                   Speaking and listening objective:
  The months of the year                               Pick up new vocabulary needed for specific topic areas
  To say when their birthday is and ask about
    someone else's birthday
Key questions / concepts:                               Resources:
  Numbers 1-31                                          Whiteboard
  Months                                                Months in English
  Tengo 12 años = I am 12                               Months in Spanish - not in order
                                                         Pictures of famous people and their birthdays
                                                         Birthday date cards (supplied below)
Activities
Starter:
  Fingers bingo 1-10 – teacher calls out a number, students hold up fingers
  Chant numbers 11-20 and then 21-31
Vocabulary: Tener, años, cumpleaños
Teach vocabulary using strategies and materials in the activity templates available to download at www.hello.org.uk/no-pens-day-wednesday
Main:
  Show months in English on whiteboard
  Choose 12 students and give each one a Spanish month – the students should stand up in a random order. Class mates should direct them where to
    stand so that they are in the correct order. They should then mix up again
  Choose 12 students and give each one an English month – in turn, the class should help the English months find their Spanish partners – each partner
    should say their month – in English and in Spanish. Ask ‘What can you notice that is similar in the words’?
  Teach the months of the year with pictures and rhymes, e.g. uno de enero, dos de febrero?
  Teach how to ask about birthdays: ¿Cuándo es tu cumpleaños
  Using one or two of the famous people ask pupils to pretend they are the person and respond to questions about their age and birthday. Higher achieving
    pupils can use the third person possessive pronoun to ask ¿Cuándo es su cumpleaños? ¿Cuándo cumple?
  Explain special dates in the Spanish calendar to introduce some background cultural information
  Teach mi, tu, su, as pupils learn possessive pronouns
  Ask the pupils to quiz each other in pairs about their own favourite stars, their ages and birthdays
  Ask the pupils to respond in birthday order around the class or to line up and enter the classroom in birthday order
Plenary / Assessment for learning:
  Round robin – pupils ask the person next to them – when is your birthday / when is your mum’s / dad’s / brother’s / sister’s / friend’s birthday? They
    answer with one of the dates from the date cards and the class have to decide if it’s true or false. Hand out birthday date cards to support.
  How many of the months of the year can you remember? What will help you remember them for next time and / or remember more? What is the most
    helpful way for you to remember how to ask about someone’s birthday?
Differentiation / Strategies:
  Question and answer prompts on display or whiteboard
  Ask simple questions in round robin activity
  Opportunities for repetition
  Thinking time – tell students you will ask them after you've asked student x
Resource: Birthday date cards for plenary


                                   1 March        2 July         3 July


                                 4 January     5 September    6 December


                                   7 June         8 April       9 March


                                10 November      11 May        12 August


                                 13 October      14 June      15 November


                                   16 May       17 March      18 February


                                 19 February   20 October      21 March


                                  22 August    23 September     24 June


                                   25 April    26 January     27 December


                                 28 August       29 May         30 June


                                31 November     1 February     2 October

								
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