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					1          Benzene            IMO has revised the minimum standards for
carriage of benzene.    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">IMO has revised the minimum
standards for carriage of benzene.<br><br>In 1992, the Maritime Safety
Commission recognised the risk of long term exposure of low
concentrations of benzene in air which can cause leukemia. In 1996 it
approved minimum safety standards for ships carrying mixtures in which
benzene content was 0.5% or more. Due to continuing concerns IMO has
further revised the minimum safety standards.<br><br>The new standards
for ships carrying liquids in bulk containing benzene include particular
guidance on information to be given to the crew, occupational exposure
limits, air quality monitoring, personal protection equipment, entry into
enclosed spaces, training, precautions during cargo operations, venting,
medical monitoring etc. Details are found in IMO MSC cicrular no. 1095 or
at the following web address <a
href=""http://www.imo.org/includes/blastDataOnly.asp/data_id%3D7511/1095.
pdf""
target=""_blank"">www.imo.org/includes/blastDataOnly.asp/data_id%3D7511/1
095.pdf</a><br><br>Source : London Club newsletter.<br><br>We have
experienced several crew claims arising from the crew developing
leukemia. The crew were mainly working on chemical tankers who may have
been exposed to benzene, however there have been claims of crew working
on dry cargo vessels. It is a little surprising that despite the IMO's
awareness of this problem, many P&I Clubs tend to take the view this
illness is self induced or inherent and hence a claim which can be
declined by the owners. Many of these claims are however settled
amicably, although the level of difference of opinion is not
justified.<br><br>Owners of chemical tankers should be aware of the new
IMO guidelines, as anything short of compliance will then certainly
provide a clear case for the crew to claim that leukemia was work
related.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                               2003-11-10
      2003-11-10 cargos       cargos002_010.htm 1
2     22    Soya bean license requirement            "Licenses are now
required to be issued by the Ministry Of Agriculture in China for import
of soya bean, who will examine the quality of the soya bean." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Licenses are now required to
be issued by the Ministry Of Agriculture in China for import of soya
bean, who will examine the quality of the soya bean. Due to the
fluctuation soya bean market, it is possible that licences will not be
issued or are issued after extensive delays which will prompt the cargo
owner / trader to look for a reason to recoup his loss, which is usually
from the shipowner.<br><br>It is important that shipowners do not give
any opportunity for the cargo interest to transfer his loss onto the
shipowner, which is usually be means of looking for technical breaches
such as back dating, ante dating of bills of lading and any discrepancies
or misdescription in the bills of lading, especially with regard to
statements on quality or grade of cargo.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                               2003-11-10
      2003-11-10 insurance_awareness     awareness020.htm 0
3
                  0
4     18    Excess General Average Expenses          Excess General
Average Expenses arise where expenditure exceeds the contributory values
('CV') of ship and cargo.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Excess General Average
Expenses arise where expenditure exceeds the contributory values ('CV')
of ship and cargo.<br> <br>
                        This situation may occur in respect of low valued
ships in the situation that salvage services are engaged by the owner. It
is easier to explain this with an example. A ship valued US$2 million
grounds laden with cargo and the terms of the salvage contract is
prudently concluded not on a no cure no pay basis but on a daily hire
remuneration with all costs of the salvers additionally payable. We have
all been taught that if at all possible, owners should refrain from
engaging salvage services based on no cure no pay LOF terms as the amount
of the award is invariably higher. At the time of the grounding it is not
known the extent of bottom damage of the ship, if any. There is some
damage to cargo as a result of ingress of seawater into the holds. The
vessel and the cargo is eventually salved. The value of salved cargo is
worth only US$200,000. When the vessel docks or a proper underwater
examination is carried out, it is found the vessel's bottom is heavily
damaged and estimate cost of repairing the damage is US$500,000. The ship
is not a constructive total loss and the value of the ship in damaged
condition is its scrap price of US$300,000. The ultimate cost of the
salvage contract was US$750,000 which is allowable in general
average.<br> <br> <img
src=""../img/common/awareness/awareness001.jpg""><br><br>There is excess
GA expense of US$250,000 after the Total CV has been
exhausted.<br><br>Cargo insurers argued that the liability of cargo in
general average is limited to its contributory value and if there is any
excess general average, this should be borne by the shipowner. The Hull
insurers also raised this same argument. Their understanding is
technically correct. We are advised there is no rule or practice of
average adjusters providing for apportionment of excess general average
expenses between ship and cargo.<br> <br>The shipowner looked to the P&I
Club for the shortfall, but Club cover do not insure general average
expenditure in excess of the contributory values and this risk or expense
does not fall under P&I Club cover. The P&I Club only covers
unrecoverable general average contributions.<br> <br>If the vessel is
proven to be a total loss, it may be possible to submit that ship's
proportion of excess general average expenditure should be recoverable as
a sue and labour expense, however in this situation, cargo's proportion
of excess general average expenditure is not recoverable.<br> <br>We
suggest the following rider clause to be included into the Hull
policy.<br> <br> <u>QUOTE</u><br> <br>Excess general average expenditure
which are not recoverable from the contributory interests shall be fully
claimable under this Hull insurance policy if the expenditure has been
reasonably incurred in saving or attempting to save the
ship.<br><br><u>UNQUOTE</u></td>
                      </tr>"                               2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness001.htm 0
5     13    War P&I cover           "This matter has been extensively
discussed and advised to all members of Group P&I Clubs," "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><p>This matter has been
extensively discussed and advised to all members of Group P&I Clubs,
however we are surprised that the majority of shipowners in China have
not taken any measures to ensure they are covered for this risk.<br>
                             <br>
                             It is important to note the P&I Club's cover
excludes liability for war risks unless the claim is in excess of the
amounts recoverable under the owner's Hull war insurance policy. If the
owners has no Hull war insurance policy arranged or the insured value
under the policy is less than the vessel's market value, the P&I Club
only becomes liable for war risks in excess of the vessel's market value
up to a maximum limit of US$200 million.<br>
                             <br>
                             The underlying layer of war P&I cover is in
practice included without additional premium into the Hull war cover by
means of a standard war P&I inclusion clause, and the P&I cover is not a
substitute for this traditional market cover.<br>
                             <br>
                             Under the current Hull war cover of many
shipowners in China which does not contain this war P&I inclusion clause,
any crew, cargo and oil pollution claims which are caused by warlike
risks will not be covered. Further the payment of an additional Hull war
premium for entry into a war zone area under the aforementioned
arrangement does not entitle the owner to enjoy the benefit of war P&I
cover, which is the most important risk to the owner in this
situation.<br>
                             <br>
                           If your hull war insurers are not able to
include the inclusion of war P&I cover, alternative arrangements should
be made with the Lloyds market at lower premiums and on far wider
coverage than available in China.</p>
                          <p> Please click in this box <a
href=""javascript:void(0);""
onclick=""MM_openBrWindow('../htm/awareness/mail_transport_bill.htm','','
width=670,height=550')"">
                                               <img
src=""../img/common/button_ask_andrew.jpg"" border=""0""
align=""absmiddle"" width=""60"" height=""11""></a> to prompt us to
contact you to clarify any query.</p></td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 insurance_awareness     awareness002.htm 0
6     16    Exercise of due diligence          "We draw attention to the
importance of the exercise of due diligence by the owners,"     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We draw attention to the
importance of the exercise of due diligence by the owners, as this
fundamental obligation affects the owner's rights under the insurance
covers.<br><br>Clubs rules exclude any claims arising from the owner's
lack of diligence as follows.<br><br>A)""There is no cover … if the
voyage … was imprudent, unsafe … or improper.""<br><br>B) Club rules are
subject to the Marine Insurance Act 1906, which states in 39(5) that
'where with the privity of the assured, the ship is sent to sea in an
unseaworthy state, the insurer is not liable for any loss attributable to
the unseaworthiness.'<br><br>Many owners including the Clubs do not
stress the importance of this obligation, possibly for the reason the
lack of due diligence as a ground of claim has not been
prevalent.<br><br>We wish to advise the dangers of owners not fulfilling
this obligation, which not only affects Club cover, but also the quantum
of claim.<br><br>Under the Hague Rules owners are obliged to exercise due
diligence before and at the beginning of the voyage to make the vessel
seaworthy. This is a personal obligation upon owners, who will be
responsible for any acts or defaults of their agents or servants or sub
contractors. Provided the owners have exercised due diligence to make the
vessel seaworthy, then acts of the crew in the management of the vessel
are excluded from owner's responsibility.<br><br>We will highlight the
seriousness of this matter by examples.<br><br><u>Example 1 </u>:<br>P&I
condition survey reveals the hatch covers leaking due to rust holes.
Repairs are deferred and P&I Club imposes into the cover a defects
warranty excluding cover for loss or damage caused by defects. Vessel
encounters heavy weather on cargo laden voyage and sustains cargo
damage.<br><br>Consequences :<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">There is no
Club cover for this claim not only due to Club rules which relate to due
diligence, but also due to the inclusion of the defects warranty in the
entry.</li><li class=""alpha"">Cargo interests can prove the vessel was
unseaworthy before and at the beginning of the voyage, thus disentitling
the owners of any exception and limitation clauses in the bill of lading.
Owners in addition to this claim being uninsured, has no defence to the
claim and will have to pay a greater amount of claim.</li><li
class=""alpha""> If the P&I condition survey was carried out
satisfactorily previously at which time the hatches were not leaking but
due subsequent to lack of maintenance the hatches develops rust holes and
causes cargo damage, the Club can still technically decline cover for the
claim based on the same principle of owner's lack of due diligence,
despite there is no defects warranty included in the
cover.</li></ol><br><br><u>Example 2:</u><br>
                        Anchor chain hold covers were swept away during a
cargo laden voyage in heavy weather due to worn out bolts which had been
replaced by tarpaulin and cement by the crew. The bolt should have been
replaced prior to the voyage and would likely lead to a finding of lack
of due diligence by the owners. There are no defects warranty in the
cover.<br>
                        <br>Consequences:<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">
Cargo interests can prove the vessel was unseaworthy before and at the
beginning of the voyage, disentitling owners of any exception and
limitation clauses in the bill of lading.</li><li class=""alpha"">
Although the P&I Club would not otherwise have reserved Club cover for
the claim as there was no defects warranty in the cover, in view the
cargo claimants are able to prove the owners' lack of diligence which
caused the claim, this may prompt the Club to decline Club cover based on
same principles.</li></ol><br><br>We consider that no proper P&I Club
should employ an allegation of owner's lack of due diligence in declining
a claim, unless the fault of the owners was so fundamental and serious.
However in view of this legal possibility, the owners should be proactive
to take measures to ensure the vessel's seaworthy condition prior to any
voyage.</td>
                      </tr>"                               2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness003.htm 0
7     15    Deck Cargo        "We are aware an increasing number of
Chinese vessels carry cargo on deck such as loggers or containerships,
and this advice is for the benefit of these owners as P&I Club cover
excludes liability for deck carriage in certain situations."     "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">We are aware an increasing
number of Chinese vessels carry cargo on deck such as loggers or
containerships, and this advice is for the benefit of these owners as P&I
Club cover excludes liability for deck carriage in certain
situations.<br><br>P&I Club rules provide there is no cover for claims
arising out of deck carriage unless the cargo is suitable for carriage on
deck, and the contract of carriage is endorsed to state deck carriage,
and there is a clause in the contract of carriage which excludes the
carrier's liability to such cargo howsoever caused or that the Hague or
Visby rules apply to deck carriage.<br><br>The following summaries of the
legal position may be useful.<ol><li class=""alpha""> clean bill of
lading means under deck stowage. Under English law a carrier need not
clause a bill of lading stating on deck carriage where it is a custom of
trade to carry such cargo on deck ie.logs and containers.</li><li
class=""alpha"">When cargo is carried on deck and stated to be so carried
in the contract of carriage, the Hague of Visby rules will not apply.
This is the reason in this situation owners need to include a clause in
the contract of carriage which gives the carrier the liberty to carry
cargo on deck and further excludes the carrier's liability for such cargo
howsoever caused or that the Hague or Visby Rules still apply. See the
P&I Club rules mentioned above. The contract of carriage must be claused
to state the cargo is carried on deck when it is not customary for such
cargo to be carried on deck.</li></ol><u>Custom of trade</u><br><br>We
said above that under English law there is no need to clause a bill of
lading stating on deck carriage where this is the custom of trade.
However the burden of proof is upon the party who alleges the existence
of such a custom ie.the shipowner. We do no envisage any difficulty to
show this custom in relation to containers or logs in view this practice
is so widespread. However we are aware the laws of other countries do not
provide an exception to the general rule to clause a bill of lading
stating on deck carriage even in trades where this is a custom. This
presumably is based on jurisprudence that the cargo can be carried in the
holds, and if it is carried on deck the cargo is certainly subject to
greater and additional risks. Under the laws of these countries who do
not recognize a custom of trade as an exception to the general rule, a
bill of lading which is not found to be claused for deck carriage may be
tantamount to a deviation of the contract of carriage which will have
severe consequences such that the carrier will not be able to rely on any
exception and limitation clauses in his favour in the bill of lading such
as the Hague rules. It is of particular importance that despite a custom
of trade is an exception to the general rule under English law, the rules
of West Of England P&I Club provide without any exceptions there will not
be Club cover unless the cargo is suitable for deck carriage and the bill
of lading is so endorsed to state deck carriage.<br>The rules of the UK
Club provide that there is no cover in respect of any cargo liabilities
including cargo carried on deck which are in excess of the Hague or Visby
Rules. If the Hague or Visby rules do not apply to the contract of
carriage for any reason, then Club cover is
prejudiced.<br><br><u>Conclusion</u><br><br>Despite the custom of trade
to carry cargo on deck, it is important to clause bills of lading to
state on deck carriage in all situations even in container and log trades
to ensure that Club cover is not prejudiced in view the rules of the P&I
Clubs prudently do not recognize (due to the difficulties mentioned) the
English law custom of trade as a ground or exception to the general
principle that all bills of lading must be claused to state on deck
carriage.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness004.htm 0
8     14    Inter Club Agreement         The Inter Club Agreement was
drawn up by and between the International Group of P&I Clubs to
facilitate the settlement of cargo claims between these P&I Clubs and the
parties to this agreement are the P&I Clubs. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Inter Club Agreement was
drawn up by and between the International Group of P&I Clubs to
facilitate the settlement of cargo claims between these P&I Clubs and the
parties to this agreement are the P&I Clubs. It is debateable if it can
be submitted this agreement is not valid if the charterer has no P&I
cover, or either charterers and / or owners have P&I cover with an
insurer which is not a party to the Inter Club Agreement. Such an
intention is not likely to be tenable as it is the parties' intention
their own liability should be apportioned in accordance with the
agreement notwithstanding their insurers are not parties to the
agreement.<br><br>For clarity, the following additional statement in the
clause incorporating the Inter Club Agreement should be
included.<br><br>""The terms of the Inter Club New York Produce Exchange
Agreement which is incorporated into this charterparty shall apply
between the owners and the charterers notwithstanding the P&I insurers of
the respective parties may not be members of the International Group Of
P&I Clubs.""<br><br>Even though many time charterparties are on the NYPE
form, it is surprising that many owners do not reserve their legal
position with regard to recovery of cargo claims against the charterers.
Owners should note there is a time limit to lodge claims against the
charterers under the agreement being, 'the other party should be notified
as soon as possible but in any event within two years of discharge or the
date when goods should have been discharged.'<br><br>We were recently
asked to draft a standard notice of claim to be sent to the charterers
for claims which may full under the Inter Club Agreement, which should be
useful to all our clients.<br><br><u>QUOTE</u><br><br>To : The
Charterers<br><br>Re : MV (Name of vessel) - (Brief details of claims and
b/l no. if known)<br><br>We are the managing agents for the shipowner and
communicate with you as the charterers of the vessel at the material
time.<br><br>We are advised of the occurrence of the above incident
relating to loss or damage to cargo and we would advise you the
possibility that a claim will be lodged by the concerned in the
cargo.<br><br>We hereby give you notice of this cargo claim in compliance
with the terms of the Inter Club New York Produce Exchange Agreement
incorporated in the charterparty.<br><br>We would further give you notice
that any cargo claims settled by the shipowner shall be deemed to have
been properly settled or compromised if such settlement or compromise is
made subject to the approval of the P&I Club, and we will not copy you in
on correspondence exchange in connection with this claim.<br><br>This
notice is given without prejudice to the shipowner's rights under the
charterparty arising from bills of lading which are not properly issued
in accordance with the terms of the
charterparty.<br><br><u>UNQUOTE</u></td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness005.htm 0
9     13    Charterers' or owner's bill of lading
      &#31199;&#23478;&#25110;&#33337;&#19996;&#25552;&#21333; The
determination of this question is important as to whether the owner or
      "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">The determination of this
question is important as to whether the owner or    charterer should
assume liability to the cargo owners for loss or damage.<br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#36825;&#20010;&#38382;&#39064;&#30340;&#37325;&#28857;&#22312;&#20110;&
#26159;&#21542;&#33337;&#19996;&#25110;&#31199;&#23478;&#24212;&#35813;&#
23545;&#36135;&#20027;&#30340;&#25439;&#22833;&#21644;&#25439;&#23475;&#2
5215;&#25285;&#36131;&#20219;&#12290;</span>                         <br>
                        <br>A recent House Of Lords decision ( "" Starsin
""2003 UKHL 13.3.203 ) is noteworthy in determining whether a bill of
lading is a charterers or owner's bill.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#33521;&#22269;&#19978;&#31561;&#38498;&#26368;&#36817;&#30340;&#19968;&
#39033;&#20915;&#35758;( &quot; Starsin &quot;2003 UKHL 13.3.203
)&#22312;&#30830;&#23450;&#26159;&#31199;&#23478;&#25552;&#21333;&#36824;
&#26159;&#33337;&#19996;&#25552;&#21333;&#26041;&#38754;&#20540;&#24471;&
#27880;&#24847;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>Bills of lading had the name and emblem of
the charterers and were signed by parties as agents for the carrier.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25552;&#21333;&#20197;&#31199;&#23478;&#32626;&#21517;&#21644;&#26631;&
#35760;&#65292;&#30001;&#25215;&#36816;&#20154;&#30340;&#20195;&#29702;&#
20204;&#31614;&#21457;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>Clause 1 of the bill defined 'carrier' as the
party on whose behalf the bills were signed.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25552;&#21333;&#26465;&#27454;1&#23450;&#20041;&ldquo;&#25215;&#36816;&
#20154;&rdquo;&#20197;&#20182;&#30340;&#21517;&#20041;&#31614;&#21457;&#2
5552;&#21333;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>Clause 33 of the bill contained an 'identity
of carrier' clause which stated the bill of lading contract was between
the shipper and the owner of the vessel and the owner shall be liable for
any damage arising under the contract of carriage.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25552;&#21333;&#26465;&#27454;33&#21253;&#21547;&#20102;&#19968;&#20010
;&ldquo;&#25215;&#36816;&#20154;&#19968;&#33268;&rdquo;&#26465;&#27454;&#
65292;&#35268;&#23450;&#20102;&#25552;&#21333;&#26159;&#25176;&#36816;&#2
0154;&#21644;&#33337;&#19996;&#20043;&#38388;&#30340;&#36816;&#36755;&#22
865;&#32422;&#65292;&#33337;&#19996;&#24517;&#39035;&#23545;&#36816;&#367
55;&#22865;&#32422;&#35268;&#23450;&#33539;&#22260;&#20869;&#21457;&#2998
3;&#30340;&#25439;&#23475;&#36127;&#36131;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>Clause 35 stated that if the vessel is not
owned or demise chartered to the company that issued the bill, the bill
shall take effect as a contract of carriage with the owner,
notwithstanding anything that appears to the contrary.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#26465;&#27454;35&#35268;&#23450;&#22914;&#26524;&#31614;&#21457;&#25552
;&#21333;&#30340;&#20844;&#21496;&#19981;&#25317;&#26377;&#33337;&#33334;
&#25110;&#19981;&#26159;&#20809;&#33337;&#31199;&#33337;&#20154;&#65292;&
#36825;&#31181;&#25552;&#21333;&#21363;&#20316;&#20026;&#19982;&#33337;&#
19996;&#20043;&#38388;&#30340;&#36816;&#36755;&#22865;&#32422;&#65292;&#1
9981;&#31649;&#26377;&#20854;&#23427;&#30456;&#21453;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>The House of Lords held the Court Of Appeal
erred when they construed the bill as a whole when a reasonable reader
would not have gone further than the face of the bill. It is only if the
information on the front is insufficient that the readers should turn to
the back to examine further the wording. However in this case even a
cursory glance of the front bill was enough to show the bill as signed by
the charterer and not the owner.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#33521;&#22269;&#19978;&#31561;&#38498;&#35748;&#20026;&#19978;&#35785;&
#27861;&#38498;&#22312;&#20998;&#26512;&#24403;&#19968;&#20010;&#36866;&#
24403;&#30340;&#35835;&#21333;&#32773;&#20165;&#30475;&#25552;&#21333;&#2
7491;&#38754;&#23601;&#35748;&#20026;&#26159;&#23436;&#25972;&#25552;&#21
333;&#30340;&#35266;&#28857;&#26159;&#38169;&#35823;&#30340;&#12290;&#201
65;&#26377;&#27491;&#38754;&#30340;&#20449;&#24687;&#26159;&#19981;&#2281
5;&#30340;&#65292;&#35835;&#21333;&#32773;&#24212;&#36827;&#19968;&#27493
;&#26816;&#26597;&#32972;&#38754;&#26465;&#25991;&#12290;&#28982;&#32780;
&#22312;&#36825;&#20010;&#26696;&#20214;&#20013;&#21482;&#35201;&#31895;&
#30053;&#19968;&#30475;&#27491;&#38754;&#25552;&#21333;&#23601;&#36275;&#
22815;&#26174;&#31034;&#25552;&#21333;&#26159;&#30001;&#31199;&#23478;&#3
1614;&#21457;&#30340;&#65292;&#32780;&#19981;&#26159;&#33337;&#19996;&#12
290;</span><br>                         </td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 insurance_awareness     chi_awareness006.htm   1
10    12    Clean bills of lading and additional remarks to protect
owners            "The master is required to issue a bill of lading
showing the apparent order and condition of the cargo loaded, and is
required to note defects in the cargo such as torn, mouldy bags, rust and
foreign admixture."     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The master is required to
issue a bill of lading showing the apparent order and condition of the
cargo loaded, and is required to note defects in the cargo such as torn,
mouldy bags, rust and foreign admixture.<br><br>A frequent issue arises
when a cargo is loaded which appears to contain other foreign particles.
Investigations should be made with the shipper and the P&I Club to
determine whether this is acceptable and usual for this particular type
of cargo being exported and sold. If the answers are in the affirmative,
the master may still be uncertain whether he should sign clean bills of
lading.<br><br>In this situation, the master should include an additional
remark which should not affect the cleanliness of the bill, by describing
the cargo as 'with permitted levels of admixture of foreign particles
according to advice by shipper.'</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness007.htm 0
11    11    Crew employment cannot be delegated to a manning agent
      "Owners should be aware they cannot delegate their obligation to
employ qualified, certified and competent crew to a manning agent."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Owners should be aware they
cannot delegate their obligation to employ qualified, certified and
competent crew to a manning agent. Should it be proven the crew were
failing in any of the three attributes, the vessel will be deemed
unseaworthy and the owners will lose their right to benefit from the
exception and limitation clauses in the contract of carriage.<br><br>In
addition to the inability to limit liability for the claim, the owner's
P&I Club cover for the claim may be prejudiced, leaving the owner along
to deal with this substantial loss. There is a fundamental rule in al
Club cover that the Club is not liable for claims if the events giving
rise to the claim were considered to be unsafe, unduly hazardous or
improper.<br><br>It is not enough for the crew to have certificates, and
the owners' must ensure the crew have the necessary experience to carry
out the task required on the particular ship type and size of vessel they
are employed. Further the owners should show there exists a system to
enable the crew to be familiarised with the ship and a system of
continuous training.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness008.htm 0
12    10    Delivery of cargo against a forged bill of lading         "In
the case of Motis (1999), the shipowners were held liable for delivering
cargo against a forged bill of lading." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In the case of Motes (1999),
the shipowners were held liable for delivering cargo against a forged
bill of lading. The P&I Club declined to support this claim despite the
owners had no knowledge the bills were forged and they acted in a way
consistent with normal commercial practice.<br>
                          <br>It is clear that under English Law the
shipowner has no defence at all to this claim even though they are also
the innocent victim of the fraud. The P&I Club declined liability for
this claim based on the rule which exclude liability arising out of
delivery of cargo without production of an original bill of
lading.<br><br>P&I Club rules state 'there is no cover in respect of any
liabilities…arising from…delivery of cargo carried under a negotiable
bill of lading or similar document of title without production of that
bill of lading or document of title properly endorsed…' . Breaking this
rule down, we opine the shipowner must receive a bill of lading which is
negotiable and properly endorsed to comply with the rules and to avoid
the claim falling under the exclusion.<br><br>To avoid owners being
placed in this difficult situation where they are also an innocent party
to a fraud and the claim is declined by the P&I Club, we suggest the
master receives standing orders to verify the authenticity of the bill,
and further the bill is properly endorsed between sellers and buyers down
to the ultimate receiver. If a bill has been properly endorsed by the
intermediary banks who have sold cargo based on the forged bill, we
consider there will be an opportunity to show the claim should fall under
Club cover, notwithstanding it turns out the bill was
fraudulent.<br><br>If the bill of lading is not properly endorsed, the
shipowner should have been put on notice or have reasonable suspicion the
bill may be forged and there may be other claimants entitled to
possession of cargo.<br><br>Our conclusion is that owners and the master
should not only verify the face of the bill of lading for its apparent
authenticity but also the back to trace and verify the endorsements. A
full legal argument we have prepared is available upon further
request.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness009.htm 0
13    9     Delivery of cargo without production of a straight bill of
lading            There are little precedents on this issue in the English
courts.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There are little precedents
on this issue in the English courts. However a recent case (APL v Peter
Voss) was heard in the Singapore courts where it was held the carriers
remain responsible even if delivery is made to the proper party named in
the straight bill of lading. In this case the consignee box named the
consignee without the words 'to order' or any other similar words
indicating the document was negotiable which is necessary for a bill of
lading to be negotiable.<br><br>The court rejected the argument the
document was effectively a seaway bill. It held that clear words must be
used to imply that the parties intended the document to be treated in all
respects as a seaway bill and that its presentation by the named
consignee is not necessary. It held that delivery under a straight bill
of lading should only be made against production of the document as with
a true bill of lading. The court took the view that a bill of lading had
two characteristics a) it was a document of title, b) it was negotiable,
and the absence of one characteristic, negotiability did not detract from
the other characteristic.<br><br>Owners should not presume they have no
risk or liabilities in delivering cargo to the proper party without
production of a bill of lading even if it is non negotiable. As owners
are well aware, the liabilities arising from delivery of cargo without a
bill of lading is excluded under Club cover.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness010.htm 0
14    8     Double Banking Clause        We recently received several
enquiries about the BIMCO Double Banking Clause.    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We recently received several
enquiries about the BIMCO Double Banking Clause.<br><br>BIMCO's clause is
not clear whether the liability of the charterer for damage to hull and
additional premium to insure the Hull policy deductible is limited to
cargo loading, discharging and transhipment operations, although we
believed there was no such restriction intended.<br><br>We have clarified
this issue with BIMCO who agree after examining their drafting notes,
there was never an intention to restrict the clause to apply in these
situations and the clause should also apply when the vessel only double
banks with another vessel due to port custom or congestion.<br><br>For
clarity, we suggest the BIMCO wording should be amended to avoid any
disputes and if owners require any assistance in this connection, they
should contact us.<br><br>Further we would advise the cost of insuring
the Hull deductible if this is agreed by the Hull insurers, may be
equivalent to about 35% of the amount of the deductible. In order to
avoid any difficulties in collecting this additional premium from
charterers, we suggest owners should advise this cost to charterers
before incurring this cost.</td>
                      </tr>"                               2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness011.htm 0
15    7     "Misrepresenting bills of lading, and ante dated bills"
      Everyone is will aware that P&I Club cover excludes liability of
the owner arising from fraudulent misrepresentations in the bill of
lading including ante and post dated bills.    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Everyone is will aware that
P&I Club cover excludes liability of the owner arising from fraudulent
misrepresentations in the bill of lading including ante and post dated
bills.<br><br>The obligation and liability of the owner is strictly
enforced by the English courts, which means a substantial loss to the
owner which is not insured. It is surprising that so many owners are
willing to take this risk in return for a letter of indemnity which is
itself unenforceable.<br><br>This principle was affirmed in 1999 by the
Court Of Appeal in Standard Chartered Bank v PNSC. This case dealt with a
novel issue whether the same standards apply to a bank in the course of
letter of credit transactions.<br><br>In this case the documents were
presented to the confirming bank Standard Chartered who due to negligence
did not note discrepancies and payment was made to the shippers. Standard
Chartered bank was not able to collect the monies from the receiver's
bank due to the discrepancies and tried to recover their loss from the
shipowner on basis they were not aware of the ante dating of the bills at
the time.<br><br>This case is interesting in that Standard Chartered bank
made several mistakes on their own accord in not checking the
discrepancies in the documents, and it is a possibility that even if the
bill was dated outside the period of the letters of credit, the bank
would still have processed the documents for payment. Further there is
the argument the real cause of the bank's loss was their own negligence
in failing to note the other discrepancies and their loss would have been
avoidable, apart from the ante dating of the bill.<br><br>The court held
the shipowners liable to the bank. It is apparent from this judgement
that as long as a party who was not aware of the fraudulent
misrepresentation of the bill at the time, later alleges this as a cause
of loss, notwithstanding the loss was due to other intervening causes,
the courts will give the claimant the benefit of doubt and hold the
shipowner liable.<br><br>In short, the practice of ante dating bills of
any other misrepresentation in the bill will allow the cargo owner do
reject the cargo, even though it can be proven the reasons for his
rejection was due to other unrelated commercial reasons such as a fall in
the market, his sub buyer no longer requires the cargo etc., This is a
really dangerous and foolish position for a shipowner to be in, as they
will in reality be financially guaranteeing every cargo owner's
profitability on each sale and resale transaction.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                               2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness012.htm 0
16    6     Ship Agents       "Owners should be careful when allowing the
charterers or their agents to sign bills of lading,"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Owners should be careful
when allowing the charterers or their agents to sign bills of lading, as
the bill issued will usually be considered an owner's bill even though
the owners may later on say the bill was incorrectly completed without
owner's authority.<br><br>We are aware of a case in which the agents were
nominated by the charterers to act as owner's agents. In this situation
it is likely the allegiance of the agent will be towards the charterer
notwithstanding the legal position. Due to a delay in loading, the
charterers sought the owner's agreement for the bills of lading to be
ante dated which was necessary in order for the charterer to comply with
the terms of the sale transaction, which the owners rightly declined.
Owners issued proper bills of lading stating the true date of loading,
but due to the conspiracy between the ship agents and the charterers, the
ship agents signed and issued another set of bills of lading which were
ante date. Due to a downturn in the cargo sale price, the receivers who
had paid or the cargo declined to receive the cargo and claimed the
owners defrauded them by issuing ante dated bills of lading. The
receivers claimed the full amount of the original cargo price they had
paid and arrested the vessel. The P&I Club declined cover for this claim
as the claim was based on the grounds the receiver's loss was caused by
ante dated bills of lading which is excluded under Club cover which
resulted in owners losing the whole vessel to claimants. <br><br>It is
especially important for owners to know and trust the ship agents,
especially when they are nominated by the charterers. We suggest that the
owners reserve their right to approve the ship agents nominated by the
charterers.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness013.htm 0
17    5     US Security Clauses          "After the events of September
11th, the US has been imposing new security regulations and measures
applicable to the shipping industry causing increased expenses and delays
to vessels calling in US."    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">After the events of
September 11th, the US has been imposing new security regulations and
measures applicable to the shipping industry causing increased expenses
and delays to vessels calling in US. To protect owner's interests against
the consequences of these new security measures, BIMCO has drafted a set
of standard clauses to be incorporated into time and voyage
charterparties.<br><br>These clauses can be obtained from BIMCO, or
owners can contact us in this respect.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness014.htm 0
18    4     US criminal laws apply to oil spill incidents       We read
from a recent article contained in Skuld Club's newsletter 'Beacon' that
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We read from a recent
article contained in Skuld Club's newsletter 'Beacon' that US criminal
laws apply to oil spill incidents imposing fines up to US$500,000. It is
said it is a grey area that fines imposed for strict US criminal
liabilities and costs incurred when defending US criminal prosecution are
not specifically covered under Club rules as it is considered that
criminal liabilities, fined and costs are not mutual risks. We were
surprised and concerned to read this as we do not share the same opinion
these risks are not covered under standard Club rules. We have discussed
this with the West Of England Club, and without prejudice to the Club
rules, they are of the same opinion as ourselves that criminal fines for
oil pollution would be recoverable as would associated legal costs
subject to the fundamental proviso ( which applies to all claims ) the
events giving rise to the fine were considered to be imprudent, unsafe,
unduly hazardous or improper. We shall discuss this matter with the other
P&I Clubs and shall keep you advised of their
opinions.<br><br>Additionally, failure to report a 'potentially hazardous
condition on board' and infringement of US law on the high seas can fall
within the jurisdiction of US authorities to prosecute such events as
'criminal' cases so owners should be particularly conscious of the nature
of cargo, condition of vessel and unlawful incidences during the voyage
to any US ports.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 insurance_awareness     awareness015.htm 0
19    3     Chinese crew compensation          "Unlike the China P&I Club,
there is no limit of liability for crew claims under the rules of P&I
Clubs who are members of the International Group." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Unlike the China P&I Club,
there is no limit of liability for crew claims under the rules of P&I
Clubs who are
members of the International Group.<br><br>The basic principle of Club
cover is that the member is fully reimbursed subject to the agreed
deductible for the full amount of claim settlement monies and expenses
necessary to conclude the crew claim.<br><br>So what is the amount of
compensation necessary to conclude a crew death claim ? This question
should in principle solely depend on the terms of the crew employment
contract. Under the Philppine POEA crew contract or the Korean Seaman's
crew contract, the terms and amount of compensation is clearly defined
and forms part of local law. However under a Chinese crew contract, it is
usually the case that either there is no crew contract (what used to be
the case for state owned companies), or if there is a crew contract that
it does not state the amount of crew death compensation. What is usually
found in Chinese crew contracts is a clause which provides for crew
compensation to be in accordance with the terms of the overseas P&I Club.
This clause means absolutely nothing as the rules of all Group P&I Clubs
do not define any terms of compensation to the crew, apart from the basic
principle of cover as mentioned above which is the widest form of cover
to the owner.<br><br>So how do the Group P&I Clubs handle the claim when
there is no crew contract or the crew contract does not define the death
compensation ? The P&I Clubs negotiate death compensation settlement
amounts based on previous and recent crew death claim compensations in
China. Basically the principle is simply the reasonable amount of
settlement necessary to amicably settle and conclude the death
compensation claim satisfactorily with the next of kin. At the moment
this ranges from about US$40,000 to US$60,000.<br><br>Having said this,
there has been claim demands from lawyers representing the next of kin
for an amount of RMB 800,000 based on Chinese court guideline dating back
to the late 1980's in relation to foreign flag vessels, and I do
understand that some Group P&I Clubs have agreed to settle for this
amount in very exceptional circumstances. However the practice is for the
P&I Clubs to settle crew death claims based on what is reasonable in the
market.<br><br>It is now becoming common for Chinese crew manning agents
to include in crew contracts that the terms of crew compensation is
subject to the Hong Kong Employees Compensation Ordinance. In this
situation the amounts would be clearly defined and calculable, and would
be far higher than the reasonable market settlement amounts in China. The
Group P&I Clubs have no objection to include such a clause into the crew
contract without any additional premium, but the owners should bear in
mind that the higher amounts of compensation will adversely affect the
owner's claims record, and this may not be in the owner's interest. The
terms of the crew contract should always be forwarded to the P&I Club for
their approval or record, otherwise there may be a risk that the owner's
excess liability arising from an unusual or unreasonable term in the crew
contract will not be covered by the Club.<br>
<br>We could comment a limit of liability for crew death claims of
US$30,000 under the China P&I rules is not sufficient to cover the
owner's legal liability towards the crew. This limit further includes all
cost and expenses connected with the claim such as burial fees etc, so in
reality the owners will only be able to recover an amount well below
US$30,000 to be used in settlement of the death compensation claim.</td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 insurance_awareness     awareness016.htm 0
20    2     Delivery of cargo into warehouses and without production of
bills of lading         This advice was prompted by a Gard Club circular
no. 3/2003 although we have adapted it with our own opinions. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">This advice was prompted by
a Gard Club circular no. 3/2003 although we have adapted it with our own
opinions. Cargoes are sometimes discharged into a bonded warehouse where
the consignee takes delivery of cargo.<br><br>There may be three types of
warehouse as follows.<ol><li>warehouse owned by
consignee</li><li>warehouse owned independently</li><li>warehouse owned
by customs or port.</li></ol><br><br>If the warehouse is owned by the
consignee, delivery of the cargo to this place will amount to delivery of
the cargo to the consignee, and without production of a bill of
lading.<br><br>We view the second situation the warehouse is
independently owned with the similar risk for the reason the warehouse
may be legally owned by different parties but beneficially owned by the
consignee. Even if the warehouse is truly independent, there may be long
term relations between the warehouse and consignee which will enable the
consignee to take delivery of cargo from the warehouse without production
of a bill of lading contrary to the shipowner's instructions.<br><br>Both
the foregoing circumstance will prejudice the P&I cover on the ground
that cargo has been delivered without a production of a bill of lading.
In the first situation, the shipowner will have no recourse claim against
the warehouse as it was the shipowner's own action in delivering cargo.
In the second situation there will be a recourse claim available but the
prospects of recovery may be extinguished if the warehouse is leased to
an operator with no financial standing.<br><br>Suggestions:<br><ol><li
class=""alpha"">Cargoes must not be delivered to the consignee's
warehouse.</li><li class=""alpha"">The Shipowner should still demand to
receive the customary LOI from the charterers who whichever party is
requesting the shipowner to deliver the cargo into a warehouse.</li><li
class=""alpha"">The shipowner should insist the cargo is delivered to an
independent warehouse and the ownership and reputation of the warehouse
and whether it is leased to an operator should be investigated by a
protecting agent. Upon satisfactory information, the shipowner should
sign a contract with the warehouse which includes a condition holding the
warehouse fully liable for delivery of cargo without production of a bill
of lading approved by the carriers or without carrier's consent. These
precautions will not reinstate the exclusion of Club cover for delivery
of cargo without production of a bill of lading but would allow the
shipowner an opportunity to recover their loss from the warehouse.
</li></ol><br></td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 legal_awareness awareness017.htm 0
21    1     When are additional shipowners' liability insurances (SOL
cover) required "required <span class=""genBoldText""><span
class=""genBoldText"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun;
color: black"" lang=""ZH-
CN"">&#20160;&#20040;&#26102;&#20505;&#38656;&#35201;&#25237;&#20445;&#33
337;&#19996;&#38468;&#21152;&#36131;&#20219;&#38505;&#65288;SOL&#20445;&#
21333;&#65289;" The need for these additional insurances are not
understood by the shipping community in China and we understand these
additional insurances are invariably not taken out by shipowners in China
to cover their additional risks in certain casualty incidences.
      "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">The need for these
additional insurances are not understood by the shipping community in
China and we understand these additional insurances are invariably not
taken out by shipowners in China to cover their additional risks in
certain casualty incidences.<br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#22312;&#20013;&#22269;&#28023;&#36816;&#20844;&#21496;&#37117;&#19981;&
#22826;&#29702;&#35299;&#20026;&#20309;&#38656;&#35201;&#25237;&#20445;&#
36825;&#20123;&#38468;&#21152;&#38505;&#65292;&#25105;&#20204;&#20102;&#3
5299;&#21040;&#20013;&#22269;&#33337;&#19996;&#37117;&#27809;&#26377;&#20
080;&#36825;&#20123;&#29305;&#23450;&#39118;&#38505;&#30340;&#38468;&#211
52;&#38505;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>There are several casualty situations in
which SOL cover should be arranged.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#20197;&#19979;&#20960;&#31181;&#29305;&#23450;&#39118;&#38505;&#24212;&
#20080;SOL&#33337;&#19996;&#36131;&#20219;&#38468;&#21152;&#38505;&#12290
;</span><br>
                        <ol><li>There are several casualty situations in
which SOL cover should be arranged.<br>
                            <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#24403;&#33337;&#33334;&#34987;&#25302;&#24102;</span></li>
                          <br>
                          <br><ol><li class=""roman"">Tower's
liability<br>
                            It is customary that all towage contracts
place all liability to third parties sustained by the tug including
damage to the tug onto the shipowner regardless of the shipowner.<br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>
&#25302;&#33337;&#30340;&#36131;&#20219;</span><br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#25152;&#26377;&#25302;&#24102;&#21512;&#21516;&#36890;&#24120;&
#37117;&#21015;&#26126;&#33337;&#19996;&#23545;&#25302;&#36718;&#36896;&#
25104;&#31532;&#19977;&#26041;&#30340;&#25152;&#26377;&#36131;&#20219;&#3
6127;&#36131;&#65292;&#21253;&#25324;&#23545;&#25302;&#36718;&#25439;&#23
475;&#12290;</span><br><br>P&I Club rules covers the liability of the
shipowner under a standard towage contract for customary towage such as
leaving and entering port or manoeuvring within a port. However owners
should be aware there is no automatic Club cover when the vessel is towed
in a casualty situation. The P&I Club should be instructed to arrange a
SOL insurance cover, and this premium would be allowed in general average
if the towage is also allowable in general average.<br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#20445;&#36180;&#35268;&#21017;&#21482;&#23545;&#26631;&#20934;&#25302;&
#24102;&#21512;&#21516;&#19979;&#30340;&#27491;&#24120;&#25302;&#24102;&#
36127;&#36131;&#65292;&#22914;&#36827;&#12289;&#20986;&#28207;&#21475;&#2
5110;&#22312;&#28207;&#20869;&#31227;&#21160;&#33337;&#33334;&#31561;&#12
290;&#28982;&#32780;&#33337;&#19996;&#24212;&#30693;&#36947;&#24403;&#333
37;&#33334;&#36973;&#36935;&#28798;&#23475;&#26102;&#30340;&#25302;&#2410
2;&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#19981;&#20250;&#33258;&#21160;&#25215;&#25285
;&#65292;&#24212;&#36890;&#30693;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#21152;
&#20445;&#33337;&#19996;&#36131;&#20219;&#38468;&#21152;&#38505;&#12290;&
#22914;&#26524;&#25302;&#24102;&#23646;&#20110;&#20849;&#25439;&#65292;&#
37027;&#20040;&#36825;&#31181;&#20445;&#38505;&#36153;&#20063;&#21487;&#2
0197;&#31639;&#20026;&#20849;&#25439;&#12290;</span></li><br><br><li
class=""roman"">Liability to cargo<br>Although bills of lading should
contain a clause which allows the vessel to be tow and be towed, this
liberty should only relate to customary towage such as in port or when
the vessel has sustained a casualty requiring towage.<br>
                              <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>
                              &#36135;&#29289;&#36131;&#20219;</span><br>
                              <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#34429;&#28982;&#25552;&#21333;&#26377;&#33337;&#33334;&#20801;&
#35768;&#25302;&#24102;&#21644;&#34987;&#25302;&#24102;&#30340;&#26465;&#
27454;&#65292;&#20294;&#36825;&#31181;&#26435;&#21147;&#21482;&#33021;&#2
9992;&#20110;&#36890;&#24120;&#30340;&#28207;&#20869;&#25302;&#24102;&#25
110;&#24403;&#33337;&#33334;&#36973;&#21463;&#24847;&#22806;&#20107;&#259
25;&#26102;&#38656;&#35201;&#30340;&#25302;&#24102;&#12290;</span><br><br
>Any other circumstance such as a decision by the shipowner to tow the
vessel to another port of repair apart from the nearest port of refuge,
or tow the vessel to destination may amount to a breach of the contract
of carriage. Unless the cargo interests have agreed to this towage
arrangement, an SOL insurance cover should be arranged.<br>
                              <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#20854;&#23427;&#24773;&#20917;&#22914;&#33337;&#19996;&#20915;&#23450;&
#23558;&#33337;&#25302;&#21040;&#21478;&#19968;&#20010;&#36828;&#31163;&#
26368;&#36817;&#30340;&#36991;&#38590;&#28207;&#30340;&#28207;&#21475;&#3
2500;&#20462;&#65292;&#25110;&#23558;&#33337;&#33334;&#25302;&#33267;&#30
446;&#30340;&#28207;&#65292;&#36825;&#31181;&#20570;&#27861;&#26159;&#368
29;&#21453;&#36816;&#36755;&#21512;&#21516;&#30340;&#65292;&#38500;&#3875
0;&#36135;&#26041;&#21516;&#24847;&#36825;&#31181;&#25302;&#24102;&#23433
;&#25490;&#12290;&#23545;&#27492;&#24212;&#23433;&#25490;&#33337;&#19996;
&#38468;&#21152;&#36131;&#20219;&#38505;&#12290;</span></li></ol><br><li>
When cargo is stored ashore whilst under ship's custody<br>
                                 <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#36135;&#29289;&#23384;&#25918;&#22312;&#23736;&#19978;&#20294;&#22312;&
#33337;&#33334;&#30340;&#20445;&#31649;&#19979;</span></li><ol><br><li
class=""roman"">P&I Club cover is prejudiced when the cargo is discharged
at a place other than the port of destination stipulated in the contract
of carriage. It is uncertain whether a P&I Club would agree to continue
their cover when the cargo is discharged at a port of refuge and it is
likely that all P&I Clubs would recommend the shipowner take out a SOL
insurance cover. It is evident the risk of cargo liability is greater
when the cargo is discharged and stored ashore due to the risks of theft,
negligence of warehouse, flooding, damage to cargo, intermingling and
contamination of cargo etc.<br>
                                       <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-
size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#24403;&#36135;&#29289;&#21368;&#22312;&#19981;&#26159;&#36816;&#36755;&
#21512;&#21516;&#35268;&#23450;&#30340;&#30446;&#30340;&#28207;&#30340;&#
20854;&#20182;&#28207;&#21475;&#65292;&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#20445;&#2
1333;&#23558;&#20250;&#21463;&#24433;&#21709;&#12290;&#24403;&#36135;&#29
289;&#21368;&#22312;&#36991;&#38590;&#28207;&#21518;&#65292;&#19981;&#330
21;&#30830;&#23450;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#26159;&#21542;&#2489
5;&#24847;&#32487;&#32493;&#20445;&#38505;&#65292;&#25152;&#26377;&#20445
;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#37117;&#20250;&#35201;&#27714;&#33337;&#19996;
&#21462;&#24471;&#19968;&#20221;&#38468;&#21152;&#39118;&#38505;&#20445;&
#21333;&#12290;&#26174;&#28982;&#36135;&#29289;&#30340;&#36131;&#20219;&#
39118;&#38505;&#26159;&#36739;&#22823;&#30340;&#65292;&#24403;&#36135;&#2
9289;&#21368;&#19979;&#23384;&#25918;&#22312;&#23736;&#19978;&#23601;&#20
250;&#20135;&#29983;&#20599;&#31363;&#12289;&#20179;&#24211;&#20445;&#316
49;&#30095;&#24573;&#12289;&#28024;&#27700;&#12289;&#36135;&#29289;&#2543
9;&#22351;&#65292;&#20132;&#21449;&#27745;&#26579;&#31561;&#39118;&#38505
;&#12290;</span><br><br>An SOL insurance cover would also be required
when the cargo is discharged into a warehouse and stored there pending
the tender of original bills of lading.<br>
                                       <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-
size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#24403;&#36135;&#29289;&#21368;&#36827;&#21644;&#23384;&#25918;&#22312;&
#20179;&#24211;&#31561;&#24453;&#27491;&#26412;&#25552;&#21333;&#26102;&#
38656;&#35201;&#19968;&#20010;&#38468;&#21152;&#39118;&#38505;&#20445;&#2
1333;&#12290;<br>
                                       </span></li></ol></ol></td>
                     </tr>"                              2003-08-05
      2003-08-05 insurance_awareness    chi_awareness018.htm   0
22          Algeria : problems with vessel arrests        "West of
England's correspondent lawyer, Omar Khelifa, has recently drawn
attention to a worrying trend in vessel arrests cases." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">West of England's
correspondent lawyer, Omar Khelifa, has recently drawn attention to a
worrying trend in vessel arrests cases. In several cases the private
Algerian Receivers have refused to accept a bank guarantee in order to
lift the arrest as provided in Article 156 of the Maritime Code . Instead
they have claimed a cash payment in full, usually in a foreign currency.
Indeed, Omar Khelifa advises that in some cases these receivers have
threatened to issue an arrest order simply to obtain a cash
payment.<br><br>Although this practice is illegal the only way to avoid
it is for the shipowners to institute proceedings in order to obtain a
judgement lifting the arrest. This may take several weeks, instead of
obtaining the lift arrest through an ex parte demand, which takes two or
three days. Normally, the President of the Court has to grant a lift of a
vessel arrest through an ex parte demand issued by the arrestor once the
bank guarantee has been duly provided by the Algerian Bank counter
guaranteed by the Ship Owners' Foreign Bank.<br><br>Due to the repetition
of such incidents in many Algerian ports, West of England's correspondent
lawyers have written to the Director of the Merchant Marine of the
Ministry of Transport in order to report this new trend, asking that he
inform the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Finances so that they
are able to take the appropriate measures to put an end to this
practice.<br><br>In addition to being in violation of the Algerian
Maritime Code and the 1952 International Convention on Ship arrest, Omar
Khelifa draws attention to the fact delays to vessels result in
port/berth congestion. This practice also affects the Algerian economy as
such practices infringe exchange control regulations as the foreign
currencies amounts claimed do not go through the appropriate bank
channels.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        algeria    Africa     Algeria
      Source : West of England Newsletter      2003-03-01 2003-03-01
      notices     algeria001.htm    0
23          Attempted theft at Douala          An incident off the waters
of Douala was reported where four thieves were found on board a ship.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident off the waters
of Douala was reported where four thieves were found on board a ship.
The thieves jumped overboard when the crew raised the alarm. After the
incident, they found that thieves had accessed the ship by climbing the
mooring line. The incident highlights the fact that ship should be bear
in mind the dangers of the waters off Douala.    <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        cameroon   Africa     Cameroon
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-08-22 2003-08-22 notices
      cameroon001.htm 0
24          Increase of damage claims to berths and fenders - EI Dekeila
            "Due to damage to fenders and quays by vessels, Alexandria
Port Authority (APA) has increased it's number of claims and" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Due to damage to fenders and
quays by vessels, Alexandria Port Authority (APA) has increased it's
number of claims and the value of the claim involved. Immediate payment
for it's claims is insisted by APA before the departure of the vessel
concerned.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        egypt Africa      Egypt Source : UK P&I
Club Loss Prevention Bulletins      2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices
      egypt001.htm      0
25          Attack at Conakry       An incident off the waters of Conakry
was reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident off the waters
of Conakry was reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship. Ten
pirates armed with guns threatened to kill the crew. They stole crew's
personal property and took ship equipment. This incident highlights the
fact that ships should be bear in mind the dangers in this
area.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        guinea      Africa      Guinea
      BIMCO News 2003-10-20 2003-10-20 notices        guinea001.htm    0
26          Contact with bollard at Port Harcourt           One of our
clients recently received a claim from the Nigerian Ports Authority
alleging the vessel had contacted the bollard "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">One of our clients recently
received a claim from the Nigerian Ports Authority alleging the vessel
had contacted the bollard and caused damage for about US$16,000. After
investigations it was apparent the vessel could not have made contact
with the bollard as the vessel berthed at a place elsewhere to the
alleged damaged bollard, and further the bollard had been damaged for a
considerable period of time of many years during which many vessels have
used this bollard. We are advised this same bollard may have been the
subject of several successful claims of damage made against various
vessels without any repairs having been carried out to the
bollard.<br><br>The master should be instructed to make a brief
examination of shore bollards, fenders and wharfs prior to the vessel
berthing, and if damage is noted a protest letter should be given to the
port authority and the charterers.<br><br>Reference is requested to the
recent London Club circular in which several incidences attributable to
defective port facilities have occurred which have caused loss and damage
to vessels.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      2003-10-30 2003-10-30 notices       nigeria001.htm    1
27          Lagos - armed attack          "In an incident off the waters of
Lagos where pirates tried to hijack a ship," "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In an incident off the
waters of Lagos where pirates tried to hijack a ship, ten pirates armed
with knives boarded the ship and stole three mooring ropes. This
incident highlights the fact that ships should be bear in mind the
dangers anchoring whilst awaiting berth in this area.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-07-21 2003-07-21 notices
      nigeria003.htm    0
28          Coastal and Inland Shipping (Cabotage) Act            The
carriage of passengers and cargo on vessels built "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The carriage of passengers
and cargo on vessels built, owned and registered in Nigeria is now
encouraged by the Coastal and Inland Shipping (Cabotage) Act.
Foreign shipping companies are still guaranteed participation as long as
they follow certain conditions.
<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      Source : The London Club News        2003-06-01 2003-06-01 notices
      nigeria002.htm    0
29          Pirate attacks at Warri              An incident at Warri was
reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship.         "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident at Warri was
reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship.      The pirates were armed
with guns and the crew were injured seriously by the attack.       Attempts
to contact the port police and port control received no response.        The
attackers finally left taking with them chains and electrical
cables.<br><br>Another pirated attack was reported on a ship at Warri in
which the crew were seriously injured. The attackers carried hammers,
steel bars and machine guns and used cars to crash through the port
entrance gate. The port police were unable to intervene.<br><br>Ships
should be aware of the dangers whilst in this area.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      Source :   BIMCO News 2003-01-14 2003-01-14 notices
      nigeria004.htm    0
30          Tanker attack off Dakar              An incident off the waters
of Dakar was reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship.        "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident off the waters
of Dakar was reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship.       Six robbers
armed with knives boarded the ship. The pirates were spotted by the
ships's crew and ran away taking two mooring ropes.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         senegal     Africa      Senegal
      Source : BIMCO News      2003-01-24 2003-01-24 notices
      senegal001.htm    0
31          Pirate attack - Gulf of Aden         A ship in the Suez Canal
was attacked by pirates armed with guns and knives. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A ship in the Suez Canal was
attacked by pirates armed with guns and knives. The pirates threatened
the ships' crew and robbed money from the cast box. The crew were injured
and communications equipment destroyed. In order to reduce the risk of
attack, ships should keep a distance from the waters of Gulf of Aden.
Ships navigating in this area should be aware of the risk of pirate
attacks.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         somalia     Africa      Somalia
      Source : BIMCO News      2003-04-25 2003-04-25 notices
      somalia002.htm    0
32          Attempted hijack by pirates off Socotra Island                An
incident off the waters of Somalia was reported where pirates tried to
hijack a ship.    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident off the waters
of Somalia was reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship.       The
pirates failed to intimidate the crew and later abandoned their attempts
to attack. This incident highlights the fact that ships should be bear in
mind the dangers of the waters off Somalia particularly the Eastern coast
and around Socotra.       In order to reduce the risk of attack, ships
should keep a distance of 50 to 100 miles away from the coast, and
reduce radio transmissions which can be monitored by
pirates.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         somalia     Africa      Somalia
      Source : Bimco News      2003-03-14 2003-03-14 notices
      somalia001.htm    0
33          Fraudulent Claims for Services - Suez Canal          A case of
fraudulent claims for services was reported in the Suez Canal area.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A case of fraudulent claims
for services was reported in the Suez Canal area.<br><br>A payment
reminder was received for an invoice which was later found to be for
motorboat's assistance during the vessel's Suez Canal transit. The
invoice appeared to have been signed by the ship's master however the
signature was fraudulent and no motorboat assistance had been
ordered.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        suezcanal Africa       Suez Canal
      Source : UK P&I Club Bulletin 324 2003-09-01 2003-09-01 notices
      suez001.htm 0
34          Fraudulent Bills of Lading for copper shipments - Dar Es
Salaam            "Cases of fraudulent bills of lading involving copper
shipments, originating from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania have been reported."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Cases of fraudulent bills of
lading involving copper shipments, originating from Dar es Salaam,
Tanzania have been reported. Similar cases have also been known to occur
from other ports where copper is exported. The criminals create a false
bill of lading then attempt to sell the false consignment by presenting a
false mining company document confirming the copper's
origin.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        tanzania   Africa      Tanzania
      Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins       2003-06-01
      2003-06-01 notices      tanzania001.htm 0
35          Soya bean license requirement            "Licenses are now
required to be issued by the Ministry Of Agriculture in China for import
of soya bean, who will examine the quality"    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Licenses are now required to
be issued by the Ministry Of Agriculture in China for import of soya
bean, who will examine the quality of the soyabean. Due to the
fluctuation soya bean market, it is possible that licences will not be
issued or are issued after extensive delays which will prompt the cargo
owner / trader to look for a reason to recoup his loss, which is usually
from the shipowner.<br><br>It is important that shipowners do not give
any opportunity for the cargo interest to transfer his loss onto the
shipowner, which is usually be means of looking for technical breaches
such as back dating, ante dating of bills of lading and any discrepancies
or misdescription in the bills of lading, especially with regard to
statements on quality or grade of cargo.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        china Asia China       2003-11-10
      2003-11-10 notices      china004.htm     1
36          China compulsory certificate       China has introduced a new
compulsory quality certificate. Initialy coming into operation in May
2003 "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">China has introduced a new
compulsory quality certificate. Initialy coming into operation in May
2003 (later postponed to August 2003), the China compulsory certificate
is required for nineteen groups of products prior to sale in China. This
product selection is based on whether the product is related to human
life and health, animals, plants, environmental protection
etc.<br><br>The system has been created by the Certification &
Accreditation Administration for Quality Supervision and Inspection and
Quarantine (AQSIQ). As of 1st August 2003, any product falling within the
above groups not bearing the new certificate for Compulsory Product
Certification (CCPC) aswell as the China Compulsory Certificate Mark
(CCCM) that arrives in China will be denied access and subject to
penalties.<br><br>The background to the CCC stems from China's entry into
the WTO. Whereas in the past China operated via two compulsory inspection
systems one for imports and exports and the other for quality control,
this has now been combined. As of 1st August 2003, the CCIB mark
introduced in 1989 and required for 47 product groups and the CCEE mark
required for electrical commodities will no longer be seen. They will be
replaced by CCC which actually came into effect on 1st May 2002 with a
one year provisional application period. Therefore the period of grace is
over and the Chinese authorities will be tough on products which do not
meet the new requirements.<br><br>Although we have not experienced these
new regulations having delayed vessel's discharge or delivery, we suggest
that the owners should include a clause in the charterparty and bills of
lading which provides for all delays attributable to import and customs
regulations not being complied with, to be compensated as damages for
detention, and any other loss and expense of whatsoever nature arising
therefrom to be fully borne by the charterers and cargo interest. Further
the clause should also allow the ship to sail to any port which the
owners consider most suitable to discharge and deliver the cargo should
damages for detention exceed 7 days, with all such time loss and expense
being borne by charterers / cargo interests. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        china Asia China        2003-11-10
      2003-11-10 notices      china003.htm      1
37          Shipments of undeclared dangerous cargoes from China
      Incidents of dangerous cargo being undeclared have been reported
being transported out of China.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Incidents of dangerous cargo
being undeclared have been reported being transported out of China. In a
recent case, the container was declared to contain stoneware but was
found to be a mixture of fireworks and cutlery.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        china Asia China Source : UK P&I Club
Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-08-01 2003-08-01 notices
      china001.htm      0
38          Problems with Importing Soya Beans        China may take action
to protect their soya bean market which could include the halting of soya
bean imports to the end of November.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">China may take action to
protect their soya bean market which could include the halting of soya
bean imports to the end of November. There could be a risk of problems in
the carriage of soya beans to China creating delays in berthing and
operations.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        china Asia China Source : UK P&I Club
Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-08-01 2003-08-01 notices
      china002.htm      0
39          Pirate attacks at Chittagong        A number of incidents of
pirate attack have been reported at Chittagong.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A number of incidents of
pirate attack have been reported at Chittagong.<br><br>In one case
fifteen armed robbers carried knives and used hooks to board the tanker.
During the attack, watchmen boarded the ship and the attackers ran
away.<br><br>In another incident pirates armed with knives and machetes
boarded the ship and stole mooring lines. Two days later, their motor
boats were spotted as they tried to plan for another attack.<br><br>These
incidents highlights the fact that ships should be aware of the dangers
of pirate attacks in this area.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        bangladesh Asia Bangladesh Source :
BIMCO News 2003-08-08 2003-08-08 notices        bangladesh001.htm 0
40          Pre-arrival clearance         "All mainland river / coastal
trade vessels, irrespective of their tonnage size can now make
applications for pre-arrival clearance at the Port of Hong Kong."
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">All mainland river / coastal trade
vessels, irrespective of their tonnage size can now make applications for
pre-arrival clearance at the Port of Hong Kong. These applications should
be made to the Immigration Department of the Harbour Control
Section.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        hongkong    Asia Hong Kong Source :
The London Club News    2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices       hongkong001.htm
      0
41          Revised Guidelines for Oil Tankers - India            All Indian
and foreign flagged oil tanker will be required to comply with certain
criteria before being allowed entry into India's ports as from 1st April
2004. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">All Indian and foreign
flagged oil tanker will be required to comply with certain criteria
before being allowed entry into India's ports as from 1st April 2004.
Tankers with segregated ballast tanks in protected locations must be
under 25 years and those oil tankers above 20 years must have at least
CAP-2 rating for hull, machinery and cargo equipment. The tankers must be
classed with either The Indian Register of Shipping (IRS) or The
International Association of Classification Societies (IACS).
<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        india Asia India Source : UK P&I Club
Bulletin 320      2003-08-01 2003-08-01 notices       india001.htm      0
42          New Requirements for Confirmation of Club Cover - Mumbai
      "Before being given access to Mumbai port, the ship's agent is
required to submit a copy of the ship's P&I Certificate of Entry. "
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Before being given access to
Mumbai port, the ship's agent is required to submit a copy of the ship's
P&I Certificate of Entry. The port will insist in seeing proof from the
insurance provider themselves of the particular ship's coverage. Any
doubt regarding the P&I documentation will be clarified with the local
correspondent.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        india Asia India Source : UK P&I Club
Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-08-01 2003-08-01 notices
      india002.htm      0
43          Attack off Bintan Island - Indonesia            An incident off
the waters of Bintan Island was reported where pirates tried to hijack a
ship. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident off the waters
of Bintan Island was reported where pirates tried to hijack a ship.
Seven attacker tried to hijacked the ship but were spotted by the ship's
piracy watch. Although no one was injured in the incident, pirates
damaged the locks of doors of the accommodation.     The incident
highlights the fact that ships should be bear in mind the dangers in this
area.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        indonesia Asia Indonesia Source :
BIMCO News 2003-07-18 2003-07-18 notices        indonesia002.htm 0
44          Mis-declaration of Coal             In Indonesia a bulk carrier
loaded a cargo of coal for which the 'Cargo Declaration' from the shipper
stated that the IMO Category for Ocean Transport Purposes for the coal
was CAT 'A' which now no longer exists. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In Indonesia a bulk carrier
loaded a cargo of coal for which the 'Cargo Declaration' from the shipper
stated that the IMO Category for Ocean Transport Purposes for the coal
was CAT 'A' which now no longer exists. This declaration was meant to
indicate that the coal had no problems with spontaneous heating during
shipment.<br><br>The master was instructed to seal the ventilators and
hatch covers throughout the voyage. The master being aware of the
relevant Code of Practice conducted the necessary hold atmosphere tests
in accordance with the Code and found that there were increasing levels
of carbon monoxide in some of the holds. This indicated that the coal had
started to heat spontaneously.<br><br>The master was able to control this
heating and continue the voyage without problems.<br><br>Masters should
be aware of The Code of Safe Practice for Solid Cargoes and to the
possibility of mis-declaration from shippers.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        indonesia Asia Indonesia Source :
UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-06-01 2003-06-01 notices
      indonesia001.htm 0
45          Tokyo MOU inspection campaign             "Starting 1 September
2003, the Tokyo MOU on Port state Control will carry out a"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Starting 1 September 2003,
the Tokyo MOU on Port state Control will carry out a three month
Concentrated Inspection Campaign on safety issues Concentrating on bulk
carriers of greater than 15,000 GT and over 12 years of age.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        japan Asia Japan Source : BIMCO News
      2003-08-29 2003-08-29 notices       japan001.htm      0
46          """ Beneficiaries "" under POEA defined"              "Following
a Court of Appeal decision in which a seafarer was lost at sea,
""beneficiaries"" under the POEA contract was"        "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Following a Court of Appeal
decision in which a seafarer was lost at sea, ""beneficiaries"" under the
POEA contract was determined to mean that of spouse, legitimate children
and descendants and not legitimate parents and ascendants.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"        philippines       Asia Philippines        Source :
West of England Newsletter    2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices
      phillipines001.htm      0
47          """ cappuccino "" bunkers"          "There has been a case of a
"" cappuccino "" bunkers incident reported in which"        "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There has been a case of a
"" cappuccino "" bunkers incident reported in which a bunker delivery at
Singapore suffered shortage despite all checks being in order at the time
of bunkering. Further investigation showed that the cause was excessive
bubbling in the fuel.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        singapore Asia Singapore Source :
BIMCO News 2003-09-08 2003-09-08 notices        singapore001.htm 0
48          CIC Inspection on bulk carriers          "As a result of the
three month Concentrated Inspection Campaign by the Tokyo MOU on Port
State Control in the Asia - Pacific region," "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">As a result of the three month
Concentrated Inspection Campaign by the Tokyo MOU on Port State Control
in the Asia - Pacific region, the Singapore port authority will also be
inspecting as many bulk carriers as possible.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       singapore Asia Singapore Source :
BIMCO News 2003-09-08 2003-09-08 notices       singapore002.htm 0
49          Piracy at Singapore          Pirates tried to hijack a ship
approaching Singapore's safety fairway. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Pirates tried to hijack a
ship approaching Singapore's safety fairway. The pirates succeeded in
stealing the crew's personal belongings and damaged one oiler. This
incident highlights the fact that ships should be aware of the dangers
whilst transiting the Singapore Straits.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       singapore Asia Singapore Source :
BIMCO News 2003-06-25 2003-06-25 notices       singapore004.htm 0
50          Visa requirements for ships crew         "With effect from 23
December 2002, Bangladeshi crew are required to arrive in Singapore with
a valid entry visa,"    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">With effect from 23 December
2002, Bangladeshi crew are required to arrive in Singapore with a valid
entry visa, whether they are joiners, signing off or through crew. Those
without the necessary visa during arrival will be refused
entry.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       singapore Asia Singapore Source :
UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins    2003-01-01 2003-01-01 notices
      singapore003.htm 0
51          Hatch covers notice          "In Thailand vessels are required
to be ready for loading 24 hrs a day," "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In Thailand vessels are
required to be ready for loading 24 hrs a day, but sudden rain showers
frequently occur which can cause wet damage to cargo, due to the
inability for the hatch covers to close immediately. The crew should take
precautions<br><br><ol><li class=""roman"">to only open the hatch covers
which will be worked on immediately.</li><li class=""roman"">Open hatch
covers half way if possible.</li><li class=""roman"">Crew should be
prepared and there should be sufficient hands to be able to close hatch
covers without delay.</li></ol><br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       thailand    Asia Thailand
      2003-11-10 2003-11-10 notices      thailand003.htm 1
52          CIC inspection on bulk carriers          "Starting 1 September
2003, Australian ports will carry out a three month Concentrated
Inspection Campaign on bulk carriers over 15,000 GT "      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Starting 1 September 2003,
Australian ports will carry out a three month Concentrated Inspection
Campaign on bulk carriers over 15,000 GT and 12 years old as part of a
co-ordinated effort organised amongst the Tokyo MOU Members on Port State
Control.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"        australia Australia Australia Source : BIMCO
News 2003-08-12 2003-08-12 notices       australia002.htm 0
53          Recent amendments to Marine Pollution          "As of 1
November 2002, the "" Marine Legislation ( Marine Pollution ) Act 2002 ""
in New South Wales now gives effect to the provisions of the MARPOL
Convention."      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">As of 1 November 2002, the
"" Marine Legislation ( Marine Pollution ) Act 2002 "" in New South Wales
now gives effect to the provisions of the MARPOL Convention. Fines for
oil pollution have been heavily increased and summons against the Owner,
master or crew member can now be served on an agent of the
ship.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-06-19 2003-06-19 notices
      australia001.htm 0
54          Oil Pollution Fines           "Oil pollution fines in New South
Wales, Australia, have been increased from US$500,000 to US$5 million for
coporate fines and a maximum of US$250,000 for individuals."      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Oil pollution fines in New
South Wales, Australia, have been increased from US$500,000 to US$5
million for corporate fines and a maximum of US$250,000 for
individuals.<br><br>Crew members could now be fined heavily if found
guilty of discharging oily waste directly into the sea whereas previously
liability for pollution was only on the owners of the vessel and the
master.<br><br>Vessels should ensure they have adequate insurance to
cover oil spills. If evidence of insurance eg. a P&I club certificate of
entry is not provided on demand, the master and owner of the ship are
automatically guilty of an offence. Each may be fined up to US$27,500 and
US$55,000 respectively.<br><br></td>
          </tr>
"           australia Australia Australia Source : The London Club
News 2003-01-01 2003-01-01 notices        australia003.htm 0
55          Increased tanker inspections        The Australian Maritime
Safety Authority ( AMSA ) will inspect all tankers over 15 years of age
and all single hulled tankers visiting Australian ports following the
sinking of the Prestige off the coast of Spain.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Australian Maritime
Safety Authority ( AMSA ) will inspect all tankers over 15 years of age
and all single hulled tankers visiting Australian ports following the
sinking of the Prestige off the coast of Spain.<br><br>Tankers in
Australian waters will be closely monitored by AMSA and those ships
identified at any Australian port with serious deficiencies expected to
affect seaworthiness and the safety of crew, or pose a threat to the
environment will be detained.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins        2003-01-01
      2003-01-01 notices      australia004.htm 0
56          New bunkering operation rules at Danish ports         New
regulations came into force 21 May 2003 and concern the bunkering
operations in Danish territorial waters.        "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New regulations came into
force 21 May 2003 and concern the bunkering operations in Danish
territorial waters.<br><br>The regulations include inspection of the
bunker ship by the DMA, a record of inspections and pressure-testing of
hoses to be kept on board, a means of emergency stopping the bunkering
supply pumps, measures for before and during operation and a contingency
plan in case of oil pollution.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        denmark     Europe      Denmark
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-06-04 2003-06-04 notices
      denmark001.htm    0
57          Single - hull tankers ban           Restrictions on single -
hull tankers in Gibraltar came into effect 20 October 2003.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Restrictions on single -
hull tankers in Gibraltar came into effect 20 October 2003. Those of
5,000 tons deadweight and carrying oils of IFO 180 will not be permitted
to enter Gibraltar port.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        gibraltar Europe        Gibraltar
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-10-17 2003-10-17 notices
      gibraltar001.htm 0
58          New Regulations for Ship Waste and Cargo Residues - Italy
      New regulations governing the disposal of ship's waste and residues
of cargo have been implemented by Italian ports from 6 August 2003.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New regulations governing
the disposal of ship's waste and residues of cargo have been implemented
by Italian ports from 6 August 2003. These regulations implement EC
directive No 2000/59/CE.<br><br>All ships with the intention of calling
at an Italian port must now inform the Marine Authority with all required
information relating to wastes kept on board at least 24 hours prior to
estimated time of arrival. Details of the type of waste and cargo
residues onboard must be listed, together with details regarding the
amount of waste to be delivered.<br><br>If these regulations are not
complied with, there may be a fine of between Euro 3000 to Euro
30,000.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        italy Europe      Italy Source : UK P&I
CLUB Bulletin 321 2003-09-01 2003-09-01 notices       italy002.htm      0
59          Tankers restriction           "Single-hull tankers over 5,000
dwt and above fifteen years of age"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Single-hull tankers over
5,000 dwt and above fifteen years of age, carrying crude oil, heavy fuel
oil, exhausted oils, bitumen and tar, will no longer be allowed to call
at Italian ports.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        italy Europe      Italy Source : The
London Club News 2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices        italy003.htm      0
60          "Inadequate reception facilities at Augusta,Italy"          "In
December 2002, there was a report of reception facilities not being made
available to a vessel calling at the port of Augusta, Italy." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In December 2002, there was
a report of reception facilities not being made available to a vessel
calling at the port of Augusta, Italy. The vessel requested to dispose
her engine slops and oily residues from her tank-washings but after
having to wait several days and lodge a formal application for disposal,
left without carrying out the disposal.<br><br>The MARPOL 73/78
regulations state facilities for such discharge should be made available
to vessels needing them.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        italy Europe      Italy Source : BIMCO
News 2003-01-20 2003-01-20 notices        italy001.htm      0
61          Norway : extension of territorial sea           The Norwegian
Parliament is considering an Act that would extend the Norwegian
territorial sea to 12 nautical miles      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Norwegian Parliament is
considering an Act that would extend the Norwegian territorial sea to 12
nautical miles (about 22 kilometres) from the current one sea mile (about
four nautical miles). It is thought that the sinking of the ""PRESTIGE""
of the northern coast of Spain has been a factor behind the introduction
of this legislation. This is coupled with the increased output from oil
fields east of the Barents Sea, resulting in more tanker movements out of
the Murmansk region down along the Norwegian coast to continental
Europe/the United States.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        norway      Europe      Norway
      Source : West of England Newsletter       2003-04-01 2003-04-01
      notices     norway001.htm     0
62          Shortage claims on steel shipments        An increasing of
shortage claims on steel shipments was found from Russian ports.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An increasing of shortage
claims on steel shipments was found from Russian ports.<br><br>Due to a
lack of independent tally of the cargo, the ports demand the master to
sign relevant tally sheets, receipts and bills of lading (without any
remarks) etc. even if a tally was carried out by the crew.<br><br>If a
shortage occurs, the consignee will meet claims losses and owner have no
defence to their claims. It is therefore necessary for a tally count to
be arranged by independent tally teams when loading steel from Russian
ports.<br><br></td>
                     </tr>"         russia      Europe      Russia
      Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins        2003-05-01
      2003-05-01 notices      russia002.htm     0
63          Incorrect declaration of medicines in ship's first aid kits
            Strict requirements are imposed by the Russian Customs
Authorites at Novorossiysk. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Strict requirements are
imposed by the Russian Customs Authorites at
Novorossiysk.<br><br>Medicines contained in the first aid kit includes
medicines containing narcotic, psychotropic or poisonous substances.
Medicines must therefore be taken into account when filling out the
general customs declaration. The Novorossiysk Customs have been
initiating cases against shipowners and ship masters for administrative
violations for false declaration of medicines.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        russia      Europe      Russia
      Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins        2003-05-01
      2003-05-01 notices      russia001.htm     0
64          Introduction of filing fees for litigation            "Fees are
now charged by Spanish courts for filing claims, counterclaims and
appeals." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Fees are now charged by
Spanish courts for filing claims, counterclaims and appeals. The fees
charged range from 90 to 600 Euros in civil and commercial matters, and
between 120 and 600 Euros in administrative matters.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        spain Europe      Spain Source : The
London Club News 2003-06-01 2003-06-01 notices        spain001.htm      0
65          New legislation on ship inspection        Spain has enacted two
Royal Decrees in relation to toughen it's policy on shipowners in all
pollution matters in port and coastal waters. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Spain has enacted two Royal
Decrees in relation to toughen it's policy on shipowners in all pollution
matters in port and coastal waters. The decrees incorporate the
provisions of two EC directives dealing with the enforcement of
international standards for ship safety, prevention of pollution and ship
inspections.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"        spain Europe      Spain Source : West of England
Newsletter 2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices        spain002.htm      0
66          Violations of the Air Pollution Act - River Schelde         A
ship transiting in the River Schelde was found to have failed the sulphur
content limit required by the EC Air Pollution Act Directive 199/32.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A ship transiting in the
River Schelde was found to have failed the sulphur content limit required
by the EC Air Pollution Act Directive 199/32. The sulphur content
concerned the marine diesel oil which was shown to be 1.61% exceeding the
limit stated in the Act to be 0.20%. Cases such as these may be subjected
to prosecution by the Dutch authorities.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        thenetherlands    Europe      The
Netherlands Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins        2003-07-01
      2003-07-01 notices      thenetherlands001.htm 0
67          Proof of P&I Club entry             "Following new legislation
in Turkey, vessels carrying dangerous cargo with a GT greater than 500GT
will not be allowed " "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Following new legislation in
Turkey, vessels carrying dangerous cargo with a GT greater than 500GT
will not be allowed to pass through the straits unless they provide proof
of their P&I insurance cover and produce their P&I
certificates.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        turkey      Europe      Turkey
      Source : The London Club News       2003-01-01 2003-01-01 notices
      turkey001.htm     0
68          Mariupol - first aid kit medication requirements
      Similar strict requirements on the declaration of medicines
contained in the first aid kit imposed by the Russian Customs Authorites
at Novorossiysk have been reported at Mariupol.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Similar strict requirements
on the declaration of medicines contained in the first aid kit imposed by
the Russian Customs Authorites at Novorossiysk have been reported at
Mariupol.<br><br>Medicines contained in the first aid kit includes
medicines containing narcotic, psychotropic or poisonous substances.
Medicines must therefore be taken into account when filling out the
general customs declaration.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ukraine     Europe      Ukraine
      Source : Bimco News     2003-10-16 2003-10-16 notices
      ukraine001.htm    0
69          Extortion at Mariupol         Extortion at Mariupol was
reported where the Master paid officials USD400 to settle a matter
relating to the ship's galley waste water.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Extortion at Mariupol was
reported where the Master paid officials USD400 to settle a matter
relating to the ship's galley waste water. A further amount of USD1,000
was requested from the Master to overlook imposing a fine when Customs
found some expired flares. This was later negotiated down to
USD500.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"        ukraine    Europe      Ukraine     Source : BIMCO
News 2003-07-22 2003-07-22 notices       ukraine002.htm    0
70          Ban on Argentinian Ships and Cargo - Iran            "In a
circular issued by the Ports and Shipping Organisation of Iran, all ships
sailing under " "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In a circular issued by the
Ports and Shipping Organisation of Iran, all ships sailing under the
Argentinian flag, or any vessel which has loaded cargo in Argentina for
discharge in Iran, will not be allowed entry into all Iranian ports from
1st September 2003.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       iran Middle East Iran Source : UK P&I
Club Bulletin 323 2003-09-01 2003-09-01 notices      iran001.htm 0
71          Increasing Cases of Oil Smuggling - Iraq             A notice
from Maritime Liaison Office in Bahrain has been issued in relation to
increased oil smuggling in Iraq. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A notice from Maritime
Liaison Office in Bahrain has been issued in relation to increased oil
smuggling in Iraq.<br><br>It states coalition forces will prevent ships
smuggling illegal oil and that oil can only be purchased from the Iraqi
state government (State Oil Marketing Organization). Any smuggling of oil
will be considered as stolen government property and subject to seizure
and vessels transporting illegal oil will be considered to be
participating in illegal activities.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       iraq Middle East Iraq Source : UK P&I
Club Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-08-01 2003-08-01 notices
      iraq002.htm 0
72          Permitted Trade        Trading with Iraq must be in accordance
with strict compliance with the UN Sanctions. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Trading with Iraq must be in
accordance with strict compliance with the UN Sanctions. Exceptions to
the sanctions known as the Oil for Food programme is strictly controlled
by the United Nations and UN inspectors. Only two loading facilities are
permitted by the UN to export oil from Iraq. Non compliance with UN
Sanctions could result in severe penalties.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       iraq Middle East Iraq Source : UK P&I
Club Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-03-01 2003-03-01 notices
      iraq001.htm 0
73          Israel : age restriction on tankers            "West of
England's correspondents, M Dizengoff & Co Ltd., have advised that the
Israeli Ministry of Transport has introduced a"      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">West of England's
correspondents, M Dizengoff & Co Ltd., have advised that the Israeli
Ministry of Transport has introduced a maximum age for tankers entering
territorial water with effect from 18th February 2003. Regulation 15(a),
Israeli Regulations of Shipping and Ports (Safety of Navigation 1982)
states that tankers 25 years of age and above and carrying persistent
oils as cargo will not be permitted to enter Israeli territorial waters
in the Mediterranean. An age restriction of 20 years and above has been
introduced for tankers entering the port of Eilat in the Gulf of Aqaba.
Persistent oils include, but are not limited to, crude, heavy and lube
oil. There are no age restrictions on tankers carrying non-persistent
oils as cargo.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        israel      Middle East Israel
      Source : West of England Newsletter       2003-04-01 2003-04-01
      notices     israel001.htm     0
74          Reminder of Boycott Rules - Lebanon             Lebanese boycott
rules prohibit Arab citizens from dealing with both Israeli public and
private entities. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Lebanese boycott rules
prohibit Arab citizens from dealing with both Israeli public and private
entities.<br><br>Ships calling at Israeli ports are prohibited from
trading with Arab ports. Those found trading are prosecuted by Lebanese
judicial authorities and may be blacklisted by the Central Bureau for the
Boycott of Israel. The prosecution may be based on port call details
posted on the Internet.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        lebanon     Middle East Lebanon
      Source : UK P&I Club Bulletin 322 2003-09-01 2003-09-01 notices
      lebanon001.htm    0
75          Middle East - Piracy report         Armed attacks on ships in
the Gulf of Aden off Yemen have been reported involving several small
vessels together with a 'mother' ship. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Armed attacks on ships in
the Gulf of Aden off Yemen have been reported involving several small
vessels together with a 'mother' ship. Ships should be aware of the
dangers of the Middle East Gulf, Gulf of Oman, Arabian Sea and Red Sea
and attempt to keep a distance from the coastlines off both Yemen and
Somalia.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        yemen Middle East Yemen Source : BIMCO
News 2003-05-19 2003-05-19 notices        yemen001.htm      0
76          Dubai - New requirements to Control Hydrocarbon Emissions
      "From 22 September 2003, tanker berth users/charterers in Dubai
must ensure that they do not cause air pollution by controlling their
hydrocarbon emissions."       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">From 22 September 2003,
tanker berth users/charterers in Dubai must ensure that they do not cause
air pollution by controlling their hydrocarbon emissions. Cargo tanks
need to be purged with fresh inert gas before arrival at Dubai ports so
that the maximum hydrocarbon content is 2% or less. Pump rooms also need
to be ventilated well in advance of arrival to expel cargo
vapours.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        uae   Middle East UAE   Source : UK P&I
Club Bulletin 329 2003-10-01 2003-10-01 notices       uae001.htm 0
77          Flags disallowed        The United Arab Emirates does not allow
vessels operating under the flags of      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The United Arab Emirates
does not allow vessels operating under the flags of Albania, Belize,
Honduras, Georgia, Saint Vincent & Grenadines, Mauritius, Cambodia,
Maldives, Comoro Islands, Bolivia, San Tome & Principe, and Tonga to
enter it's territorial waters unless they have a class certificate issued
by ABS, BS, CCS, DNV, GL, KR, LR, NK, RI, RS, CRS or IRS.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        uae   Middle East UAE   Source : The
London Club News 2003-01-01 2003-01-01 notices        uae002.htm 0
78          New regulations for non-tank vessels            New regulations
starting from 27 May 2003 now require non-tank vessels trading in Alaskan
waters to provide "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New regulations starting
from 27 May 2003 now require non-tank vessels trading in Alaskan waters
to provide proof of financial responsibility for only deductibles more
than USD 50,000. For non-tank vessels exceeding 400 gross tonnage,
contingency plans are required for oil discharge prevention.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        alaska      North America    Alaska
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-06-02 2003-06-02 notices
      alaska001.htm     0
79          Vessel Calling Vancouver - Certified Response Organization
Membership        "In Canada, vessels arriving are required to be
registered with a Certified Oil Spill Response Organization." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In Canada, vessels arriving
are required to be registered with a Certified Oil Spill Response
Organization. On the West Coast of Canada that organization is Burrard
Clean Operations.<br><br>The cost of enrolment is Cdn $ 610.00 ( a $
450.00 annual registration fee plus a $ 160.00 processing fee
).<br><br>Registration is arranged through the Chamber of Shipping of
British Columbia, and is usually done by whichever local agent Owners and
/ or their Charterers intend to use.<br><br>The Various forms required
include the Membership Agreement, a Pre - Arrival ( PAN ) Form, and a
Declaration for a Ship that is in Waters South of the Sixieth Parallel of
North Latitude.<br><br>The forms are also vailable for downloading from
the Chamber of Shipping website at <a href=""http://www.chamber-of-
shipping.com."" target=""_new"">http://www.chamber-of-
shipping.com.</a><br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        canada      North America    Canada
      "Source : Bull, Housser & Tupper" 2003-10-30 2003-09-09 notices
      canada001.htm     1
80          Canada : new security measures            "Certain initiatives
have already been implemented since the attacks on the World Trade Center
in New York on September 11th, 2001."     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Certain initiatives have
already been implemented since the attacks on the World Trade Center in
New York on September 11th, 2001. These include the introduction of the
96-hour rule whereby vessels intending to enter Canadian waters must
provide notification to the authorities. There has also been increased
collaboration with authorities in the United States to enhance screening
and hazard assessment procedures for ships entering the Saint Lawrence
Seaway system. However, the Canadian government has now announced that it
will adhere to and enforce the December 31, 2004 implementation date for
on-board Automatic Identification System (AIS) for ships to which the
December, 2002 security-related SOLAS amendments apply. Canada will be
acquiring shorebased tracking facilities to use this system to identify
and monitor ships in and approaching Canadian waters.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        canada      North America    Canada
      Source : West of England Newsletter       2003-04-01 2003-04-01
      notices     canada002.htm     0
81          New safety regulation         A new regulation starting with
effect from 1 January 2004 the Panama Canal Authority ( PCA ) will
require that      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A new regulation starting
with effect from 1 January 2004 the Panama Canal Authority ( PCA ) will
require that all vessels have the Panama Canal Shipboard Oil Pollution
Emergency Plan for Canal Waters ( PCSOPEP ) plan on board. This plan is
required to be submitted to the Panama Canal Authority ( PCA ) for review
96 hours before arrival.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        panama      North America    Panama
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-09-05 2003-09-05 notices
      panama001.htm     0
82          Reporting requirement         "Reporting requirements from July
1, 2003 for vessels approaching the Panama Canal." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Reporting requirements from
July 1, 2003 for vessels approaching the Panama Canal. These vessels are
now required to advise the Panama Canal Authority of their arrival not
less than 96 hours in advance of arrival and provide details in relation
to their type, tonnage, nature of cargo on board and details of flag
state registry.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        panama      North America    Panama
      Source : The London Club News       2003-06-01 2003-06-01 notices
      panama002.htm     0
83          Ship security plans           USCG has stated that vessels
subject to SOLAS and ISPS are not required to submit vessel security
plans to the uSCG for "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">USCG has stated that vessels
subject to SOLAS and ISPS are not required to submit vessel security
plans to the uSCG for approval. USCG will accept International Ship
Security Certificates issued by foreign organizations.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA
      2003-11-10 2003-11-10 notices       usa004.htm 1
84          New Petroleum Coke Cleanliness Requirements - USA
      Loading Petroleum Coke in the US Gulf now requires strict
cleanliness requirements following holds being rejected. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Loading Petroleum Coke in
the USA Gulf now requires strict cleanliness requirements following holds
being rejected. One Texas firm of surveyors have issued guidelines
stating that cargo compartments and hatch covers must be clean, dry and
free of previous cargo residue, rust and paint.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA   Source :
UK P&I Club Bulletin 328      2003-10-01 2003-10-01 notices      usa001.htm
      0
85          Cargo manifest information          Previous Coast Guard rule
requirements for carriers to submit their cargo manifest information to
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Previous Coast Guard rule
requirements for carriers to submit their cargo manifest information to
US Customs via electronic means with effect from July 1, 2003, has now
been suspended at the request of US Customs.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA   Source :
The London Club News    2003-06-01 2003-06-01 notices      usa002.htm 0
86          Restrictions in discharge of water used to wash holds -
Mississippi and Calcasieu Rivers          Discharging hold cleaning water
into the Mississippi requires a permit which is issued after samples of
the water to be discharged have been tested. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Discharging hold cleaning
water into the Mississippi requires a permit which is issued after
samples of the water to be discharged have been tested. Discharging wash
water is not allowed within one mile of fresh drinking water intakes and
Water Department officials will be on the lookout for ships discharging
water into the river.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA   Source :
UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins     2003-05-01 2003-05-01 notices
      usa003.htm 0
87          Contamination of Coffee by Wood Preservatives        A
consignment of coffee was found to be contaminated "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A consignment of coffee was
found to be contaminated due to the treatment of the container boards
with a wood preservative product containing dichlorophenol.On delivery,
the coffee was found to give off a bad odour and upon analysis was found
to contain traces of dichlorophenol. As a result, the coffee was
destroyed.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        westindies North America     West
Indies      Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins       2003-07-01
      2003-07-01 notices      westindies001.htm 0
88          Reception Facilities          "A vessel recently arrived at
Buenos Aires, Argentina and tried to dispose of garbage on board."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A vessel recently arrived at
Buenos Aires, Argentina and tried to dispose of garbage on board. She was
unable to do so as no reception of garbage was made available at the
port. The same vessel tried again to dispose the same garbage at other
terminals in Argentina and Brazil, without success. No assistance was
received from any of the port authorities in relation to the
matter.<br><br>The MARPOL 73/78 regulations state that facilities for
disposal of garbage should be made available to vessels needing
them.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        argentina South America      Argentina
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-09-02 2003-09-02 notices
      argentina002.htm 0
89          Loading in River Panana / River Plate area           "To reduce
the risk of grounding and causing damage to the channel, the Argentinean
Coast Guard recommends that vessels using the main waterways from Santa
Fe to the ocean must have drafts below 34 feet."     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">To reduce the risk of
grounding and causing damage to the channel, the Argentinean Coast Guard
recommends that vessels using the main waterways from Santa Fe to the
ocean must have drafts below 34 feet. High tidal levels have enabled some
vessels with drafts exceeding 34 feet to use the River Parana safely but
as tidal levels varies, this should not be taken into account when
calculating the vessel's draft.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        argentina South America      Argentina
      Source : The London Club News       2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices
      argentina001.htm 0
90          Reception Facilities          "A vessel recently arrived at
Buenos Aires, Argentina and tried to dispose of garbage on board."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A vessel recently arrived at
Buenos Aires, Argentina and tried to dispose of garbage on board. She was
unable to do so as no reception of garbage was made available at the
port. The same vessel tried again to dispose the same garbage at other
terminals in Argentina and Brazil, without success. No assistance was
received from any of the port authorities in relation to the
matter.<br><br>The MARPOL 73/78 regulations state that facilities for
disposal of garbage should be made available to vessels needing
them.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil      South America    Brazil
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-09-02 2003-09-02 notices
      brazil001.htm     0
91          Port health requirements - Santos         "All ships calling at
Santos will be inspected by the Health Authority, ANVISA which will be
enforcing a minimum level of cleanliness determined by existing hygiene
regulations."     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">All ships calling at Santos
will be inspected by the Health Authority, ANVISA which will be enforcing
a minimum level of cleanliness determined by existing hygiene
regulations. The regulations require the maintenance of all the
compartments of the ship eg. gallery, dry store, cold store, dining
saloon and toilets and bathrooms to be in satisfactory hygienic-sanitary
condition and free from any potential health risk.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil      South America    Brazil
      Source : Britannia Steam Ship Insurance - Risk Watch       2003-08-01
      2003-08-01 notices      brazil002.htm     0
92          Visas       A 'Permanent Visa V' issued by a Brazilian embassy
following approval by the Brazilian Ministry of Labour is required
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A 'Permanent Visa V' issued
by a Brazilian embassy following approval by the Brazilian Ministry of
Labour is required by all crew members arriving in Brazil. These visa
applications must be received at least thirty days before the crew
member's arrival in Brazil. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil      South America    Brazil
      Source : The London Club News       2003-06-01 2003-06-01 notices
      brazil003.htm     0
93          Port health update            Vessels / Owners could be fined
heavily for details being entered incorrectly on their crew's vaccination
cards.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Vessels / Owners could be
fined heavily for details being entered incorrectly on their crew's
vaccination cards. There have been cases where a Deed of Infraction was
served on the vessel / owners for incorrect or missing details. For
vessels trading between South America (Brazil) and west / northwest
African countries, all crew vaccination cards should be completed fully
and accurately.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil      South America    Brazil
      Source : West of England Newsletter       2003-04-01 2003-04-01
      notices     brazil004.htm     0
94          New civil code          The time-limit for presenting cargo
claims has now been changed from one to three years from the date of
discharge. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The time-limit for
presenting cargo claims has now been changed from one to three years from
the date of discharge. This change has been due to a new Civil Code as of
effect from 12th January 2003 which also allows the time limit to be
extended once. For personal injury claims, the time bar has been changed
from twenty years to ten years.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil     South America    Brazil
      Source : West of England Newsletter      2003-04-01 2003-04-01
      notices     brazil005.htm     0
95          Bunkering - New safety precautions - Santos
      "Petrobras, the state oil company responsible for supply of
bunkers, has issued safety instructions following a fatal accident
involving an inspector of a bunker barge, who fell from a pilot ladder of
a vessel receiving bunkers." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Petrobras, the state oil
company responsible for supply of bunkers, has issued safety
instructions following a fatal accident involving an inspector of a
bunker barge, who fell from a pilot ladder of a vessel receiving
bunkers.<br><br>During all bunkering operations an operational safety
inspector from the firm Technimar, a company contracted by Petrobras will
assist, with no cost to owners. This inspector will verify whether safety
procedures under the international maritime conventions are being adhered
to, by both the attending barge and by the vessel being replenished with
bunkers. Attention will be paid to the vessel's access ladder by the
inspector. The access ladder ""quebra-peito"" used for transit between
the vessel and attending barge will only be found to be acceptable if it
complies with IMO-SOLAS standards. It is also compulsory for the vessel
to have one crew member stand-by at the top of the ladder every time the
ladder is being used by Petrobras' safety inspector or by a crew member
of attending barge.<br><br>If these procedures are not completed
Petrobras will not proceed with the bunkering process.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil     South America    Brazil
      Source : UK P&I Club Loss Prevention Bulletins      2003-01-01
      2003-01-01 notices      brazil006.htm    0
96          Further Cases of Drug Smuggling - Colombia          Packets of
a suspected narcotic were found by the US Customs and DEA agents upon
inspection of a ship that loaded at Colombia. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Packets of a suspected
narcotic were found by the US Customs and DEA agents upon inspection of a
ship that loaded at Colombia. Checks carried out before departing
Colombia which included proof of drug searches by the ship's staff and
the Colombian Navy showed no results.<br><br>Although the DEA and the
Customs authorities accepted that the ship's staff were not responsible
for the presence of the drugs, a large fine was levied at US$4,576,000
for approx. 50kg of narcotics.<br><br>Before departing Colombian ports,
drug searches should be carried out and recorded in the ships
records.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        colombia   South America    Colombia
      Source : UK P&I Club Bulletin 327 2003-10-01 2003-10-01 notices
      colombia001.htm 0
97          Peru : new reporting procedures for vessels         "West of
England's local correspondents in Lima, Overseas Service Agency S.A.,
have reminded that under the Peruvian Harbour Master's Regulations"
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">West of England's local
correspondents in Lima, Overseas Service Agency S.A., have reminded that
under the Peruvian Harbour Master's Regulations, all vessels entering or
leaving Peruvian territorial waters (200 miles) must notify the Maritime
Authority of their position and intention of doing so. Any failure or
omission in providing such notification to the Maritime Authority will
result in a fine against the vessel. The amount of the fine is calculated
by reference to the vessel's tonnage. They have also advised that the
Peruvian Maritime Authority has recently changed its directives and
contact details. All ships must now report their position and their
intention to entry or leave Peruvian waters to the following email
address:<br><br><a
href=""mailto:dicatramar@marine.mil.pe"">dicatramar@marine.mil.pe</a><br>
<br>In the event members are unable to reach the Maritime Authority by
email they should contact them by fax or telex on the following
numbers:<br><br> Fax No. (51-1) 429-1547 and Telex No.
3626042<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        peru South America      Peru Source :
West of England Newsletter    2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices
      peru001.htm 0
98          Arrest for not flying the Algerian flag         A ship was
arrested in Algerian territorial waters for not flying the Algerian flag
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A ship was arrested in
Algerian territorial waters for not flying the Algerian flag and was
instructed to return to the original port. The vessel was delayed for
two days after which the Master was fined the maximum under Algerian Law
of USD 1,300.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        algeria     Africa      Algeria
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-05-27 2003-05-27 notices
      algeria002.htm    0
99          Incident of stowaways at Arzew            Two stowaways were
found on a tanker at Arzew. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Two stowaways were found on
a tanker at Arzew. They tried to disembark at a US port and failed but
succeeded at Sture, Norway, where they applied for asylum.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        algeria     Africa      Algeria
      Source : BIMCO News - Stowaways     2003-08-13 2003-08-13 notices
      algeria003.htm    0
100         Further problems with Alleged Shortage Claims - Bulk Grain
Cargoes - Algeria       More cases of shortage claims on discharging bulk
cargo at Algerian ports have been reported.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">More cases of shortage
claims on discharging bulk cargo at Algerian ports have been reported.
Possible reasons for shortage could be due to loss during transit when
trucks are overloaded or due to the shore scales used.<br><br>It appears
that when there is a surveyor attending the discharge, there are no
shortage claims but without the presence of a surveyor, shortage claims
regularly occur. Ships discharging cargo at Algerian ports should engage
a surveyor and control the weighing of cargo to reduce the possibility of
claims arising.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        algeria     Africa      Algeria
      Source : UK P & I Club Bulletin     2003-11-01 2003-11-01 notices
      algeria004.htm    0
101         New immigration clearance requirements for crewmembers of
non-military ships            "Starting 1 November 2003, new immigration
clearance procedures require crewmembers"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Starting 1 November 2003,
new immigration clearance procedures require crewmembers of non-military
ships to carry a valid passport and identity document. Those without both
documents will not be allowed to enter Australia and will have to remain
on board whilst their vessel is in Australian waters. Shipping companies
may be fined $5,000 for each crewmember found without the necessary
documents.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-07-21 2003-07-21 notices
      australia005.htm 0
102         Stowaways found with cocaine        A stowaway was found
smuggling cocaine into Belgium.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A stowaway was found
smuggling cocaine into Belgium. The vessel had called at Colombia where
banana crates were loaded. The stowaway was found hiding behind the
banana crates and the cocaine was found taped to the crates.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        belgium     Europe      Belgium
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-06-16 2003-06-16 notices
      belgium001.htm    0
103         Mooring gang assists stowaways            A mooring gang helped
to hide stowaways at Buenaventua. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A mooring gang helped to
hide stowaways at Buenaventua.    Even though the ship owner employed
watchmen to watch the gangway, the stowaways hid behind the mooring gang
and jumped onto main deck once the ship's lines were cast
off.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        colombia    South America     Colombia
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-03-07 2003-03-07 notices
      colombia002.htm 0
104         Persistent stowaways at Abidjan           Eight stowaways were
found on board of ship at Abidjan "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Eight stowaways were found
on board of ship at Abidjan for the second time in three days despite
measures in place to prevent stowaways. The stowaways hid under bags of
cocoa and were therefore undetected during a ship search.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ivorycoast Africa       Ivory Coast
      Source : BIMCO News - Stowaways     2003-01-03 2003-01-03 notices
      ivorycoast001.htm 0
105         "USD 12,000 for passage to Korea or US"         "Seventeen
Chinese stowaways found on a Hong Kong container ship alleged that they
had paid to 'snakeheads' USD 12,000 to be smuggled to Korea or US."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Seventeen Chinese stowaways
found on a Hong Kong container ship alleged that they had paid to
'snakeheads' USD 12,000 to be smuggled to Korea or US.      Even though ship
was searched by 64 police officers, a further four stowaways succeeded in
escaping from the search and were found at the next port where they were
repatriated to their place of origin.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        hongkong    Asia Hong Kong Source :
BIMCO News 2003-08-12 2003-08-12 notices        hongkong002.htm 0
106         Stowaway ban lifted at Bedi ports         "In response to
appeals by shipping interests, the Gujarat Maritime Board has cancelled
the banning of ships found to have stowaways on board." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In response to appeals by
shipping interests, the Gujarat Maritime Board has cancelled the banning
of ships found to have stowaways on board.     This decision will influence
all ships calling at Bedi ports. When stowaways are found, the Ships'
agent needs to report to the Immigration Authorities, Police and Port
Office, obtain permission to proceed and pay for Police Guards to be
present.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       india Asia India Source : BIMCO News
      2003-03-21 2003-03-21 notices      india004.htm     0
107         Kandla re-opens door to ships with stowaways        "With
effect from 14 February 2003, new procedures to facilitate ships with
stowaways require an ""Undertaking"" from the port agent" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">With effect from 14 February
2003, new procedures to facilitate ships with stowaways require an
""Undertaking"" from the port agents to be submitted to the Kandla Port
Trust Deputy Conservator and to the Kandla Traffic Manager.<br><br>The
new policy also requires guards to be on the ships until they leave port.
The port agents must be given enough advance notice of arrival and
details relating to the stowaways must be submitted to the Kandla
Immigration Authorites, the Superintendent of Police, the KPT Deputy
Conservator and the Kandla Traffic Manager.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       india Asia India Source : BIMCO News
      2003-02-19 2003-02-19 notices      india003.htm     0
108   25    Cargo must be delivered in return for a bill of lading
despite local law or practice at place of discharge       "Under Chile
law, carriers are required to deliver cargo to a licensed warehouse."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""> Under Chile law, carriers
are required to deliver cargo to a licensed warehouse. Once goods are so
delivered, the carriers' responsibility ceased and it is practice the
carriers do not receive an original bill of lading for delivery. In Chile
the Hamburg rules are applicable which further provides if carriers had
acted in accordance with local laws, they are not liable for delivery
without production of a bill of lading. <br>
                                               <br>
In the case of <u>East West Corp v DKBS (2002 LL 182)</u> , the English
High Court said that Chilean law related to procedures and did not affect
the fundamental obligation of carriers to deliver cargo in return for a
bill of lading. Nothing in Chilean law prevented the carriers from
insisting that cargo is delivered in return for a bill of lading, despite
contrary practice. Accordingly carriers were held under English law for
delivery of cargo in Chile without production of a bill of lading. <br>
<br>
This case stresses the importance of insisting on a bill of lading in any
situation, unless this fundamental obligation is ruled illegal in the
place of discharge. </td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-11-25
      2003-11-25 legal_awareness awareness022.htm 1
109         Piracy attacks on vessels          IMB reports that year 2003
has seen the highest number of piracy attacks "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">IMB reports that year 2003
has seen the highest number of piracy attacks on vessels (344) primarily
emanating from Indonesia, Bangladesh and Nigeria.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       indonesia Asia Indonesia
      2003-11-25 2003-11-25 notices      indonesia003.htm 1
110         Piracy attacks on vessels          IMB reports that year 2003
has seen the highest number of piracy attacks "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">IMB reports that year 2003
has seen the highest number of piracy attacks on vessels (344) primarily
emanating from Indonesia, Bangladesh and Nigeria.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       bangladesh Asia Bangladesh
      2003-11-25 2003-11-25 notices      bangladesh002.htm 0
111         Piracy attacks on vessels          IMB reports that year 2003
has seen the highest number of piracy attacks "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">IMB reports that year 2003
has seen the highest number of piracy attacks on vessels (344) primarily
emanating from Indonesia, Bangladesh and Nigeria.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      2003-11-25 2003-11-25 notices      nigeria005.htm    0
112         False allegations from stowaways         "Upon arrival at port
Recife, Brazil the port authority, police was present to carry out
investigations into allegations the crew"      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We recently experienced a
claim which ought to be known by our other clients. Our ship was manned
by a full complement of Chinese crew. Upon arrival at port Recife, Brazil
the port authority, police was present to carry out investigations into
allegations the crew had thrown overboard several stowaways who had
survived. The crew advised there were never any stowaways on board. The
crew were all interrogated and the vessel was detained pending security
by the agents who were nominated by the charterers Messrs. Wilsons that
crew repatriation, accomodation expenses and fines would be
met.<br><br>This incident was prime news for the local media, with the
possibility of criminal proceedings against the crew for attempted
murder. The agents demanded security from the shipowners for US$180,000
cash and US400,000 in the form of a Club LOU. Apparently the P&I Club
involved had recently handled two similar cases in Brazil all involving
Chinese crew but the agents did not demand any security.<br><br>It is
important for the owners and crew to be aware when calling at Brazilian
ports of the possibility of these false allegations which may be a means
for the stowaways to make a claim or obtain sympathy in being
relocated.<br><br>Further owners should always try to discuss with the
charterers for an appointment of an agent with whom the owners are also
familiar with in Brazil.<br><br>We also suggest all owners to have a
strict standing procedure for the crew to ensure that no stowaways board
the vessel at any port. If the procedures are sufficiently strict to
prevent the boarding of stowaways and forms part of an audited procedure,
this may be useful to disprove any false allegations the stowaways
emanated from the vessel.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       brazil      South America     Brazil
            2003-11-25 2003-11-25 notices      brazil007.htm     1
113
                  0
114         Iraqi stowaway boards at Bandar Abbas          An Iraqi
stowaway was found hidden after several days of the ship leaving port.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An Iraqi stowaway was found
hidden after several days of the ship leaving port. The stowaway had
managed to avoid been caught even though the ship had been searched
thoroughly by police officers at Bandar Abbas prior to departure.
Although the stowaway had no any identification, he was able to disembark
at Maputo, Mozambique.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        iran Middle East Iran Source : BIMCO
News 2003-03-07 2003-03-07 notices        iran002.htm 0
115         Irish agents target by migrant smugglers              Port
agents in Ireland agents were reported as being targeted by migrant
smugglers "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Port agents in Ireland
agents were reported as being targeted by migrant smugglers when a ship
seeking services for minor repairs, crew change and purchasing of mooring
lines did not exist.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ireland     Europe      Ireland
      Source : BIBCO News     2003-10-22 2003-10-22 notices
      ireland001.htm    0
116         Jamaica - Police make major marijuana bust            "Over
4,500 kg of marijuana valued at USD 27 million was found in two shipping
containers" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Over 4,500 kg of marijuana
valued at USD 27 million was found in two shipping containers hidden
among boxes of yams and vegetables. The drug produced in Jamaica was
aimed at the New York and New Jersey markets.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        jamaica     North America     Jamaica
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-01-10 2003-01-10 notices
      jamaica001.htm    0
117         United Nations extends sanctions against Liberia            "On
6 May, the United Nations Security Council took an action to extend the
existing sanctions against Liberia"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">On 6 May, the United Nations
Security Council took an action to extend the existing sanctions against
Liberia      Action including extending weapons embargo, restriction of
export of rough diamond and restricting senior official travel overseas.
The Council further decided all States to take measures to prevent the
import of logs and timber from Liberia.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        liberia     Africa      Liberia
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-05-07 2003-05-07 notices
      liberia001.htm    0
118         Netherlands - Four tones of cocaine seized            An
incident was reported in which four tonnes of smuggled cocaine with an
estimated value "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">An incident was reported in
which four tonnes of smuggled cocaine with an estimated value of more
than USD200 million was destroyed by Dutch Customs.      The cocaine had
been hidden in a compartment in one of the ship's fuel
tanks.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        thenetherlands    Europe      The
Netherlands Source : BIMCO Bulletins      2003-10-01 2003-10-01 notices
      thenetherlands002.htm 0
119         Questionable violations - Nigeria         "A number of
incidents in which Nigerian port officials and Nigerian Immigration
Officers have been paid to overlook ""questionable"" violations have been
reported." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A number of incidents in
which Nigerian port officials and Nigerian Immigration Officers have been
paid to overlook ""questionable"" violations have been
reported.<br><br>Money and items from the ship's provisions have been
reported as being given to avoid huge fines levied at the vessel or even
possible arrest. The violations range from crew members not having the
correct visas, ship deficiencies (which were prepared in advance), crew
vaccination certificates being on the wrong coloured paper and even the
ship's ""Guide to Port Entry"" not being the latest edition.<br><br>Ships
trading to Nigeria should be aware of these types of
incidents.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-10-22 2003-10-22 notices
      nigeria006.htm    0
120         Stowaway regulations          "In South Africa, the local
Immigration Authority is seeking to fine ships reported to have
stowaways" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In South Africa, the local
Immigration Authority is seeking to fine ships reported to have stowaways
on board at around USD 300 per head even if the presence of the stowaways
has been reported.     Ships which do not report the stowaways on board
will be subjected to fines of up to USD 1,200 per stowaway.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        southafrica Africa      South Africa
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-03-04 2003-03-04 notices
      southafrica001.htm      0
121         Tanzanian stowaways at Cape Town          Two Tanzanian tried
to stow away at Cape Town     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Two Tanzanian tried to stow
away at Cape Town.    They wore stevedore uniforms to avoid being caught
but were found on the deck by the crew.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        southafrica Africa      South Africa
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-07-12 2003-07-12 notices
      southafrica002.htm      0
122         Violent stowaways board ship at Izmir           "Two violent
stowaways were found on a ship at Izmir, Turkey." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Two violent stowaways were
found on a ship at Izmir, Turkey.     They were violent against the crew
and port officials. When the ship arrived at Italian ports local
officials did not allow the stowaways to disembark. They finally
disembarked back at the original port.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        turkey      Europe      Turkey
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-03-12 2003-03-12 notices
      turkey002.htm     0
123         Irregularities case of certificates at Mersin and Iskenderun
            Three incident of fraud were found at Mersin and Iskenderun.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Three incident of fraud were
found at Mersin and Iskenderun.<br><br>Case I: a claim for USD 500.00
demanded by Inspectors at Mersin for discrepancies of Engineers'
certificates.<br><br>Case II:    a claim for an invalid period of sanitary
certificate, the case was settled when the Master provided two cartons of
cigarettes and four bottles of spirits to inspectors.<br><br>Case III:
an inspector charged USD 100.00 at Iskenderun for the replacement of an
'expired' medical chest certificate.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        turkey      Europe      Turkey
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-07-12 2003-07-12 notices
      turkey003.htm     0
124         Cigarettes for port officials at Ukraine             Ships
trading to the Ukrainian ports of Sevastopol and Odessa should note the
demand for cigarettes by port officials "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Ships trading to the
Ukrainian ports of Sevastopol and Odessa should note the demand for
cigarettes by port officials including Immigration Officers, Customs
Officers, Quarantine Officers and Ecological Inspectors. The crew should
also take care of their personal belongings during cabin inspections and
ensure the ballast water is of Black Sea origin.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ukraine     Europe     Ukraine
      Source : BIMCO News     2003-01-10 2003-01-10 notices
      ukraine003.htm    0
125         USA - Tightening of Special Interest Vessel (SIV) program
regulations against Iraq            The U.S. Coast Guard has issued a
special notice in relation to vessels flying the flag of Iraq. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The U.S. Coast Guard has
issued a special notice in relation to vessels flying the flag of Iraq.
Those vessels, irrespective of the flag of registry are deemed to be
under the effective control of Iraq and will not be allowed to enter US
Waters unless under conditions of distress.<br><br>Other vessels having
Iraqi citizens on board serving as Master, Chief Mate or Chief Engineer
will be required by the Captain of the Port to have these crewmember
remain onboard. Failure to comply with the Captain of the Port's order
could result in imprisonment for up to 10 years, and fines of USD
10,000.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA   Source :
BIMCO News 2003-04-08 2003-04-08 notices        usa005.htm 0
126         Australia New South Wales pollution regulations            All
vessels are required to have insurance cover for oil spills.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><u>P&I cover</u><br><br>All
vessels are required to have insurance cover for oil spills. If evidence
of insurance is not provided on demand such as a P&I entry certificate,
the master and owner are automatically guilty of an offence and may be
fined up to A$55,000/US$27,000 for the master and A$110,000/YUS$55,000
for the owner.<br><br>It is important for owners to provide on the vessel
an original P&I entry certificate on board the vessel 'prior' to the
vessel entering Australian waters. A copy of the P&I certificate may not
be acceptable and it is useful for the P&I certificate to state the limit
of liability for oil pollution claims.<br><br>It is also important to be
aware that if owners and masters are fined due to not being able to
provide sufficient evidence of oil pollution cover such as a P&I entry
certificate, such fines would not be covered under the P&I cover on the
basis such a requirement ought to be well known to the owner and non
compliance is attributable to lack of owner's personal
diligence.<br><br><u>Increased fines and responsibility for
spill</u><br><br>On 1 November 2002 the New South Wales State Government
confirmed maximum fines for oil pollution are increased to
A$500,000/US$250,000 for individuals and A$10/us$5 million for
corporations.<br><br>If environmental damage is caused, additional fines
can be sought.<br><br>Strict liability is imposed on owners, master and
crew.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      2003-12-02 2003-12-02 notices       australia006.htm 1
127         Alaskan Financial responsibility for non tank vessels
      We summarise the Alaskan regulations which came into force on 27
May 2003 as clients frequently request this information despite it being
contained in the P&I Club circulars.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We summarise the Alaskan
regulations which came into force on 27 May 2003 as clients frequently
request this information despite it being contained in the P&I Club
circulars.<br><br><u>P&I cover :</u><br>The regulations do not alter the
amount of financial responsibility. An application for approval of
financial responsibility must be submitted to the Alaskan Dept of
Environment Conservation (ADEC) at least 15 days before the vessel enters
Alaskan waters.<br><br>Evidence of financial responsibility can be proof
of entry in a P&I Club. new applications and applications for renewal
must not be submitted less than 30 days prior to its
expiry.<br><br>Separate proof of financial responsibility in respect of
deductibles is only required in respect of deductibles exceeding
US$50,000.<br><br><u>Contingency plan requirements</u><br>As of 27
November 2002, non tank vessels require approved oil discharge prevention
and contingency plans. These plans have to be submitted to ADEC for
approval and from 27 May 2003, all vessels exceeding 400 GT may not
operate in Alaskan waters unless application for approval has been
submitted.<br><br>The regulations allow for 2 types of plan, The
Equivalent Plan and the Streamlined plan.<br><br>Equivalent plan
:<br>This is for companies who intend to use their own clean up resources
and capabilities and provide thei own management team to respond to an
oil spill.<br>We will not discuss this further as none of our clients
will wish to explore this capability.<br><br>Streamlined plan : <br>This
is for applicants who wish to employ a State approved clean up contractor
and incident management team. ADEC has 5 days to approve an application
for a streamlined plan.<br><br>The State approved vessel response plan is
renewable every 3 years and has to cover each region of the vessel's
operation. There are 10 regions and the plan has to comply with the
regulations in each of the regions in which the vessel intends to
operate.<br><br>A number of organizations have been approved by ADEC.
There are detailed regulations on what is required for approval which we
will not discuss, and we suggest the P&I Club is contacted to suggest an
approved organisiation to assist the vessel to comply with these
requirements.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       alaska      North America    Alaska
            2003-12-04 2003-12-04 notices      alaska002.htm    0
128   26    Whether to issue clean bills of lading        Should owners
issue clean bills of lading where they have agreed a clause in the
charterparty      "<tr>
                                               <td><p
class=""genText"">Should owners issue clean bills of lading where they
have agreed a clause in the charterparty that they agree not to clause
the bills of lading (due to the common occurrence of insects in the rice)
as the cargo of rice will be fumigated after loading. <br>
                                                       <br>
         It is imporant to note the rider clause in the charterparty
should not affect the master's obligation to note the apparent order and
condition of the cargo at the time of loading. If the cargo contains live
insects, then the master should still issue claused bills of lading even
though this defect in the cargo may be rectified after fumigation. <br>
         <br>
         Such a clause forcing the owners to issue clean bills of lading
is unenforceable in law as it is tantamount to fraud. <br>
         <br>
         In this difficult situation, we suggest that bills of lading are
issued containing the remarks 'live insects noted at time of lading which
apparently eradicated after fumigation on board'. It is questionable
whether this remark will amount to a defect in the cargo and cause the
bill of lading to become claused. <br>
         <br>
         No doubt chatterers will suggest that clean bills of lading
without any remarks are issued when the master is satisfied with the
cargo condition after fumigation, and many owners would wish to agree to
issue clean bills stating the cargo was loaded in good condition despite
this condition has come about due to fumigation after the time of
loading. However the danger is that this is still technically a
misrepresentation by the master of the actual apparent condition of the
cargo at the time of loading which will not only prevent the owners
having any chance of a defence should insects still be found in the cargo
at discharge or cargo receivers reject the cargo due to dead insect
bodies mixed with the cargo, and further this misrepresentation may
prejudice the P&amp;I cover as a result of cargo claims due to the vessel
knowingly stating the false condition of cargo in bills of lading.
</p></td>
                                         </tr>"
            2003-12-04 2003-12-04 legal_awareness awareness024.htm 1
129         Five new pirate attacks            New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime in the Singapore Strait, and in Indonesian,
Bangladeshi, Nigerian and South African waters.<br><br>In the Bangladesh
attack, six pirates boarded a general ship at Chittagong. They were armed
with long knives and stole ship's stores before escaping.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       bangladesh Asia Bangladesh Source :
MGN News    2003-11-26 2003-11-26 notices      bangladesh003.htm 0
130         Five new pirate attacks            New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime in the Singapore Strait, and in Indonesian,
Bangladeshi, Nigerian and South African waters.<br><br>In the Indonesian
attack, three pirates boarded a tanker off Balikpapan, Indonesia. They
were armed with guns and knives and stole ship's property and stores
whilst holding the deck watchkeeper hostage.<br><br></td>
           </tr>"       indonesia Asia Indonesia Source : MGN News
      2003-11-26 2003-11-26 notices      indonesia004.htm 0
131         Five new pirate attacks            New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime in the Singapore Strait, and in Indonesian,
Bangladeshi, Nigerian and South African waters.<br><br>In the Nigerian
attack, pirates boarded a tanker at Lagos and stole ship's stores before
escaping in a waiting trawler.<br><br></td>
                       </tr>"       nigeria     Africa     Nigeria
      Source : MGN News 2003-11-26 2003-11-26 notices      nigeria007.htm
      0
132          Five new pirate attacks            New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime in the Singapore Strait, and in Indonesian,
Bangladeshi, Nigerian and South African waters.<br><br>In the Singapore
attack, seven pirates boarded a tanker underway close to the Eastern
buoy. They were armed with long knives and stole the ship's cash before
escaping.<br><br></td>
                       </tr>"       singapore Asia Singapore Source :
MGN News     2003-11-26 2003-11-26 notices      singapore005.htm 0
133          Five new pirate attacks            New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">New pirate and attempted
pirate attacks have been reported in November 2003 by the ICC
International Maritime in the Singapore Strait, and in Indonesian,
Bangladeshi, Nigerian and South African waters.<br><br>In the attempted
South African attack, six pirates in a speedboat followed a refrigerated
ship off Port Shepstone. When they tried to board the ship, the ship's
crew managed to successfully stop them by using fire hoses.<br><br></td>
                       </tr>"       southafrica Africa     South Africa
      Source : MGN News 2003-11-26 2003-11-26 notices
      southafrica003.htm       0
134   27     Institute Warranties         Worldwide trading allowed under
the vessel's Hull and P&I insurance is always subject to trading within
Institute Warranties. "<tr>
 <td>
  <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                <tr>
                  <td class=""genText"">Worldwide trading allowed under the
vessel's Hull and P&I insurance is always subject to trading within <a
href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('warrant','warrant1');"">Institute
Warranties</a>.<br><br></td>
                </tr>
     <tr>
      <td class=""genText"">
     <table id=""warrant"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
      <tr>
        <td class=""genText"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF""><img
src=""../img/common/awareness/tophighlight.jpg""></td>
      </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>
        <table bgcolor=""#F2E066"" cellpadding=""0"" cellspacing=""1"">
         <tr>
          <td>
           <table bgcolor=""#FFFFCC"" border=""0"" cellpadding=""10""
cellspacing=""0"">
            <tr>
             <td align=""center""><span class=""genTitleText"">INSTITUTE
WARRANTIES (1/7/76)</span></td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
             <td class=""genText"">
             <ol>
               <li>Warranted no:
                <ol>
                 <li class=""alpha"">Atlantic Coast of North America, its
rivers or adjacent islands,
                  <ol>
                    <li class=""roman"">north of 52<sup>o</sup> 10' N. Lat.
and west of 50<sup>o</sup> W. Long. ;</li>
                    <li class=""roman"">south of 52<sup>o</sup> 10' N. Lat.
in the area bounded by lines drawn between Battle Harbour/Pistolet Bay ;
Cape Ray/Cape North ; Port Hawkesbury/Port Mulgrave and Baie
Comeau/Matane, between 21st December and 30th April both days
inclusive.</li>
                    <li class=""roman"">west of Baie Comeau/Matane (but not
west of Montreal) between 1st December and 30th April both days
inclusive.</li>
                  </ol>
                 </li>
                 <li class=""alpha"">Great Lakes or St. Lawrence Seaway
west of Montreal.</li>
                 <li class=""alpha"">Greenland Waters.</li>
                 <li class=""alpha"">Pacific Coast of North America its
rivers or adjacent islands north of 54<sup>o</sup> 30' N. Lat., or west
of 130<sup>o</sup> 50' W. Long.</li>
                </ol>
               </li>
               <br>
               <li>Warranted no Baltic Sea or adjacent waters east of
15<sup>o</sup> E. Long.
                <ol>
                 <li class=""alpha"">North of a line between Mo
(63<sup>o</sup> 24' N. Lat.) and Vasa (63<sup>o</sup> 06' N. Lat.)
between 10th December and 25th May b.d.i.</li>
                 <li class=""alpha"">East of a line between Viipuri
(Vyborg) (28<sup>o</sup> 47' E. Long.) and Narva (28<sup>o</sup> 12' E.
Long.) between 15th December and 15th May b.d.i.</li>
                 <li class=""alpha"">North of a line between Stockholm
(59<sup>o</sup> 20' E. Lat.) and Tallinn (59<sup>o</sup> 24' E. Lat.)
between 8th January and 5th May b.d.i.</li>
                 <li class=""alpha"">East of 22<sup>o</sup> E. Long, and
south of 59<sup>o</sup> N. Lat. between 28th December and May b.d.i.</li>
                </ol>
               </li>
                <br>
                <li>Warranted not North of 70<sup>o</sup> N. Lat. other
than voyages direct to or from any port or place in Norway or Kola
Bay.</li>
                <br><br>
                <li>Warranted no Behring Sea, no East Asian waters north of
46<sup>o</sup> N. Lat. and not to enter or sail from any port or place in
Siberia except Nakhodka and/or Vladivostock.</li>
                <br><br>
                <li>Warranted not to proceed to Kerguelen and/or Croset
Islands or south of 50<sup>o</sup> S. Lat., except to ports and/or places
in Patagonia and/or Chile and/or Falkland Islands, but liberty is given
to enter waters south of 50<sup>o</sup> S. Lat., if en route to or from
ports and/or places not excluded by this warranty.</li>
                <br><br>
                <li>Warranted not to sail with Indian Coal as cargo :
                 <ol>
                  <li class=""alpha"">between 1st March and 30th June,
b.d.i.</li>
                  <li class=""alpha"">between 1st July and 30th September,
b.d.i., except to ports in Asia, not West of Aden or East of or beyond
Singapore.</li>
                 </ol>
                </li>
               </ol>
               </td>
              </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
          </tr>
         </table>
        </td>
       </tr>
     </table>
    </td>
     </tr>
     <tr>
       <td>
     <table id=""warrant1"" style=""display: show""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
       <tr>
        <td class=""genText"">Hull insurers will require an additional
premium if the vessel is to trade outside these limits.<br><br>Our
experience has been the P&I Clubs will not likely require an additional
premium, but it is important that prior notice and approval is obtained
from the P&I Clubs before trading outside these limits.<br><br></td>
       </tr>
     </table>
    </td>
     </tr>
  </table>
 </td>
</tr> "                                   2003-12-08 2003-12-08
      insurance_awareness      awareness025.htm 1
135         Californian COFR        We have previously communicated with
The O'Brien's Group who is an approved contractor to arrange these
procedures. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We have previously
communicated with The O'Brien's Group who is an approved contractor to
arrange these procedures.<br><br> For preparing and submitting the CA-
COFR application, they will charge 10% over the application fee which is
a graduated or scaled fee based on the amount of bunkers the vessel can
carry. The maximum amount is $2500, so O'Briens would charge
$250.<br><br>For preparing the contingency fee, the charge would be
$150.<br><br> To retain O'Briens as the spill manager they would charge
an annual fee of $150 (this is renewable each year).<br><br>In order to
maintain the COFR and plan current (later in the year), non-tank vessels
must participate annually in an oil spill drill. O'Briens conducts an
annual table top drill as part of its International program and oil spill
seminar. These are held conveniently in various locations in Asia,
including Hong Kong. The charge for the table top drill is
$1500.<br><br>In addition to these charges, there are several other
requirements that need to be satisfied including the appointment and
retention of an Oil Spill Response Organization (OSRO) and Salvor.
Assuming the vessel is entered with the WoE, the appointment of the
National Response Corp (NRC) and/or Marine Spill Response Corp (MSRC) is
free of charge. Salvors, such as Marine Spill Alliance (MRA) who have a
significant presence on the US West Coast charge O'Briens clients $120 to
$200 annually.<br><br>You may contact O'Briens directly at 609-275-9600
or by email at ""oopsusa.oopsusa.com"".<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA
      2003-11-27 2003-11-27 notices       usa006.htm 0
136         No NLRC jurisdiction over P&I Clubs            "In a case where
a crewmember filed a claim for illegal dismissal against the manning
agent, shipowner, P&I Club's correspondent " "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In a case where a crewmember
filed a claim for illegal dismissal against the manning agent, shipowner,
P&I Club's correspondent and lawyers, the manning agent and shipowner
filed a third-party complaint for indemnity against the P&I Club. The
National Labour Relation Commission ruled that the P&I Club was not
involved in the overseas employment of seafarer, therefore it had no
jurisdiction over the P&I Club.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        philippines Asia Philippines Source :
West of England Newsletter    2003-04-01 2003-04-01 notices
      philippines002.htm      0
137         Alaskan COFR            We have recently been requested by
several owners to assist in the arrangement of an Alaskan COFR.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We have recently been
requested by several owners to assist in the arrangement of an Alaskan
COFR.<br><br>We have previously summarized the new regulations which came
into force on 27 May 2003 in ""Notices"".<br><br>Below is some practical
information in making the application to comply with these new
regulations.<br><br>If your vessel is going to Kivilina or Red Dog it
does not require a COFR or plan. Because the Red Dog/Kivilina anchorage
is located outside of waters of the State of Alaska, state laws do not
apply and no applications are required. However, if the vessel intends to
enter waters of the State (within the three-mile limit), then it must
have both an approved oil discharge prevention and contingency plan, and
approved proof of financial responsibility.<br><br>The Alaska COFR is
currently free. The O'Brien's Group is an approved contractor and
charges $25/vessel for completion and notarizing of application. Alaska
must have notarized application 15 days prior to arrival. In addition,
there will be a charge for the shipping and handling of this
document.<br><br>In order to complete the COFR application, please
indicate the following:<br><br>- Applicant<br>- Type of business
entity<br>- Date of Incorporation<br>- State or Country incorporated<br>-
Has applicant ever been named debtor in voluntary or involuntary
bankruptcy<br>- proceedings under Title 11<br>- Persistent Oil<br>- Non-
persistent Oil (Alaska considers diesel oil and gas oil) as non-
persistent<br>- Insurance Guarantor<br><br>A copy of the P & I
Certificate of Entry is required for the COFR application.<br><br>Once
O'Briens' has your approval, they will forward the completed application
to you. You may sign and return via email or fax with the P & I
Certificate of Entry. O'Briens' will then notarize and forward to
Alaska.<br><br>Alaska must have RECEIVED notarized application 15 days
prior to arrival.   If you are under the appropriate time frame, you must
prepare a letter on letterhead indicating what ""unanticipated
circumstances"" prevented you from filing application prior to the 15
days. <br><br><u>ALASKA PLAN</u><br><br>O'Briens' must have a nontank
contract in place prior to doing an Alaska Plan. Enclosed is <a
href=""javascript:MM_openBrWindow('../htm/notices/alaska/alaskan_cofr.htm
','','width=600,height=550,scrollbars=yes')"">information</a> regarding
fees and vessel particular checklist for the Alaska Plan. In addition,
they will need an electronic copy of the vessel's General Arrangement
Diagram with a table of tank capacity and fuel type The plans currently
are taking about 5 days for approval. Please note that you must indicate
the port of calls in the Alaska plan. Also included are samples of the
type drawing that would be required and a schematic drawing that will
assist in getting your plan approved quicker.<br><br></td>
                     </tr>"       alaska      North America    Alaska
           2003-12-08 2003-12-08 notices      alaska003.htm    1
138
                  0
139   29   Strict Liabilities           "As a result of a casualty on the
vessel, which may cause collapse of cargo stowage, vessel's list,
pollution or threat thereof, or " "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText""> As a result of a casualty
on the vessel, which may cause collapse of cargo stowage, vessel's list,
pollution or threat thereof, or if the cargo is carrying dangerous cargo,
the vessel may be required in some countries to sign contracts of
services with stevedores, port authorities and or letters of indemnities
which places strict liability on the vessel for any consequences. <br>
                                              <br>
It is important to be aware that strict liabilities assumed by the owner
under a contract do not fall under P&amp;I Club cover as these risks are
not poolable (not shared between the other Clubs and excluded under the
reinsurances). <br>
<br>
The vessel's P&amp;I Club must be notified who can arrange an additional
shipowner's liability insurance cover to cover these additional risks in
the London market. </td>
                     </tr>"                             2003-12-09
      2003-12-09 insurance_awareness   awareness028.htm 1
140
                  0
141         Oily water separator - pipe removal             The Brazilian
Port State Control is tightening it's inspections regarding the oily
water separator (OWS).        "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Brazilian Port State
Control is tightening it's inspections regarding the oily water separator
(OWS). In one case, it was reported that officers required the pipe from
the OWS to the overboard discharge valve be removed for closer
inspection. Nothing abnormal was found and no record of this removal
under Port State Control was logged. <br><br>To prevent false accusations
from other Port State Control officers making the assumption that the
pipe had been removed because it was pumping oil overboard, these
inspections should be entered into the log book with a comment from the
Port State Control inspector.<br><br>The following should be especially
noted due to active inspections by the US Coast Guard:<br><br>Flexible
hoses with flanges attached or evidence of bolts, nuts, flanges recently
moved and the existence of blank flanges on the OWS.may lead the Coast
Guard to think that this has been used to by-pass the OWS and pump oil
directly overboard.<br><br>New signs of paintwork around the OWS may be
signs of hiding evidence of tampering.<br><br>The oil record book must be
completed truthfully. False entries will lead to suspicious wrong
doings.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        brazil      South America     Brazil
      Source : UK Club Loss Prevention News     2003-09-01 2003-09-01
      notices     brazil008.htm     0
142         Fireworks restrictions        Vessels carrying cargoes of
fireworks into Rotterdam are subjected to limits of 1000 kilos IMCO 1.4S
(UN number 0337) and    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Vessels carrying cargoes of
fireworks into Rotterdam are subjected to limits of 1000 kilos IMCO 1.4S
(UN number 0337) and /or 500 kilos IMCO 1.4/1.4G (UN number 0336). There
have been reports by the Dutch authorities that shippers have been
under-declaring the amount without the knowledge of the masters of the
vessels.<br><br>Vessels found to have exceeded the limit are not allowed
entry into the port of Rotterdam. The master is held responsible and will
be subjected to an approx. fine of 10,000 Euros to 45,000 Euros or
imprisonment of 1 or 6 years depending on whether the breach of rules was
unintentional or intentional.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        thenetherlands    Europe      The
Netherlands Source : UK Loss Prevention News 2003-09-01 2003-09-01
      notices     thenetherlands003.htm 0
143         Security Guarantees in relation to Pollution          The
Spanish Maritime Authorities have tightened their pollution control
measures with tighter surveillance and sanctions against shipowners
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Spanish Maritime
Authorities have tightened their pollution control measures with tighter
surveillance and sanctions against shipowners, managers, operators,
masters and P&I Clubs found guilty of pollution. Fines range from Euro
60,101 to Euro 3,005,060.05. Recently there have been reports of large
guarantees being demanded by the Spanish Authorities for relatively minor
pollution incidents. Where there is a case of pollution, the ship will be
detained by the harbour master and a bond is needed to release the ship.
P&I Club LOUs are not acceptable.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         spain Europe      Spain Source : UK Club
Bulletin    2003-11-01 2003-11-01 notices        spain003.htm      0
144         Manoeuvring in Spanish ports         "From 1st November 2003,
The Spanish Maritime Authority is entitled to fine or detain any ship
over 500 GT in it's port areas if manoeuvring operations "         "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">From 1st November 2003, The Spanish
Maritime Authority is entitled to fine or detain any ship over 500 GT in
it's port areas if manoeuvring operations are carried out by the ship's
Master without the assistance a properly qualified officer or crew
member.<br><br>This rule will be enforced irrespective of whether there
is a pilot on board and will apply to all flags. Sanctions will be
classed from ""severe"" to ""top severe"" with fines of Euros 180,304
(US$215) and Euros 901,518 (US$1075).<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"         spain Europe      Spain Source : UK Club
Bulletin - November 2003       2003-11-01 2003-11-01 notices
      spain004.htm      0
145   30    Owners should ensure Charterers have insurance cover
      &#33337;&#19996;&#24212;&#30830;&#35748;&#31199;&#23478;&#24050;&#2
5237;&#20445;     Owners should ensure Charterers have insurance cover
      "<tr>
                          <td class=""genText"">Owners should insist on
their charterers to arrange charterers liability cover. We have
experienced a cargo claim occurring in Korea in which the cargo claimants
were entitled by the local court to demand security from every party who
may have been remotely involved in the carriage of the cargo in addition
to the shipowner such as the charterer. The vessel's P&I Club in our case
provided security to the claimants but the vessel was still not released
from arrest, as the claimants demanded a separate security from the
charterers. In view the security amount was in excess of US$100,000, the
charterers were not in a financial position to provide cash or a bank
guarantee as they had not arranged for charterers liability cover. In
order to release the vessel, the shipowners had to provide use their own
financial resources to provide security on charterers' behalf, as the
charterers can never derive any benefit under an owner's P&I cover,
notwithstanding rider clauses providing for same.<br>
                            <br>
                            <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#33337;&#19996;&#24517;&#39035;&#35201;&#27714;&#20854;&#31199;&
#23478;&#21150;&#29702;&#31199;&#23478;&#36131;&#20219;&#38505;&#12290;&#
25105;&#20204;&#26366;&#32463;&#21382;&#36807;&#21457;&#29983;&#22312;&#3
8889;&#22269;&#30340;&#36135;&#29289;&#32034;&#36180;&#26696;&#65292;&#22
312;&#36825;&#20010;&#32034;&#36180;&#26696;&#20013;&#65292;&#22320;&#260
41;&#27861;&#38498;&#25480;&#26435;&#36135;&#26041;&#32034;&#36180;&#2015
4;&#35201;&#27714;&#38500;&#33337;&#19996;&#20043;&#22806;&#30340;&#27599
;&#20010;&#19982;&#36816;&#36755;&#36135;&#29289;&#30340;&#26377;&#20851;
&#26041;&#25552;&#20379;&#25285;&#20445;&#65292;&#20363;&#22914;&#31199;&
#23478;&#12290;&#25105;&#20204;&#30340;&#26696;&#20214;&#20013;&#20445;&#
36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#21521;&#32034;&#36180;&#26041;&#25552;&#20379;&#2
0102;&#25285;&#20445;&#65292;&#20294;&#33337;&#33334;&#20173;&#26087;&#34
987;&#25187;&#30041;&#27809;&#26377;&#37322;&#25918;&#65292;&#22240;&#200
26;&#32034;&#36180;&#26041;&#35201;&#27714;&#31199;&#23478;&#21333;&#2942
0;&#25552;&#20379;&#25285;&#20445;&#36229;&#36807;10&#19975;&#32654;&#208
03;&#65292;&#30001;&#20110;&#31199;&#23478;&#27809;&#26377;&#21150;&#2970
2;&#31199;&#23478;&#36131;&#20219;&#38505;&#65292;&#20182;&#20204;&#30340
;&#36130;&#21153;&#25552;&#20379;&#19981;&#20986;&#29616;&#37329;&#25110;
&#38134;&#34892;&#25285;&#20445;&#12290;&#20026;&#20102;&#35299;&#38500;&
#33337;&#33334;&#30340;&#25187;&#30041;&#65292;&#33337;&#19996;&#19981;&#
24471;&#19981;&#29992;&#33258;&#24049;&#30340;&#36164;&#37329;&#26469;&#2
0026;&#31199;&#23478;&#30340;&#34892;&#20026;&#25552;&#20379;&#25285;&#20
445;&#65292;&#22240;&#20026;&#31199;&#23478;&#19981;&#33021;&#21463;&#304
10;&#20110;&#33337;&#19996;&#30340;&#20445;&#36180;&#20445;&#21333;&#6529
2;&#23613;&#31649;&#31199;&#32422;&#38468;&#21152;&#26465;&#27454;&#26377
;&#31867;&#20284;&#30340;&#35268;&#23450;&#12290;</span><br>
                         <br></td>
                      </tr>"                              2003-12-17
      2003-12-17 insurance_awareness     chi_awareness030.htm   1
146         Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo without production of the original bill of lading
      Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo without production of the original bill of lading
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">
             <table width=""550"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
              <tr>
                  <td>To :</td>
                  <td>[insert name of Owners]</td>
                  <td>[insert date]</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>The Owners of the [insert name of ship]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>[insert address]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class=""genText""><br>Dear Sirs<br>Ship:[insert name of
ship]<br>Voyage:[insert load and discharge ports as stated in the bill of
lading]<br>Cargo:[insert description of cargo]<br>Bill of lading: [insert
identification numbers, date and place of issue]<br><br>The above cargo
was shipped on the above ship by [insert name of shipper] and consigned
to [insert name of consignee or party to whose order the bill of lading
is made out, as appropriate] for delivery at the port of [insert name of
discharge port stated in the bill of lading] but the bill of lading has
not arrived and we, [insert name of party requesting delivery], hereby
request you to deliver the said cargo to [insert name of party to whom
delivery is to be made] at [insert place where delivery is to be made]
without production of the original bill of lading.<br><br>In
consideration of your complying with our above request, we hereby agree
as follows :-<ol><li>To indemnify you, your servants and agents and to
hold all of you harmless in respect of any liability, loss, damage or
expense of whatsoever nature which you may sustain by reason of
delivering the cargo in accordance with our request.</li><br><br><li>In
the event of any proceedings being commenced against you or any of your
servants or agents in connection with the delivery of the cargo as
aforesaid, to provide you or them on demand with sufficient funds to
defend the same.</li><br><br><li>If, in connection with the delivery of
the cargo as aforesaid, the ship, or any other ship or property in the
same or associated ownership, management or control, should be arrested
or detained or should the arrest or detention thereof be threatened, or
should there be any interference in the use or trading of the vessel
(whether by virtue of a caveat being entered on the ship's registry or
otherwise howsoever), to provide on demand such bail or other security as
may be required to prevent such arrest or detention or to secure the
release of such ship or property or to remove such interference and to
indemnify you in respect of any liability, loss, damage or expense caused
by such arrest or detention or threatened arrest or detention or such
interference, whether or not such arrest or detention or threatened
arrest or detention or such interference may be
justified.</li><br><br><li>If the place at which we have asked you to
make delivery is a bulk liquid or gas terminal or facility, or another
ship, lighter or barge, then delivery to such terminal, facility, ship,
lighter or barge shall be deemed to be delivery to the party to whom we
have requested you to make such delivery.</li><br><br><li>As soon as all
original bills of lading for the above cargo shall have come into our
possession, to deliver the same to you, or otherwise to cause all
original bills of lading to be delivered to you, whereupon our liability
hereunder shall cease.</li><br><br><li>The liability of each and every
person under this indemnity shall be joint and several and shall not be
conditional upon your proceeding first against any person, whether or not
such person is party to or liable under this
indemnity.</li><br><br><li>This indemnity shall be governed by and
construed in accordance with English law and each and every person liable
under this indemnity shall at your request submit to the jurisdiction of
the High Court of Justice of England.</li></ol>Yours faithfully<br>For
and on behalf of <br>[insert name of Requestor]<br>The
Requestor<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms003 stdforms003_01.htm     0
147         Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo without production of the original bill of lading
incorporating a bank's agreement to join in the letter of indemnity
      Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo without production of the original bill of lading
incorporating a bank's agreement to join in the letter of indemnity
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">
             <table width=""550"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
              <tr>
                  <td>To :</td>
                 <td>[insert name of Owners]</td>
                 <td>[insert date]</td>
               </tr>
               <tr>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
                 <td>The Owners of the [insert name of ship]</td>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
               </tr>
               <tr>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
                 <td>[insert address]</td>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
               </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><br>Dear Sirs<br>Ship:[insert name of
ship]<br>Voyage:[insert load and discharge ports as stated in the bill of
lading]<br>Cargo:[insert description of cargo]<br>Bill of lading: [insert
identification numbers, date and place of issue]<br><br>The above cargo
was shipped on the above ship by [insert name of shipper] and consigned
to [insert name of consignee or party to whose order the bill of lading
is made out, as appropriate] for delivery at the port of [insert name of
discharge port stated in the bill of lading] but the bill of lading has
not arrived and we, [insert name of party requesting delivery], hereby
request you to deliver the said cargo to [insert name of party to whom
delivery is to be made] at [insert place where delivery is to be made]
without production of the original bill of lading.<br><br>In
consideration of your complying with our above request, we hereby agree
as follows :-<ol><li>To indemnify you, your servants and agents and to
hold all of you harmless in respect of any liability, loss, damage or
expense of whatsoever nature which you may sustain by reason of
delivering the cargo in accordance with our request.</li><br><br><li>In
the event of any proceedings being commenced against you or any of your
servants or agents in connection with the delivery of the cargo as
aforesaid, to provide you or them on demand with sufficient funds to
defend the same.</li><br><br><li>If, in connection with the delivery of
the cargo as aforesaid, the ship, or any other ship or property in the
same or associated ownership, management or control, should be arrested
or detained or should the arrest or detention thereof be threatened, or
should there be any interference in the use or trading of the vessel
(whether by virtue of a caveat being entered on the ship's registry or
otherwise howsoever), to provide on demand such bail or other security as
may be required to prevent such arrest or detention or to secure the
release of such ship or property or to remove such interference and to
indemnify you in respect of any liability, loss, damage or expense caused
by such arrest or detention or threatened arrest or detention or such
interference, whether or not such arrest or detention or threatened
arrest or detention or such interference may be
justified.</li><br><br><li>If the place at which we have asked you to
make delivery is a bulk liquid or gas terminal or facility, or another
ship, lighter or barge, then delivery to such terminal, facility, ship,
lighter or barge shall be deemed to be delivery to the party to whom we
have requested you to make such delivery.</li><br><br><li>As soon as all
original bills of lading for the above cargo shall have come into our
possession, to deliver the same to you, or otherwise to cause all
original bills of lading to be delivered to you, whereupon our liability
hereunder shall cease.</li><br><br><li>The liability of each and every
person under this indemnity shall be joint and several and shall not be
conditional upon your proceeding first against any person, whether or not
such person is party to or liable under this
indemnity.</li><br><br><li>This indemnity shall be governed by and
construed in accordance with English law and each and every person liable
under this indemnity shall at your request submit to the jurisdiction of
the High Court of Justice of England.</li></ol>Yours faithfully<br>For
and on behalf of<br>[insert name of Requestor]<br>The
Requestor<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText"">We, [insert name of the Bank], hereby
agree to join in this Indemnity providing always that the Bank's
liability:-<ol><li>shall be restricted to payment of specified sums of
money demanded in relation to the Indemnity (and shall not extend to the
provision of bail or other security)</li><br><br><li>shall be to make
payment to you forthwith on your written demand in the form of a signed
letter certifying that the amount demanded is a sum due to be paid to you
under the terms of the Indemnity and has not been paid to you by the
Requestor or is a sum which represents monetary compensation due to you
in respect of the failure by the Requestor to fulfil its obligations to
you under the Indemnity. For the avoidance of doubt the Bank hereby
confirms that:-<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">such compensation shall
include, but not be limited to, payment of any amount up to the amount
stated in proviso 3 below in order to enable you to arrange the provision
of security to release the ship (or any other ship in the same or
associated ownership, management or control) from arrest or to prevent
any such arrest or to prevent any interference in the use or trading of
the ship, or other ship as aforesaid, and </li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">in the event that the amount of compensation so paid is
less than the amount stated in proviso 3 below, the liability of the Bank
hereunder shall continue but shall be reduced by the amount of
compensation paid</li></ol></li><br><li>shall be limited to a sum or sums
not exceeding in aggregate [insert currency and amount in figures and
words]</li><br><br><li>subject to proviso 5 below, shall terminate on
[date six years from the date of the Indemnity] (the 'Termination Date'),
except in respect of any demands for payment received by the Bank
hereunder at the address indicated below on or before that
date</li><br><br><li>shall be extended at your request from time to time
for a period of two calendar years at a time provided that:-<ol><li
class=""alpha"">the Bank shall receive a written notice signed by you and
stating that the Indemnity is required by you to remain in force for a
further period of two years, and</li><li class=""alpha"">such notice is
received by the Bank at the address indicated below on or before the then
current Termination Date.</li></ol><br></li>Any such extension shall be
for a period of two years from the then current Termination Date and,
should the Bank for any reason be unwilling to extend the Termination
Date, the Bank shall discharge its liability by the payment to you of the
maximum sum payable hereunder (or such lesser sum as you may
require).<br><br>However, in the event of the Bank receiving a written
notice signed by you, on or before the then current Termination Date,
stating that legal proceedings have been commenced against you as a
result of your having delivered the said cargo as specified in the
Indemnity, the Bank agrees that its liability hereunder will not
terminate until receipt by the Bank of your signed written notice stating
that all legal proceedings have been concluded and that any sum or sums
payable to you by the Requestor and/or the Bank in connection therewith
have been paid and received in full and final settlement of all
liabilities arising under the Indemnity<br><br><li>shall be governed by
and construed in accordance with the law governing the Indemnity and the
Bank agrees to submit to the jurisdiction of the court stated within the
Indemnity.</ol>The Bank agrees to promptly notify you in the event of any
change in the full details of the office to which any demand or notice is
to be addressed and which is stated below and it is agreed that you shall
also promptly notify the Bank in the event of any change in your address
as stated above.<br><br>Please quote the Bank's Indemnity Ref .........
in all correspondence with the Bank and any demands for payment and
notices hereunder.<br><br>Yours faithfully<br>For and on behalf of
<br>[insert name of bank]<br>[insert full details of the office to which
any demand or notice is to be
addressed]<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms003 stdforms003_02.htm     0
148         Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo at a port other than that stated in the bill of lading
            Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo at a port other than that stated in the bill of lading
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">
             <table width=""550"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
              <tr>
               <td>To :</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert name of Owners</i>]</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert date</i>]</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>The Owners of the [<i>insert name of ship</i>]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert address</i>]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
            <td class=""genText""><br>Dear Sirs<br>Ship:[<i>insert name of
ship</i>]<br>Voyage:[<i>insert load and discharge ports as stated in the
bill of lading</i>]<br>Cargo:[<i>insert description of cargo</i>]<br>Bill
of lading: [<i>insert identification numbers, date and place of
issue</i>]<br><br>The above cargo was shipped on the above ship by
[<i>insert name of shipper</i>] and consigned to [<i>insert name of
consignee or party to whose order the bill of lading is made out, as
appropriate</i>] for delivery at the port of [<i>insert name of discharge
port stated in the bill of lading</i>] but we, [<i>insert name of party
requesting substituted delivery</i>], hereby request you to order the
ship to proceed to and deliver the said cargo at [<i>insert name of
substitute port or place of delivery</i>] against production of at least
one original bill of lading.<br><br>In consideration of your complying
with our above request, we hereby agree as follows :-<ol><li>To indemnify
you, your servants and agents and to hold all of you harmless in respect
of any liability, loss, damage or expense of whatsoever nature which you
may sustain by reason of the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the
cargo against production of at least one original bill of lading in
accordance with our request.</li><br><br><li>In the event of any
proceedings being commenced against you or any of your servants or agents
in connection with the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the cargo
as aforesaid, to provide you or them on demand with sufficient funds to
defend the same.</li><br><br><li>If, in connection with the delivery of
the cargo as aforesaid, the ship, or any other ship or property in the
same or associated ownership, management or control, should be arrested
or detained or should the arrest or detention thereof be threatened, or
should there be any interference in the use or trading of the vessel
(whether by virtue of a caveat being entered on the ship's registry or
otherwise howsoever), to provide on demand such bail or other security as
may be required to prevent such arrest or detention or to secure the
release of such ship or property or to remove such interference and to
indemnify you in respect of any liability, loss, damage or expense caused
by such arrest or detention or threatened arrest or detention or such
interference, whether or not such arrest or detention or threatened
arrest or detention or such interference may be
justified.</li><br><br><li>The liability of each and every person under
this indemnity shall be joint and several and shall not be conditional
upon your proceeding first against any person, whether or not such person
is party to or liable under this indemnity.</li><br><br><li>This
indemnity shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English
law and each and every person liable under this indemnity shall at your
request submit to the jurisdiction of the High Court of Justice of
England.</li></ol>Yours faithfully<br>For and on behalf of<br>[<i>insert
name of Requestor</i>]<br>The
Requestor<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms003 stdforms003_03.htm     0
149         Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo at a port other than that stated in the bill of lading
incorporating a bank's agreement to join in the letter of indemnity
      Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo at a port other than that stated in the bill of lading
incorporating a bank's agreement to join in the letter of indemnity
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">
             <table width=""550"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
             <tr>
                  <td>To :</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert name of Owners</i>]</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert date</i>]</td>
                 </tr>
               <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>The Owners of the [<i>insert name of ship</i>]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
               </tr>
               <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert address</i>]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
               </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><br>Dear Sirs<br>Ship:[<i>insert name of
ship</i>]<br>Voyage:[<i>insert load and discharge ports as stated in the
bill of lading</i>]<br>Cargo:[<i>insert description of cargo</i>]<br>Bill
of lading: [<i>insert identification numbers, date and place of
issue</i>]<br><br>The above cargo was shipped on the above ship by
[<i>insert name of shipper</i>] and consigned to [<i>insert name of
consignee or party to whose order the bill of lading is made out, as
appropriate</i>] for delivery at the port of [<i>insert name of discharge
port stated in the bill of lading</i>] but we, [<i>insert name of party
requesting substituted delivery</i>], hereby request you to order the
ship to proceed to and deliver the said cargo at [<i>insert name of
substitute port or place of delivery</i>] against production of at least
one original bill of lading.<br><br>In consideration of your complying
with our above request, we hereby agree as follows :-<ol><li>To indemnify
you, your servants and agents and to hold all of you harmless in respect
of any liability, loss, damage or expense of whatsoever nature which you
may sustain by reason of the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the
cargo against production of at least one original bill of lading in
accordance with our request.</li><br><br><li>In the event of any
proceedings being commenced against you or any of your servants or agents
in connection with the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the cargo
as aforesaid, to provide you or them on demand with sufficient funds to
defend the same.</li><br><br><li>If, in connection with the delivery of
the cargo as aforesaid, the ship, or any other ship or property in the
same or associated ownership, management or control, should be arrested
or detained or should the arrest or detention thereof be threatened, or
should there be any interference in the use or trading of the vessel
(whether by virtue of a caveat being entered on the ship's registry or
otherwise howsoever), to provide on demand such bail or other security as
may be required to prevent such arrest or detention or to secure the
release of such ship or property or to remove such interference and to
indemnify you in respect of any liability, loss, damage or expense caused
by such arrest or detention or threatened arrest or detention or such
interference, whether or not such arrest or detention or threatened
arrest or detention or such interference may be
justified.</li><br><br><li>The liability of each and every person under
this indemnity shall be joint and several and shall not be conditional
upon your proceeding first against any person, whether or not such person
is party to or liable under this indemnity.</li><br><br><li>This
indemnity shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English
law and each and every person liable under this indemnity shall at your
request submit to the jurisdiction of the High Court of Justice of
England.</li></ol>Yours faithfully<br>For and on behalf of<br>[<i>insert
name of Requestor</i>]<br>The
Requestor<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br>We, [insert name of the
Bank], hereby agree to join in this Indemnity providing always that the
Bank's liability:-<ol><li>shall be restricted to payment of specified
sums of money demanded in relation to the Indemnity (and shall not extend
to the provision of bail or other security)</li><br><br><li>shall be to
make payment to you forthwith on your written demand in the form of a
signed letter certifying that the amount demanded is a sum due to be paid
to you under the terms of the Indemnity and has not been paid to you by
the Requestor or is a sum which represents monetary compensation due to
you in respect of the failure by the Requestor to fulfil its obligations
to you under the Indemnity. For the avoidance of doubt the Bank hereby
confirms that:-<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">such compensation shall
include, but not be limited to, payment of any amount up to the amount
stated in proviso 3 below in order to enable you to arrange the provision
of security to release the ship (or any other ship in the same or
associated ownership, management or control) from arrest or to prevent
any such arrest or to prevent any interference in the use or trading of
the ship, or other ship as aforesaid, and</li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">in the event that the amount of compensation so paid is
less than the amount stated in proviso 3 below, the liability of the Bank
hereunder shall continue but shall be reduced by the amount of
compensation paid</li></ol></li><br><li>shall be limited to a sum or sums
not exceeding in aggregate [<i>insert currency and amount in figures and
words</i>]</li><br><br><li>subject to proviso 5 below, shall terminate on
[<i>date six years from the date of the Indemnity</i>] (the 'Termination
Date'), except in respect of any demands for payment received by the Bank
hereunder at the address indicated below on or before that
date.</li><br><br><li>shall be extended at your request from time to time
for a period of two calendar years at a time provided that:-
<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">the Bank shall receive a written notice
signed by you and stating that the Indemnity is required by you to remain
in force for a further period of two years, and</li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">such notice is received by the Bank at the address
indicated below on or before the then current Termination
Date.</li></ol><br>Any such extension shall be for a period of two years
from the then current Termination Date and, should the Bank for any
reason be unwilling to extend the Termination Date, the Bank shall
discharge its liability by the payment to you of the maximum sum payable
hereunder (or such lesser sum as you may require).<br><br>However, in the
event of the Bank receiving a written notice signed by you, on or before
the then current Termination Date, stating that legal proceedings have
been commenced against you as a result of your having delivered the said
cargo as specified in the Indemnity, the Bank agrees that its liability
hereunder will not terminate until receipt by the Bank of your signed
written notice stating that all legal proceedings have been concluded and
that any sum or sums payable to you by the Requestor and/or the Bank in
connection therewith have been paid and received in full and final
settlement of all liabilities arising under the
Indemnity</li><br><br><li>shall be governed by and construed in
accordance with the law governing the Indemnity and the Bank agrees to
submit to the jurisdiction of the court stated within the
Indemnity.</li></ol>It should be understood that, where appropriate, the
Bank will only produce and deliver to you all original bills of lading
should the same come into the Bank's possession, but the Bank agrees
that, in that event, it shall do so.<br><br>The Bank agrees to promptly
notify you in the event of any change in the full details of the office
to which any demand or notice is to be addressed and which is stated
below and it is agreed that you shall also promptly notify the Bank in
the event of any change in your address as stated above.<br><br>Please
quote the Bank's Indemnity Ref ......... in all correspondence with the
Bank and any demands for payment and notices hereunder.<br><br>Yours
faithfully<br>For and on behalf of [<i>insert name of
bank</i>]<br>[<i>insert full details of the office to which any demand or
notice is to be
addressed</i>]<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms003 stdforms003_04.htm     0
150         Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo at a port other than that stated in the bill of lading
and without production of the original bill of lading           Standard
form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for delivering cargo at a
port other than that stated in the bill of lading and without production
of the original bill of lading     "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">
             <table width=""550"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
              <tr>
                  <td>To :</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert name of Owners</i>]</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert date</i>]</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>The Owners of the [<i>insert name of ship</i>]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                  <td>[<i>insert address</i>]</td>
                  <td>&nbsp;</td>
                </tr>
             </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><br>Dear Sirs<br>Ship:[<i>insert name of
ship</i>]<br>Voyage:[<i>insert load and discharge ports as stated in the
bill of lading</i>]<br>Cargo:[<i>insert description of cargo</i>]<br>Bill
of lading: [<i>insert identification numbers, date and place of
issue</i>]<br><br>The above cargo was shipped on the above vessel by
[<i>insert name of shipper</i>] and consigned to [<i>insert name of
consignee or party to whose order the bills of lading are made out, as
appropriate</i>] for delivery at the port of [<i>insert name of discharge
port stated in the bills of lading</i>] but we, [<i>insert name of party
requesting substituted delivery</i>], hereby request you to order the
vessel to proceed to and deliver the said cargo at [<i>insert name of
substitute port or place of delivery</i>] to [<i>insert name of party to
whom delivery is to be made</i>] without production of the original bill
of lading.<br><br>In consideration of your complying with our above
request, we hereby agree as follows :-<ol><li>To indemnify you, your
servants and agents and to hold all of you harmless in respect of any
liability, loss, damage or expense of whatsoever nature which you may
sustain by reason of the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the cargo
in accordance with our request.</li><br><br><li>In the event of any
proceedings being commenced against you or any of your servants or agents
in connection with the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the cargo
as aforesaid, to provide you or them on demand with sufficient funds to
defend the same.</li><br><br><li>If, in connection with the delivery of
the cargo as aforesaid, the ship, or any other ship or property in the
same or associated ownership, management or control, should be arrested
or detained or should the arrest or detention thereof be threatened, or
should there be any interference in the use or trading of the vessel
(whether by virtue of a caveat being entered on the ship's registry or
otherwise howsoever), to provide on demand such bail or other security as
may be required to prevent such arrest or detention or to secure the
release of such ship or property or to remove such interference and to
indemnify you in respect of any liability, loss, damage or expense caused
by such arrest or detention or threatened arrest or detention or such
interference, whether or not such arrest or detention or threatened
arrest or detention or such interference may be
justified.</li><br><br><li>If the place at which we have asked you to
make delivery is a bulk liquid or gas terminal or facility, or another
ship, lighter or barge, then delivery to such terminal, facility, ship,
lighter or barge shall be deemed to be delivery to the party to whom we
have requested you to make such delivery.</li><br><br><li>As soon as all
original bills of lading for the above cargo shall have come into our
possession, to deliver the same to you, or otherwise to cause all
original bills of lading to be delivered to you.</li><br><br><li>The
liability of each and every person under this indemnity shall be joint
and several and shall not be conditional upon your proceeding first
against any person, whether or not such person is party to or liable
under this indemnity.</li><br><br><li>This indemnity shall be governed by
and construed in accordance with English law and each and every person
liable under this indemnity shall at your request submit to the
jurisdiction of the High Court of Justice of England.</li></ol>Yours
faithfully<br>For and on behalf of<br>[<i>insert name of
Requestor</i>]<br>The
Requestor<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms003 stdforms003_05.htm     0
151         Standard form Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for
delivering cargo at a port other than that stated in the bill of lading
and without production of the original bill of lading incorporating a
bank's agreement to join in the letter of indemnity      Standard form
Letter of Indemnity to be given in return for delivering cargo at a port
other than that stated in the bill of lading and without production of
the original bill of lading incorporating a bank's agreement to join in
the letter of indemnity      "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">
            <table width=""550"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
             <tr>
                 <td>To :</td>
                 <td>[<i>insert name of Owners</i>]</td>
                 <td>[<i>insert date</i>]</td>
               </tr>
               <tr>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
                 <td>The Owners of the [<i>insert name of ship</i>]</td>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
               </tr>
               <tr>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
                 <td>[<i>insert address</i>]</td>
                 <td>&nbsp;</td>
               </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><br>Dear Sirs<br>Ship:[<i>insert name of
ship</i>]<br>Voyage:[<i>insert load and discharge ports as stated in the
bill of lading</i>]<br>Cargo:[<i>insert description of cargo</i>]<br>Bill
of lading: [<i>insert identification numbers, date and place of
issue</i>]<br><br>The above cargo was shipped on the above vessel by
[<i>insert name of shipper</i>] and consigned to [<i>insert name of
consignee or party to whose order the bills of lading are made out, as
appropriate</i>] for delivery at the port of [<i>insert name of discharge
port stated in the bills of lading</i>] but we, [<i>insert name of party
requesting substituted delivery</i>], hereby request you to order the
vessel to proceed to and deliver the said cargo at [<i>insert name of
substitute port or place of delivery</i>] to [<i>insert name of party to
whom delivery is to be made</i>] without production of the original bill
of lading.<br><br>In consideration of your complying with our above
request, we hereby agree as follows :-<ol><li>To indemnify you, your
servants and agents and to hold all of you harmless in respect of any
liability, loss, damage or expense of whatsoever nature which you may
sustain by reason of the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the cargo
in accordance with our request.</li><br><br><li>In the event of any
proceedings being commenced against you or any of your servants or agents
in connection with the ship proceeding and giving delivery of the cargo
as aforesaid, to provide you or them on demand with sufficient funds to
defend the same.</li><br><br><li>If, in connection with the delivery of
the cargo as aforesaid, the ship, or any other ship or property in the
same or associated ownership, management or control, should be arrested
or detained or should the arrest or detention thereof be threatened, or
should there be any interference in the use or trading of the vessel
(whether by virtue of a caveat being entered on the ship's registry or
otherwise howsoever), to provide on demand such bail or other security as
may be required to prevent such arrest or detention or to secure the
release of such ship or property or to remove such interference and to
indemnify you in respect of any liability, loss, damage or expense caused
by such arrest or detention or threatened arrest or detention or such
interference, whether or not such arrest or detention or threatened
arrest or detention or such interference may be
justified.</li><br><br><li>If the place at which we have asked you to
make delivery is a bulk liquid or gas terminal or facility, or another
ship, lighter or barge, then delivery to such terminal, facility, ship,
lighter or barge shall be deemed to be delivery to the party to whom we
have requested you to make such delivery.</li><br><br><li>As soon as all
original bills of lading for the above cargo shall have come into our
possession, to deliver the same to you, or otherwise to cause all
original bills of lading to be delivered to you.</li><br><br><li>The
liability of each and every person under this indemnity shall be joint
and several and shall not be conditional upon your proceeding first
against any person, whether or not such person is party to or liable
under this indemnity.</li><br><br><li>This indemnity shall be governed by
and construed in accordance with English law and each and every person
liable under this indemnity shall at your request submit to the
jurisdiction of the High Court of Justice of England.</li></ol>Yours
faithfully<br>For and on behalf of<br>[<i>insert name of
Requestor</i>]<br>The
Requestor<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br>We, [<i>insert name of
the Bank</i>], hereby agree to join in this Indemnity providing always
that the Bank's liability:-<ol><li>shall be restricted to payment of
specified sums of money demanded in relation to the Indemnity (and shall
not extend to the provision of bail or other
security)</li><br><br><li>shall be to make payment to you forthwith on
your written demand in the form of a signed letter certifying that the
amount demanded is a sum due to be paid to you under the terms of the
Indemnity and has not been paid to you by the Requestor or is a sum which
represents monetary compensation due to you in respect of the failure by
the Requestor to fulfil its obligations to you under the Indemnity. For
the avoidance of doubt the Bank hereby confirms that:- <br><br><ol><li
class=""alpha"">such compensation shall include, but not be limited to,
payment of any amount up to the amount stated in proviso 3 below in order
to enable you to arrange the provision of security to release the ship
(or any other ship in the same or associated ownership, management or
control) from arrest or to prevent any such arrest or to prevent any
interference in the use or trading of the ship, or other ship as
aforesaid, and</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">in the event that the
amount of compensation so paid is less than the amount stated in proviso
3 below, the liability of the Bank hereunder shall continue but shall be
reduced by the amount of compensation paid</li></ol></li><br><li>shall be
limited to a sum or sums not exceeding in aggregate [insert currency and
amount in figures and words]</li><br><br><li>subject to proviso 5 below,
shall terminate on [<i>date six years from the date of the Indemnity</i>]
(the 'Termination Date'), except in respect of any demands for payment
received by the Bank hereunder at the address indicated below on or
before that date</li><br><br><li>shall be extended at your request from
time to time for a period of two calendar years at a time provided that:-
<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">the Bank shall receive a written notice
signed by you and stating that the Indemnity is required by you to remain
in force for a further period of two years, and</li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">such notice is received by the Bank at the address
indicated below on or before the then current Termination
Date.</li></ol><br>Any such extension shall be for a period of two years
from the then current Termination Date and, should the Bank for any
reason be unwilling to extend the Termination Date, the Bank shall
discharge its liability by the payment to you of the maximum sum payable
hereunder (or such lesser sum as you may require).<br><br>However, in the
event of the Bank receiving a written notice signed by you, on or before
the then current Termination Date, stating that legal proceedings have
been commenced against you as a result of your having delivered the said
cargo as specified in the Indemnity, the Bank agrees that its liability
hereunder will not terminate until receipt by the Bank of your signed
written notice stating that all legal proceedings have been concluded and
that any sum or sums payable to you by the Requestor and/or the Bank in
connection therewith have been paid and received in full and final
settlement of all liabilities arising under the
Indemnity</li><br><br><li>shall be governed by and construed in
accordance with the law governing the Indemnity and the Bank agrees to
submit to the jurisdiction of the court stated within the
Indemnity.</li></ol>It should be understood that, where appropriate, the
Bank will only produce and deliver to you all original bills of lading
should the same come into the Bank's possession, but the Bank agrees
that, in that event, it shall do so.<br><br>The Bank agrees to promptly
notify you in the event of any change in the full details of the office
to which any demand or notice is to be addressed and which is stated
below and it is agreed that you shall also promptly notify the Bank in
the event of any change in your address as stated above.<br><br>Please
quote the Bank's Indemnity Ref ......... in all correspondence with the
Bank and any demands for payment and notices hereunder.<br><br>Yours
faithfully<br>For and on behalf of<br>[<i>insert name of
bank</i>]<br>[<i>insert full details of the office to which any demand or
notice is to be
addressed</i>]<br>________________<br>Signature<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms003 stdforms003_06.htm     0
152         ISPS Clause for Time Charter Parties          ISPS Clause for
Time Charter Parties    "<tr>
                    <td class=""genText"">
<ol><li class=""alpha""><ol><li class=""roman"">From the date of coming
into force of the International Code for the Security of Ships and of
Port Facilities and the relevant amendments to Chapter XI of SOLAS (ISPS
Code) in relation to the Vessel and thereafter during the currency of
this Charter Party, the Owners shall procure that both the Vessel and
""the Company"" (as defined by the ISPS Code) shall comply with the
requirements of the ISPS Code relating to the Vessel and ""the Company"".
Upon request the Owners shall provide a copy of the relevant
International Ship Security Certificate (or the Interim International
Ship Security Certificate) to the Charterers. The Owners shall provide
the Charterers with the full style contact details of the Company
Security Officer (CSO).</li><li class=""roman"">Except as otherwise
provided in this Charter Party, loss, damage, expense or delay, excluding
consequential loss, caused by failure on the part of the Owners or ""the
Company"" to comply with the requirements of the ISPS Code or this Clause
shall be for the Owners' account.<br></li></ol></li><li
class=""alpha""><ol><li class=""roman"">The Charterers shall provide the
CSO and the Ship Security Officer (SSO)/Master with their full style
contact details and, where sub-letting is permitted under the terms of
this Charter Party, shall ensure that the contact details of all sub-
charterers are likewise provided to the CSO and the SSO/Master.
Furthermore, the Charterers shall ensure that all sub-charter parties
they enter into during the period of this Charter Party contain the
following provision:<br><br><i>""The Charterers shall provide the Owners
with their full style contact details and, where sub-letting is permitted
under the terms of the charter party, shall ensure that the contact
details of all sub-charterers are likewise provided to the
Owners"".<br><br></i></li><li class=""roman"">Except as otherwise
provided in this Charter Party, loss, damage, expense or delay, excluding
consequential loss, caused by failure on the part of the Charterers to
comply with this Clause shall be for the Charterers'
account.<br><br></li></ol></li><li class=""alpha"">Notwithstanding
anything else contained in this Charter Party all delay, costs or
expenses whatsoever arising out of or related to security regulations or
measures required by the port facility or any relevant authority in
accordance with the ISPS Code including, but not limited to, security
guards, launch services, tug escorts, port security fees or taxes and
inspections, shall be for the Charterers' account, unless such costs or
expenses result solely from the Owners' negligence. All measures required
by the Owners to comply with the Ship Security Plan shall be for the
Owners' account.<br><br></li><li class=""alpha"">If either party makes
any payment which is for the other party's account according to this
Clause, the other party shall indemnify the paying party.</li></ol></td>
          </tr>"                               2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_01.htm     0
153
                  0
154         Year 2000 Clause for Voyage and Time Charter Parties
      Year 2000 Clause for Voyage and Time Charter Parties      "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">BIMCO Standard Year 2000 Clause for
Voyage and Time Charter Parties""Year 2000 conformity"" shall mean that
neither performance nor functionality of computer systems, electronic and
electro-mechanical or similar equipment will be affected by dates prior
to or during the year 2000.<br><br>Without prejudice to their other
rights, obligations and defences under this Charter Party including,
where applicable, those of the Hague or Hague-Visby Rules, the Owners and
the Charterers, and in particular the Owners in respect of the Vessel,
shall exercise due diligence in ensuring Year 2000 conformity in so far
as this has a bearing on the performance of this Charter Party.</td>
          </tr>"                               2003-12-16 2003-12-16
      stdforms    stdforms002_03.htm     0
155         Damage to port facilities at Berbera may lead to extremely
inflated financial demands         "Vessels carrying cargoes to Berbera,
Somaliland should be aware of possible high financial demands should
damage to port facilities " "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Vessels carrying cargoes to
Berbera, Somaliland should be aware of possible high financial demands
should damage to port facilities arise. Cases at this port have
experienced claims from the port authorities of between 5 and 7 times the
estimated cost of repair. <br><br>In one case, the vessel's bow contacted
the quay wall. The impact was minor and the damage estimated to cost
around USD20,000. The vessel was detained with the authorities rejecting
P&I Club's Bank Guarantee and Letter. To achieve the vessel's release, an
inflated sum of USD160,000 was paid.<br><br>Other cases have been the
detention of the vessel and a claim for USD1.5 million for underwater
damage to the quay wall. The wall was later repaired at a cost of
USD350,000.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       somalia     Africa      Somalia
      Source : Swedish Club News   2003-02-01 2003-02-01 notices
      somalia003.htm    0
156         Problems with voyage charters to Nigeria             Recent
cases have been reported where ships chartered by Nigerian entities to
discharge "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Recent cases have been
reported where ships chartered by Nigerian entities to discharge at
Nigerian ports have been detained causing delays and resulting in
substantial demurrage claims.<br><br>Shipowners should avoid chartering
their vessels to Nigerian entities unless they are protected by bank
guarantees or similar protection.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      Source : UK Club Bulletin    2003-12-01 2003-12-01 notices
      nigeria008.htm    0
157         Chittagong - P&I cover required          "From 1 December
2003, vessels intending to call at Chittagong port must declare the name
and address of the vessel's P&I Club"    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">From 1 December 2003,
vessels intending to call at Chittagong port must declare the name and
address of the vessel's P&I Club in the declaration form. Vessels without
P&I cover will not be allowed to enter the Chittagong Port Authority's
Karnafuli channel.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       bangladesh Asia Bangladesh Source :
Steamship Articles      2003-11-01 2003-11-01 notices
      bangladesh004.htm 0
158         Panama Canal SOPEP Requirements Postponed            Following
a recent new requirement for a Panama Canal Shipboard Oil Pollution
Emergency Plan (PCSOPEP) to be implemented on 1 January 2004     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Following a recent new
requirement for a Panama Canal Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan
(PCSOPEP) to be implemented on 1 January 2004 for all vessels transiting
the Canal, due to concerns raised from the industry the ACP has now
postponed the requirement until further notice to consider suggestions
received by customers.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       panama      North America     Panama
      Source : Steamship Articles 2003-11-01 2003-11-01 notices
      panama003.htm     0
159         U.S. Ports - Notice of Arrival           "Following the
terrorist attacks of September 11th, interim rules came into force on 4
October 2001 requiring ships entering U.S. ports to provide 96 hours
advance notice" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Following the terrorist
attacks of September 11th, interim rules came into force on 4 October
2001 requiring ships entering U.S. ports to provide 96 hours advance
notice to the U.S. Coast Guard together with crew, passenger and cargo
information. The rules were finalized in February 2003. The rules apply
to all vessels except recreational vessels bound for or departing from
ports or places in the USA.<br><br>If the voyage time is 96 hours or
more, the NOA must be submitted before departure but at least 96 hours
before entering the port or place of destination.<br><br>If the voyage
time is less than 96 hours, the NOA must be submitted before departure
but at least 24 hours before entering the port or place of
destination.<br><br>The forms for submission are available on the
National Vessel Movement Center (NVMC) website in the ""Downloads""
section.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America    USA   Source :
Steamship Articles      2003-11-01 2003-11-01 notices     usa007.htm 0
160
                  0
161         Asian Gypsy Moth       "USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand
have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy Moth into
their countries" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">USA, Canada, Australia and
New Zealand have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy
Moth into their countries, targeting vessels which have called at certain
ports in Far East Russia.<br><br><u>Australia</u><br><br>We have not
discussed the Asian Gypsy Moth problem with the Australian Quarantine and
Inspection service (AQIS), and summarise their procedures as
reported.<br><br>The regulations are similar to US and Canada, except
AQIS will determine as part of the pratique vessel monitoring system
(VSM) the risk of any vessel based on information provided by the master
and ship agents. AQIS will then decide whether the vessel can be given
pratique. It is the responsibility of the VMS officer to inform the
master and ship agent of pratique status and to inform the AGM survey
officer that an inspection will be required.<br><br>Further information
can be obtained from AQIS Canberra at (06) 272 3307.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       australia Australia Australia
      2004-01-09 2004-01-09 notices      australia007.htm 0
162         Asian Gypsy Moth       "USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand
have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy Moth into
their countries" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">USA, Canada, Australia and
New Zealand have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy
Moth into their countries, targeting vessels which have called at certain
ports in Far East Russia.<br><br><u>Canada</u><br><br>We have discussed
the matter of Asian Gypsy Moth with the Canadian Agricultural and
Fisheries Dept, and are advised the Canadian regulations are basically
the same as the US, as the two countries co-operate and decide to
implement the same regulations and Procedures. A Russian inspection
certificate confirming the vessel is free of Asian Gypsy Moth is
acceptable if the vessel has been on the US Vessel Alert List. The
Canadian authorities may carry out an audit on the vessel in this
circumstance which is a random inspection. In other words for vessels
previously on the US Alert list and which can produce a Russian
inspection certificate, an inspection may or may not be carried out which
is selected on a random basis.<br><br>The consequences are the same as
US. If after survey the problem still exists, fumigation will be carried
out, and it is only when the problem is serious that the vessel will be
ordered to leave Canadian waters immediately. There are no further
consequences such as detentions or fines.<br><br>For vessels on the US
Alert list and which do not have a Russian inspection certificate, a
mandatory inspection will be carried out, rather than m audit which is a
random inspection.<br><br>The Canadian Agricultural and Fisheries Dept.
advise that an original copy of the Russian inspection certificate should
be kept on board the vessel when the vessel calls at Canadian ports. A
copy should be faxed to the vessel's agents first, but the authorities
may occasionally wish to verify this by seeing the original
copy.<br><br>We detail below useful contact details from whom we have
sought the above information.<br><br>Tel : 1613 7591842 Mr. Doug Parker
(survey dept)<br>Tel : 1613 39528000 Mr. Greg Stubbings (regulatory
dept.)<br>Website : <a href=""http://www.inspection.qc.ca""
target=""_blank"">www.inspection.qc.ca</a><br><br></td>
                     </tr>"       canada      North America    Canada
           2004-01-09 2004-01-09 notices      canada003.htm    0
163        Asian Gypsy Moth       "USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand
have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy Moth into
their countries" "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">USA, Canada, Australia and
New Zealand have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy
Moth into their countries, targeting vessels which have called at certain
ports in Far East Russia.<br><br><u>United States</u><br><br>There is
much literature on reasons for this concern which may be interesting but
not practical if your vessel needs to trade to US. We have discussed this
matter with the US Department of Agriculture and detail below their
advice and information.<br><br>The US has a 'Vessel Alert List' which
names all vessels which have called at Russian Far East ports during the
egg laying season during July to September. It is important to note the
US Plant Pest Act allows the authority to order the infested vessel to
leave US waters.<br><br>Owners should contact the US Department of
Agriculture (USDA) for advice and check whether the vessel is on the
'Vessel Alert List', details as follows.<br><br>Jonathan Jones (No he's
not the ex P&I underwriter),<br>National Forest Pest Programs
Manager<br>USDA-AHIS-PPQ<br>ISPM 470O River Roads<br>Unit 134,Suite
4C33<br>Riverdale MD 20730<br>USA<br><br>The list of vessels on the
'Vessel Alert List' can be downloaded at<br><a
href=""http://www.aphis.usda.gov/oa/agm/vessel.html""
target=""_blank"">www.aphis.usda.gov/oa/agm/vessel.html</a><br><br>Ships
on the 'Vessel Alert List' need to have an inspection certificate from
the Russian quarantine officials. If a ship on the list arrives at a US
port with m inspection certificate, USDA will allow the ship to come to
berth and unload the cargo. USDA will inspect the ship for Asian Gypsy
Moth but will not usually stop normal operations of the ship, unless
pests are found. If the Ship has a valid Russian quarantine certificate,
it is not likely USDA will find any pests on the ship based on USDA's
experience. The Russian quarantine inspection is very thorough. If a ship
on the 'Vessel Alert List' arrives at a US port without a Russian
inspection certificate, the ship will not be allowed to come to berth.
The ship will be inspected at a remote location away, from land. If the
USDA does not find any pests, the ship will be allowed to go to dock to
resume normal operations.<br><br>It is also noteworthy the 'Vessel Alert
List' is not to be treated as all inclusive, and the following risk
criteria applies to all vessels. ""A vessel is high risk and hence ought
to be treated as a vessel on the Vessel Alert List if she is arriving at
a continental US port during March, April, may, June, July, August and
with an itinerary including a Far East Russian port where the vessel
called during July to September 30 of the previous year.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America     USA
      2004-01-09 2004-01-09 notices      usa008.htm 1
164         Asian Gypsy Moth       "USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand
have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy Moth into
their countries" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">USA, Canada, Australia and
New Zealand have strict requirements to prevent the entry of Asian Gypsy
Moth into their countries, targeting vessels which have called at certain
ports in Far East Russia.<br><br><u>New Zealand</u><br><br>The 1996
Notice to Shipping Companies and Shipping Agents on Gypsy Moth sets out
the risk and quarantine procedures.<br><br>The Ministry of Forestry
requires the following information no later than 48 hours before vessel's
estimated arrival.<ul><li>Notification of vessel's estimated date and
time of arrival.</li><li>Voyage memorandum covering all previous ports of
call for last 2 years or since vessel's last port of call in New Zealand
whichever is lesser period. This is mandatory and must include arrival
and departure dates for each port.</li><li>A valid copy of vessle's
certificate confirming she is free of Asian Gypsy Moth.</li><li>A
manifest documenting all cargo carried.</li></ul><br>On receiving the
information the Ministry OF Forestry will evaluate whether the vessel is
a high or low risk and decide whether survey is necessary. If a vessel is
classified as high risk, the vessel shall be instructed to anchor for an
offshore inspection to be carried out by the Ministry. The vessel is
ordered the vessel may not enter closer than 8 km from New Zealand
coastline, and owner or ship agents shall pay for the
inspection.<br><br>The vessel and agent will be informed of the
inspection result by the Ministry. Once cleared the vessel be subject to
an ongoing monitoring during discharge.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       newzealand Australia New Zealand
      2004-01-09 2004-01-09 notices      newzealand001.htm 0
165   31    International Marine Dangerous Good Code (IMDG)
      "(IMDG)</span> <span class=""genBoldText"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black"" lang=""ZH-
CN"">&#22269;&#38469;&#28023;&#19978;&#21361;&#38505;&#36135;&#29289;&#36
816;&#36755;&#35268;&#21017;"      The International Marine Dangerous Good
Code (IMDG) has now become law with effect from 1 January 2004 "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">The International Marine
Dangerous Good Code (IMDG) has now become law with effect from 1 January
2004 in those countries who have acceded to SOLAS.<br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#22269;&#38469;&#28023;&#19978;&#21361;&#38505;&#36135;&#29289;&#36816;&
#36755;&#35268;&#21017;&#23558;&#20174;2004&#24180;1&#26376;1&#26085;&#36
215;&#23545;&#37027;&#20123;&#21152;&#20837;&#12298;&#22269;&#38469;&#280
23;&#19978;&#20154;&#21629;&#23433;&#20840;&#20844;&#32422;&#12299;&#2226
9;&#23478;&#20135;&#29983;&#27861;&#24459;&#25928;&#21147;&#12290;</span>
<br>
                        <br>The Code contains requirements for the type
of packing, which types of cargoes cannot be stowed together and how they
must be marked. The Code can be downloaded from IMO at their website <a
href=""http://www.imo.org/safety/index.asp?topic_id=158""
target=""_blank"">www.imo.org/safety/index.asp?topic_id=158</a>.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#27861;&#35268;&#21253;&#25324;&#20102;&#23545;&#21253;&#35013;&#31867;&
#22411;&#30340;&#35201;&#27714;&#65292;&#21738;&#20123;&#31867;&#22411;&#
30340;&#36135;&#29289;&#19981;&#33021;&#35013;&#36733;&#19968;&#36215;&#2
1644;&#24212;&#24403;&#22914;&#20309;&#26631;&#35760;&#12290;&#27492;&#35
268;&#21017;&#21487;&#20197;&#20174;&#22269;&#38469;&#28023;&#20107;&#324
52;&#32455;&#30340;&#32593;&#31449;&#19978;&#19979;&#36733; <a
href=""http://www.imo.org/safety/index.asp?topic_id=158""
target=""_blank"">www.imo.org/safety/index.asp?topic_id=158
</a>&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>We would advise all our clients to be aware
of the IMDG Code and ensure they have in place procedures to apply and
enforce it as this Code has now attained force of law, and every prudent
owner is expected to know of it and apply it.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25105;&#20204;&#24314;&#35758;&#25105;&#20204;&#25152;&#26377;&#30340;&
#23458;&#25143;&#20102;&#35299;&#22269;&#38469;&#21361;&#38505;&#36135;&#
29289;&#27861;&#35268;&#20197;&#30830;&#20445;&#20182;&#20204;&#33021;&#2
1512;&#29702;&#30340;&#36816;&#29992;&#21644;&#25191;&#34892;&#65292;&#22
240;&#20026;&#29616;&#22312;&#36825;&#20010;&#35268;&#21017;&#24050;&#201
35;&#29983;&#27861;&#24459;&#25928;&#21147;&#65292;&#24076;&#26395;&#2759
9;&#20010;&#35880;&#24910;&#30340;&#33337;&#19996;&#20102;&#35299;&#23427
;&#12289;&#36816;&#29992;&#23427;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>We would also advise non compliance with the
Code which give rise to a claim may well prejudice P&I Club cover and
there is a rule of all P&I Clubs which excludes liability for voyages
which are hazardous, improper or not prudently carried out.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25105;&#20204;&#20063;&#24544;&#21578;&#22914;&#26524;&#30001;&#20110;&
#27809;&#26377;&#36981;&#23432;&#27492;&#27861;&#35268;&#32780;&#21457;&#
29983;&#30340;&#32034;&#36180;&#23558;&#20250;&#24433;&#21709;&#20445;&#3
6180;&#38505;&#30340;&#36180;&#20184;&#12290;&#25152;&#26377;&#20445;&#36
180;&#21327;&#20250;&#37117;&#26377;&#19968;&#26465;&#35268;&#21017;&#352
68;&#23450;&#37027;&#20123;&#21361;&#38505;&#30340;&#12289;&#19981;&#2151
2;&#36866;&#30340;&#25110;&#19981;&#26159;&#35880;&#24910;&#35013;&#36733
;&#30340;&#37117;&#23646;&#20110;&#38500;&#22806;&#36131;&#20219;&#12290;
</span><br>
                         <br></td>
                      </tr>"                             2004-01-09
      2004-01-09 legal_awareness chi_awareness032.htm    1
166         "Cargo shortage claims - Lome , West Africa"       We have
experienced several claim for cargo shortages which has given rise to
substantial claims.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We have experienced several
claim
for cargo shortages which has given rise to substantial claims. In
addition to the actual cargo shortage claim for which security is
required, the custom authorities now takes advantage and lodges a fine
against the shipowner for breach of customs regulations. Customs
authorities require security for as much as the cargo shortage claim and
demand security based on a wording which triggers settlement of an amount
which is mutually agreed between the ship agents and the custom
authorities. Any different wording under the Club's security is not
accepted to enable the vessel to be released. In all likelihood the ship
agents are friendly with the customs authorities and invariably agree to
a fine which is considered unreasonably high. Further the ship agents are
usually nominated by the charterers and have no interest to protect the
owner's interest. In one case an alleged shortage of 5,000 bags of sugar
resulted in a fine of US$100,000. A substantial amount of monies have
been extorted from shipowners and the P&I Club in this manner.<br><br>We
urge shipowners who trade their vessels to West African ports to include
into their charterparty a clause which provides such unsubstantiated
cargo shortage and customs losses to be contributed or shared with the
charterers, subject to the results of the P&I Club's independent tally
surveys being carried out at loadports and disports. costs which should
be shared between owners and charterers. Further the ship agents at West
African ports should be approved by the owners in all cases. Should our
clients require any assistance with the drafting of such a clause to
include into the charterparty, they are free to contact us.<br><br>We
would advise that we understand this customs practice applies to all West
African ports and not only to Lome."" <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        togo Africa       Togo        2004-01-19
      2004-01-19 notices      togo001.htm 1
167         """ Civil liabilities "" must be covered by P&I"            We
have experienced with a client shipowner that the port authority at ports
in Ukraine now require to see a copy of the P&I entry certificate
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We have experienced with a
client shipowner that the port authority at ports in Ukraine now require
to see a copy of the P&I entry certificate to confirm the insurance
covers 'civil liabilities.' We understand a copy of the P&I entry
certificate is sufficient for the moment, although we recommend all
owners to place on board with the master an original P&I entry
certificate for completeness. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ukraine     Europe      Ukraine
      2004-01-09 2004-01-09 notices       ukraine004.htm    0
168         Complaint of crew wages in US             Shipowners should be
aware of the possibility of crew lodging claims of unpaid or unfair wages
if the ship trades to the US.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
             <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
               <td class=""genText"">Shipowners should be aware of the
possibility of crew lodging claims of unpaid or unfair wages if the ship
trades to the US.<br><br>It is customary for shipowners to maintain
'double book-keeping' to satisfy ITF. The crew were required to sign
false receipts for wages under ITF scale than actually
received.<br><br>Due to the crews' complaint, the seamen became
unemployable as they were blacklisted in their country.<br><br>In one
case the US Court held the seamen were entitled to recover the following
head of claim.</td>
              </tr>
              <tr>
               <td>
                <table width=""400"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"">
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td>a) Difference in wages</td><td
align=""center""><span class=""genText"">US$165,932</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td>b) Penalties</td><td align=""center""><span
class=""genText"">US$6,571,134</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td>c) Punitive damages</td><td align=""center""><span
class=""genText"">US$17,000,000</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td>d) damages for loss of future income</td><td
align=""center""><span class=""genText"">US$6,800,470</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td>e) damages for emotional distress</td><td
align=""center""><span class=""genText"">US$1,700,000</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td>f) interest and legal cost</td><td
align=""center""><span class=""genText"">US$1,000,000</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr>
                  <td></td><td align=""center"">--------------</td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr class=""genText"">
                  <td></td><td align=""center""><span
class=""genText"">US$31,707,000</span></td>
                 </tr>
                </table>
              <br></td>
              </tr>
              <tr>
               <td class=""genText"">For a saving of US$165,932 in wages,
the shipowner had to pay a total claim of about US$32,000,000, which is
sure to financially ruin any shipowner as such risks are not covered by
insurance.</td>
              </tr>"          usa   North America    USA        2004-01-12
      2004-01-12 notices      usa009.htm 1
169         Reporting of serious deficiencies prior to entry US waters
            "It is a requirement for vessels to report serious defects or
problems in navigation, steering, propulsion and machinery to the"
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">It is a requirement for
vessels to report serious defects or problems in navigation, steering,
propulsion and machinery to the US Coast Guard prior to entry. This
obligation is emanates from the Port Waterways and Safety
Acts.<br><br>There is no definition of what is considered serious, but
presumably any matters which may increase the risk of a sea accident
falls within this ambit.<br><br>If the vessel does not report the defect
and this is found to be serious by the US Coast Guard, a hefty fine may
be lodged against the vessel and the vessel may be detained and ordered
for repairs in US.<br><br>If problems are reported the US Coast Guard
will usually take a more lenient approach and work with the vessel to
ensure the problem is rectified or if the problem cannot be not repaired
that it will not cause a safety hazard.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA
      2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       usa010.htm 1
170
                  0
171         Delivery of cargo without bills of lading            "In
accordance with Venezuelan customs practice, cargo interests are allowed
to take delivery of cargo without production of bills of lading"
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In accordance with
Venezuelan customs practice, cargo interests are allowed to take delivery
of cargo without production of bills of lading, subject to a guarantee of
Bolivares 1,000,000 (US$11,000) to deliver the bills within 30 days.
<br><br>It is important this practice places the owners at a high risk of
being defrauded as a US$11,000 guarantee is not sufficient in any case of
wrongful delivery and this risk does not fall under P&I Club
cover.<br><br>In all situations, the P&I Club must be consulted if any
cargo is to be delivered to customs or port agents in
Venezuela.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        venezuela South America      Venezuela
            2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       venezuela001.htm 0
172         Pollution         "The Environmental Criminal Offence Act
provides the master will be imprisoned for up to 3 years and fined up to
3,000 days salary if hydrocarbons leak from the vessel. " "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Environmental Criminal
Offence Act provides the master will be imprisoned for up to 3 years and
fined up to 3,000 days salary if hydrocarbons leak from the vessel.
<br><br>Further any failure to report any incident would result in the
master being arrested for 4 to 8 months and fined up to 800 days his
salary.<br><br>The act further specifies similar penalties in relation to
dumping waste water, effluents, non biodegradable products, emission of
gasses, toxic and radioactive waste.<br><br>Under the Commercial Code,
the shipowner is liable for the acts of the master and the vessel may be
arrested in addition.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        venezuela South America      Venezuela
            2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       venezuela002.htm 0
173         Customs declaration           The Customs Code and Indirect Tax
Regulations provide the vessel must within 24 hours of arrival provide a
written declaration of the ship's provisions on board and personal
possessions of crew.    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Customs Code and
Indirect Tax Regulations provide the vessel must within 24 hours of
arrival provide a written declaration of the ship's provisions on board
and personal possessions of crew.<br><br>Failure to report may result in
the following : <br>a) Undeclared goods being confiscated.<br>b)
Imprisonment for up to one year<br>c) Fine equivalent of 5 times the
value of undeclared goods.<br><br>It has been reported that a failure to
report a number of cases of beer on board has resulted in a fine of
US$2,500.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        morocco     Africa      Morocco
      2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       morocco001.htm    0
174         P&I entry certificate         "In accordance with Mexico's
laws, all vessels must have third party liability insurance " "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In accordance with Mexico's
laws, all vessels must have third party liability insurance at each port
of call in Mexico. A copy of the P&I entry certificate should be retained
on board by the master.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        mexico      North America     Mexico
            2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       mexico001.htm     0
175         Spurious stevedore claims           "Stevedore claims they are
injured whilst working on the vessel have occurred, notwithstanding there
is no evidence of such claims."     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Stevedore claims they are
injured whilst working on the vessel have occurred, notwithstanding there
is no evidence of such claims. Once the stevedores notify the police, the
vessel is detained.<br><br>The stevedores usually seek compensation of
US$10,000 and many owners settle this knowing such claims are fabricated
to avoid time loss and further problems.<br><br>We suggest that owners
incorporate into the charterparty a clause which transfers such payments
and time loss to charterers if there is no evidence of the stevedores'
clams.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        syria Middle East Syria       2004-01-12
      2004-01-12 notices      syria001.htm      0
176         Discharge of ballast water          "With effect from July
2001, new ballast water discharge regulations are implemented by the
Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS)."       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">With effect from July 2001,
new ballast water discharge regulations are implemented by the Australian
Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS).<br><br>The ballast Water
Decision Support System (DSS) will assess the risk. DSS is a computer
programme. A vessel may gain access to DSS via the internet or inmarsat-
C. The vessel must provide information to DSS which will be evaluated for
unwanted and harmful aquatic organisms. The information should be
provided at vessel's previous port and prior to entry to Australian
waters. DSS will calculate whether the vessel is 'high' or 'low' risk. If
the risk is high, one of the following procedures must be carried out
prior arrival in Australia.<br><br>a) Full ballast water exchange at
sea.<br>
                                              b) Tank to tank
transfer.<br>c) Retention of ballast on board.<br><br>In addition AQIS
requires the vessel to use the AQIS ballast Water Reporting Form. Tests
may be carried out by the authorities to ensure the vessel has accurately
reported. It is also necessary for the vessel to provide access to a safe
ballast water and/or ballast sediment sampling point on board. Sediment
removed from a ballast tank must be disposed of in a manner approved by
AQIS.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       australia008.htm 0
177         Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act       This Act provides for
compulsory pilotage and increased fines to protect this exclusive marine
environment.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">This Act provides for
compulsory pilotage and increased fines to protect this exclusive marine
environment.<br><br>Ships over 70 m in length, vessels carrying oil, gas
or chemicals must carry a pilot on board along routes of Hydrographers
Passage, Cape York, Cairns and Whitsunday Islands.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       australia009.htm 0
178         "Mooring lines - Australia , Freemantle"             Due to the
increasing number of injuries to stevedores due to sub standard ship's
mooring lines     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Due to the increasing number
of injuries to stevedores due to sub standard ship's mooring lines, the
port authority will carry out inspections on mooring ropes and record the
findings for use by the Australian port authority. We are not sure
whether such a defect may allow the port to detain the vessel. The
Freemantle port authority has produced a questionnaire which all master
must complete prior to arrival which includes a question on the condition
of mooring ropes.<br><br></td>
                     </tr>"         australia Australia Australia
      2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       australia010.htm 0
179         Enhanced inspection on cargoes due to concern of grain
disease           The Australian Agricultural and Fisheries dept has
implemented enhanced inspections to prevent the import of "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Australian Agricultural
and Fisheries dept has implemented enhanced inspections to prevent the
import of various grain diseases into the country.<br><br>If the
inspection reveals other residues of cargoes, the whole grain cargo can
be rejected. The standard also applies to other cargoes, for example is a
cargo of fertilizer reveal the existence of grain cargoes or residues,
the whole cargo can also be rejected.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      2004-01-12 2004-01-12 notices       australia011.htm 1
180         Customs fines           "The import of vehicles over the age of
10 years is prohibited. The vessel will be fined about US$11,000 and the
vehicle confiscated by the customs authority."       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The import of vehicles over
the age of 10 years is prohibited. The vessel will be fined about
US$11,000 and the vehicle confiscated by the customs authority.<br><br>We
would advise there is no P&I Club cover where the trade is unlawful and
the member's knowledge or privity is immaterial, so it is important that
owners are certain the cargoes are lawful.<br><br>We suggest the owners
obtain not only a written declaration of the lawfulness of cargo, but
also a guarantee from the charterers to indemnify owners for all loss and
expense. As always a guarantee is only as good as the financial standing
of the party issuing it.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ghana Africa     Ghana       2004-01-12
      2004-01-12 notices      ghana001.htm      0
181         "Engine testing requirement - India , Colombo"             Due
to frequent failures of ship's main engines which caused contact damage
to berths "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Due to frequent failures of
ship's main engines which caused contact damage to berths, the Colombo
port authority has issued the following order.<br><br>'All vessels geared
with bridge control main engine manoeuvring systems should change over to
engine control prior to arriving at the pilot boarding station and
engines must be tested on all manoeuvring speeds for ahead and astern
movements. Confirmation of such tests should be recorded in the bridge
bell book for the pilot's scrutiny""<br><br></td>
                     </tr>"         india Asia India       2004-01-12
      2004-01-12 notices      india005.htm      0
182         "Shortage of bulk cargoes - Russia , St Petersburg"
      There has been reports of a number of short delivery claims of bulk
cargoes at St Petersburg.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There has been reports of a
number of short delivery claims of bulk cargoes at St
Petersburg.<br><br>Cargoes are loaded from the ship to railroad trucks
and only weighed inland upon arrival. The weight of the railroad trucks
are painted at the side of each truck and are not reliable. <br><br>It is
suggested that when bulk cargoes are discharged at St Petersburg or any
other ports which carry cargoes from port to inland using rail trucks
that the P&I Club is contacted to arrange for their correspondents to
attend.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"        russia      Europe      Russia           2004-01-13
      2004-01-13 notices      russia003.htm     0
183         "Loading steel sheets - Russia , Novorossisk"        There have
been problems with loading steel sheets at port Novorossisk.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There have been problems
with loading steel sheets at port Novorossisk. The packing consist of two
runner skids. The skids if placed too close or deformed will cause the
stow to become unbalanced, especially when there are many tiers of steel
sheets. Further it is important there is sufficient dunnage.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        russia      Europe     Russia
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       russia004.htm    0
184         Paper Charts regulations            There is a regulation which
require ship agents / owners to warrant all vessels which transit Peru
waters are equipped with paper charts published by "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There is a regulation which
require ship agents / owners to warrant all vessels which transit Peru
waters are equipped with paper charts published by the Peruvian Navy's
Hydrographic and Navigation Bureau.<br><br>The situation is not clear but
it is likely if vessels are using Electronic Chart Display and
information System, they are required to have charts published by the
Peruvian Navy.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        peru South America     Peru
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       peru002.htm 0
185         Hantavirus regulations        There are regulations to control
the spread of the hantavirus by ships arriving from foreign ports
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There are regulations to
control the spread of the hantavirus by ships arriving from foreign ports
in which the virus has been reported to exist. <br><br>The virus has
existed in the US, Canada, Argentina, Chile, Brazil,
Uruguay.<br><br>Ships arriving in Peru from ports where the hantavirus is
known to exist should go to an area assigned by the harbour master where
the health authorities will carry out a sanitary inspection on board. If
the virus is detected or its presence is possible the ship will be
ordered to anchor at a quarantine zone for sanitary
measures.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        peru South America      Peru
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       peru003.htm 0
186         "Conakry , Guinea-Bissau - New Pirate Attacks"
      Armed attacks on vessels at Conakry anchorage "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Armed attacks on vessels at
Conakry anchorage. Took crew hostage whilst stealing ship's cash and
valuables. Attackers boarded from motor boats.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        guinea      Africa      Guinea
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       guinea002.htm     0
187         "Lagos , Nigeria - New Pirate Attack"           Armed attacks on
vessels at anchorage    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Armed attacks on vessels at
anchorage, with serious injury to crew and stealing ship's equipment and
cash. Lagos Port Control did nothing when assistance sought.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       nigeria009.htm    0
188         "Chittagong , Bangladesh - New Pirate Attacks"
      Armed robbery on vessels.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Armed robbery on vessels.
Port Control took no action.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        bangladesh Asia Bangladesh
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       bangladesh005.htm 0
189         "Luanda , Angola - New Pirate Attacks"          Thefts of ship's
stores when vessel anchored at roads      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Thefts of ship's stores when
vessel anchored at roads. Port Control was not interested in the
complaint. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        angola      Africa      Angola
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       angola001.htm     0
190         "Warri , Nigeria - Cash payment to ensure safe passage in
Warri"            Vessel approached by armed launch after departure from
warri on Escravos river.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Vessel approached by armed
launch after departure from warri on Escravos river. Pilot negotiated
with armed launch and explained cash payments of US$5,000 to US$17,000 to
the launch was necessary to ensure safe passage in Warri. Such payments
must be made for inward and outward passages. Port agents usually make
sure the pilots carry enough cash as insufficient cash may lead to fatal
consequences. Further there is tension and armed battles among rival
groups for positions along the river. <br><br>The risk and payments
should fall upon the charterers and we suggest owners who trade there or
vessels on period charters include a clause into the charterparty. If our
clients need any assistance in drafting such a clause, they are welcomed
to contact us.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        nigeria     Africa      Nigeria
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 notices       nigeria010.htm    1
191
                  0
192        Letter of Indemnity - Passenger travelling on board the
vessel            Passenger travelling on board the vessel     "<tr>
             <td class=""genBoldText"">
                                             <img
src=""../../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;Passenger travelling on board the vessel<br><br></td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
             <td class=""genText"">In consideration of the Managing
Agents, Messrs ____________, having agreed to allow me, [ name ], to
embark on, sail in and disembark from the vessel M.V. ""____________"" on
[ date ],so as to travel on this voyage on board the said vessel, I
hereby undertake not to interfere in any way with the navigation,
management, loading/discharging operations or any other business of the
vessel, but to indemnify and hold harmless the owners, their servants,
agents and any others for whom they may be responsible and any other
party to whom they may be obliged whether by contract or otherwise for
any loss or damage to the vessel or the cargo or any injury or death to
any third party or for any kind of loss or damage as result of such
interference.<br><br>I also agree to indemnify and hold harmless the
owners, their servants and agents against any penalties, fines or claims
whatsoever arising out of any act, omission or default by me on the
voyage, which may be imposed or made by any customs, immigration, health
or other authority or by any person and against any costs or expenses
incurred in respect thereof.<br><br>I also agree that I will not make any
claim whatsoever against the owners, their servants, agents or any others
for whom they may be responsible (whether on board the vessel or not) or
any other party to whom they may be obliged whether by contract or
otherwise to indemnify.<br><br>If I should decide for whatever reason to
brake voyage anywhere and anytime, or if circumstances should require me
to do so, I undertake to pay for all expenses to be in on way
responsible.<br><br>I declare that I shall not hold the Owner/Agents
liable for any injury or death to my person or for any damage or loss to
my property.<br><br>I further undertake to indemnify the Owners/Agents
against all actions, proceedings, liabilities, claims, demands, damage,
costs and expenses whatever which may be incurred whether intentionally
or otherwise as a result of my stay on board the vessel.<br><br></td>
            </tr>
            <tr>
             <td>
            <table width=""500"" border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText"">
             <tr>

<td>Signature</td><td>:_______________</td><td>Employer</td><td>:________
_______</td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td>Name</td><td>:_______________</td><td></td><td></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td>Passport
No</td><td>:_______________</td><td></td><td></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>

<td>Date</td><td>:_______________</td><td>Chop</td><td>:_______________</
td>
              </tr>
             </table>
         <br><br></td>
             </tr>                           "
      2004-01-13 2004-01-13 stdforms003 stdforms003_07.htm       0
193         Letter of Indemnity - Persons requesting to board the vessel
            Persons requesting to board the vessel "<tr>
              <td class=""genText"">Date :<br><br>To : The Master of
<br><br>Dear Sirs,<br><br>In consideration of your allowing me to make
attend on board the above vessel, I hereby undertake that I will not make
any claim whatsoever against you, your servants or any others for whom
you may be responsible (whether on board the vessel or not) or any other
party whom you may be obliged whether by contract or otherwise to
indemnify.<br><br>I also agree to relinquish any right which I may
acquire to participate in salvage monies.<br><br>I also agree to
indemnify and hold harmless you, your servants and any others for whom
you may be responsible and any other party whom you may be obliged
whether by contract or otherwise to indemnify against any penalties,
fines or claims whatsoever arising out of any act, omission or default by
me on the voyage, which may be imposed or made by any customs,
immigration, health or other authority or by any person and against any
costs or expenses incurred in respect thereof.<br><br></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td align=""right""><span class=""genText"">Yours
faithfully,<br><br>______________</span><br><br></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td align=""left""><span
class=""genText"">______________<br><br>From
Individual</span><br><br></td>
             </tr>"                                  2004-01-15 2004-01-15
      stdforms003 stdforms003_08.htm      0
194         Letter of Indemnity - Company who request persons to board
the vessel         Company who request persons to board the vessel
      "<tr>
              <td class=""genText"">Date :<br><br>To : <br><br>Dear
Sirs,<br><br>Re :<br><br>In consideration of your allowing our appointed
stevedores to make attend on board the above ship, we hereby undertake to
indemnify you against any claims of whatsoever nature which may be
brought in respect of the negligence of you, your servants or
otherwise.<br><br>We further undertake to indemnify and hold harmless
you, your servants and any others for whom you may be responsible and any
other party whom you may be obliged whether by contract or otherwise to
indemnify against any penalties, fines or claims whatsoever arising out
of any act, omission or default by them on the voyage, which may be
imposed or made by any customs, immigration, health or other authority or
by any person and any costs or expenses incurred in respect
thereof.<br><br></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td align=""left""><span
class=""genText"">______________<br><br>From
Employer<br><br></span><br><br></td>
             </tr>"                                  2004-01-15 2004-01-15
      stdforms003 stdforms003_09.htm     0
195         Stowaways Clause for Time Charters       Stowaways Clause for
Time Charters      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">(i) The
Charterers warrant to exercise due care and diligence in preventing
stowaways in gaining access to the Vessel by means of secreting away in
the goods and/or containers shipped by the Charterers.<br><br>(ii) If,
despite the exercise of due care and diligence by the Charterers,
stowaways have gained access to the Vessel by means of secreting away in
the goods and/or containers shipped by the Charterers, this shall amount
to breach of charter for the consequences of which the Charterers shall
be liable and shall hold the Owners harmless and shall keep them
indemnified against all claims whatsoever which may arise and be made
against them. Furthermore, all time lost and all expenses whatsoever and
howsoever incurred, including fines, shall be for the Charterers' account
and the Vessel shall remain on hire.<br><br>(iii) Should the Vessel be
arrested as a result of the Charterers' breach of charter according to
sub-clause(a)(ii) above, the Charterers shall take all reasonable steps
to secure that, within a reasonable time, the Vessel is released and at
their expense put up bail to secure release of the
Vessel.<br><br></li><li class=""alpha"">(i) If, despite the exercise of
due care and diligence by the Owners, stowaways have gained access to the
Vessel by means other than secreting away in the goods and/or containers
shipped by the Charterers, all time lost and all expenses whatsoever and
howsoever incurred, including fines, shall be for the Owners' account and
the Vessel shall be off hire.<br><br>(ii) Should the Vessel be arrested
as a result of stowaways having gained access to the Vessel by means
other than secreting away in the goods and/or containers shipped by the
Charterers, the Owners shall take all reasonable steps to secure that,
within a reasonable time, the Vessel is released and at their expense put
up bail to secure release of the Vessel.<br><br></li></ol></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-15 2004-01-15
      stdforms002 stdforms002_04.htm     0
196         Stevedore Damage Clause            Stevedore Damage Clause
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">Any damage caused by stevedores during
the currency of this Charter Party shall be reported by the Master to the
Charterers or their agents, in writing, within 24 hours of the occurrence
or as soon as possible thereafter but latest when the damage could have
been discovered by the exercise of due diligence. The Master shall use
his best efforts to obtain written acknowledgement by responsible parties
causing damage unless damage should have been made good in the
meantime.<br><br>Stevedore damage affecting seaworthiness or the proper
working of the Vessel and/or her equipment, shall be repaired without
delay to the Vessel after each occurrence in the Charterers' time and
shall be paid for by the Charterers. Other repairs shall be done at the
same time, but if this is not possible, same shall be repaired whilst
Vessel is in drydock in the Owners' time, provided this does not
interfere with the Owners' repair work, or by Vessel's crew at the
Owners' convenience. All costs of such repairs shall be for the
Charterers' account. Any time spent in repairing stevedore damage shall
be for the Charterers' account. The Charterers shall pay for stevedore
damage whether or not payment has been made by stevedores to the
Charterers.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-15 2004-01-15
      stdforms002 stdforms002_05.htm     0
197         U.S. Customs 24 Hours Rule Clause for Voyage Charter Parties
            U.S. Customs 24 Hours Rule Clause for Voyage Charter Parties
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">If loading cargo
destined for the US or passing through US ports in transit, the
Charterers shall:<ol><li class=""roman"">Provide all necessary
information, upon request by the Owners, to the Owners and/or their
agents to enable them to submit a timely and accurate cargo declaration
directly to the US Customs; or <br><br></li><li class=""roman"">If
permitted by US Customs Regulations (19 CFR 4.7) or any subsequent
amendments thereto, submit a cargo declaration directly to the US Customs
and provide the Owners with a copy thereof. <br><br></li></ol>In all
circumstances, the cargo declaration must be submitted to the US Customs
latest 24 hours in advance of loading.<br><br></li><li
class=""alpha"">The Charterers assume liability for and shall indemnify,
defend and hold harmless the Owners against any loss and/or damage
whatsoever (including consequential loss and/or damage) and any expenses,
fines, penalties and all other claims of whatsoever nature, including but
not limited to legal costs, arising from the Charterers' failure to
comply with the provisions of sub-clause (a).<br><br></li><li
class=""alpha"">If the Vessel is detained, attached, seized or arrested
as a result of the Charterers' failure to comply with the provisions of
sub-clause (a), the Charterers shall provide a bond or other security to
ensure the prompt release of the Vessel. All time used or lost until the
Vessel is free to leave any port of call shall count as laytime or, if
the Vessel is already on demurrage, time on
demurrage.</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-15 2004-01-15
      stdforms002 stdforms002_06.htm     0
198         U.S. Security Clause for Time Chartering            U.S.
Security Clause for Time Chartering      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">If the Vessel calls in the United
States, including any U.S. territory, the following provisions shall
apply with respect to any applicable security regulations or measures:
<br><br>Notwithstanding anything else contained in this Charter Party all
costs or expenses arising out of or related to security regulations or
measures required by any U.S. authority including, but not limited to,
security guards, launch services, tug escorts, port security fees or
taxes and inspections, shall be for the Charterers' account, unless such
costs or expenses result solely from the Owners' negligence.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-15 2004-01-15
      stdforms002 stdforms002_07.htm     0
199         U.S. Security Clause for Voyage Chartering          U.S.
Security Clause for Voyage Chartering    "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">If the Vessel calls in the United
States, including any U.S. territory, the following provisions shall
apply with respect to any applicable security regulations or measures:
<br><br><u>Reporting</u><br>The Vessel or its agents shall report and
send all notices as required to obtain entry and exit clearances from the
relevant U.S. authorities. Any delay caused by the failure to so report
shall be for the Owners' account, unless such failure to report is caused
by or attributable to the Charterers or their representatives or agents
including but not limited to the shipper and/or receiver of the cargo.
<br><br><u>Clearances</u><br>Unless caused by the Owners' negligence, any
delay suffered or time lost in obtaining the entry and exit clearances
from the relevant U.S. authorities shall count as laytime or time on
demurrage.<br><br><u>Expenses</u><br>Any expenses or additional fees
relating to the cargo, even if levied against the Vessel, that arise out
of security measures imposed at the loading and/or discharging port
and/or any other port to which the Charterers order the Vessel, shall be
for the Charterers' account. <br><br><u>Notice of
Readiness</u><br>Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in
this Charter Party the Vessel shall be entitled to tender Notice of
Readiness whether cleared for entry or not by any relevant U.S.
authority.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_08.htm     0
200         "War Risks Clause for Time Charters, 1993 Code Name:
""CONWARTIME 1993"""         "War Risks Clause for Time Charters, 1993
Code Name: ""CONWARTIME 1993"""    "<tr>
           <td align=""center""><br><span class=""genText"">BIMCO
standard war risks clause for time charters, 1993 code name: ""Conwartime
1993""</span><br><br></td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""genText"">For the
purpose of this Clause, the words:<ol><li class=""alpha"">""Owners""
shall include the shipowners, bareboat charterers, disponent owners,
managers or other operators who are charged with the management of the
Vessel, and the Master; and</li><li class=""alpha"">""War Risks"" shall
include any war (whether actual or threatened), act of war, civil war,
hostilities, revolution, rebellion, civil commotion, warlike operations,
the laying of mines (whether actual or reported), acts of piracy, acts of
terrorists, acts of hostility or malicious damage, blockades (whether
imposed against all vessels or imposed selectively against vessels of
certain flags or ownership, or against certain cargoes or crews or
otherwise howsoever), by any person, body, terrorist or political group,
or the Government of any state whatsoever, which, in the reasonable
judgement of the Master and/or the Owners, may be dangerous or are likely
to be or to become dangerous to the Vessel, her cargo, crew or other
persons on board the Vessel.<br><br></li></ol></li><li>The Vessel, unless
the written consent of the Owners be first obtained, shall not be ordered
to or required to continue to or through, any port, place, area or zone
(whether of land or sea), or any waterway or canal, where it appears that
the Vessel, her cargo, crew or other persons on board the Vessel, in the
reasonable judgement of the Master and/or the Owners, may be, or are
likely to be, exposed to War Risks. Should the Vessel be within any such
place as aforesaid, which only becomes dangerous, or is likely to be or
to become dangerous, after her entry into it, she shall be at liberty to
leave it.<br><br> </li><li>The Vessel shall not be required to load
contraband cargo, or to pass through any blockade, whether such blockade
be imposed on all vessels, or is imposed selectively in any way
whatsoever against vessels of certain flags or ownership, or against
certain cargoes or crews or otherwise howsoever, or to proceed to an area
where she shall be subject, or is likely to be subject to a belligerents
right of search and/or confiscation.<br><br> </li><li>&nbsp;<ol><li
class=""alpha"">The Owners may effect war risks insurance in respect of
the Hull and Machinery of the Vessel and their other interests
(including, but not limited to, loss of earnings and detention, the crew
and their Protection and Indemnity Risks), and the premiums and/or calls
therefor shall be for their account.</li><li class=""alpha"">If the
Underwriters of such insurance should require payment of premiums and/or
calls because, pursuant to the Charterers' orders, the Vessel is within,
or is due to enter and remain within, any area or areas which are
specified by such Underwriters as being subject to additional premiums
because of War Risks, then such premiums and/or calls shall be reimbursed
by the Charterers to the Owners at the same time as the next payment of
hire is due.<br><br></li></ol></li><li>If the Owners become liable under
the terms of employment to pay to the crew any bonus or additional wages
in respect of sailing into an area which is dangerous in the manner
defined by the said terms, then such bonus or additional wages shall be
reimbursed to the Owners by the Charterers at the same time as the next
payment of hire is due. <br><br></li><li>The Vessel shall have liberty:-
<ol><li class=""alpha"">to comply with all orders, directions,
recommendations or advice as to departure, arrival, routes, sailing in
convoy, ports of call, stoppages, destinations, discharge of cargo,
delivery, or in any other way whatsoever, which are given by the
Government of the Nation under whose flag the Vessel sails, or other
Government to whose laws the Owners are subject, or any other Government,
body or group whatsoever acting with the power to compel compliance with
their orders or directions;</li><li class=""alpha"">to comply with the
order, directions or recommendations of any war risks underwriters who
have the authority to give the same under the terms of the war risks
insurance; </li><li class=""alpha""> to comply with the terms of any
resolution of the Security Council of the United Nations, any directives
of the European Community, the effective orders of any other
Supranational body which has the right to issue and give the same, and
with national laws aimed at enforcing the same to which the Owners are
subject, and to obey the orders and directions of those who are charged
with their enforcement;</li><li class=""alpha"">to divert and discharge
at any other port any cargo or part thereof which may render the Vessel
liable to confiscation as a contraband carrier;</li><li
class=""alpha"">to divert and call at any other port to change the crew
or any part thereof or other persons on board the Vessel when there is
reason to believe that they may be subject to internment, imprisonment or
other sanctions.<br><br></li></ol></li><li>If in accordance with their
rights under the foregoing provisions of this Clause, the Owners shall
refuse to proceed to the loading or discharging ports, or any one or more
of them, they shall immediately inform the Charterers. No cargo shall be
discharged at any alternative port without first giving the Charterers
notice of the Owners' intention to do so and requesting them to nominate
a safe port for such discharge. Failing such nomination by the Charterers
within 48 hours of the receipt of such notice and request, the Owners may
discharge the cargo at any safe port of their own choice.
<br><br></li><li>If in compliance with any of the provisions of sub-
clauses (2) to (7) of this Clause anything is done or not done, such
shall not be deemed a deviation, but shall be considered as due
fulfillment of this Charterparty. </li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_09.htm     0
201         "War Risks Clause for Voyage Chartering, 1993 Code Name: ""
VOYWAR 1993 """         "War Risks Clause for Voyage Chartering, 1993 Code
Name: ""VOYWAR 1993""" "<tr>
           <td align=""center""><br><span class=""genText"">BIMCO
Standard War Risks Clause for Voyage Chartering, 1993 Code Name: ""VOYWAR
1993""</span><br><br></td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><ol><li>For the purpose of this Clause,
the words:<ol><li class=""alpha"">""Owners"" shall include the
shipowners, bareboat charterers, disponent owners, managers or other
operators who are charged with the management of the Vessel, and the
Master; and</li><li class=""alpha"">""War Risks"" shall include any war
(whether actual or threatened), act of war, civil war, hostilities,
revolution, rebellion, civil commotion, warlike operations, the laying of
mines (whether actual or reported), acts of piracy, acts of terrorists,
acts of hostility or malicious damage, blockades (whether imposed against
all vessels or imposed selectively against vessels of certain flags or
ownership, or against certain cargoes or crews or otherwise how- soever),
by any person, body, terrorist or political group, or the Government of
any state whatsoever, which, in the reasonable judgement of the Master
and/or the Owners, may be dangerous or are likely to be or to become
dangerous to the Vessel, her cargo, crew or other persons on board the
Vessel.</li></ol></li><br><br><li>If at any time before the Vessel
commences loading, it appears that, in the reasonable judgement of the
Master and/or the Owners, performance of the Contract of Carriage, or any
part of it, may expose, or is likely to expose, the Vessel, her cargo,
crew or other persons on board the Vessel to War Risks, the Owners may
give notice to the Charterers cancelling this Contract of Carriage, or
may refuse to perform such part of it as may expose, or may be likely to
expose, the Vessel, her cargo, crew or other persons on board the Vessel
to War Risks; provided always that if this Contract or Carriage provides
that loading or discharging is to take place within a range of ports, and
at the port or ports nominated by the Charterers the Vessel, her cargo,
crew, or other persons onboard the Vessel may be exposed, or may be
likely to be exposed, to War Risks, the Owners shall first require the
Charterers to nominate any other safe port which lies within the range
for loading or discharging, and may only cancel this Contract of Carriage
if the Charterers shall not have nominated such safe port or ports within
48 hours of receipt of notice of such requirement. </li><br><br><li>The
Owners shall not be required to continue to load cargo for any voyage, or
to sign Bills of Lading for any port or place, or to proceed or continue
on any voyage, or on any part thereof, or to proceed through any canal or
waterway, or to proceed to or remain at any port or place whatsoever,
where it appears, either after the loading of the cargo commences, or at
any stage of the voyage thereafter before the discharge of the cargo is
completed, that, in the reasonable judgement of the Master and/or the
Owners, the Vessel, her cargo (or any part thereof), crew or other
persons on board the Vessel (or any one or more of them) may be, or are
likely to be, exposed to War Risks. If it should so appear, the Owners
may by notice request the Charterers to nominate a safe port for the
discharge of the cargo or any part thereof, and if within 48 hours of the
receipt of such notice, the Charterers shall not have nominated such a
port, the Owners may discharge the cargo at any safe port of their choice
(including the port of loading) in complete fulfilment of the Contract of
Carriage. The Owners shall be entitled to recover from the Charterers the
extra expenses of such discharge and, if the discharge takes place at any
port other than the loading port, to receive the full freight as though
the cargo had been carried to the discharging port and if the extra
distance exceeds 100 miles, to additional freight which shall be the same
percentage of the freight contracted for as the percentage which the
extra distance represents to the distance of the normal and customary
route, the Owners having a lien on the cargo for such expenses and
freight. </li><br><br><li>If at any stage of the voyage after the loading
of the cargo commences, it appears that, in the reasonable judgement of
the Master and/or the Owners, the Vessel, her cargo, crew or other
persons on board the Vessel may be, or are likely to be, exposed to War
Risks on any part of the route (including any canal or waterway) which is
normally and customarily used in a voyage of the nature contracted for,
and there is another longer route to the discharging port, the Owners
shall give notice to the Charterers that this route will be taken. In
this event the Owners shall be entitled, if the total extra distance
exceeds 100 miles, to additional freight which shall be the same
percentage of the freight contracted for as the percentage which the
extra distance represents to the distance of the normal and customary
route. </li><br><br><li>The Vessel shall have liberty:- <ol><li
class=""alpha"">to comply with all orders, directions, recommendations or
advice as to departure, arrival, routes, sailing in convoy, ports of
call, stoppages, destinations, discharge of cargo, delivery or in any way
whatsoever which are given by the Government of the Nation under whose
flag the Vessel sails, or other Government to whose laws the Owners are
subject, or any other Government which so requires, or any body or group
acting with the power to compel compliance with their orders or
directions;</li><li class=""alpha"">to comply with the orders, directions
or recommendations of any war risks underwriters who have the authority
to give the same under the terms of the war risks insurance;</li><li
class=""alpha"">to comply with the terms of any resolution of the
Security Council of the United Nations, any directives of the European
Community, the effective orders of any other Supranational body which has
the right to issue and give the same, and with national laws aimed at
enforcing the same to which the Owners are subject, and to obey the
orders and directions of those who are charged with their
enforcement;</li><li class=""alpha"">to discharge at any other port any
cargo or part thereof which may render the Vessel liable to confiscation
as a contraband carrier;</li><li class=""alpha"">to call at any other
port to change the crew or any part thereof or other persons on board the
Vessel when there is reason to believe that they may be subject to
internment, imprisonment or other sanctions;</li><li
class=""alpha"">where cargo has not been loaded or has been discharged by
the Owners under any provisions of this Clause, to load other cargo for
the Owners' own benefit and carry it to any other port or ports
whatsoever, whether backwards or forwards or in a contrary direction to
the ordinary or customary route.</li></ol></li><br><br><li>If in
compliance with any of the provisions of sub-clauses (2) to (5) of this
Clause anything is done or not done, such shall not be deemed to be a
deviation, but shall be considered as due fulfilment of the Contract of
Carriage.</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_10.htm     0
202         Scrap Metal Clause           Scrap Metal Clause     "<tr>
           <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">Cargo for the
purpose of this Clause shall mean scrap metal, excluding metal borings,
shavings and turnings. The Charterers shall instruct the Terminal
Operators or their servants to load the cargo, other than by magnets, in
accordance with, where appropriate, Annex 9 of the IMO Code of Safe
Practice for Cargo Stowage and Securing. Compliance with the provisions
of Annex 9 of the above mentioned IMO Code shall not affect the counting
of laytime.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">In the event that the
Charterers, the Terminal Operators' or their servants do not comply with
the provisions of (a) the costs for any damage caused to the Vessel as a
result thereof and any time spent repairing such damage affecting laytime
shall be for the Charterers' account.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">All
claims for damage referred to under (b) above shall be reported by the
Master to the Charterers or their agents in writing within 24 hours of
the occurrence or, as soon as the damage could reasonably be expected to
have been discovered by the exercise of due diligence without prejudice
to the Charterers' liability. The Master shall use his best endeavours to
obtain written acknowledgment by the responsible party causing the damage
unless they have made good the damage in the
meantime.</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_11.htm     0
203         "P&I.Bunker Deviation Clause, 1948"           "P. & I. Bunker
Deviation Clause, 1948"      "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">The vessel in addition to all other
liberties shall have liberty as part of the contract voyage and at any
stage thereof to proceed to any port or ports whatsoever whether such
ports are on or off the direct and/or customary route or routes to the
ports of loading or discharge named in this Charter and there take oil
bunkers in any quantity in the discretion of owners even to the full
capacity of fuel tanks, deep tanks, and any other compartment in which
oil can be carried whether such amount is or is not required for the
chartered voyage. <br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_12.htm     0
204         Oil Pollution Charter Party Clause (non tankers)          Oil
Pollution Charter Party Clause (non tankers) "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">Financial responsibility in respect of
pollution (all ships other than self propelled tank vessels and non self
propelled tank vessels carrying more than 2,000 tons of persistent oil in
bulk as cargo)<br><br><ol><li>Owners warrant that throughout the currency
of this charter they will provide the vessel with the following
certificates: <br>Certificates issued pursuant to Section 1016 (a) of the
Oil Pollution Act 199O, and Section 108 (a) of the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act 198O, as amended,
in accordance with Part 138 of Coast Guard Regulations 33 CFR, from
(indicate the earliest date upon which the owners may be required to
deliver the vessel into the charter), so long as these can be obtained by
the owners from or by (identify the applicable scheme or schemes).
</li><br><br><li>Notwithstanding anything whether printed or typed herein
to the contrary, <ol><li class=""alpha"">save as required for compliance
with paragraph (1) hereof, owners shall not be required to establish or
maintain financial security or responsibility in respect of oil or other
pollution damage to enable the vessel lawfully to enter, remain in or
leave any port, place, territorial or contiguous waters of any country,
state or territory in performance of this charter. </li><li
class=""alpha"">Charterers shall indemnify owners and hold them harmless
in respect of any loss, damage, liability or expense (including but not
limited to the costs of any delay incurred by the vessel as a result of
any failure by the charterers promptly to give alternative voyage orders)
whatsoever and howsoever arising which owners may sustain by reason of
any requirement to establish or maintain financial security or
responsibility in order to enter, remain in or leave any port, place or
waters, other than to the extent provided in paragraph (1) hereof.
</li><li class=""alpha"">Owners shall not be liable for any loss, damage,
liability or expense whatsoever and howsoever arising which charterers
and/or the holders of any bill of lading issued pursuant to this charter
may sustain by reason of any requirement to establish or maintain
financial security or responsibility in order to enter, remain in or
leave any port, place or waters, other than to the extent provided in
paragraph (1) hereof. </li></ol></li><br><li>Charterers warrant that the
terms of this clause will be incorporated effectively into any bill of
lading issued pursuant to this charter.</li></ol><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_13.htm     0
205         Oil Pollution Charter Party Clause (tankers)       Oil
Pollution Charter Party Clause (tankers)      "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">Financial responsibility in respect of
pollution (applicable to all self propelled tank vessels and to non self
propelled tank vessels carrying more than 2,000 tons of persistent oil in
bulk as cargo)<ol><li>Owners warrant that throughout the currency of this
charter they will provide the vessel with the following
certificates:<ol><li class=""alpha"">Certificates issued pursuant to the
Civil Liability Convention 1969 (""CLC""), and pursuant to the 1992
protocols to the CLC, as and when in force. </li><li
class=""alpha"">Certificates issued pursuant to Section 1016 (a) of the
Oil Pollution Act 1990, and Section 108 (a) of the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act 1980, as amended
in accordance with Part 138 of Coast Guard Regulations 33 CFR, so long as
these can be obtained by the owners from or by (identify the applicable
scheme or schemes). </li></ol></li><br><li>Notwithstanding anything
whether printed or typed herein to the contrary, <ol><li
class=""alpha"">save as required for compliance with paragraph (1)
hereof, owners shall not be required to establish or maintain financial
security or responsibility in respect of oil or other pollution damage to
enable the vessel lawfully to enter, remain in or leave any port, place,
territorial or contiguous waters of any country, state or territory in
performance of this charter. </li><li class=""alpha"">Charterers shall
indemnify owners and hold them harmless in respect of any loss, damage,
liability or expense (including but not limited to the costs of any delay
incurred by the vessel as a result of any failure by the charterers
promptly to give alternative voyage orders) whatsoever and howsoever
arising which owners may sustain by reason of any requirement to
establish or maintain financial security or responsibility in order to
enter, remain in or leave any port, place or waters, other than to the
extent provided in paragraph (1) hereof. </li><li class=""alpha"">Owners
shall not be liable for any loss, damage, liability or expense whatsoever
and howsoever arising which charterers and/or the holders of any bill of
lading issued pursuant to this charter may sustain by reason of any
requirement to establish or maintain financial security or responsibility
in order to enter, remain in or leave any port, place or waters, other
than to the extent provided in paragraph (1) hereof.
</li></ol></li><br><li>Charterers warrant that the terms of this clause
will be incorporated effectively into any bill of lading issued pursuant
to this charter.</li></ol><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_14.htm     0
206         "Law & Arbitration Clause 1998 English Law, London
Arbitration"            "Law & Arbitration Clause 1998 English Law, London
Arbitration"      "<tr>
           <td align=""center""><span class=""genText"">BIMCO Standard
Law & Arbitration Clause 1998 - English Law, London
Arbitration</span><br><br></td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText"">This Contract shall be governed by and
construed in accordance with English law and any dispute arising out of
or in connection with this Contract shall be referred to arbitration in
London in accordance with the Arbitration Act 1996 or any statutory
modification or re- enactment thereof save to the extent necessary to
give effect to the provisions of this Clause.<br><br>The arbitration
shall be conducted in accordance with the London Maritime Arbitrators
Association (LMAA) Terms current at the time when the arbitration
proceedings are commenced.<br><br>The reference shall be to three
arbitrators. A party wishing to refer a dispute to arbitration shall
appoint its arbitrator and send notice of such appointment in writing to
the other party requiring the other party to appoint its own arbitrator
within 14 calendar days of that notice and stating that it will appoint
its arbitrator as sole arbitrator unless the other party appoints its own
arbitrator and gives notice that it has done so within the 14 days
specified. If the other party does not appoint its own arbitrator and
give notice that it has done so within the 14 days specified, the party
referring a dispute to arbitration may, without the requirement of any
further prior notice to the other party, appoint its arbitrator as sole
arbitrator and shall advise the other party accordingly. The award of a
sole arbitrator shall be binding on both parties as if he had been
appointed by agreement.<br><br>Nothing herein shall prevent the parties
agreeing in writing to vary these provisions to provide for the
appointment of a sole arbitrator.<br><br>In cases where neither the claim
nor any counterclaim exceeds the sum of USD50,000 (or such other sum as
the parties may agree) the arbitration shall be conducted in accordance
with the LMAA Small Claims Procedure current at the time when the
arbitration proceedings are commenced.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                                2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_15.htm      0
207         Ship arrest       We would advise clients that Algeria is a
convenient jurisdiction to arrest vessels.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We would advise clients that
Algeria is a convenient jurisdiction to arrest vessels. Under the
Algerian Maritime Code there is no need to show a prima facie case of a
claim, and an allegation is sufficient.<br><br>In Algeria there is a
distinction between vessels flying 1952 Convention flags and non
convention flags to determine what maritime claims can give rise to an
arrest. Vessels of countries who have ratified the convention can only be
arrested in respect of maritime claims listed by the
convention.<br><br>It is important to note that Club letters of
undertaking are not acceptable security to the court, and it is up to the
claimant to agree to accept a Club LOU.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>
                      <tr align=""right"">
                        <td align=""right""><span
class=""genText"">Source: UK P & I Club Bulletin<br>November
2003</span></td>
                      </tr>"        algeria     Africa     Algeria
      2004-01-16 2004-01-16 notices       algeria005.htm   1
208
                  0
209         BIMCO Standard ISM Clause for Voyage and Time Charterparties
            BIMCO Standard ISM Clause for Voyage and Time Charterparties
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">From the date of coming into force of
the International Safety Management (ISM) Code in relation to the Vessel
and thereafter during the currency of this Charterparty, the Owners shall
procure that both the Vessel and ""the Company"" (as defined by the ISM
Code) shall comply with the requirements of the ISM Code. Upon request
the Owners shall provide a copy of the relevant Document of Compliance
(DOC) and Safety Management Certificate (SMC) to the
Charterers.<br><br>Except as otherwise provided in this Charterparty,
loss, damage, expense or delay caused by failure on the part of the
Owners or ""the Company"" to comply with the ISM Code shall be for the
Owners' account.""<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                                2004-01-16 2004-01-16
      stdforms002 stdforms002_16.htm      0
210         General Ice Clause for Voyage Charter Parties        General
Ice Clause for Voyage Charter Parties     "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">The Vessel shall not be obliged to force
ice but, subject to the Owners' approval and having due regard to its
size, construction and class, may follow ice-breakers when reasonably
required.<br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">Port of Loading<ol><li
class=""roman"">If at any time after setting out on the approach voyage
the Vessel's passage is impeded by ice, or if on arrival the loading port
is inaccessible by reason of ice, the Master or Owners shall notify the
Charterers thereof and request them to nominate a safe and accessible
alternative port.<br><br>If the Charterers fail within 48 running hours,
Sundays and holidays included, to make such nomination or agree to reckon
laytime as if the port named in the contract were accessible or declare
that they cancel the Charter Party, the Owners shall have the option of
cancelling the Charter Party. In the event of cancellation by either
party, the Charterers shall compensate the Owners for all proven loss of
earnings under this Charter Party.</li><br><br><li class=""roman"">If at
any loading port the Master considers that there is a danger of the
Vessel being frozen in, and provided that the Master or Owners
immediately notify the Charterers thereof, the Vessel may leave with
cargo loaded on board and proceed to the nearest safe and ice free place
and there await the Charterers' nomination of a safe and accessible
alternative port within 24 running hours, Sundays and holidays excluded,
of the Master's or Owners' notification. If the Charterers fail to
nominate such alternative port, the vessel may proceed to any port(s),
whether or not on the customary route for the chartered voyage, to
complete with cargo for the Owners' account.*</li></ol></li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">Port of Discharge<ol><li class=""roman"">If the voyage to
the discharging port is impeded by ice, or if on arrival the discharging
port is inaccessible by reason of ice, the Master or Owners shall notify
the Charterers thereof. In such case, the Charterers shall have the
option of keeping the Vessel waiting until the port is accessible against
paying compensation in an amount equivalent to the rate of demurrage or
of ordering the Vessel to a safe and accessible alternative
port.<br><br>If the Charterers fail to make such declaration within 48
running hours, Sundays and holidays included, of the Master or Owners
having given notice to the Charterers, the Master may proceed without
further notice to the nearest safe and accessible port and there
discharge the cargo.</li><br><br><li class=""roman"">If at any
discharging port the Master considers that there is a danger of the
Vessel being frozen in, and provided that the Master or Owners
immediately notify the Charterers thereof, the Vessel may leave with
cargo remaining on board and proceed to the nearest safe and ice free
place and there await the Charterers' nomination of a safe and accessible
alternative port within 24 running hours, Sundays and holidays excluded,
of the Master's or Owners' notification. If the Charterers fail to
nominate such alternative port, the vessel may proceed to the nearest
safe and accessible port and there discharge the remaining
cargo.</li><br><br><li class=""roman"">On delivery of the cargo other
than at the port(s) named in the contract, all conditions of the Bill of
Lading shall apply and the Vessel shall receive the same freight as if
discharge had been at the original port(s) of destination, except that if
the distance of the substituted port(s) exceeds 100 nautical miles, the
freight on the cargo delivered at the substituted port(s) shall be
increased proportionately.</li></ol></li></ol>* Note: In trades where the
terms and conditions of the charter party are not incorporated into the
bill(s) of lading, such bill(s) must contain an express statement
permitting the vessel to complete with cargo at alternative port(s),
whether or not on the customary route for the chartered
voyage.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_17.htm    0
211
                  0
212
                  0
213         Hamburg Rules Charterparty Clause*)           Hamburg Rules
Charterparty Clause *) "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">Neither the Charterers nor their Agents
shall permit the issue of any bill of lading, waybill or other document
evidencing a contract of carriage (whether or not signed on behalf of the
Owner or on the Charterers' behalf or on behalf of any Sub- Charterers)
incorporating, where not compulsorily applicable, the Hamburg Rules or
any other legislation giving effect to the Hamburg Rules or any other
legislation imposing liabilities in excess of Hague or Hague/Visby Rules.
Charterers shall indemnify the Owners against any liability, loss or
damage which may result from any breach of the foregoing provisions of
this clause. <br><br>*) Operators wishing to use this Clause should seek
legal advice to confirm that the Clause is suitable for incorporation in
the relevant charter party.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_19.htm     0
214         Bulk Carrier Safety Clause         Bulk Carrier Safety Clause
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">The Charterers
shall instruct the Terminal Operators or their representatives to co-
operate with the Master in completing the IMO SHIP/SHORE SAFETY CHECKLIST
and shall arrange all cargo operations strictly in accordance with the
guidelines set out therein.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">In addition
to the above and notwithstanding any provision in this Charter Party in
respect of loading/discharging rates, the Charterers shall instruct the
Terminal Operators to load/discharge the Vessel in accordance with the
loading/discharging plan, which shall be approved by the Master with due
regard to the Vessel's draught, trim, stability, stress or any other
factor which may affect the safety of the Vessel.</li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">At any time during cargo operations the Master may, if he
deems it necessary for reasons of safety of the Vessel, instruct the
Terminal Operators or their representatives to slow down or stop the
loading or discharging.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">Compliance with
the provisions of this Clause shall not affect the counting of
laytime.</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_20.htm     0
215         Bunker Quality Control Clause for Time Charterers
      Bunker Quality Control Clause for Time Charterers "<tr>
            <td class=""genText""><ol><li>The Charterers shall supply
bunkers of a quality suitable for burning in the Vessel's engines and
auxiliaries and which conform to the specification(s) mutually agreed
under this Charter.</li><br><br><li>At the time of delivery of the Vessel
the Owners shall place at the disposal of the Charterers, the bunker
delivery note(s) and any samples relating to the fuels existing on
board.</li><br><br><li>During the currency of the Charter the Charterers
shall ensure that bunker delivery notes are presented to the Vessel on
the delivery of fuel(s) and that during bunkering representative samples
of the fuel(s) supplied shall be taken at the Vessel's bunkering manifold
and sealed in the presence of competent representatives of the Charterers
and the Vessel.</li><br><br><li>The fuel samples shall be retained by the
Vessel for 90 (ninety) days after the date of delivery or for whatever
period necessary in the case of a prior dispute and any dispute as to
whether the bunker fuels conform to the agreed specification(s) shall be
settled by analysis of the sample(s) by (...) or by another mutually
agreed fuels analyst whose findings shall be conclusive evidence as to
conformity or otherwise with the bunker fuels
specification(s).</li><br><br><li>The Owners reserve their right to make
a claim against the Charterers for any damage to the main engines or the
auxiliaries caused by the use of unsuitable fuels or fuels not complying
with the agreed specification(s). Additionally, if bunker fuels supplied
do not conform with the mutually agreed specification(s) or otherwise
prove unsuitable for burning in the ship's engines or auxiliaries the
Owners shall not be held responsible for any reduction in the Vessel's
speed performance and/or increased bunker consumption nor for any time
lost and any other consequences.</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_21.htm     0
216         "BIMCO Bunker Shortage Clause for Time Chartering Issued
November, 1974"         "BIMCO Bunker Shortage Clause for Time Chartering
Issued November, 1974" "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">If the Time Charter is concluded for a
round voyage or a trip or the like and a reduction of the speed ordered
by the Time Charterers results in the Vessel being re-delivered later
than originally intended, the Time Charterers shall pay the actual market
rate for any period exceeding the normal period provided the market rate
is higher than the Charter rate. <br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_22.htm     0
217         Chamber of Shipping War Risks Clauses 1952          Chamber of
Shipping War Risks Clauses 1952    "<tr>
           <td class=""genText""><ol><li>The Master shall not be required
or bound to sign Bills of Lading for any blockaded port or for any port
which the Master or Owners in his or their discretion consider dangerous
or impossible to enter or reach.</li><br><br><li>&nbsp;<ol><li
class=""alpha"">If any port of loading or of discharge named in this
Charter Party or to which the vessel may properly be ordered pursuant to
the terms of the Bills of Lading be blockaded, or</li><li
class=""alpha"">if owing to any war, hostilities, warlike operations,
civil war, civil commotions, revolutions, or the operation of
international law (a) entry to any such port of loading or of discharge
or the loading of discharge of cargo at any such port be considered by
the Master or Owners in his or their discretion dangerous or (b) it be
considered by the Master or Owners in his or their discretion dangerous
or impossible for the vessel to reach any such port of loading or of
discharge - the Charterers shall have the right to order the cargo or
such part of it as may be affected to be loaded or discharged at any
other safe port of loading or of discharge within the range of loading or
discharging ports respectively established under the provisions of the
Charter Party (provided such other port is not blockaded or that entry
thereto or loading or discharge of cargo thereat is not in the master's
or Owners' discretion dangerous or prohibited). If in respect of a port
of discharge no orders be received from the Charterers within 48 hours
after they or the agents have received from the Owners a request for the
nomination of a substitute port, the Owners shall then be at liberty to
discharge the cargo at any safe port which they or the Master may in
their or his descretion decide on (whether within the range of
discharging ports established under the provisions of the Charter Party
or not) and such discharge shall be deemed to be due fulfilment of the
contract or contracts of affreightment so far as cargo so discharged is
concerned. In the event of the cargo being loaded or discharged at any
such other port within the respective range of loading or discharging
ports established under the provisions of the Charter Party, the Charter
Party shall be read in respect of freight and all other conditions
whatsoever as if the voyage performed were that originally designated. In
the event, however, that the vessel discharges the cargo at a port
outside the range of discharging ports established under the provisions
of the Charter Party, freight shall be paid as for the voyage originally
designated and all extra expenses involved in reaching the actual port of
discharge and/or discharging the cargo thereat shall be paid by the
Charterers or Cargo Owners. In this latter event the Owners shall have a
lien on the cargo for all such extra
expenses.</li></ol></li><br><br><li>The vessel shall have liberty to
comply with any directions or recommendations as to departure, arrival,
routes, ports of call, stoppages, destinations, zones, waters, delivery
or in any otherwise whatsoever given by the government of the nation
under whose flag the vessel sails or any other government or local
authority including any de facto government or local authority or by any
person or body acting or purporting to act as or with the authority of
any such government or authority or by any committee or person having
under the terms of the war risks insurance on the vessel the right to
give any such directions or recommendations. If by reason of or in
compliance with any such directions or recommendations, anything is done
or is not done such shall not be deemed a deviation.<br><br>If by reason
of or in compliance with any such direction or recommendation the vessel
does not proceed to the port or ports of discharge originally designated
or to which she may have been ordered pursuant to the terms of the Bills
of Lading, the vessel may proceed to any safe port of discharge which the
Master or Owners in his or their discretion may decide on and there
discharge the cargo. Such discharge shall be deemed to be due fulfilment
of the contract or contracts of affreightment and the Owners shall be
entitled to freight as if discharge has been effected at the port or
ports originally designated or to which the vessel may have been ordered
pursuant to the terms of the Bills of Lading. All extra expenses involved
in reaching and discharging the cargo at any such other port of discharge
shall be paid by the Charterers and/or Cargo Owners and the Owners shall
have a lien on the cargo for freight and all such expenses.
</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_23.htm     0
218         Cleaning of Cargo Compartments Clause         Cleaning of
Cargo Compartments Clause     "<tr>
               <td class=""genText"">Upon completion of discharge of each
cargo, the crew shall render customary assistance in cleaning all cargo
compartments in preparation for the next cargo, if required by the
Charterers and if not prevented by any regulations or agreement
whatsoever. Such cleaning work shall be performed while the Vessel is en
route to next loading port, provided that this can be safely done and
that the duration of voyage is sufficient. The Charterers shall pay to
the Owners.....(negotiable lumpsum) each time such cleaning is performed.
The Owners will endeavour to effect such cleaning as best possible, but
without any guarantee that the cargo holds will be sufficiently cleaned
and accepted on arrival at the loading port and the Owners shall not be
responsible for any consequences arising from the fact that the crew has
been employed in cleaning. <br><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_24.htm     0
219         BIMCO Standard Dispute Resolution Clause           BIMCO
Standard Dispute Resolution Clause "<tr>
           <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">This Contract
shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English law and any
dispute arising out of or in connection with this Contract shall be
referred to arbitration in London in accordance with the Arbitration Act
1996 or any statutory modification or re-enactment thereof save to the
extent necessary to give effect to the provisions of this
Clause.<br><br>The arbitration shall be conducted in accordance with the
London Maritime Arbitrators Association (LMAA) Terms current at the time
when the arbitration proceedings are commenced.<br><br>The reference
shall be to three arbitrators. A party wishing to refer a dispute to
arbitration shall appoint its arbitrator and send notice of such
appointment in writing to the other party requiring the other party to
appoint its own arbitrator within 14 calendar days of that notice and
stating that it will appoint its arbitrator as sole arbitrator unless the
other party appoints its own arbitrator and gives notice that it has done
so within the 14 days specified. If the other party does not appoint its
own arbitrator and give notice that it has done so within the 14 days
specified, the party referring a dispute to arbitration may, without the
requirement of any further prior notice to the other party, appoint its
arbitrator as sole arbitrator and shall advise the other party
accordingly. The award of a sole arbitrator shall be binding on both
parties as if he had been appointed by agreement.<br><br>Nothing herein
shall prevent the parties agreeing in writing to vary these provisions to
provide for the appointment of a sole arbitrator.<br><br>In cases where
neither the claim nor any counterclaim exceeds the sum of US$50,000 (or
such other sum as the parties may agree) the arbitration shall be
conducted in accordance with the LMAA Small Claims Procedure current at
the time when the arbitration proceedings are commenced.</li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">This Contract shall be governed by and construed in
accordance with Title 9 of the United States Code and the Maritime Law of
the United States and any dispute arising out of or in connection with
this Contract shall be referred to three persons at New York, one to be
appointed by each of the parties hereto, and the third by the two so
chosen; their decision or that of any two of them shall be final, and for
the purposes of enforcing any award, judgement may be entered on an award
by any court of competent jurisdiction. The proceedings shall be
conducted in accordance with the rules of the Society of Maritime
Arbitrators, Inc.<br><br>In cases where neither the claim nor any
counterclaim exceeds the sum of US$50,000 (or such other sum as the
parties may agree) the arbitration shall be conducted in accordance with
the Shortened Arbitration Procedure of the Society of Maritime
Arbitrators, Inc. current at the time when the arbitration proceedings
are commenced. </li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">This Contract shall be
governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the place
mutually agreed by the parties and any dispute arising out of or in
connection with this Contract shall be referred to arbitration at a
mutually agreed place, subject to the procedures applicable
there.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">Notwithstanding (a), (b) or (c)
above, the parties may agree at any time to refer to mediation any
difference and/or dispute arising out of or in connection with this
Contract.<br><br>In the case of a dispute in respect of which arbitration
has been commenced under (a), (b) or (c) above, the following shall
apply:- <ol><li class=""roman"">Either party may at any time and from
time to time elect to refer the dispute or part of the dispute to
mediation by service on the other party of a written notice (the
""Mediation Notice"") calling on the other party to agree to mediation.
</li><li class=""roman"">The other party shall thereupon within 14
calendar days of receipt of the Mediation Notice confirm that they agree
to mediation, in which case the parties shall thereafter agree a mediator
within a further 14 calendar days, failing which on the application of
either party a mediator will be appointed promptly by the Arbitration
Tribunal (""the Tribunal"") or such person as the Tribunal may designate
for that purpose. The mediation shall be conducted in such place and in
accordance with such procedure and on such terms as the parties may agree
or, in the event of disagreement, as may be set by the mediator. </li><li
class=""roman"">If the other party does not agree to mediate, that fact
may be brought to the attention of the Tribunal and may be taken into
account by the Tribunal when allocating the costs of the arbitration as
between the parties. </li><li class=""roman"">The mediation shall not
affect the right of either party to seek such relief or take such steps
as it considers necessary to protect its interest. </li><li
class=""roman"">Either party may advise the Tribunal that they have
agreed to mediation. The arbitration procedure shall continue during the
conduct of the mediation but the Tribunal may take the mediation
timetable into account when setting the timetable for steps in the
arbitration. </li><li class=""roman"">Unless otherwise agreed or
specified in the mediation terms, each party shall bear its own costs
incurred in the mediation and the parties shall share equally the
mediator's costs and expenses. </li><li class=""roman"">The mediation
process shall be without prejudice and confidential and no information or
documents disclosed during it shall be revealed to the Tribunal except to
the extent that they are disclosable under the law and procedure
governing the arbitration.<br><br>(Note: The parties should be aware that
the mediation process may not necessarily interrupt time
limits.)</li></ol></li><br><li class=""alpha"">If this Clause has been
incorporated in to the Contract without an express choice of law and
arbitration forum chosen from sub- clauses (a), (b) and (c), then sub-
clause (a) of this Clause shall apply. Sub-clause (d) shall apply in all
cases.</li></ol><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                              2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_25.htm     0
220         Recommended Additional Lien Clause for Time Charters
      Recommended Additional Lien Clause for Time Charters     "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">In addition to the right of lien
conferred on the Owners according to the provisions of the charter-party
lien clause, the Owners also to have a lien over bunkers on board, as
well as over any sums due to Time Charterers under any sub-charterparties
(in addition to freights and sub- freights), for any amounts due under
this charter-party. Further, in the event of the Owners' exercise of
their liberty to withdraw the vessel in accordance with the provisions of
the charter-party withdrawal clause, the ownership of any bunkers
remaining on board shall thereupon vest in Owners, who shall allow to
Time Charterers by way of credit against any sums due to Owners the value
of such bunkers calculated in accordance with the provisions of the
charter-party bunkers clause applicable on redelivery.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                                2004-01-19 2004-01-19
      stdforms002 stdforms002_26.htm      0
221         New regulation on tankers           "With effect from 1 April
2004, tankers over 25 years of age"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">With effect from 1 April
2004, tankers over 25 years of age and / or not classed by an IACS Class
society or the Indian Register will not be allowed entry into Indian
waters.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        india Asia India        2004-01-20
      2004-01-20 notices      india006.htm      1
222
                  0
223
                  0
224         Traffic separation regulations in the English Channel
      The North Of England says traffic separation regulations in the
English Channel is frequently misunderstood. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The North Of England says
traffic separation regulations in the English Channel is frequently
misunderstood. <br><br>'Radio logs at Dover in England and Ushant in
France provide clear evidence of the problems that arise with rogue
vessels being regularly reported. Apart from increasing the risk of
collisions, masters and owners of contravening vessels can face criminal
action, heavy fines and costly delays.'<br><br>We have experienced this
problem with one of our client's vessels in the English Channel which
fortunately did not cause a collision. This matter was however reported
in the local media. The consequence was the English and French port
authorities detained the vessel upon arrival and carried out a detailed
investigation on the reasons for the breach of the traffic separation
rules, carried out a strict port state control survey on the vessel, and
interviewed the master and crew. They authorities also reserved their
right to lodge a fine.<br><br>We would also advise our clients to note
that a casualty arising from a blatant breach of any traffic separation
rules would likely prejudice all insurance covers on the vessel as the
courts have said such incompetence amounts to a lack of due diligence on
the part of the shipowner. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        unitedkingdom     Europe      United
Kingdom           2004-01-20 2004-01-20 notices       england001.htm    1
225         Traffic separation regulations in the English Channel
      The North Of England says traffic separation regulations in the
English Channel is frequently misunderstood. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The North Of England says
traffic separation regulations in the English Channel is frequently
misunderstood. <br><br>'Radio logs at Dover in England and Ushant in
France provide clear evidence of the problems that arise with rogue
vessels being regularly reported. Apart from increasing the risk of
collisions, masters and owners of contravening vessels can face criminal
action, heavy fines and costly delays.'<br><br>We have experienced this
problem with one of our client's vessels in the English Channel which
fortunately did not cause a collision. This matter was however reported
in the local media. The consequence was the English and French port
authorities detained the vessel upon arrival and carried out a detailed
investigation on the reasons for the breach of the traffic separation
rules, carried out a strict port state control survey on the vessel, and
interviewed the master and crew. They authorities also reserved their
right to lodge a fine.<br><br>We would also advise our clients to note
that a casualty arising from a blatant breach of any traffic separation
rules would likely prejudice all insurance covers on the vessel as the
courts have said such incompetence amounts to a lack of due diligence on
the part of the shipowner. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       france      Europe      France
      2004-01-20 2004-01-20 notices      france001.htm     0
226
                  0
227         Deck washing illegal in Australia        The Australian
Maritime Safety Authority will fine      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Australian Maritime
Safety Authority will fine any vessel which washes her decks in
Australian waters as this is a breach of the local pollution law.
<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       australia Australia Australia
      2004-01-21 2004-01-21 notices      australia012.htm 1
228
                  0
229         "Fine due to irregularities - Brazil , Paranagua"
      Local authorities are insoecting vessels strictly for any
irregularities to lodge possible fines. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Local authorities are
inspecting vessels strictly for any irregularities to lodge possible
fines.<br><br>Irregularities can consist of dirty kitchens, toilets, food
not wrapped, medicines which have expired, absence of waste baskets,
absence of gangway protection etc., Basically almost any irregularity can
attract a fine. Fines can range from US$1,200 to
US$120,000.<br><br>Appeals may be lodged with the Ministry Of Health but
judgement may take up to 2 years.<br><br>The ship agents are liable for
these fines and they will likely arrest or detain the vessel in lieu of
security. It is important to appoint a ship agent the owners are friendly
and trust who will not detain the vessel unnecessarily.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       brazil      South America     Brazil
            2004-01-21 2004-01-21 notices      brazil009.htm     1
230         Automatic Identification System (AIS) in Panama Canal
      The Panama Canal has implemented regulations to track vessels
approaching and travelling in the Canal.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Panama Canal has
implemented regulations to track vessels approaching and travelling in
the Canal.<br><br>All ships over 300 tons or more than 20 m in lenght
must be equipped with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) that
complies with IMO.<br><br>This regulation is effective from 1 July 2003
well before the IMO date for vessels to carry AIS.<br><br>For vessels not
fitted with AIS, the Panama Canal Authority will supply a portable AIS
for a fee of US$150.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       panama      North America     panama
            2004-01-28 2004-01-28 notices      panama004.htm     1
231
                    0
232           Piracy in Dominican Republic    IMB reports that Rio Haina
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">IMB reports that Rio Haina
is a high risk zone for pirates.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       dominicanrepublic North America
      Dominican Republic           2004-01-28 2004-01-28 notices
      dominicanrepublic001.htm     1
233
                  0
234         US 96 hours notice of arrival            US security
regulations require the vessel to report specific information to the US
Coast Guard "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">US security regulations
require the vessel to report specific information to the US Coast Guard
at least 96 hours before arrival or entering the port.<br><br>The US
Coast Guard has fined vessels who violate these regulations. It is
possible to lodge a Club LOU if the owners wish to contest the amount of
fine.<br><br>We would advise this is a non covered risk / liability as
the violation amounts to a lack of diligence on the part of owner. The
provision of Club LOU in such situations is discretionary and the Club
may well require suitable counter security from owners.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America     USA
      2004-01-28 2004-01-28 notices      usa011.htm 1
235
                  0
236         US checking Oily Water Separator violations          Many
vessels are being targeted for Oily Water Separator and MARPOL
violations.       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Many vessels are being
targeted for Oily Water Separator and MARPOL violations.<br><br>US Coast
Guard are carrying out detailed checks to ensure the vessel is compliant
with MARPOL, and where a discharge has occurred, the US Dept. Of Justice
will prosecute the owners and master criminally. Substantial fines and
imprisonment may result.<br><br>False and misleading statements or
actions to conceal matters either verbally or recorded by the crew gives
a separate cause of action for a criminal prosecution. This action exists
when the discharge occurs in the High Seas.<br><br>It is important to
ensure the crew is fully conversant with MARPOL regulations and the
vessel is fully compliant. It is also important that during an
investigation by the authorities, the crew appear to be truthful and
helpful. The US authorities have the right to seize documents. issue
warrants of arrest, and interview the crew.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America     USA
      2004-01-29 2004-01-29 notices      usa012.htm 1
237   32    Vessels' Hull insured values
      &#33337;&#33334;&#33337;&#22771;&#20445;&#38505;&#20215;&#20540;
      It is important to note the P&I Club's coverage for excess
collision liabilities is subject to the proviso the insured value
      "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">It is important to note the
P&I Club's coverage for excess collision liabilities is subject to the
proviso the insured value under the Hull insurance sufficiently covers
the current market value of the vessel at the time of the collision.<br>
                          <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#20540;&#24471;&#27880;&#24847;&#30340;&#26159;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&
#20250;&#23545;&#36229;&#39069;&#30896;&#25758;&#36131;&#20219;&#30340;&#
25215;&#20445;&#33539;&#22260;&#26681;&#25454;&#20294;&#20070;&#30830;&#2
3450;&#65292;&#33337;&#22771;&#38505;&#30340;&#20445;&#38505;&#20215;&#20
540;&#19981;&#33021;&#20302;&#20110;&#33337;&#33334;&#22312;&#30896;&#257
58;&#24403;&#26102;&#33337;&#33334;&#30340;&#24066;&#22330;&#20215;&#2054
0;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>If the vessel is under insured, the P&I
Club's liability for excess collision liability will be limited to the
situation the vessel was fully insured for her market value. This will
also affect the P&I Club being in a position to provide security in
respect of excess collision liability.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#22914;&#26524;&#33337;&#33334;&#19981;&#36275;&#39069;&#25237;&#20445;&
#65292;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#23545;&#36229;&#39069;&#30896;&#
25758;&#36131;&#20219;&#23558;&#25353;&#33337;&#33334;&#23436;&#22909;&#2
4066;&#22330;&#20215;&#20540;&#21152;&#20197;&#38480;&#21046;&#12290;&#36
825;&#20063;&#23558;&#24433;&#21709;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#200
26;&#36229;&#39069;&#30896;&#25758;&#36131;&#20219;&#25552;&#20379;&#2528
5;&#20445;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>Owners should make sure the Hull insured
value sufficiently covers her current market value. Increased Value
insurances can be arranged in the London market for non China flagged
vessels for values up to 25% of the Hull value on premium rates below the
basic Hull rate.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#33337;&#19996;&#24212;&#30830;&#20445;&#20854;&#25152;&#25237;&#20445;&
#33337;&#22771;&#38505;&#30340;&#20445;&#38505;&#20215;&#20540;&#19981;&#
20302;&#20110;&#33337;&#33334;&#22312;&#24403;&#26102;&#24066;&#22330;&#3
0340;&#20215;&#20540;&#12290;&#38750;&#20013;&#22269;&#31821;&#33337;&#21
487;&#20197;&#22312;&#20262;&#25958;&#24066;&#22330;&#20197;&#26368;&#228
10;&#39640;&#20110;&#33337;&#22771;&#20215;&#20540;&#30340;25%&#21152;&#2
0445;&#36229;&#20540;&#20445;&#38505;&#65292;&#20854;&#36153;&#29575;&#20
302;&#20110;&#33337;&#22771;&#22522;&#26412;&#38505;&#36153;&#29575;&#122
90;</span><br>
                        <br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td align=""center""><span class=""genText"">Please click in
this box <a href=""javascript:void(0);""
onclick=""MM_openBrWindow('mail_hull_insured.htm','','width=670,height=55
0')""><img src=""../../img/common/button_ask_andrew.jpg"" border=""0""
align=""absmiddle""></a> to prompt us to contact you to clarify any
query.</span></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-02-02 2004-02-02
      insurance_awareness     chi_awareness033.htm   1
238         Reminder of the Regulations Concerning the Disposal of
Garbage from Bulk Carriers          "Any masters, owners or crewmembers
found responsible in Australia for illegal discharges within 12 nautical
miles"      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Any masters, owners or
crewmembers found responsible in Australia for illegal discharges within
12 nautical miles of the nearest land may be liable for fines up to
AUS$1,100,000 (approx US$853,000). There are at present seven cases of
violations of Annex V of the MARPOL 73/78 Convention that are being
investigated with a view to prosecution.<br><br>The Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA) continues to receive reports of waste materials
being disposed of from bulk carriers carrying out maintenance work while
at anchor awaiting entry into load ports.<br><br>The MARPOL regulations
state that the disposal of food waste and all maintenance waste collected
by the engine and deck departments while maintaining and operating the
ship, including machinery deposits, scraped paint, deck sweepings, wiping
wastes, rags, paint supplies and larger items of shipboard fittings and
equipment is strictly prohibited within 12 nautical miles of the nearest
land. Although disposal of waste is generally permitted beyond this area,
all waste generated at anchor should be disposed of at shore based
reception facilities which can be arranged for through the ship's local
agents. If this is not possible, the waste should be disposed of in deep
water at sea in accordance with MARPOL while the ship is on route to the
next port.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      Source : UK P&I Club Bulletin 340 2004-01-01 2004-01-01 notices
      australia013.htm 0
239         Appointment of Licensed Tally Clerks           Several
situations have been reported where owners' agents have instructed a
tally contractor to attend the discharge of    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Several situations have been
reported where owners' agents have instructed a tally contractor to
attend the discharge of bagged cargo in Chittagong, Bangladesh, only to
find that they were not licensed by the relevant authority, as required
by law. This resulted in the tallies not being regarded as true records
by the courts or by the authorities.<br><br>Section 70, Chapter II of
Chittagong Port Authority Regulations for Working at Chittagong Port
(Cargo and Container) 2001 states: <br><br>""No person or body of persons
shall work as tally contractor on any vessel in the port without a
license from the authority, the decision of which shall be at the sole
discretion of the authority, and with such terms conditions and
regulations as the authority may from time to time
decide"".<br><br>Shipowners' should ensure that their agents only appoint
licensed tally contractors and to make their ships' masters and operation
departments aware.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        bangladesh Asia Bangladesh Source :
UK P&I Club Bulletin 339      2003-12-01 2003-12-01 notices
      bangladesh006.htm 0
240         Security Checkpoint Procedures           "The following is a
notice, issued by MARLO (the Maritime Liaison Office) in Bahrain about
Iraq maritime security checkpoint procedures:"       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The following is a notice,
issued by MARLO (the Maritime Liaison Office) in Bahrain about Iraq
maritime security checkpoint procedures:<br><br>'Following the removal of
the former Iraqi regime, UNSCR (UN Security Council Resolution) 1483
terminated all trade sanctions against Iraq except the import of arms and
related material. Coalition maritime forces continue to enforce this
remaining sanction while conducting broader maritime law enforcement and
security operations in Iraqi waters. The former UN checkpoint at 29-
12N/049-20E has been disestablished and a new checkpoint established to
the north to be more convenient to Iraq-bound shipping.<br><br>Vessels
bound for or departing from Iraqi ports and offshore oil terminals must
pass within a five nautical mile radius of latitude twenty-nine degrees
thirty-five minutes north and longitude forty-eight degrees fifty-three
minutes east (29-35N/048-53E). Approaching vessels must contact the on
station coalition warship on marine VHF (bridge-to-bridge) radio-
telephone, channel 16 within five nautical miles of this point and be
prepared to be queried, boarded, and inspected for prohibited cargo by
coalition Maritime Security Forces (MSF). Vessels will not be permitted
to proceed from this point until cleared by the MSF. Clearance through
the Iraqi maritime security checkpoint does not grant clearance to enter
any specific Iraqi port or the internal waters of Iraq; such clearances
must be obtained from appropriate authorities in Iraq.' <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        iraq Middle East Iraq Source : UK P&I
Club Bulletin 341 2004-01-01 2004-01-01 notices      iraq003.htm 0
241         Updated Regulations for Entry into Peruvian Waters
      Updated means in which to notify the Maritime Authority of the
ships intention to enter of leave Peruvian waters are advised as follows.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Updated means in which to
notify the Maritime Authority of the ships intention to enter of leave
Peruvian waters are advised as follows.<br><br>Issued by the Harbour
Master of Callao, in letter V200-3355 December 2003, all reports should
be sent to:<br><br>e-mail <a
href=""mailto:DICATRAMAR@MARINA.MIL.PE"">DICATRAMAR@MARINA.MIL.PE</a><br>
Telex 26042<br>Fax +51 1 4291547<br><br>or<br><br>e-mail <a
href=""mailto:COSTERACALLAO@MARINA.MIL.PE"">COSTERACALLAO@MARINA.MIL.PE</
a><br>Fax +51 1 4200177<br><br>No other stations will be accepted. Fines
of US$15,000 to US$20,000 are typically issued for ships passing messages
through the wrong stations.<br><br>It should also be noted that several
ships have been fined after using stations published in the Admiralty
List of Radio Signals, as due to the frequency of changes the publication
can be temporarily out of date.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        peru South America     Peru Source :
UK P&I Club Bulletin 342      2004-01-01 2004-01-01 notices
      peru004.htm 0
242         Settlements of Customs Fines - Lome - Togo           The Head
of Port Customs has issued a directive to all ship agencies concerning
the settlement of custom fines.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Head of Port Customs has
issued a directive to all ship agencies concerning the settlement of
custom fines. <br><br>This directive states - amongst other things -
that: <br><ol><li>The negotiation of the fine must take place within 21
days of the date of receipt of the outturn report.
</li><br><br><li>Payment of the fine is to be within eight weeks of the
date of negotiation. </li></ol><br>If these time periods are not
respected, customs will impose the total of the fine as officially
calculated and will also block all activities of the ship's agent or the
owners concerned in the Port of Lome.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       togo Africa       Togo Source : UK Club
Bulletin 343      2004-01-01 2004-01-01 notices      togo002.htm 0
243         Columbia - Precautions Against Drug Smuggling        The
following recommendations have been received from Pandi Colombia S.A.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The following
recommendations have been received from Pandi Colombia S.A.. They are
general but not exhaustive guidelines for precautionary measures to be
enforced while the vessel is in port, whether she is anchored or
alongside the berth: <br><br><ul><li>The whole crew should be warned of
the risks of carrying or trafficking drugs. Evidence of these warnings
are to be exhibited to the authorities when necessary. </li><li>When
going ashore, the crew should be warned that if they choose to have
contact with local people they should be very careful to ensure that the
people they deal with are not connected with illegal activities. Clearly,
if problems are encountered with drugs and members of the crew have been
seen meeting with people known to be connected with drug traffickers,
there is every likelihood the authorities will allege crew involvement.
</li><li>Keep a security log at the gangway recording due identification
of any persons boarding or disembarking the vessel, including
crewmembers. </li><li>Perform other security checks, inspections and
rounds with the crew and security guards. </li><li>Do not allow access
to any persons who do not have specific work to be performed on board.
</li><li>Keep locked the access to places in which no work is to be
carried out. </li><li>Permanent watch on places where people
(stevedores) are working. </li><li>Permanent watch on main deck and boat
decks. At night time these should be well lit. </li><li>Watch for the
approach of small boats or the presence of unauthorised divers or other
attempts by unauthorised persons to board the vessel. </li><li>Request
the inspection of the vessel by the anti-narcotics team before departure,
including an underwater inspection. </li><li>In the event of drugs being
found on board, cooperate fully with the investigating authorities.
</li><li><b>MOST IMPORTANT</b>: In case of problems immediately seek
assistance from the Club's local correspondents</li></ul><br></td>
                      </tr>"       colombia    South America     Colombia
      Source : Steamship Articles January 2004       2004-02-13 2004-01-01
      notices     colombia003.htm 0
244         Russian Ports - Safe Stowage And Securing Certificate
      "New rules apply to all the vessels, including foreign flag
vessels, entering and departing from Russian Sea Commercial ports."
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">New rules apply to all the
vessels, including foreign flag vessels, entering and departing from
Russian Sea Commercial ports. Rules of safe carriage of cargoes by sea
(the ""Rules"") entered into force with effect from 24.11.03. The Rules
are based on provisions of Article 1 (b) and Chapter VI of SOLAS-74.
<br><br>The Rules introduce an obligation on the Master of departing
vessels to provide the Harbor Master with Cargo Information and a
Certificate of safe stowage and securing of cargo in respect of packed
dangerous substances, oversized, heavyweight, metal cargoes, timber
cargoes.<br><br>Pursuant to Article 13 of the Rules it is generally for
the shipper to arrange issuing of the above documents (except in respect
of deck cargoes and securing by crew).<br><br>In order to avoid disputes
and delays resulting from non-compliance with the Rules it is advisable
for Masters to be instructed to:<br><br><ul><li>demand presentation of
the information on cargo prior to commencement of loading </li><li>demand
presentation of proposed scheme of stowage prior to commencement of
loading </li><li>issue, prior to completion of loading, the relevant
letter in recommended form </li></ul><br></td>
                      </tr>"        russia      Europe      Russia
      Source : Steamship Articles 2004-02-13 2004-01-01 notices
      russia005.htm     0
245         Spain - Post-Prestige Measures            Cape Finisterre
Traffic Separation Scheme     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><br><u>Cape Finisterre
Traffic Separation Scheme</u><br><br>IMO has amended the existing traffic
separation scheme for this area. The result is that vessels carrying
dangerous or potentially polluting cargoes must use the most remote
traffic lane. Details of the traffic lanes can be found on the Spanish
Ministry of Transport website <a href=""http://www.mfom.es""
target=""_blank"">www.mfom.es</a>.<br><br><u>Places of
Refuge</u><br><br>At its 23 Assembly IMO adopted guidelines on the issue
of places of refuge. New domestic legislation coming into force this
month entitles the Spanish authorities to require owners, operators or
shippers to provide guarantees against possible damage as a prerequisite
to allowing a vessel to enter a place of refuge.<br><br><u>Spain as a New
Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA)</u><br><br>With effect from June
2004, Western European waters (Belgium, UK, Ireland, France, Spain and
Portugal) are expected to be designated as a PSSA.<br><br>A PSSA is an
area that needs special protection through action by IMO because of its
significance for recognized ecological or socio-economic or scientific
reasons and which may be vulnerable to damage by international maritime
activities. When an area is approved as a particularly sensitive sea
area, specific measures can be used to control the maritime activities in
that area, such as routeing measures, strict application of MARPOL
discharge and equipment requirements for ships, such as oil tankers; and
installation of Vessel Traffic Services (VTS).<br><br>Further information
is available from the IMO webpage on <a
href=""http://www.imo.org/Environment/mainframe.asp?topic_id=760""
target=""_blank"">Special Areas and Particularly Sensitive Sea
Areas</a>.<br><br><u>Single-Hull Tanker Ban and Phase Out</u><br><br>As
reported in an earlier Steamship website article, IMO has now adopted an
accelerated phase out timetable for single-hull tankers and new
regulations for the carriage of heavy fuel oil. Click <a
href=""http://www.simsl.com/Articles/IMO_SingleHull1203.asp""
target=""_blank"">Here</a> to view.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        spain Europe      Spain Source :
Steamship Mutual Articles     2004-02-13 2004-01-01 notices
      spain005.htm      0
246         Syria - Private Ship Agents         Until recently Shipco had a
monopoly for ship agency in Syria.        "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Until recently Shipco had a
monopoly for ship agency in Syria. However, this monopoly has now been
relaxed and the establishment of private agencies is, subject to certain
conditions, now allowed. Subject to what is stated below, Owners may
appoint their own agents for their vessels' calls and, where they do so,
Owners and their Clubs are no longer required to deal through Shipco for
resolution of their problems locally. (Previously, as a result of the
monopoly, any steps to be taken on behalf of foreign Owners had to be
done through Shipco.)<br><br><b>Entitlement and Method of
Establishment</b><br><br><b>Establishing and Manning Private
Agencies</b><br><br><b>Advantages / Disadvantages /
Difficulties</b><br><br><u>Negotiating Individual Terms
</u><br><br><u>Security of Funds</u><br><br><u>Customs
Fines</u><br><br><u>Arrest</u><br><br>For further information please see
<a href=""http://www.simsl.com""
target=""_blank"">http://www.simsl.com</a><br><br></td>
                       </tr>"       syria Middle East Syria Source :
Steamship Articles       2004-02-13 2004-01-01 notices      syria002.htm
      0
247         Reminder and Amendment of Pollution Fines - Turkey         In a
recent case the Environmental Protection Authority apparently observed
pollution that occurred whilst a ship was at anchor off Ahirkapi.
      "<tr>
               <td class=""genText"">In a recent case the Environmental
Protection Authority apparently observed pollution that occurred whilst a
ship was at anchor off Ahirkapi. The pollution was caused by washing down
greasy / oily decks. The Authority took samples and photos and the ship
concerned was fined TL 145,940,350.317 (approx US$110,100.00) under the
relevant Laws/Regulations/Official Tariffs. It was stated that the fine
should be paid immediately; otherwise the vessel would be
detained.<br><br>The current fines as of the 1st January 2004
are:<br><br>For tankers, in the event of discharging dirty
ballast:<br><br></td>
              </tr>
              <tr>
               <td>
                <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""0""
bgcolor=""#C6C6C6"" >
                 <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#000080"" align=""center"">
                  <td width=""250""><span class=""genText""><font
color=""#FFFFFF"">GT of the tanker</font></span></td><td
width=""245""><span class=""genText""><font color=""#FFFFFF"">Current
Fine</font></span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"" align=""center"">
                  <td><span class=""genText"">0 -
1,000</span></td><td><span class=""genText""><span class=""genText"">TL
72,970,175,159</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"" align=""center"">
                  <td><span class=""genText"">1,001 -
5,000</span></td><td><span class=""genText"">TL
145,940,350,317</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"" align=""center"">
                 <td><span class=""genText"">5,001 and
more</span></td><td><span class=""genText"">TL
729,701,751,585</span></td>
                </tr>
               </table>
              </td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td class=""genText""><br>For all other ships including
tankers, in the event of discharging all kind of residues, bilge and for
the ships excluding tankers, in the event of discharging dirty
ballast:<br><br></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td>
               <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""0""
bgcolor=""#C6C6C6"" >
                <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#000080"" align=""center"">
                 <td width=""250""><span class=""genText""><font
color=""#FFFFFF"">GT of the ship</font></span></td><td
width=""245""><span class=""genText""><font color=""#FFFFFF"">Current
Fine</font></span></td>
                </tr>
                <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"" align=""center"">
                 <td><span class=""genText"">18 -
1,000</span></td><td><span class=""genText""><span
class=""genText"">4,378,210,510</span></td>
                </tr>
                <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"" align=""center"">
                 <td><span class=""genText"">1,001 and
more</span></td><td><span class=""genText"">72,970,175,159</span></td>
                </tr>
                <tr height=""30"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"" align=""center"">
                 <td><span class=""genText"">17 and
less</span></td><td><span class=""genText"">145,940,350,317</span></td>
                </tr>
               </table>
              </td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
              <td class=""genText""><br>The relevant Turkish laws and
regulations are very strict. Unless the fine is paid the ship will be
detained.<br><br>The relevant law/regulation refers to the acceptance of
bank guarantees, treasury bonds and debentures (Turkish Treasury) however
in practice the authority will only accept an unconditional cashable
guarantee such as a cheque. It is possible to appeal against the
imposition of a fine by filing a court case at the administrative Court
within seven days of the incident. This procedure would not stop the
execution and collection of the fine as per Turkish law. If however the
incident has been observed/established by the Authority there is little
chance of an appeal succeeding.<br><br></td>
             </tr>"          turkey     Europe      Turkey     Source :
UK P&I Club Bulletin 352     2004-03-01 2004-03-01 notices
      turkey004.htm    0
248   33    Deck cargo &#30002;&#26495;&#36135;    "In the case of
Kapitan Petko Voivoda (2003), it was held by the Court Of Appeal that"
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">In the case of <u>Kapitan
Petko Voivoda</u> (2003), it was held by the Court Of Appeal that an
unauthorised carriage of deck cargo prevented the vessel from relying on
the exceptions clauses in Artcile 4 rule 2 of the Hague Rules. but the
owners were still entitled to rely on the package limitation in Article 4
rule 5 of the rules.<br>
                          <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>
                          &#22312;Kapitan Petko Voivoda
(2003)&#26696;&#20214;&#20013;&#65292;&#19978;&#35785;&#27861;&#38498;&#3
5748;&#20026;&#26410;&#32463;&#35748;&#21487;&#30340;&#30002;&#26495;&#36
135;&#36816;&#36755;&#20351;&#33337;&#33334;&#19981;&#33021;&#20139;&#214
63;&#28023;&#29273;&#35268;&#21017;&#31532;2&#26465;&#31532;4&#27454;&#20
013;&#30340;&#20813;&#36131;&#26465;&#27454;&#65292;&#20294;&#33337;&#199
96;&#20173;&#21487;&#20139;&#21463;&#35813;&#35268;&#21017;&#31532;5&#274
54;&#23545;&#27809;&#20214;&#36135;&#30340;&#36131;&#20219;&#38480;&#2104
6;&#30340;&#35268;&#23450;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>Reference is also to our related article <a
href=""awareness004.htm"">no.15</a> in which it is stressed the
situations in which carriage of deck cargo may prejudice P&I Club
cover.<br>                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size:
10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#21442;&#32771;&#25105;&#20204;&#20808;&#21069;&#30340; <a
href=""awareness004.htm"">&#31532;15&#26465;</a>
&#24314;&#35758;&#65292;&#20854;&#20013;&#24378;&#35843;&#30002;&#26495;&
#36135;&#36816;&#36755;&#20250;&#24433;&#21709;&#20445;&#36180;&#30340;&#
36180;&#20184;&#12290;</span><br>
                         <br></td>
                      </tr>"                              2004-02-16
      2004-02-16 legal_awareness chi_awareness031.htm     1
249   34    Straight bills of lading     &#35760;&#21517;&#25552;&#21333;
      "In the recent case of <u>Rafaela S</u>, the bill of lading was non
negotiable and transferable as"    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""> In the recent case of
Rafaela S , the bill of lading was non negotiable and transferable as
there was no reference of the words ' to order'. The bill of lading
stated in the consignee box the 'b/l was not negotiable unless to the
order of'. It was a straight b/l.<br>
                          <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>
                          &#22312;&#36817;&#26399;&#30340;RafaelaS
&#26696;&#20363;&#20013;&#65292;&#30001;&#20110;&#25552;&#21333;&#19978;&
#27809;&#26377;&lsquo;to
order&rsquo;&#23383;&#26679;&#65292;&#25552;&#21333;&#26159;&#19981;&#214
87;&#35758;&#20184;&#21644;&#19981;&#21487;&#36716;&#35753;&#12290;&#2231
2;&#25910;&#36135;&#20154;&#26639;&#20013;&#27880;&#26126;&ldquo;&#25552;
&#21333;&#26159;&#19981;&#21487;&#35758;&#20184;&#30340;&#65292;&#38500;&
#38750;&#20973;&#25351;&#31034;&rdquo;&#12290;&#36825;&#23601;&#26159;&#3
5760;&#21517;&#25552;&#21333;&#12290;</span>                          <br>
                                               <br>
             The b/l however contained an attestation clause as follows.
&quot;In witness whereof the number of original bills of lading stated
above, all of this tenor and date, has been signed, one of which being
accomplished, the others to stand void. One of the bills of lading must
be surrendered duly endorsed in exchange for the goods or delivery
order.'<br>
             <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25552;&#21333;&#19978;&#30340;&#22768;&#26126;&#26465;&#27454;&#12290;&
ldquo;&#20857;&#35777;&#26126;&#19978;&#36848;&#24050;&#31614;&#27491;&#2
6412;&#25552;&#21333;&#30340;&#20221;&#25968;&#65292;&#20854;&#20013;&#19
968;&#20221;&#23436;&#25104;&#25552;&#36135;&#65292;&#20854;&#23427;&#209
60;&#20221;&#21017;&#26080;&#25928;&#12290;&#22240;&#27492;&#24517;&#3903
5;&#20132;&#20986;&#20854;&#20013;&#19968;&#20221;&#32463;&#32972;&#20070
;&#30340;&#27491;&#26412;&#25552;&#21333;&#25442;&#21462;&#36135;&#29289;
&#25110;&#25552;&#36135;&#21333;&#12290;</span><br>
             <br>
             It was the shipower's case the bill of lading was not a
document of title as it was not transferable/negotiable.<br>
             <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#36825;&#26159;&#33337;&#19996;&#30340;&#20107;&#65292;&#22240;&#20026;&
#25552;&#21333;&#19981;&#26159;&#29289;&#26435;&#20973;&#35777;&#25152;&#
65292;&#23427;&#19981;&#21487;&#36716;&#35753;/&#35758;&#20184;&#12290;</
span><br>
             <br>
             The Court Of Appeal stated that as the attestation clause
prevents the consignee from obtaining delivery of the cargo without
presentation of the bill, it is a document of title/ The Court went
further to say that even if the bill had lacked the attestation clause
requiring production of the bill for delivery, it would still have been a
document of title requiring production of a bill. Although the latter
situation is not law, other English courts would be influenced by these
remarks.<br>
             <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#19978;&#35785;&#27861;&#38498;&#35748;&#20026;&#22768;&#26126;&#26465;&
#27454;&#23601;&#26159;&#20026;&#20102;&#38450;&#27490;&#25910;&#36135;&#
20154;&#26080;&#21333;&#25552;&#36135;&#65292;&#23427;&#26159;&#29289;&#2
6435;&#20973;&#35777;&#12290;&#27861;&#38498;&#36827;&#19968;&#27493;&#34
920;&#31034;&#21363;&#20351;&#27809;&#26377;&#22768;&#26126;&#26465;&#274
54;&#35201;&#27714;&#20973;&#21333;&#25918;&#36135;&#65292;&#23427;&#2017
3;&#28982;&#35201;&#27714;&#20973;&#21333;&#25918;&#36135;&#12290;&#34429
;&#28982;&#21518;&#32773;&#19981;&#26159;&#27861;&#24459;&#35268;&#23450;
&#65292;&#20294;&#23558;&#24433;&#21709;&#33521;&#22269;&#20854;&#20182;&
#27861;&#38498;&#12290;</span><br>
             <br>
             Reference is also requested to our earlier advice <a
href=""awareness010.htm"">no.9</a> in which the Singapore Courts also
arrived at same outcome that a straight bill is also a document of title
which requires production to obtain delivery of cargo.<br>
             <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#20063;&#35831;&#21442;&#32771;&#25105;&#20204;&#20197;&#21069;&#30340;
<a href=""awareness010.htm"">&#31532;&#20061;&#26465;</a>
&#24314;&#35758;&#65292;&#26377;&#20851;&#26032;&#21152;&#22369;&#27861;&
#38498;&#20063;&#24471;&#20986;&#30456;&#21516;&#30340;&#32467;&#35770;&#
35760;&#21517;&#25552;&#21333;&#26159;&#29289;&#26435;&#20973;&#35777;&#6
5292;&#35201;&#27714;&#20973;&#21333;&#25918;&#36135;&#12290;<br>
              </span></td>
                      </tr>"                              2004-02-16
      2004-02-16 legal_awareness chi_awareness034.htm     1
250         U.S. Ports - NOA Update - ISSC Information and Online
Submission        International Ship Security Certificate Information
Required In Notice Of Arrival       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><u>International Ship
Security Certificate Information Required In Notice Of
Arrival</u><br><br>The U.S. Coast Guard National Vessel Movement Centre
(NVMC) has updated the Notice of Arrival (NOA) Workbook (six worksheets
plus instructions) to be in line with changes* requiring additional
information on the vessel's International Ship Security Certificate
(ISSC) to be submitted with a NOA. This additional information is
required from 1 January 2004.<br><br>A copy of the NOA Workbook is
available on the <a href=""http://www.nvmc.uscg.gov/download.html""
target=""_blank"">Downloads</a> page of the NVMC
website.<br><br><u>Online Submission</u><br><br>The U.S. Coast Guard
(USCG) has developed a World Wide Web online Notice of Arrival (e-NOA)
submission application. This method provides a Submitter with the means
for managing vessel arrival information online, and automatically sends
an output file containing arrival information to the National Vessel
Movement Center (NVMC). NOAs submitted via this method will constitute
the official NOA. Duplicate submittal through other means will not be
required.<br><br>A reference guide is available on the <a
href=""http://www.nvmc.uscg.gov/download.html""
target=""_blank"">Downloads</a> page of the NVMC website.<br><br>The NVMC
strongly recommends the use of USCG-formatted NOA methods. When filled
out completely and submitted properly, NOAs submitted either online or
via the NOA Workbook provide all of the information required by Federal
Regulation 33 CFR Part 160 (Notification of Arrival). The submission of a
completed NOA report significantly improves the likelihood that there
will be fewer problems with NOA submittals, and will lessen the
possibility that a vessel will be delayed or denied entry into a
port.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America   USA   Source :
Steamship Mutual Articles     2004-02-16 2004-02-16 notices     usa013.htm
      0
251         U.S. Ports - Maritime Security - Coast Guard Guidance and
Targeting Policy        The U.S. Coast Guard has recently issued several
Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circulars (NVICs) on maritime security
issues.     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The U.S. Coast Guard has
recently issued several Navigation and Vessel Inspection Circulars
(NVICs) on maritime security issues. In particular, the following provide
useful guidance to U.S. flag vessels and foreign vessels visiting U.S.
ports:<br><br><ul><li>04-03 - Guidance For Verification Of Vessel
Security Plans On Domestic Vessels In Accordance With The Regulations
Mandated By The Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA) Of 2002 And
International Ship & Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code </li><li>06-03 -
Coast Guard Port State Control Targeting Boarding Policy For Vessel
Security And Safety </li></ul><br>These and other related NVICs can be
found on the USCG website at: <a href=""http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-
m/nvic/index00.htm"" target=""_blank"">http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-
m/nvic/index00.htm</a><br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa  North America    USA   Source :
Steamship Mutual Articles     2004-02-16 2004-02-16 notices     usa014.htm
      0
252         U.S. Customs - Advance Electronic Submission of Cargo
Information       Recent legislation* states that regulations shall be
promulgated providing for the transmission of cargo information to U.S.
Customs and Border Protection (CPB) through    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Recent legislation* states
that regulations shall be promulgated providing for the transmission of
cargo information to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CPB) through an
electronic data interchange system. The final rule, published in the <a
href=""http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/fedreg/a031205c.html""
target=""_blank"">Federal Register on 5 December 2003</a>, contains CPB's
implementing regulations. This rule provides that CPB shall receive, by
way of an approved electronic data interchange system, such cargo
information which may be reasonably necessary to enable high-risk
shipments to be identified for purposes of ensuring cargo safety and
security and to prevent smuggling.<br><br>The cargo information must be
electronically received 24 hours before the cargo is laden aboard the
vessel at the foreign port.<br><br>The rule comes into effect on 5
January 2004 and enforcement with regard to inbound shipments via vessels
will commence on 4 March 2004. As with the 24 hour rule, CPB intends to
continue to work with carriers to achieve compliance with the new
regulations during the above implementation period.<br><br>The final rule
does not change the <a href=""http://www.simsl.com/Articles/U.S.
Customs_24hr_advmanifest.asp"" target=""_blank"">existing requirement
that cargo information be filed 24 hours before loading</a>; it simply
mandates that the filing be electronic, by way of CPB's Automated
Manifest Systems (AMS). AMS is a multi-modular cargo inventory control
and release notification system for sea, air and rail carriers. AMS is
intended to speed the flow of cargo and entry processing and to provide
participants with electronic authorization to move cargo prior to
arrival. The <a
href=""http://www.customs.ustreas.gov/xp/cgov/import/operations_support/a
utomated_systems/ams/"" target=""_blank"">CBP webpage on AMS</a> provides
further information. <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa  North America    USA   Source :
Steamship Articles January 2004 2004-02-16 2004-02-16 notices
      usa015.htm 0
253         Automatic Manifest System - US Customs' Requirements
      "The US Customs' '24 Hour Rule' will require from 4th March, 2004
all vessel carriers submit cargo information electronically to US Customs
and Border Protection" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The US Customs' '24 Hour
Rule' will require from 4th March, 2004 all vessel carriers submit cargo
information electronically to US Customs and Border Protection (CBP: <a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/home.xml""
target=""_blank"">http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/home.xml</a>). Under the
amended requirements each carrier must also provide its own customs bond
(International Carriers Bond) and should obtain its own US Standard
Carrier Alpha Code (SCAC). <br><br>The carrier is deemed to be the head
owner, bareboat charterer or other entity responsible for operation and
navigation of the vessel. The vessel's agent, or an authorised third
party service provider, can be used to file cargo information with the
Customs electronically under an automated manifest system (AMS), but the
carrier remains responsible for the content. Agents or other third
parties may not use their own bonds or SCAC codes when providing such
services for carriers.<br><br>Carriers can obtain a SCAC by applying to
the US National Motor Freight Traffic Association. Details of the
requirements can be found at their website at <a
href=""http://www.nmfta.org/"" target=""_blank"">www.nmfta.org</a>.
<br><br>US Customs has indicated that carriers should file an
International Carriers Bond with the Director of the US port to which
their ships most frequently trade, in a minimum amount of $50,000.
However, each Port Director has discretion to require the carrier's bond
to be for a larger amount if deemed necessary. The bond responds in order
to secure payment of customs ""duties, taxes and other charges"". A list
of approved bonding companies and brokers can be found at the United
States Department of the Treasury website at <a
href=""http://www.fms.treas.gov/c570/index.html""
target=""_blank"">http://www.fms.treas.gov/c570/index.html</a>.<br><br><s
pan class=""genSubTitleText""><a name=group>Group P&I Clubs issue
circular on US new automated manifest system
regulations</a></span><br><br><b><font
color=""#000066"">Outline</font></b><ul><li>All Members should refer to
this circular as the short deadlines involved make action, where
applicable, extremely urgent.</li><li>The United States Automated
Manifest System (AMS) regulations take effect on the 4th March
2004.</li><li>These regulations apply to all ocean carriers and non-
vessel operating common carriers (NVOCCs) shipping cargoes to <u>all</u>
US ports.</li><li>This circular explains the mandatory reporting
requirements of AMS in respect of bulk, break-bulk and other
cargoes.</li><li>Details of the compulsory Standard Carrier Alpha Code
(SCAC) and International Carrier Bond (ICB) are also
provided.</li></ul><b><font
color=""#000066"">Actions</font></b><ul><li>Members should urgently
establish whether these regulations apply to them.</li><li>If the
regulations do apply Members should proceed with the actions summarised
on page 6 of this circular.</li><li>If Members require any clarification
of this circular they should contact the Club
immediately.</li></ul><br>February, 2004<p align=""right"">Ref:6/04</p>TO
THE MEMBERS<br><br>Dear Sirs,<br><br><span class=""genSubTitleText"">USA
- NEW AUTOMATED MANIFEST SYSTEM REGULATIONS</span><br><br>Members
operating ships which trade to the United States will shortly be required
to comply with new Automated Manifest System (AMS) regulations. In order
to do so, those concerned will also need to obtain a Standard Carrier
Alpha Code (SCAC) and an International Carrier Bond (ICB). The
requirements enter into force on 4th March 2004. In view of the very
short lead time, it is important that Members take action without
delay.<br><br><font color=""#000066""><b>Background</b></font><br><br>The
US Maritime Transportation Security Act was introduced to improve the
security of cargo shipments entering or leaving the United States by sea,
air, rail or truck. The Act passed into law in 2002 and requires the
mandatory submission of cargo manifest information by electronic means.
The US Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) was charged with
implementing the new law and a Final Rule was published a short time ago
setting out the details.<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Application</b></font><br><br>The AMS regulations
will affect all ships bringing cargo into US ports including all US non-
contiguous and island territories, even if the cargo is not to be
discharged in the US and is to be consigned to foreign ports. It is
possible that the regulations may not apply in situations where a customs
entry is not currently required (eg Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP),
ship to ship transfer operations offshore), but this issue remains in
need of clarification. An AMS declaration is also required for cargo
loaded in US ports.<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Carrier</b></font><br><br>The SCAC, ICB and AMS
reporting requirements apply to ocean Carriers and to Non-Vessel
Operating Common Carriers (see below). CBP has defined the Carrier as
""the entity that controls the conveyance"" such as the head owner or the
bareboat charterer. It is thought that a manager may be construed as
being the Carrier if it is clear that the manager has assumed
responsibility for the operation of the ship, but this should be verified
with CBP in the first instance. It is less clear whether a time charterer
may be deemed to be the Carrier, and CBP may ask to see a copy of the
charter party in order to reach a decision.<br><br>Although a time
charterer may continue to issue bills of lading for and on behalf of the
master, owner or bareboat charterer, the Carrier will be responsible for
ensuring that cargo manifest declarations are made via AMS. It is
essential to note that the Carrier's SCAC must be used on all bills of
lading irrespective of the issuing party, representing a major departure
from current practice.<br><br>A list of Carriers who are already AMS
participants may be found at:<br><a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/carriers/ams_5fp
orts_5flisting/seaams_2exls/v1/seaams.xls""
target=""_blank"">http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/carri
ers/ams_5fports_5flisting/<br>seaams_2exls/v1/seaams.xls</a><br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Non-Vessel Operating Common Carrier
(NVOCC)</b></font><br><br>A Non Vessel Operating Common Carrier is
defined in 19 CFR ¡±4.7(b)(3)(ii) as ""a common carrier that does not
operate the vessels by which the ocean transportation is provided, and is
a shipper in its relationship with an ocean common carrier. The term
'non-vessel operating common carrier' does not include freight
forwarders¡K"".<br><br>Authorised NVOCC's are permitted to make AMS
declarations and may issue bills of lading under their own SCAC. The ICB
requirement still applies. However, the owner or bareboat charterer will
still need to issue a master bill of lading to the NVOCC on which the
ocean Carrier's SCAC must be used.<br><br>Many slot charterers have
acquired NVOCC status, but it seems unlikely that a time or voyage
charterer in the dry or liquid bulk trade will be considered to be a
""common carrier"". <br><br>Details of whom to approach with the aim of
becoming an authorised NVOCC are shown on the following web page:<br><a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/carriers/nvoccs_
5fams_2epdf/v1/nvoccs_5fams.pdf""
target=""_blank"">http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/carri
ers/nvoccs_5fams_2epdf/<br>v1/nvoccs_5fams.pdf</a><br><br>A list of
authorised NVOCC's may be found at:<br><a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/carriers/ams_5fp
orts_5flisting/nvocc_5flist_2exls/v17/nvocc_5flist.xls"">http://www.cbp.g
ov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/carriers/ams_5fports_5flisting/<br>nvoc
c_5flist_2exls/v17/nvocc_5flist.xls</a><br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Automated Manifest System (AMS)</b></font><br><br>As
of 4th March 2004 the Carrier must ensure that all declarations relating
to incoming cargo are submitted to CBP via the Automated Manifest System.
Depending on the type of cargo or whether it is Foreign Remaining On
Board (FROB) cargo, an AMS declaration is to be made either 24 hours
before loading or at least 24 hours before arrival at the first US port.
In the former case if nothing is heard by return from CBP in the ensuing
24 hours, then it may be assumed that the cargo may be loaded without
violation of the new AMS requirements. If the duration of the voyage is
expected to be less than 24 hours, the details are to be submitted on
departure from the final port of loading.<br><br><i>Dry Bulk and Liquid
Bulk Cargoes</i><br><br>For dry bulk and liquid bulk cargoes an AMS
submission is to be made at least 24 hours before arrival at the first US
port. In the case of FROB bulk cargo the AMS declaration should be made
24 hours before loading. Bulk cargo is defined by CBP
as:<br><br><i>""Homogenous cargo that is stowed loose in the hold and is
not enclosed in any container such as a box, bale, bag, cask, or the
like. Such cargo is also described as bulk freight. Specifically, bulk
cargo is composed of either: (a) free flowing articles such as oil,
grain, coal, ore, and the like which can be pumped or run through a chute
or handled by dumping; or (b) uniform cargo that stows as solidly as bulk
cargo and requires mechanical handling for lading and
discharging.""</i><br><br>CBP has also stated that, subject to certain
limitations, bulk cargo may include steel coils, steel plates, wire rods,
metal ingots, sawn timber, wood pulp, newsprint and various perishable
goods.<br><br><i>Break Bulk Cargo</i><br><br>For break bulk cargo an AMS
declaration is to be made 24 hours before loading. However, an
application may be lodged for an exemption which, if granted, will allow
the Carrier to file an AMS declaration 24 hours before arrival at the
first US port in the same manner as bulk cargo. In the case of FROB break
bulk cargo the AMS declaration should be made 24 hours before loading.
Break bulk cargo is defined by CBP as:<br><br><i>""Cargo that is not
containerised and that cannot be classified as ""bulk"" cargo under the
above definition. For example, new and used vehicles will be classified
as break bulk cargo.""</i><br><br><i>""It is important to note that the
difference between bulk and break bulk is based not only on the type of
cargo, but also on the way in which the cargo is stowed or loaded. For
example, bananas stowed loosely in a hold (not in boxes or containers)
will be considered bulk. Palletized boxes of bananas loaded directly into
a hold (but not loose or containerized) will be considered break
bulk.""</i><br><br>Carriers of break bulk cargo wishing to apply for an
exemption should contact:<br><br>Customs and Border Protection<br>Border
Targeting and Analysis, Room 5.4-D<br>1300 Pennsylvania Avenue
NW<br>Washington DC 20229<br><br>Email (preferred): <a
href=""mailto:24hour.exemptions@dhs.gov"">24hour.exemptions@dhs.gov</a><b
r>Phone: +1 202 927 6060<br>Fax:     +1 202 927 1435<br><br>Applications
may take two to three weeks to process and should include the following
information:<ul><li>The Carrier's IRS number (if applicable);
</li><li>The source, identity and means of packaging or bundling of the
commodities being shipped;</li><li>The ports of call both foreign and
domestic;</li><li>The number of vessels the carrier uses to transport
break bulk cargo;</li><li>The names of the vessels and their IMO
numbers;</li><li>A list of the Carrier's importers and shippers,
identifying any who are members of the C-TPAT (Customs - Trade
Partnership Against Terrorism) programme.</li></ul><br><i>Cargoes Other
than Bulk and Break Bulk</i><br><br>For all other types of cargo,
including containerised goods, the Carrier's existing obligation to file
an AMS declaration 24 hours prior to loading at a foreign port remains
unchanged.<br><br><i>AMS Submission Details</i><br><br>All AMS
submissions are to include the following information:<br><ul><li>The last
foreign port before the vessel departed for the United States;
</li><li>The carrier Standard Carrier Alpha Code (SCAC);</li><li>The
carrier assigned voyage number;</li><li>The date the vessel is scheduled
to arrive at the first US port; </li><li>The numbers and quantities from
the carrier's ocean bills of lading;</li><li>A precise description of the
cargo (or the Harmonized Tariff Schedule number under which the cargo is
classified) and the weight of the cargo;</li><li>Shipper's name and
address or identification number;</li><li>Consignee's name and address or
identification number, or where goods are consigned to order, the
""Notify Party"" details;</li><li>Vessel name, flag and IMO number;
</li><li>The first foreign port where the carrier takes possession of the
cargo destined for the United States;</li><li>The foreign port where the
cargo is laden on board;</li><li>Internationally recognised hazardous
material code when such materials are being shipped; </li><li>Container
numbers (for containerised shipments);</li><li>The seal numbers for all
seals affixed to containers.</li></ul><br>CBP Form 1302 is to be
completed in electronic format and filed along with the AMS declaration
and may be accessed at:<br><a
href=""https://forms.customs.gov/customsrf/getformharness.asp?formName=cf
-1302-form.xft""
target=""_blank"">https://forms.customs.gov/customsrf/getformharness.asp?
formName=cf-1302-form.xft</a><br><br><i>AMS Reporting
Methods</i><br><br>The Carrier may purchase and utilise compatible AMS
software for this purpose. For further information see ""Getting Started
with AMS"" at:<br><a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/import/operations_support/automated_sys
tems/ams/getting_started.xml""
target=""_blank"">http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/import/operations_support/au
tomated_systems/<br>ams/getting_started.xml</a><br><br>Alternatively, and
for a fee, the Carrier may submit the information through a third party
AMS service provider. The Carrier's agent or representative may forward
the cargo manifest details to the AMS service provider for onward
transmission, but the Carrier remains responsible for the accuracy of the
information. A list of AMS service providers around the world may be
found at:<br><a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/operations_5fsup
port/ams/sea_5fvendor_2edoc/v7/sea_5fvendor.doc""
target=""_blank"">http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/opera
tions_5fsupport/ams/<br>sea_5fvendor_2edoc/v7/sea_5fvendor.doc</a><br><br
><i>Letter of Intent</i><br><br>In the first instance, the Carrier should
submit a written ""Letter of Intent"" to CBP advising how they will be
filing their Automated Manifest System (AMS) cargo declarations. The
letter should specify the type of AMS software to be used or,
alternatively, should provide details of the third party AMS service
provider selected. The letter should be written on company headed paper
and should include a point of contact, name, title, phone number, email
address and the location of the office. The letter should be faxed
to:<br><br>Customs and Border Protection<br>Client Representative
Branch<br>7501 Boston Blvd, Room 211<br>ATTN: Sea AMS
LOI<br>Springfield, VA 22153<br><br>Phone: +1 703 921 7500 (Contact
name: Kevin Huck)<br>Fax:     +1 703 921 7563<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Standard Carrier Alpha Code
(SCAC)</b></font><br><br>All Carriers are required to obtain a SCAC.
Members should contact the National Motor Freight Traffic Association
(NMFTA) in Alexandria, VA. Tel: +1 703 838 1810. Website: <a
href=""http://www.nmfta.org/scac2.htm""
target=""_blank"">www.nmfta.org/scac2.htm</a>. It is understood that it
takes approximately one week for a SCAC letter of confirmation to be
issued. Once received, it should be faxed to CBP at +1 703 921 7173 for
the attention Charles Bennett, specifying whether the SCAC holder is a
Carrier or an NVOCC.<br><br>When making an AMS submission the cargo
declaration must contain a unique bill of lading identifier of up to
sixteen characters in length, the first four being the Carrier's SCAC.
The remaining characters may be either alpha and/or numeric. Once issued,
the unique bill of lading number is not to be used again for at least
three years.<br><br><font color=""#000066""><b>International Carrier Bond
(ICB)</b></font><br><br>As of 4th March 2004 it will no longer be
possible to file a cargo manifest under the agent's bond. Carriers will
be required to post an International Carrier Bond to secure payment to
CPB of any customs ""penalty, duty, tax or other charge provided by law
or regulation"", which any ""vessel, master, owner or person in charge of
a vessel"" fails to pay upon demand. An ICB is not to be confused with
the importer's bond posted by cargo interests. Posting the ICB is the
Carrier's sole responsibility; it cannot be delegated to the Carrier's
agent or to a time charterer.<br><br>The ICB may be a continuous bond
covering all visits to US ports by the Carrier's vessels. It remains
valid until terminated by the bond provider or by the Carrier.
Alternatively, a single entry bond may be obtained. It appears that a
bond of at least USD 50,000 will be required, but the amount may be
increased or decreased at the discretion of the local Customs Port
Director. This suggests that the required sum may vary between ports.
Factors influencing the decision may include fleet size, the number of
port calls made and the perceived risk. Members are advised to contact
the Customs Port Director in the ports visited most often to determine
the maximum figure likely to be demanded. Thereafter the bond should be
filed by the Carrier in the port where their vessels discharge most
frequently or, in the case of occasional calls, any port of
choice.<br><br>The requirements for obtaining a continuous ICB may vary
between bond providers, therefore the following advice is set out in
general terms only. Costs may also differ depending on the Carrier's
credit rating, but a typical sum appears to be in the region of USD 10
per USD 1,000.<br><br>The Carrier should contact an approved surety with
authority to write customs bonds on Customs Form 301. For a list of
approved sureties, see <a href=""http://fms.treas.gov/c570/c570.html""
target=""_blank"">http://fms.treas.gov/c570/c570.html</a>.<br><br>The
surety agent may ask for some or all of the following
information:<br><ul><li>Company details (name, address);</li><li>US tax
identification number (if applicable) , or</li><li>Customs-assigned
importer number (obtained from a customs broker);</li><li>Financial
statement (properly audited);</li><li>Possibly a Letter of Credit or some
other form of collateral</li></ul><br>Customs brokers are based in most
US ports and many are listed on CBP's website:<br><a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/contacts/ports/""
target=""_blank"">http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/contacts/ports/</a><
br><br>Single entry bonds may be obtained from a surety or a customs
broker. Some customs brokers may be prepared to arrange a facility based
on a power of attorney from the Carrier for the sole purpose of obtaining
a single entry bond, possibly obviating the need for a financial
statement and/or collateral.<br><br>Although International Group clubs
are unable to arrange or obtain ICB's on behalf of Members, it is
understood that market facilities have been established to facilitate
this process. Members requiring more information on the commercial
facilities available or wishing to discuss any aspect of the forthcoming
regulations should contact the Club.<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Summary</b></font><br><br>In summary, the action
points for Members are as follows:<br><ul><li>Establish who is the
Carrier (or Carriers). In case of doubt, contact CBP for
clarification;</li><li>For each Carrier, obtain an SCAC from NMFTA and
fax to CBP thereafter;</li><li>Decide on compatible AMS software or
select a third party AMS service provider;</li><li>Send a ""Letter of
Intent"" to CBP;</li><li>For break bulk cargo, lodge an application with
CBP if seeking an exemption from making an AMS submission 24 hours prior
to loading;</li><li>Contact the Customs Port Director in the most
frequently used port to determine the maximum amount of the International
Carrier Bond likely to be demanded;</li><li>Arrange a continuous or
single entry International Carrier Bond through an approved
surety.</li></ul><br><font color=""#000066""><b>Further
Advice</b></font><br><br>CBP has posted a list of ""Frequently Asked
Questions"" on its website at:<br><a
href=""http://www.customs.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/communicatio
ns_5fto_5ftrade/mandatory_5fadvanced_5felectronics/tpa_5ffaqs_2edoc/v1/tp
a_5ffaqs.doc""
target=""_blank"">http://www.customs.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/c
ommunications_5fto_5ftrade/<br>mandatory_5fadvanced_5felectronics/tpa_5ff
aqs_2edoc/v1/tpa_5ffaqs.doc</a><br><br>At the time of writing there are
still many outstanding matters awaiting clarification. Similarly, the new
regulations appear to give rise to a number of commercial issues which
also need to be resolved. Further advice may follow once the situation
becomes clearer.<br><br>Yours faithfully<br><br><span
class=""genSubtitleText"">THOMAS MILLER (BERMUDA)
LTD.</span><br><br>Note: A similar circular is being sent by the other
members of the International Group of P&I Associations.<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Contact</b></font><ul><li>Members are requested to
direct any questions regarding this circular through their usual
contact.</li></ul><p>Source: UK Club Bulletin 345<br>February
2004</p><span class=""genSubTitleText"">Clarification of US Automated
Manifest System</span><br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Application</b></font><br>It has been clarified that
an AMS declaration is also required for cargo loaded in US ports. A
declaration is also required if the cargo is not to be discharged in the
US and is in transit for Foreign Ports.<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>Carrier</b></font><br>There is continuing
uncertainty over the CBP definition of a Carrier. A further description
provided was 'the entity that controls the conveyance' such as the head
owner or the bareboat charterer. However, it is unclear whether a time
charter may be deemed to be the Carrier and - while attempts to obtain a
definitive explanation are ongoing - it may be that the CBP will ask to
see a copy of individual charterparties in order to reach a decision on a
case basis.<br><br><font color=""#000066""><b>Standard Carrier Alpha Code
(SCAC)</b></font><br>Once a SCAC has been received, it should be faxed to
the CBP at +1 703 921 7173, for the attention of Charles Bennett,
specifying whether the SCAC holder is a Carrier or an NVOCC.<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><b>International Carrier Bond (ICB)</b></font><br>It is
understood that market facilities have been established to facilitate the
provision of the required security. Developers will be monitored and
reported<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America     USA   Source :
UK Club Bulletin 345 - February 2004Source:The London P&I Club 2004-02-18
      2004-02-18 notices      usa016.htm 1
254         Argentine cargoes barred at Iran ports          Iran has from
1st September 2003 refused entry of vessels     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Iran has from 1st September
2003 refused entry of vessels flying Argentinian flag and/or carrying
cargoes loaded in Argentina.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        argentina South America       Argentina
            2004-02-23 2004-02-23 notices       argentina003.htm 0
255         Argentine cargoes barred at Iran ports          Iran has from
1st September 2003 refused entry of vessels     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Iran has from 1st September
2003 refused entry of vessels flying Argentinian flag and/or carrying
cargoes loaded in Argentina.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        iran Middle East Iran         2004-02-23
      2004-02-23 notices      iran003.htm 1
256         Hydrocarbon level in ballast water        There are regulations
in Russian and Ukraine which prohibit the discharge of ballast water
      "<tr>
            <td class=""genText"">There are regulations in Russian and
Ukraine which prohibit the discharge of ballast water which contain
hydrocarbon.<br><br>The maximum permissible level of hydrocarbon can
range from 0.025ppm to 0.05ppm.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        russia      Europe      Russia
      2004-02-23 2004-02-23 notices       russia006.htm     1
257         Hydrocarbon level in ballast water        There are regulations
in Russian and Ukraine which prohibit the discharge of ballast water
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There are regulations in
Russian and Ukraine which prohibit the discharge of ballast water which
contain hydrocarbon.<br><br>The maximum permissible level of hydrocarbon
can range from 0.025ppm to 0.05ppm.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ukraine     Europe      Ukraine
      2004-02-23 2004-02-23 notices       ukraine005.htm    0
258   35    No Lien clause
      &#26080;&#30041;&#32622;&#26435;&#26465;&#27454;    We suggest for
owners to include a no liens clause into the charterparty which may allow
an opportunity    "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">We suggest for owners to
include a no liens clause into the charterparty which may allow an
opportunity for a third party claimant recovering a debt against the
ship.<br>
                           <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25105;&#20204;&#24314;&#35758;&#33337;&#19996;&#22312;&#31199;&#33337;&
#21512;&#21516;&#20013;&#35746;&#31435;&#19968;&#26465;&#26080;&#30041;&#
32622;&#26435;&#26465;&#27454;&#65292;&#20351;&#31532;&#19977;&#26041;&#3
2034;&#36180;&#20154;&#27809;&#26377;&#26426;&#20250;&#21521;&#33337;&#33
334;&#35752;&#36824;&#31199;&#26041;&#30340;&#20538;&#21153;&#12290;</spa
n><br>
                        <br>In the case of (Japan Rainbow II), the
charterparty contained a no liens clause such as ""Charterers will not
suffer nor permit to be continued any lien or encumbrance incurred by
them or their agents which might have priority over the title and
interest of the vessel"".<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#22312;&#65288;&#26085;&#26412;&#24425;&#34425;II&#65289;&#26696;&#20013
;&#65292;&#31199;&#33337;&#21512;&#21516;&#20013;&#21253;&#21547;&#20102;
&#26080;&#30041;&#32622;&#26435;&#26465;&#27454;&#65306;&ldquo;&#31199;&#
23478;&#23558;&#19981;&#36973;&#21463;&#20063;&#19981;&#20801;&#35768;&#2
0182;&#20204;&#25110;&#20854;&#20195;&#29702;&#20154;&#32487;&#32493;&#30
041;&#32622;&#25110;&#22952;&#30861;&#65292;&#21363;&#20351;&#23545;&#333
37;&#33334;&#21033;&#30410;&#26377;&#20248;&#20808;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>The owners were aware of the charterers'
financial problems and notified the stevedore company in the US of the no
liens clause in the charterparty. The charterers failed to pay the
stevedore company who subsequently alleged a maritime lien on the
vessel.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#33337;&#19996;&#30693;&#36947;&#31199;&#23478;&#30340;&#36130;&#21153;&
#38382;&#39064;&#24182;&#36890;&#30693;&#20102;&#32654;&#22269;&#30340;&#
35013;&#21368;&#20844;&#21496;&#26377;&#20851;&#31199;&#33337;&#21512;&#2
1516;&#19978;&#30340;&#26080;&#30041;&#32622;&#26435;&#26465;&#27454;&#12
290;&#31199;&#26041;&#26410;&#33021;&#25903;&#20184;&#32473;&#35013;&#213
68;&#20844;&#21496;&#32780;&#21518;&#23459;&#31216;&#35201;&#30041;&#3262
2;&#33337;&#33334;&#12290;</span><br>
                        <br>The US court dismissed the stevedore's claim
as the vessel's owner had provided notice to the stevedore of the no
liens clause and that they were contracting with the charterer at their
own risk.<br>
                        <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>
&#32654;&#22269;&#27861;&#38498;&#39539;&#22238;&#35013;&#21368;&#20844;&
#21496;&#30340;&#32034;&#36180;&#65292;&#22240;&#20026;&#33337;&#19996;&#
20107;&#20808;&#36890;&#30693;&#36807;&#35013;&#21368;&#20844;&#21496;&#2
6080;&#30041;&#32622;&#26435;&#26465;&#27454;&#65292;&#20182;&#19982;&#31
199;&#23478;&#30340;&#21512;&#21516;&#26159;&#20182;&#33258;&#24049;&#303
40;&#39118;&#38505;&#12290;</span><br>
                         <br>We recommend owners to include such a no lien
clause into their charterparty as this clause will allow an opportunity
to evade the charterers' debts which may otherwise fall upon the vessel,
such as unpaid bunkers, port charges which are for the charterers'
account under the time charter.<br>                          <br>
                         <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#25105;&#20204;&#24314;&#35758;&#33337;&#19996;&#22312;&#31199;&
#33337;&#21512;&#21516;&#35746;&#31435;&#26080;&#30041;&#32622;&#26435;&#
26465;&#27454;&#65292;&#22240;&#20026;&#36825;&#20010;&#26465;&#27454;&#3
3021;&#35268;&#36991;&#31199;&#23478;&#30340;&#20538;&#21153;&#33853;&#21
040;&#33337;&#26041;&#65292;&#22914;&#26410;&#20184;&#30340;&#29123;&#260
09;&#36153;&#65292;&#28207;&#20351;&#36153;&#65292;&#36825;&#20123;&#2231
2;&#26399;&#31199;&#33337;&#21512;&#21516;&#20013;&#37117;&#26159;&#30001
;&#31199;&#23478;&#25215;&#25285;&#30340;&#12290;</span><br>
                         <br></td>
                      </tr>"                               2004-02-23
      2004-02-23 legal_awareness chi_awareness035.htm      1
259         Ballast water management           The US National Invasive
Species ACt 1996 enables the US Coast Guard to enact regulations to
control the import of aquatic species. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The US National Invasive
Species ACt 1996 enables the US Coast Guard to enact regulations to
control the import of aquatic species.<br><br>There are guidelines for
voluntary ballast water management in US waters, except for the Great
Lakes where this is mandatory.<br><br>Ships may be required to provide
information to the USCG on ballast water management, but currently there
is no civil or criminal penalties for non compliance.<br><br>It is likely
the guidelines may become mandatory in law by end of 2004.<br><br>The
following websites are useful : <br><br>USCG ballast water management
programme :<br><a href=""http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/mso4/bwm.html""
target=""_blank"">www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/mso4/bwm.html</a><br><br>IMO's
global ballast water management programme:<br><a
href=""http://www.bloballast.imo.org""
target=""_blank"">www.bloballast.imo.org</a><br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America     USA
      2004-02-23 2004-02-23 notices      usa017.htm 1
260         False stevedore injuries at Aden         There have been
reports by our clients of stevedores at port of Aden taking turns to
report they were injured whilst    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There have been reports by
our clients of stevedores at port of Aden taking turns to report they
were injured whilst working on board vessels, and sums of up to US$10,000
has been demanded. The crew should be instructed to take a careful watch
over the stevedores. If possible a clause should be included in the
charterparty transferring such claims to the charterers, if the vessel is
not at fault and there are no vessel's defects which contributed to the
alleged injury.<br><br></td>
                     </tr>"        yemen Middle East Yemen     2004-02-23
      2004-02-23 notices     yemen002.htm      1
261

262
                  0
263         24 hour notice for Canada          Canada will be implementing
similar rules as the US Automated Manifest System from 19 April 2004.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Canada will be putting into
place starting, 19 April 2004, the so-called “24 hour rule” which will
require carriers and freight forwarders to electronically report cargo
and conveyance data prior to arrival of the cargo and the vessel in
Canada. The reporting is to enable the Canada Border Services Agency
(CBSA) to identify goods of an unknown or high risk. The Advance
Commercial Information (ACI) is similar to the US’s Automated Manifest
System (AMS). Both of these initiatives were developed in
conjunction.<br><br>Under the ACI initiative the ultimate responsibility
for reporting falls on “marine carriers”, a term which has yet to be
defined by the CBSA. Indications are this may mean only the registered
owner of the vessel as there is no mention that the responsibility
extends to charterers or other disponent owners. However, time charterers
will need to make certain that the cargo and conveyance data are
electronically transmitted to the CBSA in order to avoid delays to the
vessel on account of improper reporting. In practice, the vessel’s agent
will most likely transmit the cargo and conveyance data directly to the
CBSA.<br><br>In order to transmit the data, each carrier will need a
“carrier code” which will identify the carrier in question. The carrier
will also have to post a bond in order to secure payment of duties,
taxes, and other charges including penalties incurred for failing to
comply with the ACI programme. The nature and amount of any bond,
however, has not yet been established. Freight forwarders, who may not
wish to divulge information to carriers or their agents, may apply for
their own “carrier code” and may electronically transmit this information
directly to the CBSA. <br><br>The CBSA’s website provides details on how
the information can be transmitted (<a href=""http://www.cbsa-
asfc.gc.ca/import/advance/faqs-e.html"" target=""_blank"">www.cbsa-
asfc.gc.ca/import/advance/faqs-e.html</a>). It should be noted that the
CBSA will allow third party service providers to transmit the required
information on behalf of the carrier for a fee.<br><br>The ACI requires
the marine conveyance data to provide details identifying the vessel, its
capacities, and scheduling and routing information. The cargo data to be
filed requires a “detailed commodity description”. The descriptions must
be in plain language, and details enough to allow CBSA officials identify
the size, shape, and characteristics of the commodity to the ship.
Consequently, general descriptions such as “apparel”, “electronics”, and
“equipment” are not acceptable and should be replaced with more specific
terms such as “clothing”, “personal-household electronics”, “automotive
equipment” for example.<br><br>The most important feature of the ACI is
the time frame for reporting the conveyance and cargo data. At this time,
US loaded cargo is not subject to advance electronic reporting, though
reporting requirements will be required in a future phase of ACI. For all
other cargoes shipped, it will depend on the type of cargo. Generally,
for containerised cargo the date pertaining to the goods shipped must be
transmitted electronically 24 hours prior to loading the goods for the
vessel that will transport the goods to Canada. A carrier will be allowed
to load a container if the CBSA has not issued a “hold” notice within 24
hours of successful data transmission of cargo. For bulk cargo the data
pertaining to the ships shipment must be transmitted electronically 24
hours prior to arrival in Canada. For other cargo not shipped in
containers or not in bulk, the report is in 2 steps: first the cargo data
must be transmitted 24 hours prior to loading on board the vessel that
will carry the goods to Canada, and second if authorisation to load is
granted, the cargo data must once again be electronically transmitted 24
hours prior to arrival in Canada. Data regarding empty containers carried
on board a vessel heading to Canada must be electronically transmitted 96
hours prior to arrival in Canada. If cargo is transhipped during the
course of the voyage, the cargo data must be retransmitted at least 24
hours prior to the transhipment period for all cargo remaining on board
in Canada while in transit to a third country, that cargo must comply
with the same time frames with a particular cargo.<br><br>No mandatory
penalties have been created in the ACI’s initial implementation for
failure to comply with the reporting requirements, though it is
anticipated penalties will be added. However, parties who fail to provide
the accurate data electronically within the stipulated time frames will
be subject to loading delays in a foreign port, and increased rates of
examination. In some circumstances, vessels may be refused entry into a
Canadian port, or containers could be refused authorisation from loading
in a Canadian port.<br><br>Further details on the implementation of ACI
are available on the CBSA website at <a href=""http://www.cbsa-
asfc.gc.ca/import/advance/menu-e.html"" target=""_blank"">www.cbsa-
asfc.gc.ca/import/advance/menu-e.html</a><br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       canada      North America    Canada
      Source : The North of England P&I Club 2004-03-01 2004-03-01
      notices     canada004.htm    1
264         Deadline for Security Plans to be Submitted by Australian
Ship Operators and Industry Participants - Australia            "UK P&I
Club has been advised that all Australian maritime industry participants,
including regulated Australian ship operators, must"      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">UK P&I Club has been advised
that all Australian maritime industry participants, including regulated
Australian ship operators, must submit their security plans by 1st March
2004 to the Department of Transport and Regional Services
(DOTARS).<br><br>The maritime Transport Security Act 2003 defines a
regulated Australian ship as:<ol><li>A passenger ship (carrying more than
12 passengers) that is used for overseas or interstate voyages;</li><li>A
cargo ship of 500 or more gross tonnage that is used for overseas or
interstate voyages;</li><li>A mobile offshore drilling unit that is on an
overseas or interstate voyage (other than a unit that is attached to the
seabed);</li><li>A ship of a kind prescribed in the
regulations.</li></ol>Plans submitted to DOTARS will then be reviewed. If
they are approved a notification will then be sent to the IMO. Groups
which do not submit a plan in time run the risk of being non-compliant
with the new security regulations, which could result in additional
security measures and costs if they are to participate in international
trade after 1st July 2004.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       australia Australia Australia
      Source : UK P&I Club bulletin 347 2004-03-02 2004-02-01 notices
      australia014.htm 0
265         Confirmation of P&I Entry - Australia          The Australian
Customs Service (ACS) are now insisting upon sighting a confirmation of
ships' P&I entry "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">The Australian Customs Service (ACS) are
now insisting upon sighting a confirmation of ships' P&I entry prior to
granting them permission to sail from any Australian port.<br><br>Ships
have been delayed until the P&I Club in question has provided a fax
confirmation. ACS has stated that they will accept fax copies of the
confirmation until 20th April 2004, after which ships should be able to
produce an original Certificate of Entry.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       australia Australia Australia
      Source : UK P&I Club bulletin 348 2004-03-02 2004-02-01 notices
      australia015.htm 0
266         AMS developments       It is immediately expected that CBP
will announce that for the next 30 days there will be a "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">It is immediately expected
that CBP will announce that for the next 30 days there will be a period
of ""informed compliance"" for bulk and breakbulk cargoes only. During
this period CBP will explain to the Carrier those portions of the
regulations they have failed to follow. No fine or penalty will be
assessed during the 30 day informed compliance period. After April 1
fines and penalties will be imposed. However, it appears that this
concession will not apply to containerised cargoes.<br><br>In addition we
received further information from Freehill Hogan & Mahar overnight of the
issue of whether on not a time charterer may be deemed to be the Carrier.
The advice is still far from clear, but it seems that CBP has relaxed its
initial view:<br><br>Quote<br><br>CBP confirmed that there will be no
further guidance issued at this time on the identity of carrier issue.
CBP takes the position that the parties involved in the trading of the
ship should work it out amongst themselves as to who is to comply. Our
contact cautioned, however, that owners contemplating requiring
compliance by charterers as an element of their contract to ""rent"" the
ship should keep in mind that the penalties which may be assessed are
targeted at the vessel. Thus, CBP suggests, the owner has the most at
stake in ensuring compliance with the regulations. We realize this is not
a satisfactory answer but it the best we are able to obtain from
CBP.<br><br>Unquote<br><br>Members wishing to discuss either of these
issues with CBP directly should contact:<br><br>Entry Procedures &
Carriers Branch Office<br>Regulations & Rulings<br>US Customs & Border
Protection<br>1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW<br>Mint Annex<br>Washington DC
20229<br><br>Contact: Mr Glen E Vereb<br>Tel: +1 202 572 8724<br>Fax: +1
202 572 8747<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America     USA   Source :
West of England 2004-03-04 2004-03-04 notices        usa018.htm 1
267         New TSS for Finisterre       The IMO's 23rd Assembly met
recently and adopted resolutions including an amendment to the Cape
Finisterre Traffic Separation Scheme (TSS).    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The IMO's 23rd Assembly met
recently and adopted resolutions including an amendment to the Cape
Finisterre Traffic Separation Scheme (TSS). The amendment involves the
introduction of new traffic lanes, established for vessels carrying
dangerous or pollutant bulk cargoes.<br><br>Failure to comply with the
new scheme could be classified as an infringement of the Spanish Ports
and Merchant Marine law. Penalties may include the arrest of the vessel
at a Spanish port pending provision of an acceptable guarantee. The new
scheme will enter force on June 1, 2004.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        spain Europe     Spain Source : The
London P&I Club 2004-03-05 2004-03-05 notices        spain006.htm       0
268         Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS)
      Vessels calling in Australia should be aware that AQIS are
enforcing a strict policy that      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Vessels calling in Australia
should be aware that AQIS are enforcing a strict policy that arriving
vessels are free from grain, mud residues and pests. Vessels have been
otherwise ordered to leave Australian waters. Details of AQIS
requirements can be found on AQIS website <a
href=""http://www.aqis.gov.au""
target=""_blank"">www.aqis.gov.au</a>.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        australia Australia Australia
      2004-03-09 2004-03-09 notices       australia016.htm 1
269         Extortions        There are several reports of this instances.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There are several reports of
this instances.<br><br>In a case reported by BIMCO, the customs at
Abidjan found irregularities as the quantity of lube oil declared
exceeded the actual quantity on board. A fine of US$5,260 was requested
which could be reduced to US$2,260 if cash was paid. The master refused
to accept the breach and requested the attendance of the P&I Club to
verify the quantity of lube oil on board. The customs refused to accept
this arrangement and arrested the vessel and demanded a fine of
US$180,000. Eventually the P&I Club negotiated with the customs to revert
to their original fine of US$5,260 subject to a cash payment. The vessel
lost half a day due to this incident.<br><br>In another incident at
Nigeria, the port informed the master the crew's seaman books were
invalid as they should be issued by the ship's flag state and not of
another state even though this meets all international standards. Such
false allegations of breaches could be resolved with cash
payments.<br><br>We suggest owners include into their charterparties a
clause which transfers onto the charterers the additional expenditure to
resolve / conclude such alleged breaches which are not defined by the
local legislature, and further all delays arising from such situations to
be for charterers' account.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        ivorycoast Africa       Ivory Coast
      2004-03-09 2004-03-09 notices       ivorycoast002.htm 1
270         Extortions        There are several reports of this instances.
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There are several reports of
this instances.<br><br>In a case reported by BIMCO, the customs at
Abidjan found irregularities as the quantity of lube oil declared
exceeded the actual quantity on board. A fine of US$5,260 was requested
which could be reduced to US$2,260 if cash was paid. The master refused
to accept the breach and requested the attendance of the P&I Club to
verify the quantity of lube oil on board. The customs refused to accept
this arrangement and arrested the vessel and demanded a fine of
US$180,000. Eventually the P&I Club negotiated with the customs to revert
to their original fine of US$5,260 subject to a cash payment. The vessel
lost half a day due to this incident.<br><br>In another incident at
Nigeria, the port informed the master the crew's seaman books were
invalid as they should be issued by the ship's flag state and not of
another state even though this meets all international standards. Such
false allegations of breaches could be resolved with cash
payments.<br><br>We suggest owners include into their charterparties a
clause which transfers onto the charterers the additional expenditure to
resolve / conclude such alleged breaches which are not defined by the
local legislature, and further all delays arising from such situations to
be for charterers' account.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       nigeria     Africa     Nigeria
      2004-03-09 2004-03-09 notices      nigeria011.htm   0
271         Fake invoices          Owners of vessels which have transited
the Suez Canal have received fake invoices     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Owners of vessels which have
transited the Suez Canal have received fake invoices from the following
companies which do not exist. <br><br>Delta Marine Safety<br>Abuyoussef
Export / Import<br>Dolphin Maritime Transport Services<br>International
Division Transit Services<br>Sailing Information Centre<br>Suez Canal
Maritime Services<br>Suez Canal Navigation<br>Youssef M. Dahrough
Maritime Transport Services<br><br>Owners should examine all invoices to
verify its authenticity before payment, and further instruct the vessel
which is transiting the Suez not to sign any document submitted by any
company , unless verified by the owners.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       suezcanal Africa       Suez Canal
      2004-03-09 2004-03-09 notices      suez002.htm 1
272         "New Automated Manifest System Regulations - 30 Days of
""Informed Compliance"" - USA"           There has been wide circulation
of an email sent by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) area director
indicating that "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">There has been wide
circulation of an email sent by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP)
area director indicating that a 30-day period of ""informed compliance""
has been granted by CBP. Informed compliance means that CBP will
essentially explain to the carrier those portions of the regulations the
carriers have failed to follow but no fine or penalty will be assessed
during the 30 day informed compliance period. The enforcement of the
regulations in respect of the penalties shall start from 2nd April 2004.
The message sent by the CBP's area director is quoted as
follows:<br><br>""As you may have heard already, Customs and Border
Protection (CBP) will delay full enforcement of the automation
requirements for vessels, which was slated to begin on March 4th. CBP is
aware of several bulk and break bulk carriers who because they are
foreign entities, have been unable to secure an Activity Code 3
International Carriers bond by the March 4th deadline. Therefore, for
bulk and break bulk carriers, as well as for passenger vessels, CBP will
allow a period of informed compliance for 30 days. Any bulk or break bulk
vessel (including passenger vessels) that is beginning the entire voyage
on or after April 2, 2004 must comply with the required advanced
electronic presentation of cargo information final rule. Enforcement
actions will be initiated after these 30 days (April 2nd, 2004). However,
for container vessels, enforcement actions will still begin on March 4th.
Enforcement actions will progress from denial of preliminary entry, to
penalties, and up to denial of permit to unlade cargo. As for the
offshore service vessels common in the Gulf, these vessels will be akin
to break bulk carriers, and thus subject to a 30 day delay in
enforcement. Please be aware that any bulk or break bulk carrier which
may have containers on its deck or otherwise carried, those vessels will
be considered as container vessels and subject to enforcement starting on
March 4th. This is an important point - Bulk and break bulk vessels with
containers, even one, will not be granted the 30 day delay and will be
subject to immediate enforcement actions starting on March 4th. More
information will be provided as it is received. Todd Owen, Area Port
Director, Customs & Border Protection""<br><br>It is expected that a
formal notice on the ""informed compliance period"" will be posted on
CBP's website soon.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America    USA   Source :
UK Club Bulletin 349    2004-03-10 2004-03-10 notices     usa019.htm 0
273         Automated Manifest System (AMS) Regulations/USA - latest
update            The AMS is a new requirement implemented by the United
States of Americas' Customs & Border Protection Department which
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><br><br><b><font
color=""#000066"">Introduction</font></b><br><br>The AMS is a new
requirement implemented by the United States of Americas' Customs &
Border Protection Department which all Carriers going to/from United
States of America must comply with. There have recently been a number of
circulars from various P&I Clubs on this matter. We have attempted to
comprehend the information provided by the various sources and we have
now for your better understanding, prepared our own, hopefully simple and
easy to understand writeup on how to proceed with satisfying this new USA
requirement.<ul><li>Ships trading to the USA will require to comply with
a new regulation called ""AUTOMATED MANIFEST SYSTEM"" which officially is
enforced on 4th,March,2004.</li><li>US Customs have indicated a ""Grace
period"" of 30 days until 2nd,April,2004 when carriers who have not
complied with the regulations,will have the relevant parts explained and
they will not be fined.</li></ul><br><b><font color=""#000066"">Who needs
to conform to this new requirement?</font></b><ul><li>Ocean Carriers and
Non-Vessel Operating Common Carriers(NVOCC)</li><li>Definition of a
""Carrier"": The entity that controls the the conveyance such as the Head
Owner,Bareboat Charterers and also the Managers of the vessel,if it can
be shown that the Manager has assumed operation of the ship(This needs
to be reconfirmed with the Customs and Border Protection
Dept.(CBP)).</li></ul><br><b><font color=""#000066"">Who is charged with
implementing this new regulation?</font></b><br><br>The US Bureau of
Customs and Border Protection(CBP).<br><br><font
color=""#000066""><br><b>What is the reason for this new requirement
?</b></font><br><br>The US Maritime Transportation Security Act was
introduced to improve the security of cargo shipments entering or leaving
the USA by sea,air,rail or truck.The Act passed into Law in
2002.<br><br><br><b><font color=""#000066"">What cargoes will required to
be declared?</font></b><br><br>Basically all cargo types : Dry bulk,
liquid bulk, Break bulk<br><br><br><font color=""#000066""><b>When must
cargo be declared to the CBP?</b></font><br><br>All declarations relating
to incoming cargo are submitted to the CBP via the AUTOMATED MANIFEST
SYSTEM.<br>The declaration is to be made either 24 hours BEFORE LOADING
or at least 24 hours BEFORE ARRIVAL at the first US
port.<br><br><br><font color=""#000066""><b>The
Procedure</b></font><br><br><b>Step1</b><br><br>Submit a written ""Letter
of Intent"" to CBP explaining how you will be presenting your filing of
the AMS cargo declarations.In the letter,which should be on Company
letter headed paper,you need to explain the type of AMS software you will
be using or you can give the details of the the third party AMS service
provider selected.<a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/ImageCache/cgov/content/import/operations_5fsup
port/ams/sea_5fvendor_2edoc/v7/sea_5fvendor.doc""
target=""_blank"">service providers</a><br><br>The AMS service provider
will act on your behalf to file the cargo manifest data by electronic
means with the CBP.In other words they will perform step 2 for you.To
register with an AMS service provider,you will need to supply the
following information to them:<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('b');"">Information required</a><table
id=""b"" style=""display: none""; border=""0"" cellspacing=""0""
cellpadding=""0"" class=""genText""><tr><td><ol><br><li class=""roman"">A
copy of the carrier's SCAC certificate;</li><li class=""roman"">A Letter
of Intent, prepared on the carrier's letterhead, authorizing the service
center to file cargo manifests to CBP on behalf of the carrier.<br>A
draft Letter of Intent is provided here; and</li><li class=""roman"">A
copy of the carrier's ICB.</li></ol></td></tr></table><br><br>The cost of
the AMS service provider will roughly be as follows: an initial start up
fee of approximately US$250-500. Each-filing will cost approximately
US$100-200 provided the number of filings per year do not exceed 10-15
times.In excess of this,may require a minimum charge per
month.<br><br><b>Step 2</b><br><br> As mentioned in step 1,if you wish to
deal directly with CBP,then you will need to complete a CBP Form 1302 in
ELECTRONIC format and file this along with the AMS declaration.This form
may be accessed at:<br>
                                            <a
href=""http/forms.customs.gov/customsrf/getformharness.asp?formName=cf-
1302-form.xft""
target=""_blank"">http//forms.customs.gov/customsrf/getformharness.asp?fo
rmName=cf-1302-form.xft</a>.<br>To access the CBP's Automated Manifest
System(AMS),you will need to have both the I) SCAC code II)
International Carrier Bond(ICB) ready.See step 3 and 4 on how to get
these two items.<br><br><b>Step 3</b><br><br>Obtain a Standard Carrier
Alpha Code(SCAC) from the National Motor Freight Traffic
association(NMFTA) in Alexandria,VA. whose contact details are as
follows: tel: +1 703 838 1810, website: <a
href=""http://www.nmfta.org/scac2.htm""
target=""_blank"">www.nmfta.org/scac2.htm</a>.The SCAC is a unique 2-4
digit code assigned to transportation companies for identification
purposes.<br><br>The intial cost of obtaining the code is US$30 and the
code will remain valid through July 1st of the following year and must be
renewed on an annual basis.Renewal cost is subsequently
US$26.<br><br>Once the SCAC is received(about 1 week),fax the code to CBP
at +1 703 921 7173<br><br><b>Step 4</b><br><br>Arrange for an
International Carrier Bond(ICB) to secure payment to CPB in the event the
vessel/master fails to pay on demand any customs' penalty,duty,tax or
any other charges required by law.<br><br>The ICB may be a CONTINUOUS
bond covering ALL visits to US ports by the Carrier's vessels.This will
require that you disclose your Company's financial statement whcih are
properly audited and/or otherwise put up a collateral.<br>Otherwise a
SINGLE entry bond may be obtained.For a single entry bond,some custom
broker can possibly arrange a facility based on a POWER OF ATTORNEY
signed by your Company.You will need to produce your P & I Club
Certficate of Entry for the vessel entering,as part of your submission of
documents.The P & Club certificate should show a DEDUCTIBLE for FINES AND
PENALTIES not more than US$25,000.If it is more than US$25,000,then more
additional underwriting information may be needed.<br><br>Make contact
with a Surety agent/Customs broker to contact an approved Surety with
authority to issue Custom bonds on Customs Form 301.<br><br><br><b><font
color=""#000066"">How much ICB bond will be required to be put up and how
much will this cost?</font></b><br><br>The AMOUNT of the bond required
may vary from port to port as it is at the discretion of the local
Customs Port Director who will need to assess your fleet size,the number
of ports of call,the risk profile for your port calls.For example,the New
York Customs and Border Protection Protection of New York requires each
ICB to be in the amount of US$100,000.You should,or at least ,request
your port agent in USA to contact the Customs Port Director for that port
which your vessel will call, to establish the maximum Bond amount that is
likely to be demanded.In the application for the ICB,you will need to
insert your USA port agent's full style address and details as the
Correspondent address.<br><br>There appears to be a minimum bond required
of US$50,000.Costs may also vary depending on the analysis of the bond
provider of your credit rating.As a rough guide,it will cost US$10-20 per
US$1,000 of bond put up.<br><br><br><b><font color=""#000066"">Who can
help you to process the AMS and obtain the SCAC and
ICB?</font></b><br><br>There is a list of surety agents/customs broker
who can arrange for both the SCAC and the ICB at <a
href=""http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/contacts/ports/""
target=""_blank"">www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/contacts/ports/</a>.<br><br
>In the arrangement of the SCAC and ICB,your port agent in USA will be
one of your best contact to help you to arrange for such.As mentioned
above,they can make contact with the Customs Port Director to establish
the maximum bond required.They will also need to be the contact point in
USA for the application of the ICB as it is required that the
correspondent to whom the Bond provider will communicate with must have
an address based in the USA.<br><br>You may either ask your port agent to
instruct a customs broker or you may contact the customs broker directly
to appoint them to handle the entire AMS process for you.The customs
broker should be able to do the following:<ol><li class=""roman"">obtain
an SCAC code</li><li class=""roman"">obtain an importer I.D. from
CBP</li><li class=""roman"">apply for an ICB from a surety</li><li
class=""roman"">arrange for an AMS data service centre to transmit cargo
data directly to CBP on your behalf.</li></ol>As a very rough
guide,customs broker are currently charging US$2,500-3,100 per annum
regardless of the number of vessels.This fee includes the bond
premium(US$100,000),the SCAC annual membership, and CBP importer I.D.
processing fee.It does NOT include the AMS data service centre
fee.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa  North America    USA
      2004-03-10 2004-03-10 notices     usa020.htm 1
274   37    Crew war bonus
      &#33337;&#21592;&#25112;&#20105;&#27941;&#36148;   We have been
asked by one of our clients to draft a clause in the crew contract to
avoid the situation of the crew seeking "<tr>
                     <td class=""genText"">We have been asked by one of
our clients to draft a clause in the crew contract to avoid the situation
of the crew seeking crew war bonuses whenever the vessel enters a war
excluded zone as many charterparties seem to provide for same.<br>
                       <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25105;&#20204;&#30340;&#23458;&#25143;&#26366;&#32463;&#35201;&#27714;&
#25105;&#20204;&#26367;&#20182;&#20204;&#36215;&#33609;&#19968;&#20010;&#
33337;&#21592;&#21512;&#21516;&#30340;&#26465;&#27454;&#29992;&#26469;&#3
6991;&#20813;&#27599;&#24403;&#33337;&#33334;&#36827;&#20837;&#38750;&#25
112;&#21306;&#33337;&#21592;&#32034;&#35201;&#33337;&#21592;&#25112;&#201
05;&#27941;&#36148;&#30340;&#24773;&#20917;&#65292;&#23601;&#35937;&#3576
8;&#22810;&#31199;&#33337;&#21512;&#21516;&#35268;&#23450;&#30340;&#37027
;&#26679;&#12290;</span><br>
                     <br>We have asked BIMCO and they do not have a
clause which provides for when crew war bonus should be payable, but they
say this is a good question and they shall bring this matter to the
documentary committee for their consideration.<br>
                     <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#25105;&#20204;&#35810;&#38382;&#36807;BIMCO&#65292;&#20182;&#20204;&#27
809;&#26377;&#19968;&#20010;&#26465;&#27454;&#35268;&#23450;&#20160;&#200
40;&#26102;&#20505;&#24212;&#25903;&#20184;&#33337;&#21592;&#25112;&#2010
5;&#27941;&#36148;&#65292;&#20294;&#20182;&#20204;&#35828;&#36825;&#26159
;&#19968;&#20010;&#24456;&#22909;&#30340;&#38382;&#39064;&#65292;&#20182;
&#20204;&#20250;&#23558;&#23427;&#24102;&#32473;&#25991;&#20214;&#22996;&
#21592;&#20250;&#65292;&#35753;&#20182;&#20204;&#32771;&#34385;&#12290;</
span><br>
                     <br>Meantime, we draft a clause as follows.<br>
                     <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#22312;&#36825;&#26399;&#38388;&#65292;&#25105;&#20204;&#36215;&#33609;&
#20102;&#22914;&#19979;&#26465;&#27454;&#65306;</span><br>
                     <br>""Crew war bonus shall only be payable when the
vessel's entry into a war zone shall subject the crew to a real risk of
increased danger. In order to place a definition of a real risk of
increased danger, it is hereby agreed between the crew and the owners and
manning agents, that this will occur when the additional war premium rate
payable by the vessel for entry into the war excluded zone is 0.1% or
above. It is further agreed between the parties that in this circumstance
the crew war bonuses will only be payable during the period the vessel is
within port limits.""<br>
                     <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

&#33337;&#21592;&#25112;&#20105;&#27941;&#36148;&#21482;&#26377;&#22312;&
#24403;&#33337;&#33334;&#36827;&#20837;&#25112;&#20105;&#21306;&#22495;&#
65292;&#33337;&#21592;&#22788;&#20110;&#21361;&#38505;&#19981;&#26029;&#2
2686;&#21152;&#30340;&#30495;&#27491;&#39118;&#38505;&#26102;&#25165;&#33
021;&#32473;&#20104;&#25903;&#20184;&#12290;&#20026;&#20102;&#26126;&#308
30;&#36825;&#20010;&#30495;&#27491;&#39118;&#38505;&#65292;&#32463;&#3680
7;&#33337;&#21592;&#12289;&#33337;&#19996;&#21644;&#33337;&#21592;&#20195
;&#29702;&#37096;&#30340;&#21327;&#21830;&#65292;&#30830;&#23450;&#24403;
&#33337;&#33334;&#36827;&#20837;&#38750;&#25112;&#21306;&#26102;&#33337;&
#33334;&#38656;&#25903;&#20184;&#30340;&#38468;&#21152;&#25112;&#20105;&#
20445;&#38505;&#36153;&#29575;&#20026;0.1%&#25110;&#20197;&#19978;&#12290
;&#32463;&#36807;&#21508;&#26041;&#36827;&#19968;&#27493;&#21327;&#21830;
&#30830;&#23450;&#65292;&#33337;&#21592;&#25112;&#20105;&#27941;&#36148;&
#30340;&#25903;&#20184;&#20165;&#38480;&#20110;&#33337;&#33334;&#22312;&#
28207;&#20869;&#30340;&#26399;&#38388;&#12290;</span><br>
                     <br>The war rate of 0.1% can be changed by choice or
by mutual agreement, but we consider such a rate or higher would
represent an appreciable risk of danger to the crew.<br>
                     <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-size: 10.0pt;
font-family: SimSun; color: black""><br>

0.1%&#30340;&#38468;&#21152;&#25112;&#20105;&#38505;&#36153;&#29575;&#303
40;&#25913;&#21464;&#21487;&#30001;&#36873;&#25321;&#20915;&#23450;&#6529
2;&#20063;&#21487;&#20849;&#21516;&#21327;&#21830;&#20915;&#23450;&#65292
;&#20294;&#25105;&#20204;&#35748;&#20026;&#36825;&#26679;&#19968;&#20010;
&#36153;&#29575;&#25110;&#39640;&#20110;&#36825;&#20010;&#36153;&#29575;&
#35828;&#26126;&#20102;&#33337;&#21592;&#25152;&#36935;&#39118;&#38505;&#
30340;&#31243;&#24230;&#12290;</span><br>
                      <br></td>
              </tr>"                                2004-03-15 2004-03-15
      legal_awareness chi_awareness037.htm     1
275         Egypt : new minimum for shipping agency fees        "West of
England's correspondent lawyers, Eldib Advocates, have advised us of "
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">West of England's
correspondent lawyers, Eldib Advocates, have advised us of a new minimum
tariff for shipping agency fees for Egyptian ports and Suez Canal
transit. This tariff came into force on 19 March 2003. Eldib Advocates
warn that the application of the tariff will be very strictly supervised
by the Ministry of Transport. The new tariff has been implemented by
Ministerial Decree no. 75/2003 issued by the Minister of Transport on the
5th February 2003.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       egypt Africa     Egypt Source : West of
England Newsletter      2004-03-18 2004-03-18 notices     egypt002.htm
      0
276         Brazil : draft restrictions for Parana River        Coast
Guard in Buenos Aires has warned of several vessels sailing from Santa Fe
to the ocean with drafts above 34 feet "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Coast Guard in Buenos Aires
has warned of several vessels sailing from Santa Fe to the ocean with
drafts above 34 feet having caused damage to the channel. Apart from the
risk of grounding and the related navigational hazards this would cause,
these incidents have contributing to congestion and affected the traffic
in this area. While vessels with drafts above 34 feet have been able to
use the Parana River safely this has been due to the high tidal levels.
However, the Coast Guard warns that the tidal levels are not constant and
should not be taken into account when calculating the vessel's draft. In
order to minimise the risk of grounding and the associated problems the
Coast Guard recommends that vessels using the main waterways from Santa
Fe to the ocean must have drafts below 34 feet.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       brazil      South America    Brazil
      Source : West of England Newsletter      2004-03-18 2003-04-01
      notices     brazil010.htm    0
277         Letter of Indemnity - In-transit fumigation of bulk cargoes
            In-transit fumigation of bulk cargoes    "<tr>
              <td class=""genText"">[insert date]<br>To:[insert name of
shipowners] The Owners of the [insert name of ship] [insert
address]<br><br>Dear Sirs,<br><br>Ship: [insert name of ship] Voyage:
[insert load and discharge ports as stated in the bill of
lading]<br>Cargo: [insert description of cargo] Bill of lading: [insert
identification numbers, date and place of issue]<br>Charterparty: [insert
form, date and place of issue]<br><br>The above Cargo has been shipped on
the Ship by [insert name of shipper] and consigned to [insert name of
consignee or party to whose order the bill of lading is made out, as
appropriate] for delivery at the port of [insert name of discharge port
stated in the bill of lading].<br><br>[With reference to clause [insert
number] of the Charterparty,] We hereby request the owners of the Ship
to fumigate the Cargo on board the Ship while in transit to the discharge
port. Such fumigation should be carried out strictly in accordance with
our written instructions, which will be provided forthwith to the Master
of the Ship. We warrant that the fumigation has been approved by the
shippers and will be carried out by qualified personnel acting on our
behalf and solely at our own risk and expense, in accordance with
guidelines and recommendations issued by the International Maritime
Organisation.<br><br>In consideration of your complying with our above
request, we hereby agree as follows:<br><br>To indemnify you, your
servants and agents and to hold all of you harmless in respect of any
liability, loss, damage or expense of whatsoever nature which you may
sustain by reason of fumigating the Cargo on board the Ship.<br><br>In
the event of any proceedings being commenced against you or any of your
servants or agents in connection with, or as a consequence of, the
fumigation of the Cargo on board the Ship, to provide you or them on
demand with sufficient funds to defend the same.<br><br>If the Ship, or
any other ship or property in the same or associated ownership,
possession, management or control, is arrested or detained, or threatened
to be arrested or detained, or should there be any other interference in
the use or trading of the Ship (whether by virtue of a caveat being
entered on the ship's registry or otherwise howsoever), in connection
with, or as a consequence of, the fumigation of the Cargo on board the
Ship, we warrant to provide on your demand such bail or other security as
may be required to ensure the release from or prevention of such arrest
or detention or other interference in the use or trading and to indemnify
you in respect of any liability, loss, cost or expense caused
thereby.<br><br>The liability of each and every person under this
indemnity shall be joint and several and shall not be conditional upon
you proceeding first against any person, whether or not such person is
party to or liable under this indemnity.<br><br>This indemnity shall be
governed by and construed in accordance with English law and each and
every person liable under this indemnity shall at your request submit to
the jurisdiction of the High Court of Justice in London and will, within
seven days of a request so to do, appoint solicitors within the
jurisdiction who are authorized to accept service.<br><br>Yours
faithfully,<br><br>For and on behalf of...[insert name of the Requestor]
Signature<br>For and on behalf of Charterers...[insert name of the
Charterer if different from the Requestor] Signature<br>For and on behalf
of Bankers...[insert name of bank and full details of the office to which
any demand or notice is to be addressed] Signature.<br><br></td>
             </tr>"                                  2004-03-18 2004-03-18
      stdforms003 stdforms003_10.htm     0
278         "Cargo loss, damage"         "If there is any allegation of
cargo loss or damage, the port authority will investigate and issue a
certificate to confirm the facts." "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">If there is any allegation
of cargo loss or damage, the port authority will investigate and issue a
certificate to confirm the facts. The vessel will be detained pending the
investigation. <br><br>Owners should include into the charterparty a
clause which transfers such delays to the charterers on the basis such
delays arise from the peculiarities of custom and regulation in the
country and arise from the charterers' employment orders to trade to that
country.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        peru South America     Peru
      2004-03-19 2004-03-19 notices      peru005.htm 1
279         "AMS update:International Sureties,Ltd request for Fines and
Penalties Deductible to be revised to US$10,000 from US$25,000."
      "We have received information on 16th,March,2004 from one of the
ICB bond provider,namely International Sureties,Ltd who" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We have received information
on 16th,March,2004 from one of the ICB bond provider,namely International
Sureties,Ltd who advise us that the bonding company has changed a
requirement under the ICB Program. Everything remains the same with the
exception of the deductible on the Club Certificate: The deductible
cannot be greater than $10,000 now in lieu of the original $25,000.
<br><br>We checked this new request for the change in the deductible with
a P & I Club and they approached the International Sureties,Ltd and
discussed further on this point.We are pleased to advise that upon their
discussion with the Surety,the Surety has agreed as of 19th,March,2004
to revert back to the original US$25,000 deductible limit for Fines and
Penalties.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa  North America     USA
      2004-03-19 2004-03-19 notices      usa021.htm 1
280         Alumina           Alumina    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Alumina</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Alumina is a fine, white odourless powder with
little or no moisture content that is used in the production of
aluminium, the preparation of paint and dyeing calico print.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fine powder<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.92 - 1.28</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">As for sugar: no residual cargo, including
dust, with particular attention to coal, iron ore, sulphur and
phosphates. All loose rust and scale are to be removed. Holds must be
completely dry before surveyor will issue certificate.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be loaded in light rain with hatch lids on
non-working holds closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo space.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Alumina dust is very abrasive and 'gets into
everything'. Accordingly, take precautions to cover and protect machinery
accommodation and bilge wells from it. If wet, alumina is unpumpable;
good cover on bilge wells to prevent ingress.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Maintain protection of accommodation and
machinery against dust.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">After discharge there must be a thorough double
sweep and cleaning of high frames and shedders. After hose down, use
portable pump to clear water from holds - not the bilge pump.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_001.htm 0
281         Ammonium Sulphate      Ammonium Sulphate "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Ammonium Sulphate</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Fine granulated, off white or brown crystals.
There may be a slight ammonia like odour. Sulphate of ammonia is a
chemical fertilizer.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 2mm - 4mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
36<sup>0(1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 1.0 - 1.15</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be clean and absolutely dry.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Because it will cake and become corrosive when
wet, ammonium sulphate must not be worked in rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo space.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">When carried in bulk a danger of heavy
corrosion to steelwork exists if moisture is introduced by condensation,
cargo sweating or hatch covers leaking. Close attention must be given to
hatch sealing. Do not ventilate so as to keep moist air to ammonium.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal discharge practices. If cargo has
hardened trimming may be necessary to avoid formation of overhanging
cargo faces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be thoroughly cleaned and washed out
after discharge to remove all traces of the cargo. This cargo is soluble
in water.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with the
source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk
Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the Shipper.<br><br></td>
          </tr>
"                            Source : Australian Maritime Safety
Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos       cargos001_002.htm 0
282        Bauxite           Bauxite    "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Bauxite</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">A brownish, yellow claylike and earthy mineral
that is a principal ore for aluminium production.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 70/90% Lumps 10/30% Powder<br>ANGLE OF
REPOSE : N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.72 - 0.84</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clean and dry with no cargo residue. Protect
bilge wells against ingress.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be worked in light rain with non working
hatches closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_003.htm 0
283         Bentonite (Extremely Hygroscopic)      Bentonite (Extremely
Hygroscopic)      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Bentonite (Extremely Hygroscopic)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Bentonite is a clay, light fawn in colour. It
is sometimes processed for carriage by extrusion into pencil-like shapes.
Subsequent handling breaks the 'pencils' up into varying lengths.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Dust to lumps also pellets<br>ANGLE OF
REPOSE : 30<sup>0</sup> to 40<sup>0 (1)</sup> <br>STOWAGE FACTOR
m<sup>3</sup>/t : 1.2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clean and dry with no residue of previous
cargo.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be kept dry. Do not work in rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">A property of Bentonite is that it absorbs
moisture and becomes very slippery, making decks dangerous to walk on.
Spread sand on working areas. Cargo can be very dusty. Persons involved
in loading should wear protective clothing, goggles, and facemasks.
Bentonite swells greatly on absorption of water.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal Hatches. No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Residues will stick to bulkheads and should be
scraped off. When washing down make men aware of the slippery
surfaces.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with the
source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk
Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the Shipper.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_004.htm 0
284         Cement            Cement     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Cement</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Cement is a finely ground powder which becomes
almost fluid in nature when aerated or significantly disturbed thereby
creating a very minimal angle of repose. After loading is completed de-
aeration occurs almost immediately and the product settles into a stable
mass. Cement dust can be a major concern during loading and discharge if
the vessel is not specially designed as a cement carrier or shore
equipment is not fitted with special dust control equipment.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fine Powder<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.78 - 0.83</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds should be double swept clean and totally
free of any residues of previous cargoes. In the case of previous cargoes
being carbohydrate or starchy particularly sugar - holds must be
meticulously washed and dried. The smallest amount of sugar can render
the whole cargo useless.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Do not load in rain if not being loaded in a
totally enclosed system. Keep non working hatches dosed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Consideration should be given as to whether
cement has had sufficient time to settle before sailing and guidance may
be sought through the IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes,
Appendix C.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Ensure hold bilge wells are dry, taped up and
made sift proof. Protect machinery, accommodation, and equipment from
dust ingress. Persons involved in loading should wear protective
clothing, goggles and dust filter masks, if not a closed circuit
loading.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Hatches must be sealed. Shut all vents and
access ways. DO NOT pump bilges in cement holds unless absolutely
necessary.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">If using grabs and not discharging in a closed
circuit system ensure the vessel is again protected against dust ingress
and personnel are wearing the appropriate protective clothing, goggles,
and face masks.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Before washdown begins, holds, decks, houses,
machinery etc. should be thoroughly swept and all residues removed. Pay
particular attention to bilge wells and framework in holds. Final clean
up of equipment and in particular portholes can be undertaken easily by
wiping down with a mild acid, such as vinegar, and then hosing down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_005.htm 0
285         Cement Clinkers        Cement Clinkers "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Cement Clinkers</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Cement is formed by burning limestone with
clay. This burning produces rough cinderlumps that are later crushed to a
fine powder to produce cement. The rough cinder lumps are called clinker
and are shipped in this form to avoid the difficulties of carrying cement
powder.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Omm - 40mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.61 - 0.84</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds should be double swept clean and totally
free of any residues of previous cargoes. In the case of previous cargoes
being carbohydrate or starchy particularly sugar-holds must be
meticulously washed and dried. The smallest amount of sugar can render
the hold cargo useless.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Do not load in rain. Keep non working hatches
closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Make sure bilge wells are dry; cover with
burlap. Protect machinery, accommodation, and equipment from dust
ingress. Persons involved in loading should wear protective clothing,
goggles and dust filter masks.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Hatches should be sealed. Shut all vents and
access ways. DO NOT pump bilge wells in cement holds unless absolutely
necessary.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Make sure that machinery, accommodation and
equipment is again protected from dust. Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Before washdown begins, holds, decks, houses
etc. should be thoroughly swept and all residue removed. Final clean up
of equipment and in particular portholes can be under-taken easily by
wiping down with a mild acid, such as vinegar, and then hosing down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_006.htm 0
286         Clay        Clay "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Clay</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clay is usually light to dark grey and
comprises 10% soft lumps and 90% soft grains. The material is usually
moist but not wet to the touch. Moisture is up to 18%.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 0mm - 150mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.66 - 1.34</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds should be clean, dry, and free of
contamination. Iron ore, rust and coal residues should be strictly
guarded against.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Do not load in rain. Keep non working hatches
closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Keep dry. The moisture content should be kept
as low as possible otherwise the material will go 'gluggy' and thus
extremely difficult to handle.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal hatches to keep cargo dry. No other
special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Scrape and sweep out hold carefully: clean
bilge wells before washing out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_007.htm 0
287         Coal        Coal (See also Appendix II) "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Coal <span class=""genText"">(See also <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=328"">Appendix II</a>)</span></td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Coal is a natural, solid, combustible material
consisting of amorphous carbon and hydrocarbons.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : mainly up to 50mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.79 - 1.53</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix B. Material hazardous in Bulk.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds should be swept clean and clear of
residues of previous cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Coal can be loaded in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Make sure bilge wells are dean and covered with
burlap. Refer to <a href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=328"">Appendix II(b)</a>
and the general requirements for carrying hazardous bulk cargoes
contained in the IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Ensure the requirements of the IMO Code of Safe
Practice of Solid Bulk Cargoes are complied with.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_008.htm 0
288         Coke        Coke "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Coke</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Coke is used in steelmaking as a heat energy
source in blast furnaces. The carbon it contains helps with the reductive
process that turns iron oxide into metallic iron.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines up to 120mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 1.25 - 2.93</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds should be swept clean and dear of
residues of previous cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Coke can be loaded in
the rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Coke is very light and will cubically fill
holds. Cover bilge wells with burlap. Coke will float and clog bilge
lines, strums and scuppers if precautions are not taken.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and wash clean. Watch for blocked
bilge wells and scuppers.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_009.htm 0
289         Diammonium Phosphate (D.A.P.)          Diammonium Phosphate
(D.A.P.)    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Diammonium Phosphate (D.A.P.)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">DAP is a processed fertiliser designed for use
on grain and with other mixtures on cane and horticulture. It is
odourless and comes in the form of grey granules. Depending on source it
can be dusty.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 2mm - 4mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
35<sup>0</sup> - 40<sup>0 (1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t :
1.10 - 1.20</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clean and dry with no residues of previous
cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">DAP is hygroscopic and will harden and cake in
high humidity. Do not work this cargo in rain and keep non-working
hatches closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">When carried in bulk, DAP in humid conditions
will set hard in the hold. Condensation, cargo sweating, and leaking
hatch covers must be carefully watched. Pay close attention to hatch
sealing and cargo ventilation.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge. Trimming will be
necessary to avoid the formation of overhanging cargo faces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be swept clean and then washed out
to remove all traces of this cargo. Pay particular attention to bilge
wells.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with the
source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk
Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the Shipper.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_010.htm 0
290         Dolomite          Dolomite   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Dolomite</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Dolomite is a light yellow/brown coloured
mineral stone, which is very hard and compact. It is used in steelmaking
as part of a flux mix for producing slag; or a fettling for containing
molten metal in an open hearth. Dolomite fines are used for the
manufacture of refractory bricks.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines up to 32mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.6 - 0.7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep dean and clear of residues of previous
cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_011.htm 0
291         Ferro Alloys           Ferro Alloys    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Ferro Alloys</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Extremely heavy cargo. The most common ores in
this category are ferro-manganese; silica manganese and ferrosilicon
(which is dealt with separately).</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines to 300mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.18 - 0.28</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and clear of previous cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces. As the ore is extremely heavy care must be exercised
to ensure that loading is evenly spread across tank tops to spread the
weight. Do not let loader driver pile ore in centre of hatch during
loading.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Usually by electro-hydraulic grab.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_012.htm 0
292         Ferrosilicon           "Ferrosilicon <span
class=""genText"">(containing more than 25% but less than 90% Silicon)
(Including Briquettes) (See Also <a href=""cargos001_052.htm"">Appendix
III</a>)</span>" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Ferrosilicon <span
class=""genText"">(containing more than 25% but less than 90% Silicon)
(Including Briquettes) (See Also <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=331"">Appendix III</a>)</span></td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Ferrosilicon is an extremely heavy cargo which,
if it comes into contact with moisture or water may evolve hydrogen, a
flammable gas which may form explosive mixtures with air and may, under
similar circumstances, produce phosphine and arsine, which are highly
toxic gases.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines to 300mm Briquettes<br>ANGLE OF
REPOSE : N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.48 - 0.72, 0.65 -
0.90</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix B. Material possessing chemical
hazards.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be absolutely clean and dry. Holds must be
inspected by an Australian Maritime Safety Authority Surveyor, prior to
loading.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be kept absolutely dry. A certificate must
be given to the master by the shipper stating that the material has been
stored under cover but exposed to the weather for not less than three
days prior to shipment.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim reasonably level to the boundaries of the
cargo spaces. Stow evenly across tank tops. Refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=331"">Appendix III</a> and IMO Code of Safe
Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=331"">Appendix III</a> and IMO Code of Safe
Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Special precautions - refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=331"">Appendix III</a>.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Grab discharge - refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=331"">Appendix III</a>.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep clean - avoid using water because
of danger of gas.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_013.htm 0
293         Fly Ash           Fly Ash    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Fly Ash</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Fly Ash is a fine powder used as a partial
cement replacement material, which becomes almost fluid in nature when
aerated or significantly disturbed thereby creating a very minimal angle
of repose. After loading is completed deaeration occurs over several
hours and the material settles into a stable mass. Fly Ash dust can be a
major concern during loading and discharge if the vessel is not specially
designed as a powder carrier or if the discharge equipment is not fitted
with special dust control mechanisms.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fine Powder<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.8 - 1.2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds should be double swept clean and totally
free of any residues of previous cargoes. In the case of previous cargoes
being carbohydrate or starchy particularly sugar, holds must be
meticulously washed and dried. The smallest amount of sugar can render
the whole cargo useless.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Do not load in rain if not being loaded in a
totally enclosed system. Keep non-working hatches closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Consideration should be given as to whether fly
ash has had sufficient time to settle before sailing and guidance may be
sought through the I.M.O. Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes,
Appendix C.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Ensure hold bilge wells are dry, taped up and
made sift proof. Protect machinery, accommodation and equipment from dust
ingress. Persons involved in loading should wear protective clothing,
goggles and dust filter masks, if not a closed circuit loading.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Hatches must be sealed. Shut all vents and
access ways. DO NOT pump bilges in fly ash holds unless absolutely
necessary.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">If using grabs and not discharging in a closed
circuit system ensure the vessel is again protected against dust ingress
and personnel are wearing the appropriate protective clothing, goggles
and facemasks. Protect the cargo from high humidity and moisture (rain)
ingress.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Before washdown begins, holds, decks, houses,
machinery etc. should be thoroughly swept. Pay particular attention to
bilge wells and framework in holds. Then hose down and discharge in an
appropriate manner. (The ash is not toxic; represents Suspended Solids
loading only).</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA)   2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_014.htm 0
294         Granulated Slag        Granulated Slag   "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Granulated Slag</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">This is a residue from steelworks blast
furnaces and has a dirty grey, lumpy appearance.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Up to 5mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.9</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be loaded in the rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Slag dust is fine and has abrasive
characteristics. Protect bilge wells and machinery from dust. This
material should not be loaded hot. </td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_015.htm 0
295         Gypsum            Gypsum     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Gypsum</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">A natural Hydrated Calcium Sulphate. Insoluble
in water. It is loaded as a fine powder that ""clags"" into lumps up to
100mm. Gypsum is used in the production of cement, tiles, plaster and
plate glass. Average moisture content is 1% to 2%.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 0mm to 100mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.67 - 0.78</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazards.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep and hose out after previous
cargo.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be worked in light rain - not heavy rain.
Close non-working hatches in rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge. Gypsum has tendency to
cling to frames, ladders and shedder plates.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Gypsum is not water-soluble and can be
difficult to wash down. Ensure that decks and holds are shovelled and
swept dean before hosing.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_016.htm 0
296         Hot Briquetted-Red Iron (H.B.I.)       "Hot Briquetted-Red
Iron (H.B.I.)<span class=""genText""> - (Important - see also <a
href=""cargos001_056.htm"">Appendix V</a>)<br>*Referred to in B.C. Code
as ""Direct Reduced Iron - Briquettes, hot-moulded.</span>"    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Hot Briquetted-Red Iron (H.B.I.)<span
class=""genText""> - (Important - see also <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=335"">Appendix V</a>)<br>*Referred to in
B.C. Code as ""Direct Reduced Iron - Briquettes, hot-moulded.</span></td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">HBI is a material derived from a densification
process whereby the direct reduced iron (DRI) feed material is subjected
to a hot moulding process by which briquettes of iron are formed under
pressure at a temperature greater than 650C at time of moulding and has a
density greater than 5.0gms/cm""</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Briquettes 90mm x 60mm x 30mm
(approx)<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE : 350 - 380 (approx) <br>STOWAGE FACTOR
m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.35 (approx) </td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix B. Material Hazardous in Bulk.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be clean and dry before receiving
cargo, and be free of foreign substances.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Cargo must be kept dry at all times. Loading
must ceace immediately with the onset of rain and hatches closed. Loading
systems must be run after rain so that accumulations of water are dried
off.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim reasonably level in the boundaries of the
cargo spaces. The cargo should be loaded in layers of not more than 2.0
metres deep to ensure that the concentration of fines in the stow are
minimised.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=335"">Appendix V</a> and the IMO Code of
Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">For special precautions refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=335"">Appendix V</a>.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Usually Grab discharge - refer to <a
href=""cargos_details.jsp?id=335"">Appendix V</a>.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Accumulations of dust and fines should be
removed as soon as possible and the ship washed down, preferably with
fresh water.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_017.htm 0
297         Iron Ore          Iron Ore   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Iron Ore</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Iron ore vanes in colour from dark grey to
rusty red. It varies in iron content from haematite, (high-grade ore) to
iron stone of the lower commercial ranges.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines to 250mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.29 - 0.80</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Can be loaded in the
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to boundaries of
the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Iron ore cargoes may affect magnetic compasses.
Normally, loading rates are very high, preplanning of ballasting
operation is essential.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions necessary.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_018.htm 0
298         Iron Ore Pellets       Iron Ore Pellets "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Iron Ore Pellets</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Pellets are approximately spherical lumps
formed by crushing iron ore into a powder. This iron oxide is formed into
pellets by using clay as a binder and then hardening by firing in kilns
at 1315<sup>0</sup>.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 6mm - 19mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.47</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean. Make sure bilge wells are covered
with burlap.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements. Can be loaded in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and wash out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>
           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_019.htm 0
299         Limesand          Limesand   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Limesand</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Limesand is a creamy white to light brown sand
with a high lime content. It is used as part of a flux in blast furnaces
after agglomeration with other fines in the sinter plant.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fine particles<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
30<sup>0</sup> - 50<sup>0 (1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t :
0.50 - 0.98</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and remove residue of previous
cargo.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Can be loaded in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Dry sand will run readily. Make sure hold bilge
wells are well protected and covered to prevent ingress.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep out and hose down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_020.htm 0
300         Limestone         Limestone "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Limestone</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Limestone varies in colour from cream through
white to medium dark grey. (When freshly broken).</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines to 75mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.67 - 0.84</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements. Can be loaded in the
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Ensure hold bilge wells are well covered and
protected to prevent ingress.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep out and hose down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_021.htm 0
301         Magnesia (Deadburned)        Magnesia (Deadburned) "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Magnesia (Deadburned)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Also known as deadburned magnesite,
electrofused magnesia, magnesite clinker and magnesia clinker. It is
manufactured in briquetted form and is usually white, brown or grey. It
is very similar in size, appearance and handling to gravel and is dry and
dusty. It is used for refractory purposes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Approx 30mm to fines<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE
: N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.5</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard. Deadburned magnesia is natural magnesite
calcined at very high temperatures, which results in a non-reactive
magnesium oxide which does not hydrate or produce spontaneous heat.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be very clean and dry as avoidance
of contamination is critical. Grain hold cleanliness conditions are
appropriate. Make sure bilge wells are dry and covered.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Cargo must be kept dry and loading not to take
place during rain. Non-working hatches to be kept covered at all times.
Cargo must be kept free of any contaminating dust during windy
conditions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Guard against any possible contamination from
other part cargoes. Prior to loading, a declaration should be provided by
the manufacturer or shipper, stating that the material has been
sufficiently heat treated and is ready for shipment.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Tape all hatches. Guard against condensation
and other water contamination.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge with above weather
precautions to apply.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_022.htm 0
302         Magnesite         Magnesite "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Magnesite</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Magnesite is white to yellow in colour. It is
dry and dusty and is used in the manufacture of refractory bricks.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines to dust<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be very clean. Magnesite is very
susceptible to contamination. Where possible wash out with fresh water.
Make sure holds are dry before loading. Make sure bilge wells are dry and
covered.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Cargo must be kept dry. Do not load in rain and
keep non-working hatches covered at all times.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">After loading cover cargo with clean
tarpaulins.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Tape all hatches. Guard against
condensation.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge. Do not work in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_023.htm 0
303         Magnetite         Magnetite "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Magnetite</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Very fine black mineral that is used in coal
washing plants.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fines<br>T.M.L. : 9.2%<br>ANGLE OF
REPOSE : N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.33 - 0.57</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix A. Material that may liquefy.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be absolutely clean and free of all
residues from previous cargoes. Preferably washed out. Ensure bilge wells
are clean and covered with burlap.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements, may be worked in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">If cargo appears excessively wet before
loading, it should be tested for flow characteristics. Refer to IMO Code
of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Check holds frequently for any signs of
liquefaction.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and wash out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_024.htm 0
304         Manganese Ore          Manganese Ore   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Maganese Ore</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Manganese ore is black to brownish black in
colour. It is a very heavy cargo and is used in the steelmaking process
to harden steel.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Fine dust to lumps<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : fines - 0.47,lumps - 0.5</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to Hquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep clean of other cargo residue. If
chrome ore has previously been carried all traces of it must be removed
before loading manganese ore. The smallest amount of chrome ore can
render a parcel of manganese ore useless.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements. Can be loaded in the
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Because of the heavy nature of the ore it is
necessary to ensure that weight distribution is evenly spread over the
tank tops. Protective clothing should be worn, including goggles and face
masks, by persons involved in, loading and discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">By grab. Usually electro-hydraulic grabs are
used.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_025.htm 0
305         Millscale - Iron Ore (Sinter Feed)     Millscale - Iron Ore
(Sinter Feed)     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Millscale - Iron Ore (Sinter Feed)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Millscale is an oxide or iron which is recycled
as small grey flakes as a ferrous feed for the sinter plant.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Small flakes 6mm to fine grit<br>ANGLE
OF REPOSE : N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.44</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix A. Material which may liquefy. NOTE:
Very fine particle shipments should be treated as concentrates under
Appendices A and B contained in the IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Can be loaded in rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">This cargo must be trimmed reasonably level to
the boundaries of the cargoes spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Usually the cargo is drained before shipment.
If not then tests must be made to determine the T.M.L. before loading
commences.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Check frequently that the cargo is not becoming
fluid.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_026.htm 0
306         Mineral Concentrates         Mineral Concentrates<ul><li>Zinc
Concentrates</li><li>Lead Concentrates</li><li>Copper
Concentrates</li><li>Low Grade Middlings
Concentrates</li><li>Pyrites</li></ul> "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Mineral Concentrates<ul><li>Zinc
Concentrates</li><li>Lead Concentrates</li><li>Copper
Concentrates</li><li>Low Grade Middlings
Concentrates</li><li>Pyrites</li></ul></td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Mineral concentrates are refined ores in which
the valuable components have been enriched by eliminating the bulk of
waste materials. Generally the particle size is small although
agglomerates sometimes exist in concentrates which have not been freshly
produced. In some concentrates, oxidation may cause self-heating.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">T.M.L. : 90% of flow moisture point. Values can
vary over a large range.<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE : 0.35 - 0.60<br>STOWAGE
FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : A.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Refer to Metal Sulphide Concentrates in
Appendix B of IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and clear of residues of previous
cargo.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be loaded and discharged in light rain,
unless flow moisture point is very low.</td>
  </tr>
  <!--
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">This cargo must be trimmed reasonably level to
the boundaries of the cargoes spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  -->
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Beware of oxidation. Ventilate and test
atmosphere before entry into holds. Breathing apparatus should be used.
Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes. As particle
size, T.M.L., and possibility of oxidation and self heating are vital
factors in the carriage of concentrates, <i>the Master must ensure that
he has all relevant information before loading from the
shipper.</i><br><br>Shipments of Metal Sulphide Concentrates from newly
developed sources should be notified to the Australian Maritime Safety
Authority together with a form setting out the detailed mineralogical
description, chemical analysis, angle of repose, T.M.L. and history in
stockpile etc. For these shipments, the AMSA Surveyor may require the
Master to perform temperature monitoring of the cargo during carriage.
</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Ensure that hatches are watertight. Tape seams
if necessary. Keep a careful check that cargo is not becoming fluid. The
cargo should not be ventilated.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep and wash clean.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_027.htm 0
307         Monoammonium Phosphate (M.A.P.)        Monoammonium
Phosphate (M.A.P.)      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Monoammonium Phosphate (M.A.P.)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">MAP is a processed fertiliser designed for use
on grain and oilseed crops. It is odourless and comes in the form of
brownish-grey granules. It can be very dusty.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 2mm - 4mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
35<sup>0</sup> - 40<sup>0 (1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t :
1.0 - 1.1</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clean and dry with no residues of previous
cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">MAP is hygroscopic and will harden and cake in
high humidity. Do not load in rain and keep non working hatches
closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargoes reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Personnel should wear protective clothing and
goggles.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Bulk MAP has PH of 4.5 and with high moisture
content can be corrosive. Condensation, cargo sweating and leaking hatch
covers must be carefully watched. Pay close attention to hatch sealing
and cargo ventilation. This cargo will decompose burlap or canvas cloth
covering bilge wells. Continuous carriage may have detrimental structural
effects over a long period of time.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge practices. Trimming may
be necessary to avoid the formation of overhanging cargo faces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be swept clean and then washed out
to remove all traces of this cargo. Pay particular attention to bilge
wells.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr>"                          Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_028.htm 0
308         Muriate of Potash       Muriate of Potash "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Muriate of Potash</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Brown, pink or white in colour, muriate of
potash is produced in granular crystals for use in fertilizers. It is
odourless.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Granular 2mm - 4mm <br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
35<sup>0</sup> - 40<sup>0</sup>+ <sup>(1)</sup> <br>STOWAGE FACTOR
m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.9 - 1.0</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and ensure holds are dry.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Muriate of potash is hygroscopic and will cake
if wet. Do not load in rain and close non working hatches.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal hatches to prevent water ingress. Carry
out normal ventilation practices.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge. Trimming may be
necessary to avoid the formation of overhanging cargo faces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Muriate of potash is corrosive when wet. Sweep
clean and thoroughly wash out holds and bilge wells.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr>"                          Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_029.htm 0
309         Pencil Pitch            Pencil Pitch     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Pencil Pitch</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Pencil pitch is made from Tar produced during
the coking of coal. It is black with a distinctive odour. It is extruded
into its characteristic pencil shape to make handling easier.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 9mm diameter and up to 0.7cm
long<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE : 22<sup>0</sup> - 38<sup>0 (1)</sup><br>STOWAGE
FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 1.25 - 2.0</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix B. Material possessing chemical
hazards. Melts when heated; combustible; dust may cause skin and eye
irritation.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be absolutely clean and clear of all
traces of previous cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Cargo must be kept dry. Keep non-working
hatches closed. Do not load in rain or high winds. To avoid skin and eye
irritations cargo should only be loaded at night.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to boundaries of
cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">General Precautions to be
observed:<ol><li>Permission to load is not required. However, it is
prudent to have an independent surveyor to attend.</li><li>Holds should
be washed out and dry before loading.</li><li>Loading/Discharging should
be during hours of darkness only.</li><li>Loading/Discharging is to be
stopped during rain and hold covered.</li><li>Personnel engaged in
loading are to be supplied with approved protective clothing and
goggles.</li><li>Eyewashes and sun screen creams are to be readily
available.</li><li>Keep personnel in area of loading to minimum. Make
sure that they are aware of all the hazards involved.</li><li>Personnel
engaged in the handling of pencil pitch should wash well and keep out of
the sun for a few days.</li><li>Close the hatch after each nights work
and hose down the ship to remove all dust.</li><li>If wind is blowing
dust about it is recommended that loading or discharging should
cease.</li><li>Clean up all spillages about the decks whilst it is still
dark.</li><li>Accommodation ventilation should be dosed. Air conditioning
systems should be on re-cycle mode when this cargo is being handled -
either loading or discharging.</li></ol>
</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Tape hatches. Check for condensation.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">By grab. Should be at night only. Wash ship
down frequently to keep dust to an absolute minimum.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Wash down holds and whole of ship
thoroughly.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

            <br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
            <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_030.htm 0
310         Phosphate Rock (Uncalcined)        Phosphate Rock (Uncalcined)
      "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Phosphate Rock (Uncalcined)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Phosphate rock is an ore in which phosphorus
and oxygen are chemically united. Depending on the source, it is tan to
dark grey, dry and dusty. It is used in the manufacture of
Superphosphate.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Lumps to powder<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.70 - 0.80</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Can be worked in the
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Depending on its source this cargo may have a
low angle of repose, but once settled it is not liable to shift.
Personnel should wear protective clothing, goggles and face masks during
loading and discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions required.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep residue and then wash vessel down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_031.htm 0
311         Pig Iron          Pig Iron   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Pig Iron</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Foundry pig iron is cast in 28 grades into 20kg
pigs. Each pig in Australia is approximately 540mm x 160mm x 67mm.
Overseas, pigs might be slightly smaller. In a random heap, pig iron
occupies approximately 50% of the apparent volume.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : See above<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.28 - 0.30</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean. Clean out bilge wells and cover
with burlap.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be loaded in rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Make sure stow is level and brows are in a
straight line athwartships.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Check vessel stability and stresses. Refer to
notes below.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Check lashings, if any,
regularly.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Usually by magnet.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText""><b>Pig iron</b> is usually loaded
from tubs. These are lowered by a crane into the hold and the contents
spilled out. The first few tubs should be lowered onto the tank top to
avoid damage. Bulldoze under overhangs and into the
wings.<br><br>Separation of grades is an important consideration and
adequate, suitable material should be on hand for this.<br><br>Methods of
grade separation (within one hold) are:<ol><li class=""alpha"">Stow
different grades at opposite ends of hold.</li><li
class=""alpha"">Separate grades using steel products or bolsters or pig
tubs (preferably full).
</li><li class=""alpha"">Use chicken wire (double run) and plastic over
the overstowed grade if overstow is unavoidable.</li><li
class=""alpha"">Never stow an ""F"" grade and an ""SP"" grade in the same
hatch in bulk.</li></ol>Grade separation should be, preferably, by a
vertical face athwartships, rather than a horizontal separation. Mark
each grade carefully and ensure that trucks servicing each hold are
accurately marked.<br><br>The grades are marked with white cloth labels,
the grade numbers printed in black. If more than one grade is loaded in a
hold cover each grade as it is completed to avoid mixing from
spillage.<br><br>When the cargo is loaded, bulldozers are used to level
the stow from wing to wing and also substantially fore and aft.<br><br>To
avoid undue stiffness, pig iron, if possible, should be stowed in the
'tween decks' in tubs or bolsters. The amount depending on the ships
stability requirements, bolsters or tubs available and 'tween deck
loading limitations. Any bolsters or tubs stowed on steel decks require
dunnage under them and suitable
lashings.<br><br><b>Carriage</b><br><br>No special precautions are
necessary during carriage apart from checking any lashings
regularly.<br><br><b>Discharge</b><br><br>Discharge of pig iron is by
magnet, or by hand in some overseas ports.<br><br>Adjacent grades should
be covered when working a magnet to avoid stray pigs mixing. Care is
required when approaching separations as the magnets will tear through
chicken wire easily.<br><br>When discharging into trucks, check for
residues of other pig that might remain in the trucks. Ensure trucks are
clearly marked with the grade they are carrying and the hold they are
working.</span></td>
          </tr>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_032.htm 0
312         Potash            Potash     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Potash</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Brown, pink or white in colour, potash is
produced in granular crystals for use in fertilisers and soaps. It is
odourless.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Powder - 4mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
33<sup>0 (1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.77 - 1.03</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and ensure holds are dry.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Potash is hygroscopic and will cake if wet. Do
not load in rain and close non-working hatches.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Check vessel stability and stresses. Refer to
notes below.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal hatches to prevent water ingress. Carry
out normal ventilation practices.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Potash is mildly corrosive. Sweep clean and
thoroughly wash out holds and bilge wells.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_033.htm 0
313         Quartzite         Quartzite "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Quartzite</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Quartzite is a compact, granular, metamorphosed
sandstone containing quartz. It is white to grey in colour and its size
varies from large rocks to pebbles. It may also be shipped in semi-
crushed and graded sizes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 10mm - 200mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.64</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">May be loaded in rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Dust is very abrasive. Operators should wear
goggles and face masks.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions required.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep out before wash down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_034.htm 0
314         Salt        Salt "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Salt</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Fine white grains.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Grains to 12mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.81 -1.12</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No residue from other cargoes. All loose rust
and scale is to be removed. Shippers may require holds to be limed washed
with slake lime to surveyors satisfaction of cleanliness.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Salt is water soluble and must be kept
dry.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal hatches and avoid excessive
condensation.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and wash out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_035.htm 0
315         Scrap Metal       Scrap Metal "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Scrap Metal</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">""Scrap"" iron or steel covers an enormous
range of ferrous metals, principally intended for recycling.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Varies<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : Varies</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard. The shipper is required to declare in writing
that the cargo does not include borings, shavings, turnings or cuttings
in a form susceptible to self heating. <b>NOTE</b> When cargo contains
SWARF (fine metal turnings) refer to Appendix B of the Code of Safe
Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. May be loaded in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Refer to Note below.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Refer to Note below.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Do not pump bilge wells unless absolutely
necessary because of possibility of oil seepage.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">By magnet or spider grab.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Make sure that oil spillages, if any, are
cleaned from tank tops and bilge wells before wash down.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText""><b>NOTE:</b><br><br>""Scrap"" iron
or steel covers an enormous range of ferrous metals principally intended
for recycling. Scrap is very important in steelmaking and thousands of
tonnes of it are used in furnaces every year.<br><br>Handling of scrap
varies from magnets to spider grabs, depending usually on the size of
material. Unless the content of a scrap cargo is particularly mentioned,
the ship's officers should expect anything. This may include articles
from the size of car bodies to fine metal turnings swarf . The weight of
individual pieces will also vary greatly, ranging from heavy machinery to
tin cans.<br><br>Special charter arrangements usually cover ships
carrying scrap.<br><br><i>Swarf is liable to spontaneous combustion</i>.
See entry for ferrous metal in Appendix B of the IMO Code of Safe
Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.<br><br><b>Loading</b><br><br>If swarf is
included in the cargo a surveyor may attend.<br><br>Before loading, the
holds should be prepared as per general loading practice and any areas
liable to be damaged by the falling scrap should be protected with
dunnage. This includes decks and coamings in way of the material's path
to the holds. Removing the ship's side rails may be advisable.<br><br>A
layer of scrap should be carefully placed over the tank top in the square
to cushion any fall out. Magnet and grab drivers should be instructed not
to release their loads too high above the pile.<br><br>The usual method
of loading is to form a pile along the ship's centre line and use the
slope to roll material into the ends and sides. Every effort must be made
to work the wings and ends to evenly distribute the weight. If this is
not done, the light high volume pieces will roll to the wings and the
small heavy pieces will concentrate in the square.<br><br>A certain
amount of dirt and oil can be expected from old machinery so it is
advisable to check overboard discharges if pumping bilge wells is
contemplated. Broken glass and sharp jagged edges should be avoided by
men working near scrap.<br><br>A draft survey will inevitably follow
completion of the cargo to ascertain tonnage lifted, especially when
loaded from a stockpile. Before hatches are closed, check to see that no
sharp projections could possibly pierce the ship's side.<br><br><b>During
Carriage</b><br><br>No special care is required. Do not pump bilge wells
unless absolutely necessary, because of possible oil
seepage.<br><br><b>During Discharge</b><br><br>Protect the decks, etc.
from fall out. Make sure the crew are aware of broken glass and sharp
edges when cleaning up. Clean up any oil spillages on the tank top or in
the bilge wells. Check carefully for damage.</span></td>
          </tr> "                        Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_036.htm 0
316         Soda Ash          Soda Ash   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Soda Ash</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Soda ash is composed of white, odourless, sugar
like grains and dust. It is made by the combustion of salt and limestone.
It is used in the manufacture of glass, paper and detergents.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Less than 1mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.95 - 1.2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clean and dry and absolutely free of other
cargo residue.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Do not work in rain; close hatches that are not
being worked.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Soda ash is ruined on contact with oil. It will
strip paint and slowly corrode aluminium if wet. Soda ash is dry and very
dusty so hatch openings during loading should be kept to a minimum.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal hatches. No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normally by suction. Can also be by grab.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean. Residue can be pumped as a slurry
during wash out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_037.htm 0
317         Sugar       Sugar "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Sugar</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td height=""59"" align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Depending on type, sugar may be either brown or
white granules, with a very low moisture content to the order of 0% to
0.05%.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Up to 3mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 1.0 - 1.6</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds must be clean from previous cargo. Rust
scale and flaking paint removed. Wash out and have dry for surveyors
inspection.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sugar is highly soluble and therefore must not
be worked in rain. Cover holds that are not being worked. </td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be kept dry. Seal hatches if leaks are
suspected. Do not ventilate on passage to avoid salt contamination and
variations in moisture content which might cause drying out and
""caking"" or an unacceptable moisture increase.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep clean and then hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_038.htm 0
318         Sulphur           Sulphur    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Sulphur</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td height=""61"" align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Bright yellow elemental formed sulphur in bulk
is imported from Canada and U.S. West Coast.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Slate to 10mm granules & prillsto
5mm<br>IMO CLASS : 4.1<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE : 35<sup>0</sup> -
40<sup>0(1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.85 - 0.95</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix B. Material hazardous in bulk. Easily
ignited by external sources. Not liable to liquefy.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be thoroughly clean and washed with fresh
water. Holds should be limewashed on trimming plates and tank tops. Upper
sections should have sound coating of paint.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions can be worked in the
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sulphur is loaded in a damp or wet condition.
Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <!--
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special requirements.</td>
  </tr>
  -->
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Seal hatches tightly. Remove ALL fuses serving
holds and adjacent spaces. Any hold ventilators should have spark
arresting screens fitted. Pump bilge wells regularly to prevent
accumulation of water/acid solution.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">There is a possibility of dust explosion,
especially after discharge and during cleaning. It is strongly
recommended that holds are washed out with fresh water and NOT swept.
Ensure that all residues are washed away and the holds thoroughly dried.
Wet dust or residues will form highly corrosive sulphurous acid, which is
extremely dangerous to personnel and will, of course, corrode steel.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

            <br><br></td>
                      </tr>
           <tr>
            <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
           </tr> "                       Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_039.htm 0
319         Talc        Talc "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Talc</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td height=""61"" align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Talc is an extremely soft, whitish, green or
greyish hydrated magnesium silicate. It has a characteristic soapy, or
greasy feel. Talc is used as a filler, coating, pigment, dusting agent
and in ceramics, rubber, plastics, lubricants and talcum powders.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : <12mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 0.7</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. Can be loaded in the
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces as talc may shift - particularly in smaller
vessels.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Sweep clean and hose out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>           "                         Source :
Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA)    2004-03-19 2004-03-19
      cargos      cargos001_040.htm 0
320         Triple Superphosphate        Triple Superphosphate "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Triple Superphosphate</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td height=""61"" align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Triple Superphosphate is a fertilizer used for
grain crops, sugar cane and pastures. It is also used in other fertilizer
blends. It is granular form, dark grey in colour and, depending on its
source, can be dusty.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 2mm - 4mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
30<sup>0</sup> - 35<sup>0</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 1.10
- 1.20</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be dean and absolutely dry.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Triple Superphosphate is hygroscopic and will
harden and cake if wet. Do not load in rain and keep non working hatches
closed.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Hold trimming plates and tank tops should be
lime washed to prevent corrosion.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">When carried in bulk a danger of add corrosion
to steelwork exists if moisture is introduced by condensation, cargo
heating or hatch covers leaking. Close attention must be given to hatch
sealing and cargo ventilation. This cargo will decompose burlap or canvas
cloth covering bilge wells.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge practices. If cargo has
hardened trimming may be necessary to avoid the formation of overhanging
cargo faces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Holds, steel surfaces, deck machinery etc.
should be thoroughly swept clean and then washed down. Pay particular
attention to bilge wells.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr> "                        Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_041.htm 0
321         Urea        Urea (up to 46% Nitrogen)   "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Urea (up to 46% Nitrogen)</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td height=""61"" align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">White, granular, odourless commodity that
resembles sugar in appearance, hygroscopic - may be treated with dolomite
or phosphate rock to reduce hygroscopicity. Urea is used for fertilizer;
animal feed and chemical. Moisture content is less than 1%. Gives off
ammonia odour.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : 2mm - 4mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE :
28<sup>0</sup> - 45<sup>0 (1)</sup><br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t :
1.2 - 1.3</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix C. Neither liable to liquefy nor to
possess chemical hazard.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Thoroughly sweep clean and then hose out and
dried.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Must be kept dry. Do not load in the rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Hold trimming plates and tank tops should be
lime washed to prevent corrosion.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Urea must be kept dry. Use tape to seal
hatches. Do not ventilate so as to keep moist air to a minimum</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge. Trimming may be
necessary to avoid formation of overhanging cargo faces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Urea does not corrode steel but in a water
solution may strip paintwork. Sweep, hose out and dry holds.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
           <td><span class=""genText"">(1) Angle of Repose varies with
the source of the material. Refer to IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid
Bulk Cargoes, using the Angle of Repose provided by the
Shipper.</span></td>
          </tr>"                          Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)       2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_042.htm 0
322         Woodpulp Pellets        Woodpulp Pellets "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
<table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9a9a9a9a"">
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genBoldText"">CARGO</span></td>
    <td class=""genBoldText"">Woodpulp Pellets</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td height=""61"" align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DESCRIPTION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">The pellets are brown in colour; very hard and
cannot be easily squashed. They are light and are about half the size of
a bottle cork. The pellets are made of compacted woodchips.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CHARACTERISTICS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">SIZE : Approx. 15mm x 20mm<br>ANGLE OF REPOSE
: N/A<br>STOWAGE FACTOR m<sup>3</sup>/t : 3.07</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">IMO CLASSIFICATION</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Appendix B. M.H.B. - material possessing
chemical hazard. Some shipments may be subject to oxidation leading to
depletion of oxygen and increase of carbon dioxide in cargo and adjacent
spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">HOLD CLEANLINESS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Clean and dry with no residue of previous
cargo.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">WEATHER PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">No special precautions. May be loaded in
rain.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">LOADING</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Trim cargo reasonably level to the boundaries
of the cargo spaces.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">PRECAUTIONS</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Refer to Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk
Cargoes. Separate as for Class 4.1 materials as woodchips can be easily
ignited by external sources; is readily combustible and can ignite by
friction. Entry of personnel into cargo spaces is not permitted until all
safety precautions have been taken. In dry weather, dust which settles on
deck, will dry out quickly and is easily ignited by naked flame, e.g.
cigarette; no smoking or naked flame is to be permitted in vicinity of
loading operation.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CARRIAGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Keep well ventilated.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">DISCHARGE</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Normal grab discharge.</td>
  </tr>
  <tr bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
    <td align=""center"" bgcolor=""#FFFBDB""><span
class=""genboldText"">CLEAN UP</span></td>
    <td class=""genText"">Double sweep clean and wash out.</td>
  </tr>
</table>

           <br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_043.htm 0
323         Appendix I - Maritime Safety Card       Appendix I - Maritime
Safety Card "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
I</b><br><br><b>Maritime Safety Card<br>(entering cargo spaces, tanks
pump rooms, fuel tanks, cofferdams, duct keels, ballast tanks and similar
enclosed compartments)</b>.<br><br><span class=""genBoldText"">GENERAL
PRECAUTIONS</span><br>Do not enter an enclosed space unless authorised by
the master or a responsible officer and only after all the appropriate
safety checks listed overleaf have been carried out.<br><br>The
atmosphere in any enclosed space may be incapable of supporting human
life. It may be lacking in oxygen content or contain flammable or toxic
gases. This also applies to tanks which have been inerted.<br><br>The
master or a responsible officer MUST ensure that it is safe to enter an
enclosed space by:<ol><li>ensuring that the space has been thoroughly
ventilated by natural or mechanical means;</li><li>testing the atmosphere
of the space at different levels for oxygen deficiency and harmful vapour
where suitable instruments are available; and</li><li>requiring breathing
apparatus to be worn by all persons entering the space where there is any
doubt as to the adequacy of ventilation or testing before
entry.</li></ol><span class=""genBoldText"">WARNING</span><br><br>Where
it is known that the atmosphere in an enclosed space is unsafe, it should
only be entered when it is essential or in an emergency. All the safety
checks overIeaf should be carried out before entry and breathing
apparatus must be worn.<br><br><span class=""genBoldText"">PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT AND CLOTHING</span><br><br>It is important that all those
entering an enclosed space wear suitable clothing and that they make use
of protective equipment which may be provided on board for their safety.
Access ladders and surfaces within the space may be slippery and suitable
footwear should be worn. Safety helmets protect against falling objects
and, in confined space, against bumps. Loose clothing, which is likely to
catch on obstructions, should be avoided. Additional precautions are
necessary where there is a risk of contact with harmful chemicals. Safety
harnesses, belts and lifelines should be worn and used where there is any
danger of falling from a height.<br><br>There may be additional safety
instructions on board the ship - make sure that they are made well known
to all concerned.</td>
                      </tr> "                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_044.htm 0
324         Appendix I - Safety Check List          Appendix I - Safety
Check List "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
I</b><br><br><b>Maritime Safety Card<br>(extract from IMO Code of Safety
Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes, 1999)</b>.<br><br><span
class=""genBoldText"">SAFETY CHECK LIST</span><br>Before entering any
enclosed space all the appropriate safety checks listed below must be
carried out by the master or responsible officer and by the person who is
to enter the space.<br><br><span class=""genBoldText"">SECTION 1 - To be
checked by the master or responsible officer</span><br><br>1.1 Has the
space been thoroughly ventilated and, where testing equipment is
available, has the space been tested and found safe for entry?<br><br>1.2
Have arrangements been made to continue ventilation during occupancy of
the space and at intervals during breaks?<br><br>1.3 Are rescue and
resuscitation equipment available for immediate use beside the
compartment entrance?<br><br>1.4 Have arrangements been made for a
responsible person to be in constant attendance at the entrance to the
space?<br><br>1.5 Has a system of communication between the person at the
entrance and those in the space been agreed?<br><br>1.6 Are access and
illumination adequate?<br><br>1.7 Are portable lights or other equipment
to be used of an approved type?<br><br>When the necessary safety
precautions in Section 1 have been taken, this card should be handed to
the person who is to enter the space for completion.<br><br><span
class=""genBoldText"">SECTION 2 -To be checked by the person who is to
enter the space</span><br><br>2.1 Have instructions or permission been
given by the master or a responsible officer to enter the enclosed tank
or compartment?<br><br>2.2 Has Section 1 been completed as
necessary?<br><br>2.3 Are you aware you should leave the space
immediately in the event of failure of the ventilation system?<br><br>2.4
Do you understand the arrangements made for communication between
yourself and the responsible person in attendance at the entrance to the
space?<br><br><span class=""genBoldText"">SECTION 3 - Where breathing
apparatus is to be used, this section must be checked jointly by the
responsible officer and the person who is to enter the
space.</span><br><br>3.1 Are you familiar with the apparatus to be
used?<br><br>3.2 Has the apparatus been tested as follows?<ol><li>Gauge
and capacity of air supply</li><li>Low pressure audible
alarm</li><li>Face mask - air supply and tightness</li></ol>3.3 Has the
means of communication been tested and emergency signals
agreed?<br><br>Where instructions have been given that a responsible
person be in attendance at the entrance to the compartment, the person
entering the space should show their completed card to that person before
entering. Entry should then only be permitted provided all the
appropriate questions have been correctly checked.</td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_045.htm 0
325        Appendix I - Recommendations for Entering Enclosed Spaces
Aboard Ships           Appendix I - Recommendations for Entering Enclosed
Spaces Aboard Ships    "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
I</b><br><br><b>Recommendations for Entering Enclosed Spaces Aboard
Ships</b>.<br><br><span class=""genBoldText"">PREAMBLE</span><br>The
object of these recommendations is to encourage the adoption of safety
procedures aimed at preventing casualties to ships personnel entering
enclosed spaces where there may be an oxygen deficient, flammable and/or
toxic atmosphere.<br><br>Investigations into the circumstances of
casualties that have occurred have shown that accidents on board ships
are in most cases caused by an insufficient knowledge of, or disregard
for, the need to take precautions rather than a lack of
guidance.<br><br>The following practical recommendations apply to all
types of ships and provide guidance to seafarers. It should be noted that
on ships where entry into enclosed spaces may be infrequent, for example,
on certain passenger ships or small general cargo ships, the dangers may
be less apparent and, accordingly, there may be a need for increased
vigilance.<br><br>The recommendations are intended to complement national
laws or regulations, accepted standards or particular procedures which
may exist for specific trades, ships or types of shipping
operations.<br><br>It may be impracticable to apply some recommendations
to particular situations. In such cases, every endeavour should be made
to observe the intent of the recommendations, and attention should be
paid to the risks that may be
involved.<br><br><ol><li><b>INTRODUCTION</b></li><br><br>The atmosphere
in any enclosed space may be deficient in oxygen and/or contain flammable
and/or toxic gases or vapours. Such an unsafe atmosphere could also
subsequently occur in a space previously found to be safe. Unsafe
atmosphere may also be present in spaces adjacent to those spaces where a
hazard is known to be
present<br><br><li><b>DEFINITIONS</b></li><br><br>2.1 ""Enclosed space""
means a space which has any of the following characteristics:<br><br>.1
limited openings for entry and exit;<br><br>.2 unfavourable natural
ventilation; and<br><br>.3 is not designed for continuous worker
occupancy,<br><br>and includes, but is not limited to, cargo spaces,
double bottoms, fuel tanks, pump-rooms, compressor rooms, cofferdams,
void spaces, duct keels, inter-barrier spaces, engine crankcases and
sewage tanks.<br><br>.2.2 ""Competent person"" means a person with
sufficient theoretical knowledge and practical experience capable of
making an informed assessment of the likelihood of a dangerous atmosphere
being present or subsequently arising in the space.<br><br>.2.3
""Responsible person"" means a person authorised to permit entry into an
enclosed space and having sufficient knowledge of the procedures to be
followed.<br><br><li><b>ASSESSMENT OF RISK</b></li><br><br>3.1 In order
to ensure safety, a competent person should always make a preliminary
assessment of any potential hazards in the space to be entered taking
into account the previous cargo carried, ventilation of the space,
coating of the space and other relevant factors. The competent person's
preliminary assessment should determine the potential for the presence of
an oxygen-deficient, flammable or toxic atmosphere.<br><br>3.2 The
procedures to be followed for testing the atmosphere in the space and for
entry should be decided on the basis of the preliminary assessment. These
will depend on whether the preliminary assessment shows
that:<br><br>there is minimal risk to health or life of personnel
entering the space;<br><br>there is no immediate risk to health or life
but a risk could arise during the course of work in the space;
and<br><br>a risk to health or life is identified.<br><br>3.3 Where the
preliminary assessment indicates minimal risk to health or life or
potential for a risk to arise during the course of work in the space, the
precautions described in sections 4, 5, 6 and 7 should be followed as
appropriate.<br><br>3.4 Where the preliminary assessment identifies risk
to life or health, if entry is to be made, the additional precautions
specified in section 8 should also be
followed.<br><br><li><b>AUTHORISATION OF ENTRY</b></li><br><br>4.1 No
person should open or enter an enclosed space unless authorised by the
master or nominated responsible person and the appropriate safety
procedures laid down for the particular ship have been
followed.<br><br>4.2 Entry into enclosed spaces should be planned and the
use of an entry permit system, which may include the use of a checklist,
is recommended. An Enclosed Space Entry Permit should be issued by the
master or nominated responsible person and completed by a person who
enters the space, prior to entry. An example of the Enclosed Space Entry
Permit is provided in the annex.<br><br><li><b>GENERAL
PRECAUTIONS</b></li><br><br>5.1 The master or responsible person should
determine that it is safe to enter an enclosed space by
ensuring:<br><br>.1 that potential hazards have been identified in the
assessment and as far as possible isolated or made safe;<br><br>.2 that
the space has been thoroughly ventilated by natural or mechanical means
to remove any toxic or flammable gases, and to ensure an adequate level
of oxygen throughout the space;<br><br>.3 that the atmosphere of the
space has been tested as appropriate with properly calibrated instruments
to ascertain acceptable levels of oxygen and acceptable levels of
flammable or toxic vapours;<br><br>.4 that the space has been secured for
entry and properly illuminated;<br><br>.5 that a suitable system of
communication between all parties for use during entry has been agreed
and tested;<br><br>.6 that an attendant has been instructed to remain at
the entrance to the space whilst it is occupied;<br><br>.7 that rescue
and resuscitation equipment has been positioned ready for use at the
entrance to the space, and that rescue arrangements have been
agreed;<br><br>.8 that personnel are properly clothed and equipped for
the entry and subsequent tasks; and<br><br>.9 that a permit has been
issued authorising entry.<br><br>The precautions in .6 and .7 may not
apply to every situation described in this section. The person
authorising entry should determine whether an attendant and the
positioning of rescue equipment at the entrance to the space is
necessary.<br><br>5.2 Only trained personnel should be assigned duties of
entering or functioning as attendants or as members of rescue teams.
Ships' crews should be drilled periodically in rescue and first
aid.<br><br>5.3 All equipment used in connection with entry should be in
good working condition and inspected prior to use.<br><br><li><b>TESTING
THE ATMOSPHERE</b></li><br><br>6.1 Appropriate testing of the atmosphere
of a space should be carried out with properly calibrated equipment by
persons trained in the use of the equipment. The manufacturers'
instructions should be strictly followed. Testing should be carried out
before any person enters the space and at regular intervals thereafter
until all work is completed. Where appropriate, the testing of the space
should be carried out at as many different levels as is necessary to
obtain a representative sample of the atmosphere in the space.<br><br>6.2
For entry purposes, steady readings of the following should be
obtained:<br><br>.1 21 % oxygen by volume by oxygen content meter,
and<br><br>.2 not more than 1 % of lower flammable limit (LFL) on a
suitably sensitive combustible gas indicator, where the preliminary
assessment has determined that there is potential for flammable gases or
vapours.<br><br>If these conditions cannot be met, additional ventilation
should be applied to the space and re-testing should be conducted after a
suitable interval. Any gas testing should be carried out with the
ventilation to the enclosed space stopped, in order to obtain accurate
readings.<br><br>6.3 Where the preliminary assessment has determined that
there is potential for the presence of toxic gases and vapours,
appropriate testing should be carried out using fixed or portable gas or
vapour detection equipment. The readings obtained by this equipment
should be below the occupational exposure limits for the toxic gases or
vapours given in accepted national or international standards. It should
be noted that testing for flammability does not provide a suitable means
of measuring for toxicity, nor vice versa.<br><br>6.4 It should be
emphasised that pockets of gas or oxygen deficient areas can exist and
should always be suspected even when an enclosed space has been
satisfactorily tested as being suitable for
entry.<br><br><li><b>PRECAUTIONS DURING ENTRY</b></li><br><br>7.1 The
atmosphere should be tested frequently whilst the space is occupied and
persons should be instructed to leave the space should there be a
deterioration in the conditions.<br><br>7.2 Ventilation should continue
during the period that the space is occupied and during temporary breaks.
Before re-entry after a break, the atmosphere should be re-tested. In the
event of failure of the ventilation system, any persons in the space
should leave immediately.<br><br>7.3 In the event of an emergency, under
no circumstances should the attending crew member enter the space before
help has arrived and the situation has been evaluated to ensure the
safety of those entering the space to undertake rescue
operations.<br><br><li><b>ADDITIONAL PRECAUTIONS FOR ENTRY INTO A SPACE
WHERE THE ATMOSPHERE IS KNOWN OR SUSPECTED TO BE
UNSAFE</b></li><br><br>8.1 If the atmosphere in an enclosed space is
suspected or known to be unsafe, the space should only be entered when no
practical alternative exists. Entry should only be made for further
testing, essential operation, safety of life or safety of a ship. The
number of persons entering the space should be the minimum compatible
with the work to be performed.<br><br>8.2 Suitable breathing apparatus,
e.g., of the air-line or self-contained type should always be worn, and
only personnel trained in its use should be allowed to enter the space.
Air-purifying respirators should not be used as they do not provide a
supply of clean air from a source independent of the atmosphere within
the space.<br><br>8.3 The precautions specified in section 5 should also
be followed, as appropriate.<br><br>8.4 Rescue harnesses should be worn
and, unless impractical, lifelines should be used.<br><br>8.5 Appropriate
protective clothing should be worn particularly where there is any risk
of toxic substances or chemicals coming into contact with the skin or
eyes of those entering the space.<br><br>8.6 The advice in paragraph 7.3
concerning emergency rescue operations is particularly relevant in this
context.<br><br><li><b>HAZARDS RELATED TO SPECIFIC TYPES OF
CARGO</b></li><br><br><b>9.1 Dangerous goods in packaged
form</b><br><br>9.1.1 The atmosphere of any space containing dangerous
goods may put at risk the health or life of any person entering it.
Dangers may be flammable, toxic or corrosive gases or vapours that
displace oxygen, residues on packages and spilled material. The same
hazards may be present in spaces adjacent to the cargo spaces.
Information on the hazards of specific substances is contained in the
IMDG Code, the Emergency Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods
(EMS) and Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). If there is evidence or
suspicion that leakage of dangerous substances as occurred, the
precautions specified in section 8 should be followed.<br><br>9.1.2
Personnel required to deal with spillage or to remove defective or
damaged packages should be appropriately trained and wear suitable
breathing apparatus and appropriate protective clothing.<br><br><b>9.2
Bulk liquid</b><br><br>The tanker industry has produced extensive advice
to operators and crews of ships engaged in the bulk carriage of oil,
chemicals and liquefied gases, in the form of specialist international
safety guides. Information in the guides on enclosed space entry
amplifies these recommendations and should be used as the basis for
preparing entry plans.<br><br><b>9.3 Solid bulk</b><br><br>On ships
carrying sold bulk cargoes, dangerous atmospheres may develop in cargo
spaces and adjacent spaces. The dangers may include flammability,
toxicity oxygen depletion or self-heating, which should be identified in
shipping documentation. For additional information, reference should be
made to the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.<br><br><b>9.4
Oxygen depleting cargoes and materials</b><br><br>A prominent risk with
such cargoes is oxygen depletion due to the inherent form of the cargo,
for example, self-heating, oxidation of metals and ores or decomposition
of vegetable oils, animal fats, grain and other organic materials or
their residues. The materials listed below are known to be capable of
causing oxygen depletion. However, the list is not exhaustive. Oxygen
depletion may also be caused by other materials of vegetable or animal
origin, by flammable or spontaneously combustible materials, and by
materials with high metal content:<br><ol><li>grain, grain products and
residues from grain processing (such as bran, crushed grain, crushed malt
or meal), hops, malt husks and spent malt;</li><li>oilseeds as well as
products and residues from oilseeds (such as seed expellers, seed cake,
oil cake and meal);</li><li>copra</li><li>wood in such forms as packaged
timber, roundwood, logs, pulpwood, props (pit props and other propwood),
woodchips, woodshavings, woodpulp pellets and sawdust;</li><li>jute,
hemp, flax, sisal, kapok, cotton and other vegetable fibres (such as
esparto grass/Spanish grass, hay, straw, bhusa), empty bags, cotton
waste, animal fibres, animal and vegetable fabric, wool waste and
rags;</li><li>fishmeal and fishscrap;</li><li>guano;</li><li>sulphidic
ores and ore concentrates;</li><li>charcoal, coal and coal
products;</li><li>direct reduced iron (DRI);</li><li>dry
ice;</li><li>metal wastes and chips, iron swarf, steel and other
turnings, borings, drillings, shavings, filings and cuttings;
and</li><li>scrap metal </li></ol><br><b>9.5 Fumigation</b><br><br>When a
ship is fumigated, the detailed recommendations contained in the
Recommendations on the Safe Use of Pesticides in Ships"" should be
followed. Spaces adjacent to fumigated spaces should be treated as if
fumigated.<br><br><li><b>CONCLUSION</b></li><br><br>Failure to observe
simple procedures can lead to people being unexpectedly overcome when
entering enclosed spaces. Observance of the principals outlined above
will form a reliable basis for assessing risks in such spaces and for
taking necessary precautions.<br><br>*Refer to the recommendations on
Safe Use of Pesticides in Ships, approved by the Maritime Safety
Committee of the Organisation by circular MSC/Circ.612, as amended by
MSC/Circ.689 and MSC/Circ.746. </ol></td>
                      </tr> "                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_046.htm 0
326         Annex - Example of an Enclosed Space Entry Permit
      Annex - Example of an Enclosed Space Entry Permit "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><a
href=""../doc/cargos/amslot_ann.pdf"">Example of an Enclosed Space Entry
Permit</a> (Acrobat Reader needed)</td>
                      </tr> "                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_047.htm 0
327         Appendix II (a) - Bulk Coal Cargoes - Declaration by Shipper
            Appendix II (a) - Bulk Coal Cargoes - Declaration by Shipper
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><a
href=""../doc/cargos/bulkcoal.pdf"">Bulk Coal Cargoes - Declaration by
Shipper</a> (Acrobat Reader needed)</td>
                      </tr> "                       Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_048.htm 0
328         Appendix II (a) - Bulk Coal Cargoes - Declaration by Shipper
            Appendix II (a) - Bulk Coal Cargoes - Declaration by Shipper
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix II (b)
Coal</b><br><br>(See also Appendix A of the B.C. Code)<br><br>BC No. :
010<br>IMO Class : MHB<br>MFAG Table No. : 311,616+<br>Approximate
stowage factor(m3/t) : 0.79 to 1.53<br>EmS No. : B14<br><br><b>Properties
and characteristics</b><br><br><ol><li>Coals may emit methane, a
flammable gas. A methane/air mixture containing between 5% and 16%
methane constitutes an explosive atmosphere which can be ignited by
sparks or naked flame, e.g. electrical or frictional sparks, a match or
lighted cigarette. Methane is lighter than air and may, therefore,
accumulate in the upper region of the cargo space or other enclosed
spaces. If the cargo space boundaries are not tight, methane can seep
through into spaces adjacent to the cargo space</li><li>Coals may be
subject to oxidation, leading to depletion of oxygen and an increase in
carbon dioxide in the cargo space (see also section 3 and appendix F of
the B.C. Code). </li><li>Some coals may be liable to self-heating that
could lead to spontaneous combustion in the cargo space. Flammable and
toxic gases, including carbon monoxide, may be produced. Carbon monoxide
is an odourless gas, slightly lighter than air, and has flammable limits
in air of 12% to 75% by volume. It is toxic by inhalation, with an
affinity for blood haemoglobin over 200 times that of oxygen.
</li><li>Some coals may be liable to react with water and produce acids
which may cause corrosion. Flammable and toxic gases, including hydrogen,
may be produced. Hydrogen is an odourless gas, much lighter than air, and
has flammable limits in air of 4% to 75% by volume.
</li></ol><b>Segregation and stowage requirements</b><ol><li>Boundaries
of cargo spaces where materials are carried should be resistant to fire
and liquids. </li><li>Coals should be ""separated from"" goods of classes
1 (division 1.4), 2,3,4, and 5 in packaged form (see IMDG Code) and
""separated from"" solid bulk materials of classes 4 and 5.1
</li><li>Stowage of goods of class 5.1 in packaged form or sold bulk
materials of class 5.1 above or below a coal cargo should be prohibited.
</li><li>Coals should be ""separated longitudinally by an intervening
complete compartment or hold from "" goods of class 1 other than division
1.4. </li></ol>Note:<br>For the interpretation of the segregation terms
see paragraph 9.3.3.<br><br>* For comprehensive information on transport
of any material listed, refer to sections 110 of this Code.<br>+ Refer to
paragraph 6. 1. 1. (Asphyxia) of the MFAG.<br><br><b>General requirements
for all coals</b><br><br><ol><li>Prior to loading, the shipper or his
appointed agent should provide in writing to the master the
characteristics of the cargo and the recommended safe handling procedures
for loading and transport of the cargo. As a minimum, the cargo's
contract specifications for moisture content, sulphur content and size
should be stated, and especially whether the cargo may be liable to emit
methane or self-heat.</li><li>The master should be satisfied that he has
received such information prior to accepting the cargo. If the shipper
has advised that the cargo is liable to emit methane or self-heat, the
master should additionally refer to the ""Special
precautions"".</li><li>Before and during loading, and while the material
remains on board, the master should observe the following:</li><br><br>.1
All cargo spaces and bilge wells should be clean and dry. Any residue of
waste material or previous cargo should be removed, including removable
cargo battens, before loading.<br><br>.2 All electrical cables and
components situated in cargo spaces and adjacent spaces should be free
from defects. Such cables and electrical components should be safe for
use in an explosive atmosphere or positively isolated.<br><br>.3 The ship
should be suitably fitted and carry on board appropriate instruments for
measuring the following without requiring entry in the cargo
space:<br><br><ul>.3.1 concentration of methane in the
atmosphere;<br><br>.3.2 concentration of oxygen in the
atmosphere;<br><br>.3.3 concentration of carbon monoxide in the
atmosphere; and<br><br>.3.4 pH value of cargo hold bilge
samples.</li><br><br>These instruments should be regularly serviced and
calibrated. Ship personnel should be trained in the use of such
instruments. Details of gas measurement procedures are given at the end
of this entry.</ul><br><br>.4 It is recommended that means be provided
for measuring the temperature of the cargo in the range 00C to 1000C.
Such arrangements should enable the temperature of the coal to be
measured while being loaded and during the voyage without requiring entry
into the cargo space.<br><br>.5 The ship should carry on board the self-
contained breathing apparatus required by SOLAS regulation 11-2/17. The
self-contained breathing apparatus should be worn only by personnel
trained in its use (see also section 3 and appendix F of the B.C.
Code).<br><br>.6 Smoking and the use of naked flames should not be
permitted in the cargo areas and adjacent spaces and appropriate warning
notices should be posted in conspicuous places. Burning, cutting,
chipping, welding or other sources of ignition should not be permitted in
the vicinity of cargo spaces or in other adjacent spaces, unless the
space has been properly ventilated and the methane gas measurements
indicate it is safe to do so.<br><br>.7 The master should ensure that the
coal cargo is not stowed adjacent to hot areas.<br><br>.8 Prior to
departure, the master should be satisfied that the surface of the
material has been trimmed reasonably level to the boundaries of the cargo
space to avoid the formation of gas pockets and to prevent air from
permeating the body of the coal. Casings leading into the cargo space
should be adequately sealed. The shipper should ensure that the master
receives the necessary co-operation from the loading terminal (see also
section 5 of the B.C. Code).<br><br>.9 The atmosphere in the space above
the cargo in each cargo space should be regularly monitored for the
presence of methane, oxygen and carbon monoxide. Details of gas
monitoring procedures are given at the end of this entry. Records of
these reading should be maintained. The frequency of the testing should
depend upon the information provided by the shipper and the information
obtained through the analysis of the atmosphere in the cargo
space.<br><br>.10 Unless expressly directed otherwise, all holds should
be surface ventilated for the first 24 hours after departure from the
loading port. During this period, one measurement should be taken from
one sample point per hold.<br><br>If after 24 hours the methane
concentrations are at an acceptably low level, the ventilators should be
closed. If not, they should remain open until acceptably low levels are
obtained. In either event, measurements should be continued on a daily
basis.<br><br>If significant concentrations of methane subsequently occur
in unventilated holds, the appropriate special precautions as described
in section 2.2.1 should apply.<br><br>.11 The master should ensure, as
far as possible, that any gases which may be emitted from the materials
do not accumulate in adjacent enclosed spaces.<br><br>.12 The master
should ensure that enclosed working spaces, e.g. storerooms, carpenter's
shop, passage ways, tunnels, etc. are regularly monitored for the
presence of methane, oxygen and carbon monoxide. Such spaces should be
adequately ventilated.<br><br>.13 Regular hold bilge testing should be
systematically carried out. If the pH monitoring indicates that a
corrosion risk exists, the master should ensure that all bilges are kept
dry during the voyage in order to avoid possible accumulation of acids on
tank tops and in the bilge system.<br><br>.14 If the behaviour of the
cargo during the voyage differs from that specified in the cargo
declaration, the master should report such differences to the shipper.
Such reports will enable the shipper to maintain records on the behaviour
of the coal cargoes, so that the information provided to the master can
be reviewed in the light of transport experience.<br><br>.15 The
Administration may approve alternative requirements to those recommended
in this schedule.</ol><b>Special Precautions</b><ol><li><i>Coals emitting
methane</i></li><br><br>If the shipper has advised that the cargo is
liable to emit methane or analysis of the atmosphere in the cargo space
indicates the presence of methane in excess of 20% of the lower explosion
limit (LEL), the following additional precautions should be
taken:<br><br>.1 Adequate surface ventilation should be maintained. On no
account should air be directed into the body of the coal as air could
promote self-heating.<br><br>.2 Care should be taken to vent any
accumulated gases prior to removal of the hatch covers or other openings
for any reason, including unloading. Cargo hatches and other openings
should be opened carefully to avoid creating sparks. Smoking and the use
of naked flame should be prohibited.<br><br>.3 Personnel should not be
permitted to enter the cargo space or enclosed adjacent spaces unless the
space has been ventilated and the atmosphere tested and found to be gas-
free and to have sufficient oxygen to support life. If this is not
possible, emergency entry into the space should be undertaken only by
trained personnel wearing self-contained breathing apparatus, under the
supervision of a responsible officer. In addition, special precautions to
ensure that no source of ignition is carried into the space should be
observed (see also section 3 and appendix F of the B.C. Code).<br><br>.4
The master should ensure that enclosed working spaces, e.g. storerooms,
carpenter's shops, passage ways, tunnels, etc. are regularly monitored
for the presence of methane. Such spaces should be adequately ventilated
and, in the case of mechanical ventilation, only equipment safe for use
in an explosive atmosphere should be used. Testing is especially
important prior to permitting personnel to enter such spaces or
energising equipment within those spaces.<br><br><li><i>Self-heating
coals</i></li><br><br>.1 If the shipper has advised that the cargo is
liable to self-heat, the master should seek confirmation that the
precautions intended to be taken and the procedures intended for
monitoring the cargo during the voyage are adequate.<br><br>.2 If the
cargo is likely to self-heat or analysis of the atmosphere n the cargo
space indicates and increasing concentration of carbon monoxide, then the
following additional precautions should be taken:<br><br><ul>.2.1 The
hatches should be closed immediately after completion of loading in each
cargo space. The hatch covers can also be additionally sealed with a
suitable sealing tape. Surface ventilation should be limited to the
absolute minimum time necessary to remove methane which may have
accumulated. Forced ventilation should not be used. On no account should
air be directed into the body of the coal as air could promote self
heating.<br><br>.2.2 Personnel should not be allowed to enter the cargo
space, unless they are wearing self-contained breathing apparatus and
access is critical to the safety of the ship or safety of life. The self-
contained breathing apparatus should be worn only by personnel trained in
its use (see also section 3 and appendix F of the B.C. Code).<br><br>.2.3
When required by the competent authority, the carbon monoxide
concentration in each cargo space should be measured at regular time
intervals to detect self-heating.<br><br>.2.4 If at the time of loading,
when the hatches are open, the temperature of the coal exceeds 550C,
expert advice should be obtained.<br><br>.2.5 If the carbon monoxide
level is increasing steadily, a potential self-heating may be developing.
The cargo space should be completely closed down and all ventilation
creased. The master should seek expert advice immediately. Water should
not be used for cooling the material or fighting coal cargo fires at sea,
but may be used for cooling the boundaries of the cargo
space.<br><br>.2.6 Information to be passed to owners<br><br>The most
comprehensive record of measurements will always be the log used to
record daily results. The coal cargo monitoring log for the voyage should
be faxed, or the appropriate content should be telexed to the vessel's
owners.<br><br>The following minimum information is essential if an
accurate assessment of the situation is to be
achieved.</li><br><br><ol><li class=""alpha"">identity of the holds
involved; monitoring results covering carbon monoxide, methane and oxygen
concentrations;</li><li class=""alpha"">if available, temperature of
coal, location and method used to obtain results;</li><li
class=""alpha"">time gas samples taken (monitoring routine);</li><li
class=""alpha"">time ventilators opened/closed;</li><li
class=""alpha"">quantity of coal in hold(s) involved;</li><li
class=""alpha"">type of coal as per shipper's declaration, and any
special precautions indicated on declaration;</li><li
class=""alpha"">date loaded, and ETA at intended discharge port (which
should be specified); and</li><li class=""alpha"">comments or
observations from the ship's master.</li></ol></ul></ol><b>Procedures for
gas monitoring of coal cargoes</b><br><br><b>.1
Observations</b><br><br>Carbon monoxide monitoring, when conducted in
accordance with the following recommendations, will provide a reliable
early indication of self-heating within a coal cargo. This allows
preventive action to be considered without delay. A stead, rise in the
level of carbon monoxide detected within a hold is a conclusive
indication that self-heating is taking place.<br><br>All vessels engaged
in the carriage of coal should carry on board an instrument for measuring
methane, oxygen and carbon monoxide gas concentrations (general
requirements for all coals, section 3.3 in the coal entry, appendix B),
so that the atmosphere within the cargo space may be monitored. This
instrument should be regularly serviced and calibrated in accordance with
the manufacturer's instructions. When properly maintained and operated,
this instrument will provide reliable data about the atmosphere within
the cargo space. Care needs to be exercised in interpreting methane
measurements carried out in the low oxygen concentrations often found in
unventilated cargo holds. The catalytic sensors normally used for the
detection of methane rely on the presence of sufficient oxygen for
accurate measurement. This phenomenon does not affect the measurement of
carbon monoxide, or measurement of methane by infrared sensor. Further
guidance may be obtained from the instrument manufacturer.<br><br><b>.2
Sampling and measurement procedure</b><ul><i>.2.1 Equipment</i><br><br>An
instrument is required which is capable of measuring methane, oxygen and
carbon monoxide concentrations. The instrument should be fitted with an
aspirator, flexible connection and length of tubing to enable a
representative sample to be obtained from within the square of the hatch.
Stainless steel tubing approximately 0.5m in length and 6 mm nominal
internal diameter with an integral stainless steel threaded collar is
preferred. The collar is necessary to provide an adequate seal at the
sampling point.<br><br>A suitable filter should be used to protect the
instrument against the ingress of moisture as recommended by the
manufacturer. The presence of even a small amount of moisture will
compromise the accuracy of the measurement.<br><br><i>2.2 Siting of
sampling points</i><br><br>In order to obtain meaningful information
about the behaviour of coal in a hold, gas measurements should be made
via one sample point per hold. To ensure flexibility of measurement in
adverse weather, however, two sample points should be provided per hold,
one on the port side and one on the starboard side of the hatch cover.
Measurement from either of these locations is satisfactory.<br><br>Each
sample point should comprise a hole of diameter approximately 12mm
positioned as near to the top of the hatch coaming as possible. It should
be sealed with a screw cap to prevent ingress of water and air. It is
essential that this cap is securely replaced after each measurement to
maintain a tight seal.<br><br>The provision of any sample point should
not compromise the seaworthiness of the vessel.<br><br><i>.2.3
Measurement</i><br><br>Ensure that the instrument is calibrated and
working properly in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.
Remove the sealing cap, insert the stainless steel tube into the sampling
point and tighten the integral cap to ensure an adequate seal. Connect
the instrument to the sampling tube. Draw a sample of the hold atmosphere
through the tube, using the aspirator, until steady readings are
obtained. Log the results on a form which records cargo hold, date and
time for each measurement.<br><br><i>.2.4 Measurement
strategy</i><br><br>The identification of incipient self-heating from
measurement of gas concentrations is more readily achieved under
unventilated conditions. This is not always desirable because of the
possibility of the accumulation of methane to dangerous concentrations.
This is primarily, but not exclusively, a problem in the early stages of
a voyage. Therefore it is recommended that holds are initially ventilated
until measured methane concentrations are at an acceptably low
level.<br><br><i>.2.5 Measurement in unventilated holds</i><br><br>Under
normal conditions one measurement per day is sufficient as a
precautionary measure. However, if carbon monoxide levels are higher than
30 ppm then the frequency should be increased to at least twice a day at
suitably spaced intervals. Any additional results should be
logged.<br><br>If the carbon monoxide level in any hold reaches 50 ppm a
self-heating condition may be developing and the owners of the vessel
should be notified.<br><br><i>.2.6 Measurement in ventilated
holds</i><br><br>If the presence of methane is such that the ventilators
are required to remain open, then a different procedure should be applied
to enable the onset of any incipient self-heating to be
detected.<br><br>To obtain meaningful data the ventilators should be
closed for a period before the measurements are taken. This period may be
chosen to suit the operational requirements of the vessel, but it is
recommended that it is not less than four hours. It is vital in the
interests of data interpretation that the shutdown time is constant
whichever time period is selected. These measurements should be taken on
a daily basis. If the carbon monoxide results exhibit a steady rise over
three consecutive days, or exceed 50 ppm on any day, the owners of the
vessel should be notified.</ul></td>
                      </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_049.htm 0
329         Annex - Emergency Schedule B 14          Annex - Emergency
Schedule B 14     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><a
href=""../doc/cargos/amslotb14.pdf"">Emergency Schedule B 14</a> (Acrobat
Reader needed)</td>
                      </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_050.htm 0
330         Appendix II (c) - Instructions to the Ship's Captain
Transportation of Brown Coal Briquettes        Appendix II (c) -
Instructions to the Ship's Captain Transportation of Brown Coal
Briquettes "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix II
(c)</b><br><br><b>Instructions to the Ship's Captain Transportation of
Brown Coal Briquettes</b><ol><li><b>INTRODUCTION</b></li><br><br>The
transportation of brown coal briquettes is subject to the International
Maritime Organisation (IMO) 'Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk
Cargoes' 1990, ed., Appendix B. The following instructions are
specifically for the transportation of brown coal briquettes and cover
all items in the above IMO Code.<br><br>Brown coal briquettes are
manufactured by pressing dried coal particles into compressed blocks.
Briquettes are easily ignited and are a free burning fuel. In bulk
quantities, they are liable to spontaneous heating, but do not emit
methane. <br><br>The underlying principle is that the briquettes are
shipped in sealed holds, thus denying the briquettes access to sufficient
atmospheric oxygen to sustain combustion. In fact, after sealing the
holds, the briquettes consume the atmospheric oxygen initially present,
to form an inert gas atmosphere of residual atmospheric nitrogen and
carbon dioxide. To maintain this safe transport condition, forced or
natural draft ventilation of the hold(s) must not be permitted at any
stage during the voyage prior to discharge. Unlike, other coals, brown
coal briquettes do not emit explosive gases (methane) during transport,
eliminating any need to ventilate the hold(s) prior to
discharge.<br><br>It is essential to note that during the voyage, the
sealed hold(s) do not contain sufficient atmospheric oxygen to sustain
life. Therefore the hold(s) must not be entered under any circumstances
without the aid of breathing apparatus. Even after opening the hold(s)
for discharge, the oxygen level should be 21% before entering the
hold(s).<br><br><li><b>PREPARATION OF THE VESSEL FOR
LOADING</b></li><br><br><ol><li>Before accepting the vessel, a Marine
Surveyor from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority may inspect the
vessel for seaworthiness, especially the rubber seals on hatch covers and
seals on ventilators.</li><li>All cargo spaces and bilge wells should be
clean, dry and any residue or waste material from previous cargo should
be removed, including removable cargo battens, before loading. It is also
recommended that the bilge wells be protected by placing a sheet of
burlap over the bilge well cover to prevent briquette dust blocking the
pumps.</li><li>All electrical cables and components situated in cargo
spaces and adjacent spaces should be free from defects and safe for use
in a dusty environment, or positively isolated.</li><li>All ventilators,
shafts and doors leading to and from the holds are to be closed and
sealed to reduce air circulation to a minimum during loading and to
prevent any circulation of air after the hatches have been
closed.</li><li>Ascertain if the Australian Maritime Safety Authority
requires temperature or gas readings in the cargo hold during the voyage.
Procure and install equipment if required. If temperature readingsare
required, then an acceptable method is to place a three point
thermocouple loom three metres below the deck surface, immediately prior
to filling the hatch square and exiting through a closed hatch cover for
measurement using a digital thermometer. If gas readings are required,
then an acceptable method is using a Dreager CO<sub>2</sub>/O<sub>2</sub>
tube.</li></ol><br><li><b>LOADING THE VESSEL</b></li><br><br><ol><li
class=""roman"">Warning notices against smoking and the use of naked
flames should be posted in the cargo space area. No smoking, burning or
chipping or other sources of ignition should be allowed in the vicinity
of cargo spaces or adjacent spaces.</li><li class=""roman"">During
loading, briquettes should not be stowed adjacent to steam pipes.</li><li
class=""roman"">Briquettes should not be dropped further than one metre
from the grab to minimize the creation of fines.</li><li
class=""roman"">If possible holds should be loaded without interruption.
The maximum advisable loading time for an individual hold is six days.
Based on past loading experience, hot spots seldom develop in the first
few days but a half filled hold that is kept open for six days or more
can expect hot spots to develop.</li><li class=""roman"">Briquettes which
show signs of steaming in wharf stockpiles should not be loaded.</li><li
class=""roman"">If a 'hot spot' (i.e. steaming) is noticed in the hold
during loading, then unload the 'hot spot' region onto the wharf. Spread
the 'hot spot' region out on the wharf to allow heat removal. Check the
area in the hold with a temperature probe (0.5 metres insertion) and if
the temperature is below 550C continue loading. If the temperature is
more than 550 C, repeat digging out. Act quickly and decisively. </li><li
class=""roman"">Ensure that the briquette surface is trimmed reasonably
level to the boundary wall to prevent air ingress. This is not required
in a fully filled hold.</li><li class=""roman"">Broken stowage (i.e. half
filled holds) should be avoided.</li><li class=""roman"">Close the hatch
covers immediately after completion of loading in each hold. The hatch
covers can also be additionally sealed with a suitable sealing tape (such
as 'Ramneck""). Recheck that all ventilators are closed as no ventilation
is permitted during transport.</li></ol><br><li><b>MONITORING THE CARGO
DURING THE VOYAGE</b></li><br><br><ol><li class=""roman"">If requested by
the Australian Maritime Safety Authority, monitor the cargo temperatures
twice daily and compare with air and sea temperatures.</li><li
class=""roman"">If requested by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority,
monitor the hold atmosphere twice daily.</li><li class=""roman"">Return
the completed log of temperature/hold atmosphere information to the
Australian Maritime Safety Authority upon arrival at the destination
port.</li><li class=""roman"">If a large increase in temperature (i.e.
500C increase in 3 days) occurs relative to air/sea temperatures, then
recheck hatch covers and ventilators for leaks and re-seal where
necessary.</li><li class=""roman"">Under no circumstances should the
hatches be opened or the hold entered during the
voyage.</li></ol><br><li><b>PREPARATION FOR
DISCHARGE</b></li><br><br><ol><li class=""roman"">Prior to opening the
hatches, at least one water hose with a fine spray nozzle must be in
readiness for each hold. Salt water is acceptable if no other water is
available.</li><li class=""roman"">Only open the hatches immediately
prior to commencement of discharge. The cargo may mist noticeably on a
cool day, but this is harmless. Brown coal briquettes, unlike coal, do
not emit methane during transport and so there is no risk of explosion.
Under no condition should the holds be ventilated prior to
discharge.</li></ol><br><li><b>DISCHARGE OF THE CARGO</b><br><br><ol><li
class=""roman"">To prevent excessive dust during discharge, the cargo
surface should be sprayed with a light cover of water.
If any personnel must enter the hold or work on the surface of the
briquettes during discharge, then the hold atmosphere has to comply with
an oxygen level of 21%. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide gas levels
should be measured. The recommended threshold level for carbon monoxide
is 50 ppm (55 mg/m3). The recommended threshold level for carbon dioxide
is 5,000 ppm (9,000mg/m3). Carbon dioxide is a product of coal oxidation.
If diesel bulldozers, etc. are used in the hold they should be fitted
with catalytic converters to reduce carbon dioxide, odour and particle
emissions. Compliance with local regulations is required</li><li
class=""roman"">During unloading, attention should be paid to the cargo
for signs of 'hot spots' (i.e. steaming). If a 'hot spot' is detected,
then spray the affected area with water and remove the 'hot spot'
immediately to prevent spreading. Spread out the 'hot spot' area on the
wharf away from the remainder of the cargo.</li><li class=""roman"">If
the discharge is interrupted for more that eight hours, then the hatch
covers and all other ventilation should be
closed.</li></ol></li></ol></td>
                      </tr> "                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_051.htm 0
331         Appendix III - General Requirements for Carriage of
Ferrosilicon            Appendix III - General Requirements for Carriage
of Ferrosilicon "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
III</b><br><br><b>General Requirements for Carriage of
Ferrosilicon</b><ol><li>The compartment to contain ferrosilicon may be
inspected by a surveyor of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority
before commencement of loading.</li><li>Two sets of self-contained
breathing apparatus must be carried in the ship - in addition to normal
fire-fighting equipment.</li><li>At least two gas detectors, suitably
calibrated to indicate the presence of hydrogen, phosphine or arsine,
must be available on board, together with instructions for their use.
Measurements must be taken at least once during every eight hours at each
outlet ventilator and in any other accessible space adjacent to the
compartment where the ferrosilicon is stowed and the results entered in
the log book. Facilities must be provided to make accurate determinations
of the gas concentrations at each outlet ventilator without danger to the
operator.</li><li>Ferrosilicon must be stored under cover, but exposed to
the weather for not less than 3 days prior to shipment.</li><li>Consult
the IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes if other dangerous
goods are to be carried in conjunction with Ferrosilicon.</li><li>A
certificate stating the percentage of silicon present in the consignment
is to be produced by the shipper before commencement of
loading.</li><li>Ventilation fans are to be in operation at all times
from commencement of loading until the compartment is free of
ferrosilicon.</li><li>The bilge wells are to be in a clean, dry condition
before commencement of loading. The bilge timbers are to be in good
condition and covered with double hessian.</li><li>The bilge wells must
be opened up and the compartment washed out after unloading. A gas check
by a chemist must be made before washing out begins.</li><li>In older
vessels it could be advisable to pump out the ballast in tanks adjacent
to a compartment containing ferrosilicon. ( In case of
leaks.)</li></ol><b>DETAILED REQUIREMENTS</b><br><br>Prior to loading the
cargo compartment is to be inspected by a surveyor of the Australian
Maritime Safety Authority for compliance with requirements.<br><br>The
provisions of the IMO Bulk Cargoes Code are the basic requirements for
the carriage of ferrosilicon in bulk in the holds of dry cargo ships. The
following are amplifications of the Code requirements:<ol><li>Bilge wells
are to be clean and dry before commencement of loading and covered with
hessian to preclude entry of the ferrosilicon. Where the bilge suction
valve of the compartment is located in the machinery space the valve is
to be opened up and if necessary the valve lid and seat lapped to a fine
finish. After re-assembly the valve is to be locked shut and a notice
placed adjacent to the valve warning against opening without the master's
permission.</li><li>All pipes passing through the compartment must be in
good order and condition. Hold atmosphere sampling units must be
effectively blanked off.</li><li>Electrical circuits which are unsuitable
for use in an explosive atmosphere are to be isolated.</li><li>Ventilator
trunkings must be in sound condition and so arranged to preclude
interconnection of the hold atmosphere with other cargo spaces,
accommodation or work areas.</li><li>Mechanical ventilation fan motors
are to be either explosion proof or arranged so that the motor is not
located in the direct path of the hold atmosphere
exhaust.</li></ol><b>Operational Requirements</b><ol><li
class=""roman"">No smoking or naked flame is to be permitted on deck in
the vicinity of the hold or in the hold itself during loading or
unloading.</li><li class=""roman"">Any portable lighting must be safe for
use in an explosive atmosphere.</li><li class=""roman"">The cargo must be
dry and work is to cease during wet weather conditions and the hold
covered.</li><li class=""roman"">Sets of self-contained breathing
apparatus are to be available for immediate use together with lifeline
and a gas detector.</li><li class=""roman"">Prior to commencing unloading
the hold atmosphere is to be tested by a qualified chemist for the
presence of toxic and flammable gases.</li><li class=""roman"">Checks for
contaminant gases are to be carried out by a qualified chemist at 30
minute intervals while persons are in the hold.</li><li
class=""roman"">Entry into the hold is to be prohibited when gas
concentrations exceed the Threshold Limit Values, for phosphine (0.03ppm)
for arsine (0.05ppm) or where the oxygen level is below
18%.</li></ol></td>
                      </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_052.htm 0
332         Appendix III - Gases Releases from Ferrosilicon Impurities
When Water Is Added           Appendix III - Gases Releases from
Ferrosilicon Impurities When Water Is Added    "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
III</b><br><br><b>Instructions</b><br><br><b>QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORY -
CHEMICAL DIVISION</b><br><br>USE OF DREAGER GAS DETECTOR TO MONITOR
LEVELS OF ARSINE AND PHOSPHINE IN ATMOSPHERE IN SHIPS' HOLDS CONTAINING
BULK FERROSILICON<br><br><b>OPERATION OF DREAGER GAS
DETECTOR</b><ol><li>Check hand pump for correct operation, i.e. check
that pump is airtight by operating pump with unopened detector tube in
position.</li><li>Break off both ends of gas detector tube using the
attachment on the handpump.</li><li>Insert detector tube in handpump with
the arrow on the tube pointing toward the pump.</li><li>With 20 strokes
of the pump for arsine (or 10 strokes for phosphine) draw the atmosphere
to be tested through the detector tube.</li><li>Read the length of the
grey-violet discolouration from the printed scale. Scale values - ppm
AsH<sub>3</sub>, or PH<sub>3</sub>.</li><br><br>The maximum allowable
concentrations for safe exposure for eight (8) hours per day, five days
per week are;<br>Arsine 0.05 ppm.<br>Phosphine 0.3
ppm.<br><br><li>Detailed information on the tubes are included in the
packet.</li></ol><b>TESTING PROCEDURE</b><ol><li>Each eight hours test
the atmosphere in the hold containing the ferrosilicon, preferably at the
fan exhaust. Test for both arsine and phosphine</li><br><br>N.B. If
testing has to be carried out through an access opening, the exhaust fan
should be turned off during testing. On no account should the access
opening be entered to carry out testing - hold the gas detector inside
the access opening from outside.</li><br><br><li>Each eight hours test
the atmosphere, through an access opening, in the spaces adjacent to the
hold containing the ferrosilicon.<li>Record in a note book all test
results, including time date and atmosphere sampled.</li></ol></td>
                      </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_053.htm 0
333         Appendix III - Instructions - Quality Control Laboratory -
Chemical Division       Appendix III - Instructions - Quality Control
Laboratory - Chemical Division     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
III</b><br><br><b>Instructions</b><br><br><b>QUALITY CONTROL LABORATORY -
CHEMICAL DIVISION</b><br><br>USE OF DREAGER GAS DETECTOR TO MONITOR
LEVELS OF ARSINE AND PHOSPHINE IN ATMOSPHERE IN SHIPS' HOLDS CONTAINING
BULK FERROSILICON</b><br><br><b>OPERATION OF DREAGER GAS
DETECTOR</b><ol><li>Check hand pump for correct operation, i.e. check
that pump is airtight by operating pump with unopened detector tube in
position.</li><li>Break off both ends of gas detector tube using the
attachment on the handpump.</li><li>Insert detector tube in handpump with
the arrow on the tube pointing toward the pump.</li><li>With 20 strokes
of the pump for arsine (or 10 strokes for phosphine) draw the atmosphere
to be tested through the detector tube.</li><li>Read the length of the
grey-violet discolouration from the printed scale. Scale values - ppm
AsH<sub>3</sub>, or PH<sub>3</sub>.</li><br><br>The maximum allowable
concentrations for safe exposure for eight (8) hours per day, five days
per week are;<br>Arsine 0.05 ppm.<br>Phosphine 0.3
ppm.<br><br><li>Detailed information on the tubes are included in the
packet.</li></ol><b>TESTING PROCEDURE</b><br><br><ol><li>Each eight hours
test the atmosphere in the hold containing the ferrosilicon, preferably
at the fan exhaust. Test for both arsine and phosphine</li><br><br>N.B.
If testing has to be carried out through an access opening, the exhaust
fan should be turned off during testing. On no account should the access
opening be entered to carry out testing - hold the gas detector inside
the access opening from outside.</li><br><br><li>Each eight hours test
the atmosphere, through an access opening, in the spaces adjacent to the
hold containing the ferrosilicon.</li><li>Record in a note book all test
results, including time date and atmosphere sampled.</li></ol></td>
                      </tr>"                         Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_054.htm 0
334         Appendix IV - Section 9 - Materials Possessing Chemical
Hazards           Appendix IV - Section 9 - Materials Possessing Chemical
Hazards     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><b>Appendix
IV</b><br><br><b>Section 9 - Materials Possessing Chemical Hazards</b>
(Extract from IMO Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes - 1990
Edition)<br><br><b>9.1 General</b><br><br>9.1.1. Solid materials
transported in bulk which can present a hazard during transportation
because of their chemical nature or properties are listed in Appendix B.
Some of these materials are classified as dangerous goods in the
International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG Code), others are
materials which may cause hazards when transported in bulk.<br><br>9.1.2
It is important to note that this list of materials is not exhaustive. It
is therefore essential to obtain currently valid information about the
physical and chemical properties of the materials to be shipped in bulk
prior to loading whenever such shipment is contemplated. When materials
not listed in Appendix B are carried which fall within the classification
of 9.2.2, the ship concerned should carry evidence of the approval of the
competent authority for their transport.<br><br>9.1.3 Where consultation
with the competent authority is required prior to bulk shipment of a
material, it is equally important to consult authorities at the ports of
Ioading and discharge, concerning requirements which may be in
force.<br><br><b>9.2 Classes of hazard</b><br><br>9.2.1 The
classification of materials possessing chemical hazards and intended to
be shipped in bulk under the requirements of this Code should be in
accordance with 9.2.2 and 9.2.3.<br><br>9.2.2 Classification Chapter VII
of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as
amended, sets out the various classes of dangerous goods. For the purpose
of the Code it has been found more convenient to designate these classes
in accordance with the IMDG Code and to define in greater detail the
materials which would fall within each class. Additionally, ""Materials
Hazardous only in Bulk"" (MHB) are defined in this
section.<br><br>9.2.2.1 Class 4.1: Flammable solids<br>These materials
possess the properties of being easily ignited by external. sources such
as sparks and flames and of being readily combustible or of being liable
to cause or contribute to fire through friction.<br><br>9.2.2.2 Class
4.2: Substances liable to spontaneous combustion<br>These materials
possess the common property of being liable to heat spontaneously and to
ignite.<br><br>9.2.2.3 Class 4.3: Substances which, in contact with
water, emit flammable gases.<br>These materials possess the common
property, when in contact with water, of evolving flammable gases. In
some cases these gases are liable to spontaneous ignition.<br><br>9.2.2.4
Class 5.1: Oxidising substances (agents)<br>These materials although in
themselves not necessarily combustible may, either by yielding oxygen or
by similar processes, increase the risk and intensity of fire in other
materials with which they come into contact.<br><br>9.2.2.5 Class 6.1:
Poisonous (toxic) substances<br>These materials are liable either to
cause death or serious injury or to harm human health if swallowed or
inhaled, or by skin contact.<br><br>9.2.2.6 Class 6.2: Infectious
substances<br>These materials contain viable micro-organisms or their
toxins which are known or suspected to cause disease in animals or
humans.<br><br>9.2.2.7 Class 7: Radioactive Materials<br>These materials
spontaneously emit a significant radiation. Their specific, activity is
greater than 70k Bq/kg (2nCi/g).<br><br>9.2.2.8 Class 8:
Corrosives<br>These materials possess in their original state the common
property of being able to more or less severely damage living
tissue.<br><br>9.2.2.9 Class 9: Miscellaneous dangerous substances and
articles<br>These materials present a hazard not covered by other
classes.
          </td>"                         Source : Australian Maritime
Safety Authority (AMSA)      2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_055.htm 0
335         Appendix V - Hot Briquetted Iron (H.B.I.) Recommended Loading
and Carriage Guidelines            Appendix V - Hot Briquetted Iron
(H.B.I.) Recommended Loading and Carriage Guidelines      "<tr>
                        <td
class=""genText""><ol><li>Guidelines</li><br><br>The purpose of these
Guidelines is to provide practical guidance to shipmasters and terminals
to ensure that appropriate practices and precautions are adopted for the
safe loading, carriage, and discharge of HBI.<br><br>The scope of these
guidelines is to act as a core document from which charterers, ship and
terminal operators will develop specific and detailed instructions for
the areas of their responsibility describing how the standards of these
Guidelines are to be applied and maintained. To ensure compliance with
Australian law these Guidelines should be read in conjunction with the BC
Code and with Marine Orders Part
34.<br><br><li>Description</li><br><br>HBI is derived from Direct Reduced
Iron (DRI) by a hot moulding process in which. briquettes of iron are
formed under pressure at temperatures greater than 6500C. The density of
the briquettes is consistently greater than 5
gms/cm<sup>3</sup>.<br><br><li>Regulations</li><br><br>The following
Regulations are administered by AMSA and are applicable to all vessels
engaged in international voyages to or from Australian ports and in
Australian interstate voyages. Intrastate voyages within Australian
states are the responsibility of the relevant State Marine
Authority.<ul><li>Marine Orders. Part 34, Cargo & cargo handling - solid
bulk cargoesIssue 3 of 1997, pursuant to S.425(1AA) of the Navigation Act
1912, and</li><li>International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG
Code), supplement Solid Bulk Cargoes (BC Code)published by the
International Maritime Organisation (IMO) pursuant to the International
Convention for Safety of Life at Sea, 1974 (SOLAS)
</li></ul><br><li>Pre-Loading requirements</li><br><br>Any vessel not
fulfilling all of the pre-loading Guidelines of 4.1, 4.2, 4.3 and 4.5 is
to be rejected for loading until able to conform. Guidelines of 4.4 are
to be noted as complied with, or not complied with.<br><ul><li>4.1 Cargo
Holds - before commencement of loading</li><br>4.1.1 Holds are to be
clean and dry with all previous cargo residues removed and cargo
battens/timber removed;<br>4.1.2 Surrounding structure is to be water-
tight, and adjacent tanks to cargo holds are to have been
tested;<br>4.1.3 Bilge suction's have been tested and found efficient;
and<br>4.1.4 Bilges, bilge wells or both must be clean, dry, and covered
with gauze sufficient to prevent entry of HBI chips and
briquettes.<br><br><li>4.2 Hatchcovers, Vents, and Accessories - before
commencement of loading</li><br>4.2.1 Hatchcovers are watertight and have
been tested;<br>4.2.2 Ventilators and hatches giving access to holds are
watertight and have been tested.<br><br><li>4.3 Shippers Responsibilities
- before commencement of loading</li><br>4.3.1 The ships master has been
supplied by the shipper with details of the properties and
characteristics of the cargo as required by Marine Orders, Part 34 and
the provisions of the BC Code<br><br><li>4.4 Ship Preparation - before
commencement of loading</li><br>4.4.1 Holds have been washed down,
preferably with fresh water, and be dry;<br>4.4.2 Decks should be washed
down with fresh water in order to remove salt accumulation wherever
likely to have contact with HBI fines or dust;<br>4.4.3 Sensitive
electronic equipment, satellite communication and radar aerials are to be
protected by dust-proof coverings;<br>4.4.4 The ship has cleaning and
removal equipment in place for dealing with HBI dust and
fines;<br><br><li>4.5 Ballast</li><br>4.5.1 Where possible, adjacent
ballast tanks, other than double bottom tanks, should be kept empty.
</ul><br><li>Loading and stowage</li><br><br>Guidelines relating to
loading and stowage are to be noted by surveyors for the shipper as being
compiled with or not compiled with.<br><ul><li>5.1 Loading and
Storage</li><br>5.1.1 Temperatures of HBI being loaded are to be observed
and recorded by shippers, surveyors;<br>5.1.2 When loading, cargo should
be evenly distributed and concentrations of fines in the stow minimised.
Cargo should be loaded in layers, each of a nominal height of 2.0 metres
deep, to assist fines distribution;<br>5.1.3 When each successive pour is
complete, the cargo temperature is to be regularly checked and a record
of surface temperatures kept for each hold;<br>5.1.4 Loading sequences
are to be planned to maximise periods of rest between pours in each
hold;<br>5.1.5 In fine weather, hatches are to be kept open between pour
sequences to assist ventilation of holds;<br>5.1.6 If ""hot spots"" form
in the stow, they are to be continuously monitored until stabilised and
temperatures decline;<br>5.1.7 ""Hot spots"" which fail to stabilise are
to be removed by grab when exceeding 750C.<br>5.1.8 Loading of HBI is to
be stopped and conveyors cleared on HBI whenever rain occurs and all
hatches closed during any rainfall;<br>5.1.9 When resuming the loading of
HBI after rain, conveyor belts are to be run clear of the hatch until
free of water.<br><br><li>5.2 Terminal Practices - Prior to and during
loading</li><br>5.2.1 HBI at the point of loading is not to exceed a
temperature of 650C and its fines content is not to exceed 5% (under 4mm)
by mass;<br>5.2.2 Open storage is acceptable prior to loading, however,
HBI being loaded should be free of visible moisture;<br>5.2.3 Conveyor
belts are to be dry and free of residues from cargoes handled previously.
</ul><br><li>Post Loading </li><br><br>Events following loading are to be
noted by Shippers surveyors, as far is practicable<br>6.0.1 The final
form of stowage and temperatures for each hold is to be observed and
recorded prior to the final closing of hatches;<br>6.0.2 Vessels carrying
HBI should not proceed to sea until cargo temperatures are observed to be
stable;<br>6.0.3 Heating which may occur in the cargo usually subsides,
but surface temperatures should not be permitted to rise over 750C
without intervention;<br>6.0.4 Hatches when closed for sea are to be
watertight, and sealed to prevent water ingress.<br><br><li>Ocean
Carriage</li><br><ul><li>7.1 On the voyage</li><br>7.1.1 Accumulation of
HBI dust, fines and chips are to removed after completion of loading and
washdown and cleaning measures carried out as soon as practicable after
departure from the port;<br>7.1.2 Hatches are to remain secured and water
tightness maintained;<br>7.1.3 Entry of water into holds from any cause
is to be prevented;<br>7.1.4 Bilges and bilge wells are to be regularly
monitored to ensure that they are dry during the voyage and no free water
exists in the holds. Should water be detected in any quantity, it must be
removed as a matter of priority and the source of ingress located and
sealed.<br>7.1.5 Surface ventilation of the HBI cargo is to be carried
out in fine weather and dry conditions.<br>7.1.6 No smoking, naked
lights, or hotwork is to be permitted on the main deck in the way of
cargo vents. </ul><br><li>General</li><br><ul><li>8.1
Personnel</li><br>Entry of personnel into s containing HBI should not be
permitted until the master is satisfied that it is safe to do so after
taking all safety precautions.<li>8.2 Measuring Equipment</li><br>All
measuring equipment used in the loading, stowage, and monitoring of HBI
cargo should be subject to a programme of checks and calibration.<li>8.3
Contingency Plans</li><br>8.3.1 When in port the terminal operator should
ensure that contingency plans are in place to enable the prompt removal
of any overheating HBI cargo. For this purpose grabs and hoisting
equipment are to be available;<br>8.3.2 in ports handling HBI, a suitable
area should be nominated for the reception, open air storage and
passivating of HBI cargo removed from a ship;<br>8.3.3 For the vessel at
sea, it is the responsibility of the master and owner to ensure that
contingency plans are in place to redirect the vessel to the nearest port
able to provide a means of promptly removing an overheated portion of HBI
cargo. (See 6.0.3 above). <li>8.4 HBI Cargo Discharge </li>Precautions
8.4.1, 8.4.2, and 8.4.3 are to be carried out before discharge
commences.<br>8.4.1 Sensitive electronic equipment, satellite
communication and radar aerials are to be protected by dust-proof
coverings;<br>8.4.2 Decks should be washed down with fresh water wherever
likely to have contact with HBI fines or dust;<br>8.4.3 The ship has
cleaning and removal equipment in place for dealing with HBI dust and
fines.</ul></ol><br></td>
                      </tr>"                        Source : Australian
Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) 2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos
      cargos001_056.htm 0
336         DRI pellet             "                     <tr>
                        <td span class=""genText"">
                                             <img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('1');"">Direct reduced iron (DRI)</a></td>
                    </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
             <table id=""1"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
               <td class=""genText""><ul><li>Cargo spaces should in an
inert condition with less than 5% oxygen, and hydrogen at less than
1%.</li><li>DRI should be treated with an oxidation-inhibiting
process.</li><li>Carriage of DRI should always be under a nitrogen
blanket.</li><li>Records should be frequently taken of the levels of
hydrogen and oxygen in each cargo space.</li><li>DRI should not be hot or
damp when loaded. DRI in excess of 65 degrees centigrade should never be
loaded.</li><li>DRI should be trimmed to reduce amount of cargo surface
area and also reduce void space in the cargo which will allow hot gas to
move upwards.</li></ul></td>
              </tr>
             </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                      <tr>
                        <td span class=""genText"">
                                             <img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('2');"">Oxygen depleting cargoes</a></td>
                    </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
             <table id=""2"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                      <td width=""5""></td>
              <td><span class=""genBoldText"">A recent report from The
Nautical Institute International Marine Accident Reporting Scheme (MARS)
described an incident in which four stevedores died.</span></td>
             </tr>
                        <tr>
                                      <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                      <td width=""5""></td>
                          <td class=""genText"">After entering a hold,
one of them slipped on a cargo of logs which had been stripped of their
bark. When the other stevedores went in to try and rescue him, they too
were trapped in the deep spaces between the logs. All four were later
brought out unconscious and were pronounced dead on arrival at the
hospital. The inherent nature of the cargo, which lead to oxygen
depletion in the enclosed space, combined with the slippery surfaces of
the logs, created the hazard which led to this tragic
incident.<br><br>Logs are just one of several cargoes which are known to
have oxygen depleting properties. This oxygen depletion can be caused by
factors such as self-heating of the cargo, oxidation of metals and ores
or decomposition of vegetable oils, animal fats, grain and other organic
materials or their residues. The materials listed below are known to be
capable of causing oxygen depletion:<br><br><ul><li>Grain, grain products
and residues from grain processing (such as bran, crushed grain, crushed
malt or meal), hops, malt husks and spent malt;</li><li>Oilseeds as well
as products and residues from oilseeds (such as seed expellers, seed
cake, oil cake and meal);</li><li>Copra;</li><li>Wood in such forms as
packaged timber, round wood logs, pulpwood, props (pit props and other
prop wood), woodchips, wood shavings, wood pulp pellets and
sawdust;</li><li>Jute, hemp, flax, sisal, kapok, cotton and other
vegetable fibres, empty bags, cotton waste, animal fibres, animal and
vegetable fabric, wool waste and rags;</li><li>Fishmeal and
fishscrap;</li><li>Guano;</li><li>Sulphidic ores and ore
concentrates;</li><li>Charcoal, coal and coal products;</li><li>Direct
reduced iron (DRI);</li><li>Dry ice;</li><li>Metal wastes and chips, iron
swarf, steel and other turnings, borings, drillings, shavings, filings
and cuttings; and</li><li>Scrap metal.</li></ul>Failure to observe simple
procedures can lead to people being unexpectedly overcome when entering
enclosed spaces. While ship¡¦s staff will no doubt be aware of such
dangers and will observe sufficient precautions, it is also obligatory on
the part of the ship to ensure that cargo holds are well ventilated and
that the stevedoring company is warned of inherent dangers with the cargo
carried on board before commencement of work.<br><br></td>
                        </tr>
             <tr>
                                      <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                      <td width=""5""></td>
              <td align=""right""><span class=""genText"">Source :
Britannia<br>March 2004</span><br><br></td>
             </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                      <tr>
                        <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('3');"">Problems with DRI pellet cargoes in
the Caribbean</a></td>
                    </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
            <table id=""3"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                         <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
                           <td class=""genText"">A number of problems
involving the loading of direct reduced iron pellets at Point Lisas in
Trinidad have recently been reported by P&I Club correspondent Steers /
Cariconsult.<br><br>DRI pellets are listed in the IMO Code of Safe
Practice for the Carriage of Solid Cargoes in Bulk, which stipulates that
this cargo requires inerting and temperature monitoring throughout
loading, as well as further monitoring of oxygen, hydrogen and
temperature levels until discharge.<br><br>Steers / Cariconsult says that
problems involve excessive heating of cargo, contamination of ships'
decks and coatings with corrosive dust, shoreside fires during loading,
and loading of burning DRI. There has also been an incident resulting in
the death of a ship's second officer, potentially arising from improper
management of inerting systems.<br><br>They add that several cases
""appear to indicate physical shortcomings in shore facilities, chain-of-
command failure, or inadequate application of safe practices in relation
to the loading and handling of DRI. The role of the Competent Authority
is likely to come under scrutiny.<br><br>""It is recommended that
particular caution be exercised when loading DRI pellets in Trinidad, and
masters should be diligent to ensure that all recommendations of the IMO
Code are properly carried out, and any deficiencies reported to
shipowners so that proper steps can be taken prior to vessels
sailing.<br><br>""Vessels affected by DRI dust - whether loading the
cargo themselves or performing operations at adjacent facilities - should
protect radar and other sensitive equipment, record and protest dust
contamination, and obtain full advice on requirements for cleaning
affected surfaces.""<br><br>For further information,<br>contact Rupert
Steer of Steers/<br>Cariconsult International Limited<br>on: Tel +1 246
423 6412 / Fax: +1<br>246 423 0985, or email:<br><a
href=""mailto:rupert.cconsult@caribsurf.com"">rupert.cconsult@caribsurf.c
om</a><br><br></td>
                         </tr>
             <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
               <td align=""right""><span class=""genText"">Source : the
London P&I club<br>February 2004</span><br><br></td>
             </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                      <tr>
                        <td span class=""genText"">
                                             <img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('4');"">Recent casualties</a></td>
                    </tr>
           <tr>
            <td>
             <table id=""4"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                         <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
                           <td class=""genText""><ul><li>MV 'Ythan' built
1984 sustained an explosion and sank off Colombia carrying a cargo of DRI
in March 2004.</li><li>MV 'Admandas' built 1986 also sank in October 2003
carrying a cargo of DRI, or iron briquettes.</li></ul></td>
                         </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
           </tr>"                              2004-03-19 2004-03-19
      cargos      cargos002_001.htm 0
337
                  0
338         Oxygen depleting cargoes           A recent report from The
Nautical Institute International Marine Accident Reporting Scheme (MARS)
described an incident in which four stevedores died.      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">After entering a hold, one
of them slipped on a cargo of logs which had been stripped of their bark.
When the other stevedores went in to try and rescue him, they too were
trapped in the deep spaces between the logs. All four were later brought
out unconscious and were pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital. The
inherent nature of the cargo, which lead to oxygen depletion in the
enclosed space, combined with the slippery surfaces of the logs, created
the hazard which led to this tragic incident.<br><br>Logs are just one of
several cargoes which are known to have oxygen depleting properties. This
oxygen depletion can be caused by factors such as self-heating of the
cargo, oxidation of metals and ores or decomposition of vegetable oils,
animal fats, grain and other organic materials or their residues. The
materials listed below are known to be capable of causing oxygen
depletion:
                                             <br>
<ul><li>Grain, grain products and residues from grain processing (such as
bran, crushed grain, crushed malt or meal), hops, malt husks and spent
malt;</li><li>Oilseeds as well as products and residues from oilseeds
(such as seed expellers, seed cake, oil cake and
meal);</li><li>Copra;</li><li>Wood in such forms as packaged timber,
round wood logs, pulpwood, props (pit props and other prop wood),
woodchips, wood shavings, wood pulp pellets and sawdust;</li><li>Jute,
hemp, flax, sisal, kapok, cotton and other vegetable fibres, empty bags,
cotton waste, animal fibres, animal and vegetable fabric, wool waste and
rags;</li><li>Fishmeal and fishscrap;</li><li>Guano;</li><li>Sulphidic
ores and ore concentrates;</li><li>Charcoal, coal and coal
products;</li><li>Direct reduced iron (DRI);</li><li>Dry
ice;</li><li>Metal wastes and chips, iron swarf, steel and other
turnings, borings, drillings, shavings, filings and cuttings;
and</li><li>Scrap metal.</li></ul>Failure to observe simple procedures
can lead to people being unexpectedly overcome when entering enclosed
spaces. While ship¡¦s staff will no doubt be aware of such dangers and
will observe sufficient precautions, it is also obligatory on the part of
the ship to ensure that cargo holds are well ventilated and that the
stevedoring company is warned of inherent dangers with the cargo carried
on board before commencement of work.<br><br></td>
                       </tr>"                        Source : Britannia
      2004-03-19 2004-03-19               0
339
                   0
340         "Grain, grain products and residues from grain processing"
            "Grain, grain products and residues from grain processing"
      "                       <tr>
                         <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);"" onmousedown=""showSubSection('1');"">Loading
grain (and other moisture sensitive cargoes) in Vancouver,
Canada</a></td>
                     </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
             <table id=""1"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
                                        <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                        <td width=""5""></td>
                            <td class=""genText"">We are grateful to Roger
A Day from Shipowners Assurance Management (BC) Ltd, our correspondents
in Vancouver, for this article on loading cargo in the rain in
Vancouver.<br><br>At some times of the year on Canada¡¦s west coast,
mainly between October and March, Pacific depressions follow one another
with monotonous regularity giving rise to many days at a time of overcast
skies and continuous light to moderate precipitation interspersed with
periods of heavier rain ¡V or snow.<br><br>Many of the bulk cargoes
loaded here, particularly grains, are to some extent moisture sensitive.
Masters and ships¡¦ officers are rightly concerned to avoid harming such
cargoes by exposing them to extended periods of precipitation. Shutting
down cargo operations during these extended periods of precipitation
would significantly extend the loading operation. While the first concern
must be the condition of the cargo, ¡¥time is money¡¦ and Masters and
officers are therefore expected to avoid undue delays. The exercise of
their duties becomes one of balancing possible risk to the cargo against
stopping cargo operations unnecessarily. A realistic assessment of the
risk to the cargo from rainwater exposure is a useful
exercise.<br><br>The area (in square metres) of the open hatchway when
multiplied by the precipitation rate per hour (in millimetres), divided
by one thousand, will give the approximate quantity of water (in m.
tonnes) that will be added to the cargo loaded during that hour. For
example, rain falling at a rate of 3 millimetres per hour (moderate rain)
through an open hatch measuring 15 by 20 metres, adds just under one m.
tonne of water to the cargo loaded during that hour. If the vessel was
loading cargo at 500 m. tonnes per hour (a rate usually exceeded in the
port of Vancouver) this would lead to an increase of 0.2% moisture
content. (To put this into context, the maximum allowable moisture
content for many cargoes is in the region of 14.5% and typically grain is
loaded at about 12% moisture content). Clearly a reduction in the area of
the open hatch, or an increase in the loading rate, with a constant rate
of precipitation, reduces the increase in the moisture
content.<br><br>Most cargoes presented for loading in Vancouver have
moisture contents reasonably well below the maximum allowable moisture
content and can therefore withstand a modest increase. Some insight into
what various precipitation rates look and feel like can be gained by
leaving a straight sided container (a crude gauge) exposed to
precipitation and noting the rate of accumulated precipitation against
the look and feel of the rain that is falling. A rule of thumb is that if
the rain would call for the intermittent use of windscreen wipers while
driving a car then loading can continue if suitable precautions are
adopted. Rain that would call for the operation of high-speed wipers
would be heavy enough to curtail cargo operations.<br><br>Tarpaulins,
carefully deployed to avoid rain collecting in ¡¥bellies¡¦ from which
water could be spilled by careless handling, can be useful in reducing
the effective hatch opening. Before opening hatches to resume cargo
operations following rain or snow, standing water left on the hatch
covers should be removed with brooms or squeegees so that it does not
spill into the cargo. Generally, avoiding concentrations of water falling
into small areas of the cargo is the object of the exercise.<br><br>So
called ¡¥rain letters¡¦ can be issued by shippers or charterers
purporting to hold the Master and the ship free of responsibility for
claims arising from loading in the rain but these letters are less than
comprehensively worded and would probably provide little protection
against third party bill of lading holders in the event of problems with
the cargo.<br><br>There are also problems that sometimes arise over the
perceived quality and quantity figures that appear in Mate¡¦s Receipts
and bills of lading for grain cargoes loaded in Canada. Ship¡¦s officers
cannot be expected to be expert judges of the quality of any particular
grain cargo. There are over a dozen different qualities of wheat for
instance and similar variations in the quality of other grains handled
through Canada¡¦s export elevators. Except in obvious circumstances, for
example, where the wrong type of grain is being loaded, or the cargo has
an offensive smell or is contaminated with foreign material, ships¡¦
officers usually have neither the experience nor the knowledge to
criticise the quality of a grain cargo being loaded. To help the ships¡¦
officers ascertain the quality and also the quantity of grain loaded,
Canada¡¦s Federal Government has set up the Canadian Grain Commission
(CGC), to ensure that Canadian export grains properly meet sales contract
specifications. They also supervise the movement of such cargoes to tide
water and their loading.<br><br>The CGC inspectors are present at all
export elevators. Their mandate is to inspect, test and classify all
grain cargoes arriving at those elevators and to ensure that cargoes
loaded into ships are what is described in the sales contract. They are
also charged with the measurement of all such cargoes and the compiling
of any records and data that may be required by the Federal Government in
the movement and sale of such cargoes. These inspectors will regularly
attend on board vessels loading grain cargoes to ensure that the correct
cargo is being loaded. They have the authority to suspend loading and, if
necessary, remove cargo from a ship that is not within the sales contract
specifications and to have it replaced by sound cargo. The CGC inspectors
have been found to be extremely reliable and ships¡¦ officers can be
confident that if the CGC inspector is satisfied then the quality of the
grain being loaded is in accord with the sales contract
specification.<br><br>Similarly, the CGC is responsible for determining
the quantity of cargo received at an elevator and loaded into vessels.
Their scales are frequently checked for accuracy. Mate¡¦s Receipt
quantities for such cargoes are always those determined by the CGC
inspectors at the elevator and, for accuracy, are certainly more reliable
than any figures ever calculated from, for instance, a carefully carried
out draft survey. This does not reduce the responsibility of ships¡¦
officers carefully and conscientiously to monitor the loading of such
cargoes. They should immediately bring to the notice of those carrying
out the loading any reservations they may have as to the quantity of the
cargo being loaded or the quality of a parcel that has been
loaded.<br><br>Due to the unusual meteorological conditions in Vancouver,
loading in the rain seems, at times, to be unavoidable. However, it
remains the case that the Master is ultimately responsible for
determining what precautions should be taken and whether cargo should be
protected from the rain, with or without the assistance of a P&I
surveyor. Similarly, while the presence of such experts as the CGC
inspectors may give some comfort to a Master, it remains the Master¡¦s
responsibility to note the apparent condition of the cargo for the
purposes of clausing the bills of lading.<br><br></td>
             </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                     <tr>
           <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);"" onmousedown=""showSubSection('2');"">Oxygen
depleting cargoes</a></td>
                   </tr>
                     <tr>
           <td>
            <table id=""2"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
             <tr>
                                      <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                      <td width=""5""></td>
                          <td class=""genText"">After entering a hold,
one of them slipped on a cargo of logs which had been stripped of their
bark. When the other stevedores went in to try and rescue him, they too
were trapped in the deep spaces between the logs. All four were later
brought out unconscious and were pronounced dead on arrival at the
hospital. The inherent nature of the cargo, which lead to oxygen
depletion in the enclosed space, combined with the slippery surfaces of
the logs, created the hazard which led to this tragic
incident.<br><br>Logs are just one of several cargoes which are known to
have oxygen depleting properties. This oxygen depletion can be caused by
factors such as self-heating of the cargo, oxidation of metals and ores
or decomposition of vegetable oils, animal fats, grain and other organic
materials or their residues. The materials listed below are known to be
capable of causing oxygen depletion:<br><br><ul><li>Grain, grain products
and residues from grain processing (such as bran, crushed grain, crushed
malt or meal), hops, malt husks and spent malt;</li><li>Oilseeds as well
as products and residues from oilseeds (such as seed expellers, seed
cake, oil cake and meal);</li><li>Copra;</li><li>Wood in such forms as
packaged timber, round wood logs, pulpwood, props (pit props and other
prop wood), woodchips, wood shavings, wood pulp pellets and
sawdust;</li><li>Jute, hemp, flax, sisal, kapok, cotton and other
vegetable fibres, empty bags, cotton waste, animal fibres, animal and
vegetable fabric, wool waste and rags;</li><li>Fishmeal and
fishscrap;</li><li>Guano;</li><li>Sulphidic ores and ore
concentrates;</li><li>Charcoal, coal and coal products;</li><li>Direct
reduced iron (DRI);</li><li>Dry ice;</li><li>Metal wastes and chips, iron
swarf, steel and other turnings, borings, drillings, shavings, filings
and cuttings; and</li><li>Scrap metal.</li></ul>Failure to observe simple
procedures can lead to people being unexpectedly overcome when entering
enclosed spaces. While ship¡¦s staff will no doubt be aware of such
dangers and will observe sufficient precautions, it is also obligatory on
the part of the ship to ensure that cargo holds are well ventilated and
that the stevedoring company is warned of inherent dangers with the cargo
carried on board before commencement of work.<br><br></td>
             </tr>
            </table>
           </td>

                     </tr>"                              2004-03-19
      2004-03-19 cargos     cargos002_003.htm 0
341
                 0
342        Cargo damaged by sweat       When the temperature of the cargo
is below the dew point       "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">Cargo sweat :<br>When the
temperature of the cargo is below the dew point of surrounding air, the
cargo cools the air and condensation forms on the cargo. Cargo sweat
occurs when warm moist air enters the cargo hold containing colder
cargo.<br><br>Ship sweat :<br>When the temperature of ship's steel
plating is lower than dew point of air in hold, ship sweat occurs due to
failure of replacing warmer air at load port with cooler and drier air
when the vessel sails to a colder climate.<br><br>Cargo types
:<br>Hygroscopic cargoes contain moisture such as agriculture products,
fish, forest cargoes. These cargoes can absorb and release moisture both
which can cause damage. There is a danger of heavy ship's sweat during
carriage from a warm to a cold climate and ventilation is necessary to
replace moist air with drier air. The risk of sweat from cold to warm
climate is low.<br><br>Non hygroscopic cargoes contain no moisture such
as steel. They do not release moisture but can be damaged if they absorb
moisture. There may be a risk of ship's sweat if warm moist air exists
from load port. Ventilation is necessary. If carriage from a cold to warm
climate, cargo sweat is likely but ventilation is not necessary and holds
should be sealed.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                               2004-03-19
      2004-03-19 cargos       cargos002_005.htm 0
343         Bagged Rice       "Rice is grown all over Vietnam,
particularly in the Mekong Delta region."       "                     <tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">
                                             <table width=""100%""
border=""0"" cellpadding=""0"" cellspacing=""0"">
                                                <tr>
                                                  <td class=""genText""
height=""16""><img src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('3');"">Discharge of bagged rice in
Ukrainian ports</a></td>
                                                </tr>
              <tr>
               <td>
              <table id=""3"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
               <tr>
                                        <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                        <td width=""5""></td>
                <td class=""genText"">Advice has been received from DIAS
Marine Consultants based in Odessa, Ukraine that there are frequent
incidents where vessels are required by the State Sanitary Authority
(SSA) to stop discharging further cargo the moment alledged non-sound
cargo is discovered. Upon vessel's arrival, the SSA will board and
inspect the condition of the cargo. Even if mould is found on the bags
only, the SSA will stop the discharge of all cargo from the holds where
the mouldy bags are discovered. It is understood the SSA have a very
tough stance and negotiation is difficult and cargo receivers have been
known to reject the cargo on the basis of the SSA report.<br><br>This
issue appears to relate to a number of vessels arriving from Chinese
loadports where sometimes the cargo, packed in single woven polypropelene
bags(not double bags), is stored in stacks in the open area covered only
by tarpaulin and as a conseqeunce wettage and collection of moisture
prior to loading or during the loading operation may have arisen. Another
possibility for the moulding of the bags could have arisen during the
long voyage from China to the Black Sea ports which would mean transiting
several climatic zones resulting in formation of sweat. The improper
stowage of the cargo in the holds would not allow proper ventilation and
this could also contribute to the development of mould on the
bags.<br><br>In the event your vessels will be calling any Ukraine ports
to discharge bagged rice, we would suggest you advise the Master of the
above situation and request him to take the following precautionary
measures:<br><ul><li>ensure the cargo, prior to loading, is stored at a
warehouse </li><li>in the event the cargo is stored improperly, a Letter
of Protest should be issued prior to loading</li><li>monitoring the
loading operation with careful inspection of the cargo loaded on board
should be performed to prevent the possibility of any wet bags being
loaded</li><li>ensure proper stowage of the cargo in the holds to allow
satisfactory cargo ventilation during the voyage</li></ul>In the event
damage to cargo is suspected to have occurred during the voyage, please
inform your P&amp;I Club so that the P&amp;I Club's correspondent at the
discharge port may appoint surveyors to attend the vessel and assist to
minimise the potential claim.</td>
              </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
             </tr>
                                              <tr>
                                                <td span
class=""genText"" height=""16""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('1');"">Rice cargo protection</a></td>
                                              </tr>
             <tr>
              <td>
             <table id=""1"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
               <td class=""genText""><p>Allied Maritime, has developed a
new procedure for the protection of bagged rice cargoes, a type of cargo
often exposed to the threat of condensation damage. </p>
                         <p>According to Dimitris Marinis, Manager of
Allied Maritime Inc., they have been experiencing several incidents of
damage to rice cargoes. Most commonly, this is caused by ship sweat
during freights between South East Asia and West Africa . In this area,
the substantial variance in sea water temperatures increases the danger
of condensation.</p>
                         <p>Traditionally, rice cargoes are protected
through the use of bamboo mats and sticks. However, bamboo is known to
absorb ship sweat. Sometimes the bamboo itself is too fresh, meaning that
the bamboo contains humidity. Both scenarios give an increased risk of
cargo damage.</p>
                         <p><b>The secret of success</b></p>
                         <p>So what is Allied Maritime doing to protect
their cargos? Quite simply, they've overcome condensation damage by using
a mix of kraft paper, plastic and styrofoam. </p>
                         <p>The three materials are used as follows: </p>
                         <p><ul><li>Kraft paper and plastic at tank tops
and hopper tanks</li><li>Styrofoam on the ship's sides, on the forward
bulkhead of no.1, on the engine room bulkhead and under the deck between
the hatch covers </li><li>Kraft paper on all other bulkheads In addition
to the above, it is recommended </li></ul> </p>
                         <p>that cargo is placed within the corrugated
bulkheads. In this way, the problem of bags falling from the top and
bursting, resulting in cargo shortages at the first ports, is also
eliminated.</p>
                         <p><b>Allied Maritime's experience</b></p>
                          <p>¡V After starting this new practice, we have
seen a considerable improvement, says Mr. Marinis. ¡V Successive use of
these materials, and especially the styrofoam, shows that condensation
damage is significantly reduced. The reason is that </p>
                          <p>temperature differences within the holds
become much lower, and they no longer reach the levels seen when bamboo
mats and sticks were used.</p>
                          <p>A good example is the discharge of 890,000
bags of rice at Buenaventura by our managed vessel, M/V Aventurero dos.
This cargo was loaded in Thailand and protected by craft paper, plastic
and styrofoam. The result was 226 bags very slightly affected by
condensation. For us this is really a miracle. We are fully convinced
that these materials should be the preferred method of protection for
rice cargoes. Provided all crew members take good care of ventilation,
condensation damage will no longer occur in this trade.</p>
                          <p><b>Joint benefit</b></p>
                          <p>Allied Maritime strongly believes that this
new practise should be made known for the greater benefit of the shipping
community. ¡V After all, the purpose of the steps taken is to protect the
trade and owners in general. The lesser the relevant claims, the better
renewal rates the P&amp;I clubs can offer, ends Mr. Marinis. </p>
                          <p>SUCCESSIVE USE OF THESE MATERIALS, AND
ESPECIALLY THE STYROFOAM, SHOWS THAT CONDENSATION DAMAGE IS SIGNIFICANTLY
REDUCED. THE REASON IS THAT TEMPERATURE DIFFERENCES WITHIN THE HOLDS
BECOME MUCH LOWER, AND NO LONGER REACH THE LEVELS SEEN WHEN BAMBOO MATS
AND STICKS WERE USED.</p>
                        <p align=""right""><span class=""genText"">Source
: Beacon (Skuld Magazine)<br>No.1 May 2004<br></span></p></td>
              </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
             </tr>
                                               <tr>
                                                 <td span
class=""genText"" height=""6""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"" width=""5""
height=""5"">&nbsp;<a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('2');"">Rice Production</a></td>
                                               </tr>
             <tr>
              <td>
             <table id=""2"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
                                        <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                        <td width=""5""></td>
               <td class=""genText"">Rice is grown all over Vietnam,
particularly in the Mekong Delta region. Approximately 3 million tonnes
of rice is being exported annually, compared with very little in the
past. There are few large plantations and most of the rice is produced by
smallholders.<br><br>
                               Two to three crops are harvested each year.
The first is planted in October/November and is gathered in
January/February when the climate is dry and the crop mature. However,
rice planted in March is harvested in August/September during the rainy
season. The colour of the rice is less white than the first crop and the
paddy (ie the complete rice kernel in its shell) may have a moisture
content of up to 30%.<br>
                              <br>After harvesting and threshing the
paddy must be dried. Although this is best achieved mechanically with hot
air dryers, such equipment is scarce in Vietnam at the present time.
Consequently, much of the paddy is left to dry naturally in the sun. This
method is less effective in terms of reducing moisture content, which may
be as high as 20% on completion.<br><br>
                              The paddy is then bagged and dispatched to
milling stations, usually by boat. The first milling removes the husks
and most of the bran, after which the rice may be specified as
""Reasonably Well Milled"" (RWM). The precise standard of RWM rice is not
defined. Further milling, polishing and cleaning may be carried out to
improve the white colour of the final product.<br>
                              <br>
                              The milling and polishing process also
serves to reduce the moisture content of the rice, typically to a level
between 15% and 16%. In some cases these figures may be higher if the few
plants in operation minimise the milling process in an effort to
accommodate the increasing rice supply.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Storage</b><br>
                              <br>
                              After milling the rice is bagged and
transported by river to centrally located warehouses for storage. In some
instances mixing and re-bagging may take place to achieve a particular
specification. However, unlike other producing countries where the rice
may be stored for many months, the majority of Vietnamese rice is
exported almost immediately. The short period spent in storage allows
little opportunity for the rice to continue drying naturally.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Rice Standards</b><br>
                              <br>
                              The export of Vietnamese rice is monitored
and supervised by organisations such as SGS, Vina Control, or the Food
and Commodities Control Center. These agencies act on behalf of shippers
to ensure that the specification of rice leaving the country complies
with the applicable standard.<br>
                              <br>
                              The Vietnamese Standard for White Rice
specifies rice grades in terms of grain classification, grain
composition, degree of milling and other factors. The prescribed moisture
content for most grades is 14%, this being the upper limit for the safe
storage and carriage of rice.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Moisture Content</b><br>
                              <br>
                              In spite of such checks, experience has
shown that the true moisture content of Vietnamese rice at the time of
loading may exceed the critical figure of 14%, sometimes by a significant
amount.<br>
                              <br>
                              Beyond this level, the risk of the air in
the hold becoming saturated by moisture transferred from the rice rises
proportionally. The resulting condensation may give rise to conditions
favourable for mould growth and the subsequent deterioration of the
cargo.<br>
                              <br>
                              In such instances, a vessel fitted with
natural ventilation alone is unlikely to succeed in reducing the moisture
content of the air to the point where it ceases to become a threat.
Almost all claims to date have occurred aboard such ships, and vessels
with mechanically ventilated holds stand a far better chance of a sound
outturn.<br>
                              <br>
                              The likelihood of excessive moisture
content is greatest during the rainy season (May to October) when sudden
cloudbursts and high relative humidity may affect the rice as it is
transported by barge from the warehouse to the vessel.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Independent Surveyors</b><br>
                              <br>
                              In view of the potential problems, the
appointment of an independent surveying company to monitor the loading is
recommended. There are at least two private companies in Ho Chi Minh City
providing such a service, and arrangements may be made through the local
Club Correspondent.<br>
                              <br>
                              It is customary for the independent
surveying company to allocate a junior surveyor to each of the
stevedoring gangs, with a principal surveyor in overall charge.<br>
                              <br>
                              Attendance by an independent surveying
company is regarded as an important loss prevention measure. <b>Therefore
in an effort to minimise the possibility of large claims, the Club will
bear 50% of the survey costs until the situation improves</b>. <br>
                              <br>
                              Members should also organise an independent
tally for their own account.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Loading</b><br>
                              <br>
                              On arrival the Master should ask for a
written specification of the rice including moisture content. Permission
to start loading should not be granted until these details have been
provided. Such information may be used to counter claims for
deterioration if the rice is later found to have a moisture content
appreciably higher than that originally declared.<br>
                              <br>
                              The number and location of ventilation
channels within the stow should be discussed with the principal surveyor
beforehand. If the ship is not fitted with cargo battens, particular care
should be exercised to ensure that bags are not loaded in between frame
spaces, thereby restricting ventilation.<br>
                              <br>
                              Similarly, the method and extent of
dunnaging should be agreed. Rows of bamboo poles should be laid
athwartships on the tank top, not more than 20 centimetres apart. A
second layer should be placed on top at right angles to the first before
covering the whole area with bamboo matting.<br>
                              <br>
                              Bamboo poles should also be positioned
crosswise against the frames to keep the cargo away from the sides of the
ship, interwoven to provide a barrier. Bamboo mats should again be placed
against this arrangement and elsewhere. No bags should come into contact
with exposed steel.<br>
                              <br>
                              The top surface of the stow should be
covered with thick kraft paper over the entire hold, not just in the
hatch square. <br>
                              <br>
                              Separating layers of bags with plastic
sheeting as the stow grows in height is not recommended practice. The
sheets may restrict the ability of the rice to ""breathe"" and act as
moisture traps.<br>
                              <br>
                              During the loading the surveying team will
supervise the dunnaging and the building of ventilation channels in the
stow. To key the stow together single bags should be placed across the
ventilation channel every fifth layer, spaced five to ten bags apart. It
should be made clear to the surveying team that they must alert the Duty
Officer immediately if the stevedores begin to deviate from the agreed
plan.<br>
                              <br>
                              If it becomes necessary to close the hatch
covers due to rain or other reasons, hold ventilation should be started
at once to minimise the early onset of condensation. Light plastic sheets
may be obtained locally and placed over the stow temporarily as an
additional precaution.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Rejection of cargo</b><br>
                              <br>
                              Deck officers should be aware that
individual bags and, if necessary, entire barges should be rejected if
there is tearing or staining, or if the condition of the rice is damp or
suspect.<br>
                              <br>
                              Only sound bags should be loaded as any
which are stained or damp may spoil undamaged cargo in the immediate
vicinity.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Sampling</b><br>
                              <br>
                              In addition to examining the rice as it
arrives and monitoring the stowage on board, the independent surveying
company should be instructed to take samples from each rice barge
throughout the loading. These should be sent to a laboratory for analysis
to determine whether the moisture content concurs with the specifications
provided. Again, evidence of an excessively high moisture content may
prove instrumental in defending claims for moisture damage at a later
date.<br>
                              <br>
                              On some occasions it has been reported that
shippers have refused to allow rice samples to be taken. Masters should
be instantly suspicious and inform the local Club Correspondent
immediately, note protest and make a detailed entry in the logbook.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Other Precautions</b><br>
                              <br>
                              Irrespective of the current production
difficulties in Vietnam, it should be remembered that rice is sold on the
basis of weight. Consequently rice with an excessive moisture content may
not concern the sellers unduly, particularly if they feel that they can
blame any subsequent deterioration on the ship. <br>
                              <br>
                              Therefore it is vital that the ship pays
close attention to the cargo throughout the voyage and can support all
customary routines and safeguards with written evidence. In addition to
logbook entries, weather reports, stowage plans and tally sheets,
comprehensive ventilation records will always be called for in the event
of moisture damage. Good ventilation records will almost certainly
strengthen a vessel? case if it can be shown that full and correct
control was exercised.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Discharging</b><br>
                              <br>
                              For the time being, Members should contact
the local Club Correspondent at the port of discharge and arrange for an
independent surveying company to monitor the condition of the rice as it
is unloaded. <b>The Club will make a 50% contribution towards these costs
until further notice</b>. An independent tally should also be organised,
again for the account of the Member.<br>
                              <br>
                              <b>Recommendations</b><br>
                              <br>
                              In summary and to minimise the possibility
of claims for moisture damage, Members should note the following if
planning to load a cargo of Vietnamese rice;</p><ul><li>As far as
possible, only mechanically ventilated vessels should be considered for
this trade.</li><li>The local Club Correspondent should be contacted
prior to arrival and asked to appoint an independent surveying company to
monitor the loading and tally the cargo.</li><li>Loading should not
commence until the Master has obtained a written specification of the
rice including its moisture content.</li><li>A dunnaging plan should be
discussed with the independent surveying company prior to cargo
operations.</li><li>A stowage plan should also be agreed including the
number and position of the ventilation channels.</li><li>The independent
surveying company should be instructed to take representative samples of
the rice throughout the loading for laboratory analysis.</li><li>Parcels
and/or individual bags of rice arriving by barge should be rejected if
found to be torn, stained, damp or in otherwise suspect
condition.</li><li>Bags of rice damaged while being loaded should also be
rejected. Only sound cargo should be accepted for shipment.</li><li>The
use of cargo handling hooks by stevedores should be
forbidden.</li><li>Only one cargo sling should be attached per
lift.</li><li>If it is necessary to close any hatches (eg rain, idle
time), hold ventilation should be started immediately.</li><li>At the
discharge port the local Club Correspondent should be asked to appoint an
independent surveying company to monitor the condition of the cargo. An
independent tally should also be arranged.</li><li>All customary routines
regarding the handling, stowage and ventilation of rice should be
observed and recorded.</li>
                          </ul>
                         <span class=""genText"" align=""right"">
                                          Source : West of England - Loss
prevention bulletin 1/1998/99</span><br>
&nbsp;</span></td>
              </tr>
             </table>
            </td>
             </tr>
                                            </table>

           </td>
                      </tr>"                          "Source : West of
England - Loss prevention bulletin 1/1998/99,Source : Beacon (Skuld
Magazine)
No.1 May 2004"    2004-03-19 2004-03-19 cargos        cargos002_006.htm 1
344         Magnesium phosphide fumugant        Magnesium phosphide is
sometimes used a fumigant     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Magnesium phosphide is
sometimes used a fumigant and inserted in tubes together with the cargo
in the cargo holds.<br><br>There has been reports these tubes have burnt
and exploded when leaked and there is water contact. Reference should be
made to IMO's pblication on 'Rceommendations on the safe use of
pesticides in ships.'<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                                2004-03-19
      2004-03-19 cargos       cargos002_007.htm 0
345         "Charcoal, coal and coal products"        Charcoal    "
<tr>
                        <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('1');"">Charcoal</a></td>
                    </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
             <table id=""1"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                         <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
                           <td class=""genText"">Carriage of charcoal in
containers has caused several fires on board vessels. Charcoal is
usually packed in paper bags and carried in containers. Charcoal is made
by heating under restricted air supply, a process called calcination. To
avoid self heating the charcoal must be allowed to cool down sufficiently
after heating before being packed.<br><br>The calcination process which
takes place at temperatures between 350 and 500 C produces non activiated
charcoal. Additional treatment by enlarging the porous structure will
give a product called activated charcoal. Both activated and non
activated charcoal fall within class 4.2 IMDG code. The Cide does not
apply to a consignment of charcoal if ot passes the test for non
activated carbon described on page 4225 of the Code and is accomonaued by
the certificate from the shipper stating the cargo has passed the test.
Charcoal which falls within Class 4.2 should not be carried in bulk. The
cargo must be packed, stowed and segregated as indicated in the Code.
Activiated charcoal is subject to stricter packing requirements and needs
to be carried in sealed packaging.<br><br></td>
                         </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                      <tr>
                        <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);"" onmousedown=""showSubSection('2');"">Oxygen
depleting cargoes</a></td>
                    </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
            <table id=""2"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
             <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
               <td><span class=""genBoldText"">A recent report from The
Nautical Institute International Marine Accident Reporting Scheme (MARS)
described an incident in which four stevedores died.</span></td>
             </tr>
             <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
                           <td class=""genText"">After entering a hold,
one of them slipped on a cargo of logs which had been stripped of their
bark. When the other stevedores went in to try and rescue him, they too
were trapped in the deep spaces between the logs. All four were later
brought out unconscious and were pronounced dead on arrival at the
hospital. The inherent nature of the cargo, which lead to oxygen
depletion in the enclosed space, combined with the slippery surfaces of
the logs, created the hazard which led to this tragic
incident.<br><br>Logs are just one of several cargoes which are known to
have oxygen depleting properties. This oxygen depletion can be caused by
factors such as self-heating of the cargo, oxidation of metals and ores
or decomposition of vegetable oils, animal fats, grain and other organic
materials or their residues. The materials listed below are known to be
capable of causing oxygen depletion:<br><br><ul><li>Grain, grain products
and residues from grain processing (such as bran, crushed grain, crushed
malt or meal), hops, malt husks and spent malt;</li><li>Oilseeds as well
as products and residues from oilseeds (such as seed expellers, seed
cake, oil cake and meal);</li><li>Copra;</li><li>Wood in such forms as
packaged timber, round wood logs, pulpwood, props (pit props and other
prop wood), woodchips, wood shavings, wood pulp pellets and
sawdust;</li><li>Jute, hemp, flax, sisal, kapok, cotton and other
vegetable fibres, empty bags, cotton waste, animal fibres, animal and
vegetable fabric, wool waste and rags;</li><li>Fishmeal and
fishscrap;</li><li>Guano;</li><li>Sulphidic ores and ore
concentrates;</li><li>Charcoal, coal and coal products;</li><li>Direct
reduced iron (DRI);</li><li>Dry ice;</li><li>Metal wastes and chips, iron
swarf, steel and other turnings, borings, drillings, shavings, filings
and cuttings; and</li><li>Scrap metal.</li></ul>Failure to observe simple
procedures can lead to people being unexpectedly overcome when entering
enclosed spaces. While ship¡¦s staff will no doubt be aware of such
dangers and will observe sufficient precautions, it is also obligatory on
the part of the ship to ensure that cargo holds are well ventilated and
that the stevedoring company is warned of inherent dangers with the cargo
carried on board before commencement of work.<br><br></td>
              </tr>
             </table>
           </td>
          </tr>"                               2004-03-22 2004-03-22
      cargos      cargos002_008.htm 0
346   38    US laws in environmental cases
      &#20851;&#20110;&#29615;&#22659;&#20107;&#20214;&#30340;&#32654;&#2
2269;&#27861;&#24459; "Various US laws are available to criminally
prosecute owners, masters, crew in an envrionmental offence such as
MARPOL"     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Various US laws are
available to criminally prosecute owners, masters, crew in an
environmental offence such as MARPOL and we suggest owners are aware of
the potential seriousness of these violations when trading to the US.
                                             <p>
                                             <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#35768;&#22810;&#29616;&#26377;&#30340;&#32654;&#22269;&#27861;&
#24459;&#35268;&#23450;&#23545;&#33337;&#19996;&#65292;&#33337;&#38271;&#
21644;&#33337;&#21592;&#36829;&#21453;&#29615;&#22659;&#27745;&#26579;&#2
7861;&#35268;&#35832;&#22914;&#22269;&#38469;&#38450;&#27745;&#26579;&#20
844;&#32422;&#65288;MARPOL&#65289;&#31561;&#35838;&#20197;&#21009;&#20107
;&#22788;&#32602;&#65292;&#25105;&#20204;&#25552;&#35831;&#33337;&#19996;
&#26126;&#30333;&#21435;&#32654;&#22269;&#30340;&#33337;&#33334;&#23545;&
#20197;&#19978;&#36829;&#29359;&#30340;&#28508;&#22312;&#30340;&#20005;&#
37325;&#21518;&#26524;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br>
           <font color=""#000066""><b>Act to prevent pollution from
ships</b></font></p>
                                             <p><b><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#38450;&#27490;&#33337;&#33334;&#36896;&#25104;&#27745;&#26579;
&#27861;&#20196;<br>
                                             </span>
           </b>
           <br>Adopts as US law the provisions of MARPOL. It is a class D
felony to knowingly commit a MARPOL offence. This is punishable by up to
10 years imprisonment and a fine of up to US$250,000 for an individual
and US$500,000 for a company. A vessel violating MARPOL may be arrested
and sold to satisfy the fine. The security requested by the Coast Guard
is a US$500,000 surety bond, and a P&amp;I Club LOU may not be
acceptable.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#26681;&#25454;MARPOL&#26465;&#25991;&#21046;&#23450;&#30340;&#3
2654;&#22269;&#27861;&#24459;&#35268;&#23450;&#25925;&#24847;&#36829;&#21
453;MARPOL&#23558;&#23450;&#20026;D&#32423;&#37325;&#32618;&#65292;&#2418
2;&#23545;&#20010;&#20154;&#22788;&#20197;&#26368;&#22810;10&#24180;&#303
40;&#30417;&#31105;&#21644;&#26368;&#39640;25&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#30
340;&#32602;&#27454;&#65292;&#23545;&#20844;&#21496;&#22788;&#20197;&#263
68;&#39640;50&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#30340;&#32602;&#27454;&#12290;&#36
829;&#21453;MARPOL&#30340;&#33337;&#33334;&#23558;&#34987;&#25187;&#30041
;&#24182;&#21334;&#20986;&#29992;&#26469;&#20607;&#20184;&#32602;&#27454;
&#12290;&#28023;&#23736;&#35686;&#21355;&#38431;&#35201;&#27714;&#20986;&
#20855;&#19968;&#20221;50&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#30340;&#23653;&#32422;
&#25285;&#20445;&#65292;&#32780;&#19988;&#19981;&#25509;&#21463;&#20445;&
#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#30340;&#25285;&#20445;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br>The US authorities may revoke departure clearance for the
vessel and detain the vessel where there is reasonable cause to believe
the ship, owner or opertair may have committed a MARPOL offence.
                                            </p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#32654;&#22269;&#24403;&#23616;&#26377;&#26435;&#22312;&#26377;&
#21512;&#29702;&#30340;&#29702;&#30001;&#35748;&#20026;&#33337;&#33334;&#
12289;&#33337;&#19996;&#25110;&#33337;&#33334;&#32463;&#33829;&#20154;&#3
6829;&#21453;&#20102;MARPOL&#30340;&#35268;&#23450;&#26102;&#25764;&#2223
8;&#33337;&#33334;&#31163;&#28207;&#35777;&#24182;&#25187;&#30041;&#33337
;&#33334;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br><font color=""#000066""><b>Clean Water Act</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#27700;&#22495;&#28165;&#27905;&#27861;&#20196;<br>
                                            </span></b>
           <br>
           This Act prohibits the discharge of any pollutant into the
waters of US or the contiguous zone. Failure to report a discharge may be
punishable by imprisonment of up to 5 years.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#35813;&#27861;&#20196;&#31105;&#27490;&#21521;&#32654;&#22269;&
#30340;&#27700;&#22495;&#25110;&#20854;&#20020;&#36817;&#21306;&#22495;&#
25490;&#25918;&#20219;&#20309;&#27745;&#26579;&#29289;&#36136;&#12290;&#1
9981;&#19978;&#25253;&#32780;&#25797;&#33258;&#25490;&#25918;&#27745;&#26
579;&#29289;&#36136;&#30340;&#23558;&#34987;&#22788;&#20197;&#26368;&#228
10;5&#24180;&#30340;&#30417;&#31105;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br>
           <font color=""#000066""><b>Rivers and Harbour
Act</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#27827;&#27969;&#21644;&#28207;&#21475;&#27861;&#20196;
           <br>
                                            </span></b>
           <br>This Act prohibits the discharge of refuse of any kind
into US waters, and the defination includes oil. Violation of the Act is
a strict liability offence. Although it is said by some Clubs that strict
liability offences are not covered under P&I Club rules, we are of the
opinion if such offences are a result of negligence of the crew and there
is no wrongdoing by the owners or the managers, we consider the P&I Club
should not take a position to exclude a strict liability claim.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#35813;&#27861;&#20196;&#31105;&#27490;&#21521;&#32654;&#22269;&
#30340;&#20219;&#20309;&#27700;&#22495;&#20542;&#20498;&#20219;&#20309;&#
31181;&#31867;&#30340;&#24223;&#29289;&#65292;&#36825;&#20854;&#20013;&#2
1253;&#25324;&#27833;&#31867;&#12290;&#36829;&#21453;&#27492;&#26465;&#27
861;&#20196;&#26159;&#20005;&#26684;&#36180;&#20607;&#36131;&#20219;&#303
40;&#36829;&#27861;&#34892;&#20026;&#12290;&#34429;&#28982;&#26377;&#2012
3;&#21327;&#20250;&#22768;&#31216;&#20005;&#26684;&#36180;&#20607;&#36131
;&#20219;&#30340;&#36829;&#27861;&#34892;&#20026;&#19981;&#23646;&#20110;
&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#35268;&#21017;&#30340;&#25215;&#20445;&
#33539;&#22260;&#65292;&#20294;&#26159;&#25105;&#20204;&#35748;&#20026;&#
22914;&#26524;&#36825;&#20123;&#36807;&#38169;&#26159;&#30001;&#20110;&#3
3337;&#21592;&#30340;&#30095;&#24573;&#65292;&#20063;&#19981;&#23384;&#22
312;&#33337;&#19996;&#21644;&#32463;&#31649;&#20154;&#28459;&#19981;&#324
63;&#24515;&#30340;&#34892;&#20026;&#65292;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#2025
0;&#27809;&#26377;&#29702;&#30001;&#23558;&#20005;&#26684;&#36180;&#20607
;&#36131;&#20219;&#20316;&#20026;&#38500;&#22806;&#36131;&#20219;&#12290;
</span>
           <br>
           <br>
           <font color=""#000066""><b>False Statements Act</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <font color=""#000066"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#20266;&#35777;&#27861;&#20196;</span>
           </font>
           <br>
                                            </span></b>
           <br>There is a violation if concealment is found where
disclosure is required by statute or form. A false entry in a vessel's
oil record book is a ground for an indictment resulting in fines and
imprisonment. We would advise these consequences would not fall under P&I
Club cover and owners are strongly advised to educate their crew on the
seriousness of these laws.</p>
                                             <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                             <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#38544;&#30610;&#27861;&#20196;&#25110;&#21046;&#24230;&#35268;&
#23450;&#24517;&#39035;&#20844;&#24320;&#30340;&#20107;&#23454;&#26159;&#
19968;&#31181;&#36829;&#35268;&#34892;&#20026;&#12290;&#20266;&#36896;&#3
3337;&#33334;&#27833;&#31867;&#35760;&#24405;&#26412;&#35760;&#36733;&#20
869;&#23481;&#23558;&#34987;&#25511;&#21578;&#24182;&#22788;&#20197;&#326
02;&#27454;&#21644;&#30417;&#31105;&#12290;&#25105;&#20204;&#24544;&#2157
8;&#36825;&#20123;&#32467;&#26524;&#23558;&#19981;&#23646;&#20110;&#20445
;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#30340;&#25215;&#20445;&#33539;&#22260;&#65292;
&#24182;&#24378;&#28872;&#24314;&#35758;&#33337;&#19996;&#25945;&#32946;&
#20182;&#20204;&#30340;&#33337;&#21592;&#20102;&#35299;&#36825;&#20123;&#
27861;&#24459;&#30340;&#20005;&#37325;&#24615;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br><font color=""#000066""><b>Perjury and witness
tampering</b></font></p>
                                             <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                             <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#20316;&#20266;&#35777;&#21450;&#36159;&#36162;&#35777;&#20154;
<br>
                                             </span></b><br>US laws
provide for severe penalties for false information to a Government
representative. Influencing, witness tampering, corrupting officials and
destroying evidence results in a criminal offence with imprisonment of up
to 10 years. These consequences do not fall under P&I Club cover.</p>
                                             <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                             <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#32654;&#22269;&#27861;&#24459;&#20005;&#26684;&#22788;&#32602;&
#21521;&#25919;&#24220;&#20195;&#34920;&#25552;&#20379;&#34394;&#20551;&#
25253;&#21578;&#30340;&#34892;&#20026;&#12290;&#24433;&#21709;&#12289;&#3
6159;&#36162;&#35777;&#20154;&#12289;&#33104;&#36133;&#23448;&#21592;&#21
644;&#38144;&#27585;&#35777;&#25454;&#23548;&#33268;&#29359;&#32618;&#303
40;&#23558;&#22788;&#20197;&#26368;&#39640;10&#24180;&#30340;&#30417;&#31
105;&#12290;&#36825;&#20123;&#21518;&#26524;&#19981;&#23646;&#20110;&#204
45;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#20445;&#21333;&#33539;&#22260;&#12290;<br></
span>
           </td>
                      </tr>"                              2004-03-22
      2004-03-22 legal_awareness chi_awareness038.htm     1
347         US laws in environmental cases
      &#20851;&#20110;&#29615;&#22659;&#20107;&#20214;&#30340;&#32654;&#2
2269;&#27861;&#24459; "Various US laws are available to criminally
prosecute owners, masters, crew in an envrionmental offence such as
MARPOL"     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Various US laws are
available to criminally prosecute owners, masters, crew in an
environmental offence such as MARPOL and we suggest owners are aware of
the potential seriousness of these violations when trading to the US.
                                            <p>
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#35768;&#22810;&#29616;&#26377;&#30340;&#32654;&#22269;&#27861;&
#24459;&#35268;&#23450;&#23545;&#33337;&#19996;&#65292;&#33337;&#38271;&#
21644;&#33337;&#21592;&#36829;&#21453;&#29615;&#22659;&#27745;&#26579;&#2
7861;&#35268;&#35832;&#22914;&#22269;&#38469;&#38450;&#27745;&#26579;&#20
844;&#32422;&#65288;MARPOL&#65289;&#31561;&#35838;&#20197;&#21009;&#20107
;&#22788;&#32602;&#65292;&#25105;&#20204;&#25552;&#35831;&#33337;&#19996;
&#26126;&#30333;&#21435;&#32654;&#22269;&#30340;&#33337;&#33334;&#23545;&
#20197;&#19978;&#36829;&#29359;&#30340;&#28508;&#22312;&#30340;&#20005;&#
37325;&#21518;&#26524;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br>
           <font color=""#000066""><b>Act to prevent pollution from
ships</b></font></p>
                                            <p><b><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#38450;&#27490;&#33337;&#33334;&#36896;&#25104;&#27745;&#26579;
&#27861;&#20196;<br>
                                            </span>
           </b>
           <br>Adopts as US law the provisions of MARPOL. It is a class D
felony to knowingly commit a MARPOL offence. This is punishable by up to
10 years imprisonment and a fine of up to US$250,000 for an individual
and US$500,000 for a company. A vessel violating MARPOL may be arrested
and sold to satisfy the fine. The security requested by the Coast Guard
is a US$500,000 surety bond, and a P&amp;I Club LOU may not be
acceptable.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#26681;&#25454;MARPOL&#26465;&#25991;&#21046;&#23450;&#30340;&#3
2654;&#22269;&#27861;&#24459;&#35268;&#23450;&#25925;&#24847;&#36829;&#21
453;MARPOL&#23558;&#23450;&#20026;D&#32423;&#37325;&#32618;&#65292;&#2418
2;&#23545;&#20010;&#20154;&#22788;&#20197;&#26368;&#22810;10&#24180;&#303
40;&#30417;&#31105;&#21644;&#26368;&#39640;25&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#30
340;&#32602;&#27454;&#65292;&#23545;&#20844;&#21496;&#22788;&#20197;&#263
68;&#39640;50&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#30340;&#32602;&#27454;&#12290;&#36
829;&#21453;MARPOL&#30340;&#33337;&#33334;&#23558;&#34987;&#25187;&#30041
;&#24182;&#21334;&#20986;&#29992;&#26469;&#20607;&#20184;&#32602;&#27454;
&#12290;&#28023;&#23736;&#35686;&#21355;&#38431;&#35201;&#27714;&#20986;&
#20855;&#19968;&#20221;50&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#30340;&#23653;&#32422;
&#25285;&#20445;&#65292;&#32780;&#19988;&#19981;&#25509;&#21463;&#20445;&
#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#30340;&#25285;&#20445;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br>The US authorities may revoke departure clearance for the
vessel and detain the vessel where there is reasonable cause to believe
the ship, owner or opertair may have committed a MARPOL offence.
                                            </p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#32654;&#22269;&#24403;&#23616;&#26377;&#26435;&#22312;&#26377;&
#21512;&#29702;&#30340;&#29702;&#30001;&#35748;&#20026;&#33337;&#33334;&#
12289;&#33337;&#19996;&#25110;&#33337;&#33334;&#32463;&#33829;&#20154;&#3
6829;&#21453;&#20102;MARPOL&#30340;&#35268;&#23450;&#26102;&#25764;&#2223
8;&#33337;&#33334;&#31163;&#28207;&#35777;&#24182;&#25187;&#30041;&#33337
;&#33334;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br><font color=""#000066""><b>Clean Water Act</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#27700;&#22495;&#28165;&#27905;&#27861;&#20196;<br>
                                            </span></b>
           <br>
           This Act prohibits the discharge of any pollutant into the
waters of US or the contiguous zone. Failure to report a discharge may be
punishable by imprisonment of up to 5 years.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#35813;&#27861;&#20196;&#31105;&#27490;&#21521;&#32654;&#22269;&
#30340;&#27700;&#22495;&#25110;&#20854;&#20020;&#36817;&#21306;&#22495;&#
25490;&#25918;&#20219;&#20309;&#27745;&#26579;&#29289;&#36136;&#12290;&#1
9981;&#19978;&#25253;&#32780;&#25797;&#33258;&#25490;&#25918;&#27745;&#26
579;&#29289;&#36136;&#30340;&#23558;&#34987;&#22788;&#20197;&#26368;&#228
10;5&#24180;&#30340;&#30417;&#31105;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br>
           <font color=""#000066""><b>Rivers and Harbour
Act</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#27827;&#27969;&#21644;&#28207;&#21475;&#27861;&#20196;
           <br>
                                            </span></b>
           <br>This Act prohibits the discharge of refuse of any kind
into US waters, and the defination includes oil. Violation of the Act is
a strict liability offence. Although it is said by some Clubs that strict
liability offences are not covered under P&I Club rules, we are of the
opinion if such offences are a result of negligence of the crew and there
is no wrongdoing by the owners or the managers, we consider the P&I Club
should not take a position to exclude a strict liability claim.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#35813;&#27861;&#20196;&#31105;&#27490;&#21521;&#32654;&#22269;&
#30340;&#20219;&#20309;&#27700;&#22495;&#20542;&#20498;&#20219;&#20309;&#
31181;&#31867;&#30340;&#24223;&#29289;&#65292;&#36825;&#20854;&#20013;&#2
1253;&#25324;&#27833;&#31867;&#12290;&#36829;&#21453;&#27492;&#26465;&#27
861;&#20196;&#26159;&#20005;&#26684;&#36180;&#20607;&#36131;&#20219;&#303
40;&#36829;&#27861;&#34892;&#20026;&#12290;&#34429;&#28982;&#26377;&#2012
3;&#21327;&#20250;&#22768;&#31216;&#20005;&#26684;&#36180;&#20607;&#36131
;&#20219;&#30340;&#36829;&#27861;&#34892;&#20026;&#19981;&#23646;&#20110;
&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#35268;&#21017;&#30340;&#25215;&#20445;&
#33539;&#22260;&#65292;&#20294;&#26159;&#25105;&#20204;&#35748;&#20026;&#
22914;&#26524;&#36825;&#20123;&#36807;&#38169;&#26159;&#30001;&#20110;&#3
3337;&#21592;&#30340;&#30095;&#24573;&#65292;&#20063;&#19981;&#23384;&#22
312;&#33337;&#19996;&#21644;&#32463;&#31649;&#20154;&#28459;&#19981;&#324
63;&#24515;&#30340;&#34892;&#20026;&#65292;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#2025
0;&#27809;&#26377;&#29702;&#30001;&#23558;&#20005;&#26684;&#36180;&#20607
;&#36131;&#20219;&#20316;&#20026;&#38500;&#22806;&#36131;&#20219;&#12290;
</span>
           <br>
           <br>
           <font color=""#000066""><b>False Statements Act</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <font color=""#000066"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#20266;&#35777;&#27861;&#20196;</span>
           </font>
           <br>
                                            </span></b>
           <br>There is a violation if concealment is found where
disclosure is required by statute or form. A false entry in a vessel's
oil record book is a ground for an indictment resulting in fines and
imprisonment. We would advise these consequences would not fall under P&I
Club cover and owners are strongly advised to educate their crew on the
seriousness of these laws.</p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#38544;&#30610;&#27861;&#20196;&#25110;&#21046;&#24230;&#35268;&
#23450;&#24517;&#39035;&#20844;&#24320;&#30340;&#20107;&#23454;&#26159;&#
19968;&#31181;&#36829;&#35268;&#34892;&#20026;&#12290;&#20266;&#36896;&#3
3337;&#33334;&#27833;&#31867;&#35760;&#24405;&#26412;&#35760;&#36733;&#20
869;&#23481;&#23558;&#34987;&#25511;&#21578;&#24182;&#22788;&#20197;&#326
02;&#27454;&#21644;&#30417;&#31105;&#12290;&#25105;&#20204;&#24544;&#2157
8;&#36825;&#20123;&#32467;&#26524;&#23558;&#19981;&#23646;&#20110;&#20445
;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#30340;&#25215;&#20445;&#33539;&#22260;&#65292;
&#24182;&#24378;&#28872;&#24314;&#35758;&#33337;&#19996;&#25945;&#32946;&
#20182;&#20204;&#30340;&#33337;&#21592;&#20102;&#35299;&#36825;&#20123;&#
27861;&#24459;&#30340;&#20005;&#37325;&#24615;&#12290;</span>
           <br>
           <br><font color=""#000066""><b>Perjury and witness
tampering</b></font></p>
                                            <p class=""MsoNormal""><b>
                                            <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family:
SimSun"">&#20316;&#20266;&#35777;&#21450;&#36159;&#36162;&#35777;&#20154;
<br>
                                            </span></b><br>US laws
provide for severe penalties for false information to a Government
representative. Influencing, witness tampering, corrupting officials and
destroying evidence results in a criminal offence with imprisonment of up
to 10 years. These consequences do not fall under P&I Club cover.</p>
                                             <p class=""MsoNormal"">
                                             <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#32654;&#22269;&#27861;&#24459;&#20005;&#26684;&#22788;&#32602;&
#21521;&#25919;&#24220;&#20195;&#34920;&#25552;&#20379;&#34394;&#20551;&#
25253;&#21578;&#30340;&#34892;&#20026;&#12290;&#24433;&#21709;&#12289;&#3
6159;&#36162;&#35777;&#20154;&#12289;&#33104;&#36133;&#23448;&#21592;&#21
644;&#38144;&#27585;&#35777;&#25454;&#23548;&#33268;&#29359;&#32618;&#303
40;&#23558;&#22788;&#20197;&#26368;&#39640;10&#24180;&#30340;&#30417;&#31
105;&#12290;&#36825;&#20123;&#21518;&#26524;&#19981;&#23646;&#20110;&#204
45;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#20445;&#21333;&#33539;&#22260;&#12290;<br></
span>
           </td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America    USA
      2004-03-22 2004-03-22 notices      usa022.htm 1
348         Draft limit in Conakry
      &#31185;&#32435;&#20811;&#37324;&#21507;&#27700;&#38480;&#21046;
      We understand the draft limitation in port has been reduced
substantially and vessels are      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We understand the draft
limitation in port has been reduced substantially and vessels are known
to take ground in port whilst working cargo. Owners should verify the new
draft limits with their own port agent as charterers' agents are known to
be unhelpful and further place charterers on notice the risk of vessel
taking ground and that all losses are for charterers' account.
                         <p class=""MsoNormal""> <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: SimSun; color:
black"">&#25105;&#20204;&#30693;&#36947;&#28207;&#21475;&#21507;&#27700;&
#24050;&#22823;&#22823;&#20943;&#23569;&#20102;&#65292;&#22823;&#23478;&#
37117;&#26126;&#30333;&#33337;&#33334;&#22312;&#28207;&#21475;&#35013;&#2
1368;&#36135;&#29289;&#20250;&#22352;&#27973;&#12290;&#33337;&#19996;&#24
212;&#21644;&#20182;&#20204;&#30340;&#28207;&#21475;&#20195;&#29702;&#266
80;&#23454;&#26032;&#30340;&#21507;&#27700;&#38480;&#21046;&#65292;&#2224
0;&#20026;&#31199;&#23478;&#20195;&#29702;&#30693;&#36947;&#26159;&#27809
;&#26377;&#29992;&#30340;&#65292;&#24182;&#35201;&#21578;&#30693;&#31199;
&#23478;&#33337;&#33334;&#22352;&#27973;&#30340;&#39118;&#38505;&#21644;&
#30001;&#27492;&#36896;&#25104;&#30340;&#25152;&#26377;&#25439;&#22833;&#
30001;&#31199;&#23478;&#25215;&#25285;&#12290;<br>
                         </span>
</td>
                      </tr>"       guinea      Africa     Guinea
      2004-03-22 2004-03-22 notices      guinea003.htm    1
349
                  1
350         International Carrier Bond (ICB) for AMS can also be arranged
by SIGCO          "We have been advised by SIGCO, the arrangers of the
COFRs, that they are now in a position to"     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We have been advised by
SIGCO, the arrangers of the COFRs, that they are now in a position to
also arrange for the International Carrier Bond (ICB) as required by the
new AMS requirement. As an example, a US$100,000 bond would cost US$1,750
and with their existing COFR processes, this should enable the bonds to
be delivered on time. SIGCO have this facility as a result of a
partnership with approved Surety Bond issuers who will be the issuers of
the bonds. Sigco is acting only as the interface for the obtainment of
the Bond.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       usa   North America    USA
      2004-03-23 2004-03-23 notices      usa023.htm 1
351         Recommendations on the Carriage of Calcium Hypochlorite
      Recommendations on the Carriage of Calcium Hypochlorite "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Reference is made to The
International Maritime Organisation&rsquot;s (IMO) Marine Safety Circular
No. 963 dated 1 June 2000. <br><br>After several large fires in cargo
ships in the 1990? involving calcium hypochlorite, the International
Group of P&I Clubs commissioned full-scale tests on the package sizes of
this cargo, which are routinely shipped. The results were such that
experts advising the International Group viewed the prevailing transport
requirements for this product group as inadequate and recommended that
they be amended.<br><br>The International Group therefore delivered a
submission to the February 2000 meeting of the IMO sub-committee on
Dangerous Goods, Solid Cargoes and Containers (DSC5), recommending
amendments to the IMDG Code transport requirements for calcium
hypochlorite. The changes recommended to the IMO were based on the
scientific results reflected in the Group circular issued by the Clubs in
November 1999. After much debate in plenary session at DSC5 the sub-
committee decided to recommend the Maritime Safety Committee to partially
amend the rules in the updated version of the IMDG Code (Amendment 30)
coming into force 1 January 2001. However, the amendments will not
introduce any changes to package sizes for this product, nor will they
expressly require stowage of the cargo Clear of Living Quarters. The
Maritime Safety Committee (MSC 72) adopted the recommendations of DSC 5
and the entries for calcium hypochlorite (UN Nos. 1748, 2208 and 2880)
will be amended in the new version of the code. In addition, an MSC
Circular (attached) was issued urging all parties to implement the
amended requirements as soon as possible.<br><br>The International Group
supports the actions undertaken by the IMO and agrees with the amendments
introduced in the new IMDG Code. However, the failure to introduce
package size limitation and the failure to require stowage Clear of
Living Quarters contradicts scientific advice received from the experts
advising the International Group. All of the full scale tests performed
by the International Group on calcium hypochlorite UN No. 2880 indicates
that larger packages can develop a critical condition at temperatures
which can be encountered in cargo holds of modern container vessels.
Furthermore, if calcium hypochlorite develops a critical condition (for
any reason) it will emit chlorine gas, which is toxic, and the runaway
reaction will develop extreme heat that will ignite surrounding cargoes,
which demonstrates the need to consider the proximity to living quarters
in stowage of such cargoes.<br><br>Consequently, it is the recommendation
of the International Group that Members involved in shipments of calcium
hypochlorite products should, in addition to the new requirements of the
IMDG Code, ensure that cargo transport units are stowed Clear of Living
Quarters and that the size of the individual packages stowed in the cargo
transport unit should not exceed 45 kg net weight per
package.<br><br>Below is a list of synonyms for products that are calcium
hypochlorites or products related to calcium hypochlorite. Depending on
the exact chemical composition of the product it may or may not become
unstable at temperatures encountered in the ship&rsquot;s hold.<br><br>B-
K POWDERBLEACHING POWDER<br>BLEACHING POWDER, containing 39% or less
chlorine<br>CALCIUM CHLOROHYDROCHLORITE<br>CALCIUM
HYPOCHLORIDE<br>CALCIUM HYPOCHLORITE<br>CALCIUM
OXYCHLORIDE<br>CAPORIT<br>CCH<br>CHLORIDE OF LIME<br>CHLORINATED
LIME<br>HTH<br>HY-CHLOR<br>LIME CHLORIDE<br><br></td>
                     </tr>

          <tr>
           <td align=""right""><span class=""genText"">Reference : The
International Group of P&I Clubs<br><!--24 March 2004--
></span><br><br></td>
          </tr>"                         Reference : The International
Group of P&I Clubs      2004-03-24 2004-03-24 cargos
      cargos002_009.htm 0
352         Sri Lanka - P&I confirmation &#26031;&#37324;&#20848;&#21345;-
&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#30830;&#35748;       Sri Lanka port authorities
require to receive evidence of coverage of P&I cover to include in the
minimum oil "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Sri Lanka port authorities
require to receive evidence of coverage of P&I cover to include in the
minimum oil pollution, wreck removal and fixed and fIoating objects with
effect from 1st March 2004. An original copy of the P&I entry certificate
will be sufficient if this specifically states the three minimum risks
coverage which is likely not to be the case. Accordingly a letter from
the P&I insurers in this connection would be required. Please find below
a extract of the port authority notice.
                          <p class=""MsoNormal"" style=""margin-left: -
.1pt""> <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#20174;2004&#24180;3&#26376;1&#26085;&#36215;&#65292;&#26031;&#
37324;&#20848;&#21345;&#28207;&#21475;&#24403;&#23616;&#35201;&#27714;&#2
5552;&#20379;&#26377;&#25928;&#30340;&#35777;&#25454;&#35777;&#26126;&#21
442;&#21152;&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#65292;&#21253;&#25324;&#35777;&#261
26;&#36215;&#30721;&#30340;&#27833;&#27745;&#38505;&#65292;&#28165;&#3850
0;&#27531;&#39608;&#21644;&#30896;&#25758;&#22266;&#20307;&#21644;&#28418
;&#28014;&#29289;&#20307;&#38505;&#12290;&#21482;&#35201;&#21327;&#20250;
&#30340;&#27491;&#26412;&#20837;&#20250;&#35777;&#20070;&#36275;&#20197;&
#35777;&#26126;&#19978;&#19977;&#31181;&#39118;&#38505;&#23601;&#19981;&#
25104;&#38382;&#39064;&#65292;&#25110;&#30456;&#24212;&#30340;&#21327;&#2
0250;&#30340;&#35777;&#26126;&#20070;&#12290;&#20197;&#19979;&#26159;&#28
207;&#21475;&#24403;&#23616;&#36890;&#30693;&#30340;&#25688;&#35201;&#653
06;</span><br>
                              <br>
                              <b><font color=""#000066""> PROTECTION &
INDEMNITY COVER FOR VESSELS ENTERING SRI LANKAN PORTS</font></b></p>
                          <p class=""MsoNormal"" style=""margin-left: -
.1pt""> <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#25237;&#20445;&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#30340;&#33337;&#33334;
&#36827;&#20837;&#26031;&#37324;&#20848;&#21345;&#28207;&#21475;&#39035;&
#30693;</span></p>
                          1.&#12288;Vessels entering Sri Lankan Ports,
should furnish as a minimum, the insurances set out by the Sri Lanka
Ports Authority, to cover the following, inter alia and should ensure all
such insurances are placed with reputable insurers, acceptable to the Sri
Lanka Ports Authority.
                                              <p class=""MsoNormal""
style=""margin-left: -.1pt""> <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">1.&#12288;&#33337;&#33334;&#36827;&#20837;&#26031;&#37324;&#2084
8;&#21345;&#28207;&#24212;&#25552;&#20379;&#28207;&#21475;&#24403;&#23616
;&#35268;&#23450;&#30340;&#19979;&#21015;&#26368;&#20302;&#20445;&#36180;
&#20445;&#38556;&#65292;&#24182;&#20445;&#35777;&#36825;&#20123;&#20445;&
#38556;&#30001;&#33879;&#21517;&#30340;&#20445;&#38505;&#20844;&#21496;&#
25215;&#20445;&#24182;&#26159;&#26031;&#37324;&#20848;&#21345;&#28207;&#2
1475;&#24403;&#23616;&#25152;&#33021;&#25509;&#21463;&#30340;&#12290;</sp
an></p>
                                              2.&#12288;Protection &
Indemnity cover for the vessels should include following but not limited
to
                                              <ul>
                                                 <li>Oil Pollution</li>
                                                 <li>Wreck removal</li>
                                                 <li>Damage to port
property</li>
                                              </ul>
                                              <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family:
SimSun"">2.&#12288;&#33337;&#33334;&#30340;&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#2125
3;&#25324;&#20197;&#19979;&#20960;&#31181;&#20294;&#19981;&#20165;&#38480
;&#20110;&#20197;&#19979;&#20960;&#31181;</span>
                                              <p></p>
                                              <ul>
                                                 <li><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family: SimSun"">&#27833;&#27745;</span></li>
                                                 <li><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#28165;&#38500;&#27531;&#39608;</span></li>
                                                 <li><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#25439;&#22351;&#28207;&#21475;&#35774;&#26045;</span></li>
                                              </ul>
                                              3.&#12288;Vessels that are
not entered in a P & I Club within the International Group should ensure
that the following minimum limits of insurances are available for any one
accident / incident arising out of one occurrence as indicated in item -
3 above, unlimited in the aggregate and as may be required by statute:-
                                              <p class=""MsoNormal""
style=""margin-left: -.1pt; font-family:
SimSun;"">3.&#12288;&#33337;&#33334;&#27809;&#26377;&#22312;&#22269;&#384
69;&#20445;&#36180;&#38598;&#22242;&#20013;&#30340;&#20445;&#36180;&#2132
7;&#20250;&#25237;&#20445;&#30340;&#65292;&#24517;&#39035;&#20445;&#35777
;&#21457;&#29983;&#19978;&#36848;&#19977;&#31181;&#24773;&#20917;&#20043;
&#19968;&#30340;&#27599;&#27425;&#20107;&#25925;/&#20107;&#20214;&#30340;
&#26368;&#20302;&#20445;&#38556;&#65292;&#32047;&#35745;&#20107;&#25925;&
#26080;&#38480;&#39069;&#24182;&#25353;&#27861;&#24459;&#35268;&#23450;&#
65306;</p>
                                              <ol>
                                                 <li
class=""alpha"">Vessels which are not carrying petroleum cargoes - US $
10 million</li>
                                                 <li
class=""alpha"">Vessels which carry petroleum cargoes</li>
                                                 <ol>
                                                   <li class=""roman"">Up
to 3000 MT Dead Weight [DWT] - US $ 10 million</li>
                                                   <li
class=""roman"">3000 MT Dead Weight [DWT] and above - US $ 100 million or
Oil pollution<br>
                                                      US $ 10 million For
Wreak removal or Damage to Port Propert</li>
                                                 </ol>
                                              </ol>
                                              <ol>
                                                 <li class=""alpha""><span
class=""MsoNormal""><span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#38750;&#36816;&#36733;&#30707;&#27833;&#20135;&#21697;&#30340;
&#33337;&#33334;¡V1&#21315;&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;</span></span></li>
                                                 <li class=""alpha""><span
class=""MsoNormal""><span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#36816;&#36755;&#30707;&#27833;&#30340;&#33337;&#33334;:</span>
</span></li>
                                                 <ol>
                                                   <li
class=""roman""><span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">3000&#36733;&#37325;&#21544;&#20197;&#19979;&#30340;&#33337;&#33
334;¡V1&#21315;&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;</span></li>
                                                   <li
class=""roman""><span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">3000&#36733;&#37325;&#21544;&#20197;&#19978;&#30340;&#33337;&#33
334;&#20159;&#32654;&#20803;&#25110;&#25353;&#27833;&#27745;&#38505;&#384
80;&#39069;</span><br>
                                                        <span lang=""ZH-
CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#28165;&#38500;&#27531;&#39608;&#25110;&#25439;&#22351;&#28207;
&#21475;&#35774;&#26045;&#20026;1&#21315;&#19975;</span></li>
                                                 </ol>
                                              </ol>
                                              <p> <span
class=""style1"">4.&#12288;</span>If the above liability requirements are
covered through a split entry i e Hull & Machinery Policy etc¡K, vessel
should provide evidence where these liabilities are included as split
entry with vessels P&I / Hull and Machinery cover.</p>
                                              <p><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family:
SimSun"">4.&#12288;&#22914;&#20197;&#19978;&#36131;&#20219;&#20445;&#3850
5;&#20197;&#20998;&#25955;&#25237;&#20445;&#24418;&#24335;&#22914;&#33337
;&#22771;&#38505;&#31561;&#25237;&#20445;&#30340;&#65292;&#33337;&#33334;
&#23601;&#35201;&#35777;&#26126;&#21738;&#20123;&#26159;&#23646;&#20110;&
#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#25215;&#20445;&#33539;&#22260;&#30340;&#65292;&#
21738;&#20123;&#26159;&#23646;&#20110;&#33337;&#22771;&#38505;&#25215;&#2
0445;&#33539;&#22260;&#30340;&#12290;</span></p>
                                              <p> <span
class=""style1"">5.&#12288;</span>Sri Lanka Ports Authority may request
the vessel agent / local representative of the P & I Club to furnish
security ratings of the insurance companies with whom vessels insure
their risk in order to determine the financial security.</p>
                                              <p><span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family:
SimSun"">5.&#12288;&#26031;&#37324;&#20848;&#21345;&#28207;&#21475;&#2440
3;&#23616;&#20250;&#35201;&#27714;&#33337;&#33334;&#20195;&#29702;&#20445
;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#30340;&#24403;&#22320;&#20195;&#34920;&#25552;
&#20379;&#33337;&#33334;&#25152;&#25237;&#20445;&#30340;&#20445;&#38505;&
#20844;&#21496;&#30340;&#31561;&#32423;&#26469;&#30830;&#23450;&#20854;&#
36130;&#21153;&#20445;&#35777;&#12290;</span></p>
                                              The vessel's local agent is
required to furnish a copy of the entry certificate or the cover note
duly endorsed by the local representative of the P & I Club for it's
authenticity to the safety section of the Harbour Masters division prior
to the vessel's arrival in Colombo, thus avoiding any delay in berthing
                                              <p class=""MsoNormal""
style=""margin-left: -.1pt""> <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#22312;&#33337;&#33334;&#25269;&#36798;&#31185;&#20262;&#22369;
&#20043;&#21069;&#65292;&#33337;&#33334;&#24403;&#22320;&#20195;&#29702;&
#35201;&#25552;&#20379;&#19968;&#20221;&#33337;&#33334;&#20837;&#20250;&#
35777;&#20070;&#21103;&#26412;&#25110;&#30001;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#2
0250;&#30340;&#24403;&#22320;&#20195;&#34920;&#31614;&#32626;&#30340;&#20
445;&#38505;&#35777;&#26126;&#32473;&#28207;&#38271;&#23433;&#20840;&#234
60;&#65292;&#26469;&#35777;&#26126;&#20445;&#38505;&#30340;&#30495;&#2345
4;&#24615;&#65292;&#20197;&#20813;&#24310;&#35823;&#38752;&#27850;&#12290
;</span> <br>
                                                  <br>
                                                  Above requirement will
be in force from 1st of March, 2004.</p>
                                              <span lang=""ZH-CN""
style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#20197;&#19978;&#35268;&#23450;&#23558;&#22312;2004&#24180;3&#2
6376;1&#26085;&#36215;&#26045;&#34892;&#12290;</span><br>
</td>
                     </tr>"       srilanka    Asia Sri Lanka
      2004-03-25 2004-03-25 notices     srilanka001.htm 1
353

354        Claims for Non-Compliance with the Northern Right Whale
Mandatory Ship Reporting System - USA         UK Club has been advised of
a recent case where the US Coast Guard cited a ship transiting a 'Right
Whale' critical habitat without   "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">UK Club has been advised of
a recent case where the US Coast Guard cited a ship transiting a 'Right
Whale' critical habitat without the ship concerned reporting this
movement which contravenes the regulation concerning the 'Northern Right
Whale Mandatory Ship Reporting System'. The Coast Guard has demanded a
$32,000 guarantee - although at the present time the amount of the fine
is yet undetermined as the regulation does not set out a particular fine
amount.<br><br>The 'Northern Right Whale Mandatory Ship Reporting System'
was adopted by IMO in December 1998 and under this system, any commercial
vessel of 300 GT or greater must report to the Coast Guard's
Communications Area Master Station Atlantic (CAMSLANT) prior to entering
a 'Right Whale' critical habitat providing the ships position, course,
speed, destination and route to the next port. The purpose of this is to
make mariners aware of the existence of the endangered Right Whale
habitats.<br><br>There are two special Right Whale zones on the east
coast of the US. The north east area 'Whalenorth' includes the waters of
Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts Bay and the Great South Channel east and
south east of Massachusetts. The south east area 'Whalesouth' is located
off the east coast of Florida and Georgia, which includes coastal waters
within approximately 25 nautical miles along a 90 nautical mile stretch
of the coast, which includes in the zone the ports of Brunswick in
Georgia and Jacksonville and Fernandina in Florida.<br><br>The Coast
Guard has actively started to enforce this regulation and ships failing
to provide these reports are now subject to fines.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa  North America    USA   Source :
UK P&I Club Bulletin 350      2004-03-26 2004-03-26 notices     usa024.htm
      0
355         New Regulations Concerning Tanker Operations - Romania
      "The Romanian Ministry of Transport, Buildings and Tourism issued
an order that became effective on 27th February 2004. Order 276/2004
covers the acceptance of petroleum"      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The Romanian Ministry of
Transport, Buildings and Tourism issued an order that became effective on
27th February 2004. Order 276/2004 covers the acceptance of petroleum,
chemical and LPG tankers at Romanian terminals and the monitoring of the
safety of tanker operations by the Romanian Naval Authority - RNA - which
is the result of the merger between the former Inspectoratul Navigatiei
Civile and the Romanian Register of Shipping.<br><br>The provisions of
the subject order are:<ol><li>RNA has statutory authority to maintain a
safety officer designated by RNA onboard tankers, throughout their
operation in Romanian terminals, at a fee of Euro 30 per hour/person. In
addition to this fee an inspection fee of Euro 850 will be charged for
the issuance of a ""Tanker Acceptance Permit"". Without this tankers are
not allowed to operate. </li><li>RNA personnel or RNA endorsed companies
are granted the statutory authority to issue gas free certificates and
hot-work permits. Therefore it is assumed that even persons listed as
court experts cannot be commissioned for gas free surveys unless the RNA
authorizes them.</li></ol>The provision regarding the issuance of gas
free certificate and hot work permits could have a significant cost
impact as it is expected that the RNA will charge a fee of Euro 50 per
each and every inspected volume of 1,000 cbm, and possibly for every
additional inspection in the same compartment if the compartment is not
found gas free initially.<br><br>The order states that the surveys should
be conducted on basis of following guidelines:<ul><li>International
Safety Guide for Oil Tankers & Terminals</li><li>Inspection Guidelines
for Bulk Oil Carriers, Ships carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk and
Chemical Tankers</li><li>Tanker Safety Guide (Liquefied
Gas)</li><li>Prevention of Oil Spillage Through Cargo Pumproom Sea
Valves</li><li>Safety Guide for Terminal Handling Ships carrying
Liquefied Gases in Bulk.</li><li>Tanker Safety Guide
(Chemicals)</li><li>Safety in Oil Tankers</li><li>Ship to Ship Transfer
Guide (Petroleum)</li><li>Safety in Chemical Tankers</li></ul>This order
would suggest that aforesaid list is not exhaustive and it further refers
to guides issued by ICS and OCIMF, recommended by IMO, in
general.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        romania     Europe     Romania
      Source : UK P&I Club Bulletin 351 2004-03-26 2004-03-26 notices
      romania001.htm    0
356         US Automated Manifest System - meaning of 'carrier'        "A
Customs and Border Protection (CBP) seminar was held 18th March in New
Orleans," "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">A Customs and Border
Protection (CBP) seminar was held 18th March in New Orleans, during which
CBP addressed the issue of who is the 'carrier' (the party responsible
for compliance) for a chartered ship.<br><br>CBP indicated that the
'carrier' would be the entity to which the following descriptions apply:
(a) determining ports of call, (b) controlling of loading and discharging
cargo, (c) knowledge of cargo information, (d) issuing bills of lading,
(e) the entity that has typically provided the CF 1302 cargo declaration
or the cargo information to prepare the CF 1302 to the vessel
agent.<br><br>CBP has not provided a general ruling that the charterer
will always be the carrier, not is its guidance entirely free from
ambiguity; its stance remains one of leaving it to owners and charterers
to determine in each individual case who best fits the role of carrier
and to ensure compliance accordingly. In case of dispute, a ruling can be
sought on the facts of a particular case from CBP.<br><br>However, it is
likely that in many cases it will be the time charterer, or even a voyage
charterer, that is the party with responsibility for AMS compliance,
including the filing of cargo information, and obtaining a SCAC number
and International Carrier Bond. This is a major change from CBP's
original approach under which the carrier was indicated to be the person
responsible for operation and navigation of the ship.<br><br>CBP has
advised that enforced compliance of the new regulations will begin for
non-container ships on 2nd April for entire voyages that commence on or
after this date. Owners should therefore ensure that they, or their
charterers if appropriate, have made suitable arrangements for compliance
as soon as possible. Work continues, in co-operation with other Clubs, on
charterparty clauses, and a further update will be issued.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        usa   North America    USA   Source :
UK Club Bulletin 353    2004-03-26 2004-03-26 notices      usa025.htm 0
357   41    Bio - Chem Risks
      &#29983;&#29289;&#21270;&#23398;&#21697;&#39118;&#38505; "Hull,
War, P&I and excess War Risks P&I covers contain a Bio-Chem Exclusion
with the result there will be no cover for " "<tr>
                             <td class=""genText""><p>Hull, War, P&I and
excess War Risks P&I covers contain a Bio-Chem Exclusion with the result
there will be no cover for War P&I risks which are caused either directly
or indirectly from a chemical, biological, bio-chemical, or electro-
magnetic weapon, or from the use of any computer or computer system as a
means for inflicting harm.</p>
                           <p> <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#33337;&#22771;&#38505;&#65292;&#25112;&#20105;&#38505;&#65292;
&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#21644;&#39069;&#22806;&#25112;&#20105;&#20445;&
#36180;&#38505;&#30340;&#20445;&#21333;&#22343;&#23545;&#29983;&#29289;&#
21270;&#23398;&#21697;&#20316;&#20026;&#38500;&#22806;&#36131;&#20219;&#6
5292;&#23548;&#33268;&#25112;&#20105;&#20445;&#36180;&#38505;&#19981;&#25
215;&#20445;&#37027;&#20123;&#30001;&#20110;&#30452;&#25509;&#21644;&#383
88;&#25509;&#30001;&#21270;&#23398;&#21697;&#12289;&#29983;&#29289;&#2104
6;&#21697;&#12289;&#29983;&#29289;&#21270;&#23398;&#21697;&#25110;&#30005
;&#30913;&#27494;&#22120;&#65292;&#25110;&#30001;&#20110;&#20351;&#29992;
&#30005;&#33041;&#25110;&#30005;&#33041;&#31995;&#32479;&#36896;&#25104;&
#30340;&#25439;&#23475;&#12290;</span>
                    <br>
                    <br>
                    All International Group Clubs (except for the moment
the Japan Club) have now decided that they should provide limited cover
for two risks through the Group's Pooling arrangements for which there
would otherwise be no cover.</p>
                                                        <p><span
lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#25152;&#26377;&#30340;&#22269;&#38469;&#38598;&#22242;&#20445;
&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#65288;&#38500;&#30446;&#21069;&#30340;&#26085;&
#26412;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#22806;&#65289;&#24050;&#20915;&#
23450;&#23545;&#20108;&#31181;&#39118;&#38505;&#36890;&#36807;&#22269;&#3
8469;&#20445;&#36180;&#38598;&#22242;&#30340;&#23433;&#25490;&#25552;&#20
379;&#26377;&#38480;&#30340;&#20445;&#38556;&#65292;&#38500;&#27492;&#200
43;&#22806;&#27809;&#26377;&#20854;&#20182;&#20154;&#25215;&#20445;&#1229
0;</span>
              <br>
              <br>
              With effect from noon GMT on 15th March 2004, the risks
which are to be covered through the Group's new Pooling facility will be
in respect of the Member's liability:
              </p>
                          </p>
                          <p>
              <span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#20174;&#26684;&#26519;&#23612;&#27835;&#26631;&#20934;&#26102;
&#38388;2004&#24180;3&#26376;15&#26085;&#20013;&#21320;&#36215;&#65292;&#
23545;&#20110;&#20135;&#29983;&#20250;&#21592;&#36131;&#20219;&#30340;&#2
7492;&#31181;&#39118;&#38505;&#23558;&#30001;&#22269;&#38469;&#20445;&#38
505;&#38598;&#22242;&#26032;&#30340;&#26426;&#26500;&#25215;&#20445;&#653
06;</span>
              <br>
              <br>
              (1) To pay damages, compensation or expenses in consequence
of the personal injury to or illness or death of any seaman (including
diversion expenses, repatriation and substitute expense and Shipwreck
unemployment indemnity),and</p>
                                                        <p>
              (1)<span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#25903;&#20184;&#30001;&#20110;&#33337;&#21592;&#21463;&#20260;
&#12289;&#29983;&#30149;&#25110;&#27515;&#20129;&#36896;&#25104;&#30340;&
#25439;&#23475;&#65292;&#36180;&#20607;&#25110;&#36153;&#29992;&#65288;&#
21253;&#25324;&#32469;&#33322;&#36716;&#31227;&#33337;&#21592;&#30340;&#3
3457;&#36153;&#65292;&#36963;&#36865;&#36153;&#21644;&#26367;&#20195;&#36
153;&#29992;&#20197;&#21450;&#33337;&#33334;&#25253;&#24223;&#21518;&#303
40;&#33337;&#21592;&#22833;&#19994;&#36180;&#20607;&#65289;</span>
              <br>
              <br>
              (2) for the legal costs and expenses incurred solely for
the purpose of avoiding or minimising any other P&I liability arising
from a Bio-Chem event (other than under the Omnibus Rule).<br>
              <br>
              (2)<span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#20165;&#20026;&#20102;&#36991;&#20813;&#25110;&#20943;&#23569;
&#29983;&#29289;&#21270;&#23398;&#21697;&#20107;&#20214;&#20013;&#20854;&
#20182;&#20445;&#36180;&#36131;&#20219;&#32780;&#21457;&#29983;&#30340;&#
27861;&#24459;&#36153;&#29992;&#65288;&#38500;&#20102;&#26434;&#39033;&#3
5268;&#21017;&#22806;&#65289;</span>
              <br>
              <br>
              The detailed terms and conditions of the Pooling facility
are set out in a Supplemental Agreement to the 2004 Pooling Agreement.
Its principal provisions are that:
              </p>
                          </p>
                          </p>
              <p><span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#22312;2004&#24180;&#22269;&#38469;&#21327;&#20250;&#21327;&#23
450;&#20013;&#30340;&#34917;&#20805;&#21327;&#23450;&#30340;&#35814;&#324
54;&#26465;&#27454;&#12290;&#20854;&#20027;&#35201;&#35268;&#23450;&#2291
4;&#19979;&#65306;</span>
              <br>
                                                        <br>
                                                        (1)Cover, which
will attach automatically for all Members, will be from the ground-up (in
excess of a Member's usual deductible), but limited to USD 20 million any
one event or occurrence (or series of occurrences arising from the same
event) each vessel.</p>
                          <p>
              (1)<span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#33258;&#21160;&#25215;&#20445;&#25152;&#26377;&#20250;&#21592;
&#36229;&#39069;&#37096;&#20998;&#65288;&#36229;&#36807;&#20250;&#21592;&
#36890;&#24120;&#30340;&#20813;&#38506;&#39069;&#65289;&#65292;&#20294;&#
27599;&#19968;&#33337;&#33334;&#30340;&#27599;&#27425;&#20107;&#25925;&#2
5110;&#20107;&#20214;&#65288;&#25110;&#21516;&#19968;&#20107;&#25925;&#30
340;&#20960;&#20010;&#20107;&#20214;&#65289;&#30340;&#36180;&#20607;&#384
80;&#39069;&#20026;</span><span lang=""EN-US"">2</span><span lang=""ZH-
CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#21315;&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#12290;</span><br>
                                                        <br>
                                                        (2)Individual
Clubs will retain the first USD 5 million of any one claim, with the USD
15 million excess over USD 5 million being Pooled as if any other Pool
claim.</p>
                          <p>(2)<span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#21333;&#20010;&#21327;&#20250;&#20250;&#26367;&#27599;&#20010;
&#32034;&#36180;&#25215;&#25285;&#39318;&#20010;5&#30334;&#19975;&#32654;
&#20803;&#65292;&#20854;&#20313;&#30340;1&#21315;5&#30334;&#19975;&#32654
;&#20803;&#23558;&#30001;&#21327;&#20250;&#21516;&#30431;&#25215;&#25285;
&#65292;&#21644;&#20854;&#23427;&#32034;&#36180;&#19968;&#26679;&#12290;<
/span>
              <br>
                                                        <br>
                                                        (3)The limit of
cover (USD 20 million) will apply to all interests for each vessel in
aggregate regardless of the number of interests and regardless of whether
or not they are entered in different P&I Clubs (e.g. Owners, charterers
and sub-charterers).
                                                        </p>
                          </p>
                          <p>(3)<span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#36180;&#20607;&#38480;&#39069;&#65288;</span><span lang=""EN-
US"">2</span><span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#21315;&#19975;&#32654;&#20803;&#65289;&#23558;&#36866;&#29992;
&#20110;&#27599;&#33368;&#33337;&#33334;&#30340;&#25152;&#26377;&#21033;&
#30410;&#26041;&#65292;&#19981;&#31649;&#26377;&#22810;&#23569;&#21033;&#
30410;&#26041;&#65292;&#20063;&#19981;&#31649;&#20182;&#20204;&#26159;&#2
1542;&#21152;&#20837;&#19981;&#21516;&#30340;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20
250;&#65288;&#20363;&#22914;&#33337;&#19996;&#65292;&#31199;&#33337;&#201
54;&#21644;&#36716;&#31199;&#31199;&#33337;&#20154;&#65289;</span>
              <br>
                                                        <br>
                                                        (4)To avoid
excessive aggregation of risk, cover will have a cancellation provision
(48 hours notice), and areas of particular sensitivity may also be the
subject of geographical exclusions (e.g. the Athens Olympics).
                                                        </p>
              </p>
                          <p>
              (4)<span lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#20026;&#20102;&#36991;&#20813;&#36807;&#22810;&#30340;&#39118;
&#38505;&#21516;&#26102;&#21457;&#29983;&#65292;&#36180;&#20184;&#26377;&
#19968;&#20010;&#26102;&#38388;&#38480;&#21046;&#65288;48&#23567;&#26102;
&#36890;&#30693;&#65289;&#65292;&#26377;&#20123;&#29305;&#27530;&#25935;&
#24863;&#30340;&#21306;&#22495;&#65288;&#20363;&#22914;&#38597;&#20856;&#
22885;&#26519;&#21305;&#20811;&#65289;&#31561;&#23558;&#20316;&#22320;&#2
9702;&#20301;&#32622;&#19978;&#30340;&#19968;&#20123;&#38500;&#22806;&#12
290;</span>
              <br>
              <br>
              (5)No premium will be charged for the cover, although
premium may be charged for specific risks which may arise and which may
be the subject of a premium notice if cover is to be maintained or
varied.
              </p>
                          </p>
                                                        <p>(5)<span
lang=""ZH-CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#26080;&#38656;&#25903;&#20184;&#20445;&#36153;&#65292;&#23613;
&#31649;&#26377;&#20123;&#29305;&#27530;&#39118;&#38505;&#30340;&#20135;&
#29983;&#21487;&#33021;&#26159;&#30001;&#20110;&#20445;&#21333;&#30340;&#
32500;&#25345;&#25110;&#21464;&#26356;&#32780;&#20381;&#25454;&#20445;&#3
6153;&#36890;&#30693;&#21487;&#33021;&#25910;&#21462;&#20445;&#36153;&#12
290;</span>
              <br>
                                                        <br>
                                                         So far as the
Japan Club is concerned, it is their intention to participate in these
arrangements along with all other Group Clubs once they have had
regulatory approval to do so hopefully by June 2004.
                                                         </p>
                                                         <span lang=""ZH-
CN"" style=""font-family:
SimSun"">&#33267;&#20110;&#26085;&#26412;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;
&#65292;&#20182;&#20204;&#24847;&#21521;&#21644;&#20854;&#20182;&#38598;&
#22242;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#19968;&#36215;&#21442;&#19982;&#
65292;&#19968;&#26086;&#24471;&#21040;&#25209;&#20934;&#65292;&#26377;&#2
4076;&#26395;&#22312;2004&#24180;6&#26376;&#12290;<br>
                                                         </span></td>
                         </tr> "                                2004-04-01
      2004-04-01 insurance_awareness     chi_awareness041.htm   1
358         "USA AUTOMATED MANIFEST SYSTEM (AMS) UPDATE: -Definition of
""Carrier"" as viewd by the U.S. Bureau of Customs & Border Protection
(CBP)"            "Because of the continuing confusion as to the identity
of the Carrier, on Thursday, 18 March 2004 a meeting was held by CBP"
      "<tr>
          <td width=""10"">&nbsp;</td>
          <td width=""460"" class=""genText"">Because of the continuing
confusion as to the identity of the Carrier, on Thursday, 18 March 2004 a
meeting was held by CBP in New Orleans. In this meeting it was decided
that the industry was the best suited to determine who amongst owners and
charterers was the Carrier.<br><br>For purposes of guidance, CBP advised
that it views the Carrier as the entity that ""controls"" the vessel
which includes : (a) determining ports of call; (b) controlling loading
and discharging cargo; (c) knowledge of cargo information; (d) issuing of
bills of lading; and (e) the entity which has typically provided the CF
1302 cargo declaration or the cargo information to prepare the CF 1302 to
the vessel agent. When pressed for further guidance as to who is the
Carrier where the owner issues the bill of lading and the charterer does
everything else, CBP indicated that it would only respond to questions in
writing, about a specific charterparty, and submitted for a formal ruling
to CBP headquarters in Washington.<br><br>It is recommended that owners
and charterers agree in any new charter party who will undertake to
comply with the regulations including the filing of the manifest, SCAS
and ICB for vessels calling in the U.S. As for existing charters that do
not state which party is to be responsible for compliance, owners and
charterers should agree in writing prior to a vessel's arrival in the US
which of them will comply with the regulations and how the cost of so
doing will be allocated.<br><br>There are potential consequences for both
the Head Owners/ Master and vessel as well as the Charterers. Under US
law, CBP is authorized to assess fines and penalties not only against the
Carrier, but also against the master and the vessel. Charterers who act
unreasonably also face potential risks through whatever recourse may be
available to owners under the relevant charter party. <br><br>All
concerned are reminded that CBP will commence enforced compliance of the
new regulations as of 2 April 2004 for voyages which commence on or after
that date.<br><br>For further information please also refer to the UK
Club bulletin in the USA section of ""Notices"".</td>
          <td width=""9"">&nbsp;</td>
         </tr>"                                 2004-04-01 2004-04-01 news
      news004.htm 1
359   42    Through transport bills of lading
      &#20840;&#31243;&#25552;&#21333; We wish to advise all container
operators that standard P&I Club rules exclude the liability under a
      "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText""><p>We wish to advise all
container operators that standard P&I Club rules exclude the liability
under a through transport bill of lading arising under subsequent voyages
or inland transits after cargo has been discharged from the entered
vessel, unless this has been prior approved by the Club.Although it can
be said that P&I Clubs should be expected to know or realise that it is
customary practice for container operators to issue through transport
bills of lading, approval should be obtained from the P&I Club to be
certain.<br>
                          <br><font
face=""SimSun"">&#25105;&#20204;&#24314;&#35758;&#25152;&#26377;&#30340;&
#38598;&#35013;&#31665;&#32463;&#33829;&#32773;&#30693;&#36947;&#26631;&#
20934;&#30340;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#35268;&#21017;&#30340;&#2
5215;&#20445;&#33539;&#22260;&#65292;&#22312;&#20840;&#31243;&#25552;&#21
333;&#19979;&#19981;&#21253;&#25324;&#24403;&#36135;&#29289;&#21368;&#199
79;&#20837;&#20250;&#33337;&#33334;&#21518;&#30340;&#33322;&#31243;&#2511
0;&#20869;&#38470;&#36816;&#36755;&#30340;&#36131;&#20219;&#65292;&#38500
;&#38750;&#20107;&#20808;&#24471;&#21040;&#21327;&#20250;&#30340;&#20801;
&#35768;&#12290;&#34429;&#28982;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#24212;&
#35813;&#30693;&#36947;&#25110;&#26126;&#20102;&#31614;&#21457;&#20840;&#
31243;&#25552;&#21333;&#23545;&#38598;&#35013;&#31665;&#32463;&#33829;&#3
2773;&#26469;&#35828;&#26159;&#24815;&#20363;&#34892;&#20026;&#65292;&#20
294;&#26159;&#20174;&#20445;&#36180;&#21327;&#20250;&#22788;&#33719;&#244
71;&#25209;&#20934;&#26159;&#24517;&#39035;&#30340;&#12290;</font><br>
                          <br>If approval is given, it is further important
and there is a warranty that all rights of recovery and recourse are
preserved against all sub contractors.<br>
                          <br><font
face=""SimSun"">&#22914;&#26524;&#33719;&#24471;&#20801;&#35768;&#65292;&
#36825;&#23558;&#24456;&#37325;&#35201;&#65292;&#20445;&#35777;&#20102;&#
20182;&#20204;&#30340;&#34917;&#20607;&#26435;&#21644;&#23545;&#25152;&#2
6377;&#20998;&#27573;&#25215;&#36816;&#20154;&#30340;&#36861;&#32034;&#26
435;&#12290;</font><br>
                           <br>
              </p>
                       </td>
                       </tr>"                              2004-04-06
      2004-04-06 insurance_awareness      chi_awareness042.htm   1
360         """BIMCO"" AMS clauses for incorporation into Charter
Parties"           """BIMCO"" AMS clauses for incorporation into Charter
Parties"    "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">Further to our notice of
1st,April,2004 in which We commented on the United States's Customs and
Border Protection (CBP)'s definition of the ""Carrier"",BIMCO have
drafted clauses for incorporating into both the ""Voyage"" and ""Time""
Charter Parties which will clarify and outline each contracting party's
responsibility with respect to the AMS(Automated Manifest System)
requirement when the vessel calls United State's ports.BIMCO's suggested
clauses are based on the following assumption:<br><br>Carrier = ""Ship
Owner"" for ""Voyage Charter Party""<br><br>Carrier = "" Charterer ""
for ""Time Charter Party""<br><br>BIMCO comments that the responsibility
for assuming the role of the ""Carrier"" under a ""Time Charter Party""
should be the Charterers'.They add that the position of which party
should assume the role of the ""Carrier"" under a ""Voyage Charter
Party"" is less clear.So although BIMCO has made the ""Ship Owner"" as
the party who will act as the ""Carriers"" in the ""Voyage Charter
Party"" version of the clause,the way in which the CBP rules may be
interpretated in the context of a ""Voyage Charter Party"",may well mean
the ""Charterer"" may be the ""Carrier"".As such,BIMCO recommends that
the parties amend the ""Voyage Charter Party"" AMS clause accordingly to
reflect the changed responsibilities.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('voyage');"">Please press HERE for the
BIMCO's version of the AMS Clause for ""VOYAGE CHARTER PARTY""</a></td>
          </tr>
                              <tr>
                                <td>
            <table id=""voyage"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                                     <tr>
                                        <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                        <td width=""5""></td>
                                        <td class=""genBoldText""
bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
               <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                <tr>
                 <td><span class=""genBoldText"">US Customs Advance
Notification/AMS Clause for Voyage Charter Parties</span></td>
                </tr>
                <tr>
                 <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">If the
Vessel loads or carries cargo destined for the US or passing through US
ports in transit, the Owners shall comply with the current US Customs
regulations (19 CFR 4.7) or any subsequent amendments thereto and shall
undertake the role of carrier for the purposes of such regulations and
shall, in their own name, time and expense:<br><ol><li
class=""roman"">Have in place a SCAC (Standard Carrier Alpha
Code);</li><li class=""roman"">Have in place an ICB (International
Carrier Bond); and</li><li class=""roman"">Provide the Owners with a
timely confirmation of i) and ii) above; and </li><li
class=""roman"">Submit a cargo declaration by AMS (Automated Manifest
System) to the US Customs. </li></ol></li><br><li class=""alpha"">The
Charterers shall provide all necessary information to the Owners and/or
their agents to enable the Owners to submit a timely and accurate cargo
declaration.<br><br>The Charterers shall assume liability for and shall
indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Owners against any loss and/or
damage whatsoever (including consequential loss and/or damage) and/or any
expenses, fines, penalties and all other claims of whatsoever nature,
including but not limited to legal costs, arising from the Charterers'
failure to comply with any of the provisions of this sub-clause. Should
such failure result in any delay then, notwithstanding any provision in
this Charter Party to the contrary, all time used or lost shall count as
laytime or, if the Vessel is already on demurrage, time on
demurrage.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">The Owners shall assume
liability for and shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless the
Charterers against any loss and/or damage whatsoever (including
consequential loss and/or damage) and any expenses, fines, penalties and
all other claims of whatsoever nature, including but not limited to legal
costs, arising from the Owners' failure to comply with any of the
provisions of sub-clause (a). Should such failure result in any delay
then, notwithstanding any provision in this Charter Party to the
contrary, all time used or lost shall not count as laytime or, if the
Vessel is already on demurrage, time on demurrage.</li><br><br><li
class=""alpha"">The assumption of the role of carrier by the Owners
pursuant to this Clause and for the purpose of the US Customs Regulations
(19 CFR 4.7) shall be without prejudice to the identity of carrier under
any bill of lading, other contract, law or regulation.</li></ol></td>
                 </tr>
                </table>
               </td>
                                       </tr>
                                     </table>
           </td>
                               </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('time');""><br>Please press HERE for the
BIMCO's version of the AMS Clause for ""TIME CHARTER PARTY""</a></td>
          </tr>
                               <tr>
                                 <td>
            <table id=""time"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                                       <tr>
                                          <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                          <td width=""5""></td>
                                          <td class=""genBoldText""
bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
                <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                 <tr>
                  <td><span class=""genBoldText"">US Customs Advance
Notification/AMS Clause for Time Charter Parties</span></td>
                 </tr>
                 <tr>
                  <td class=""genText""><ol><li class=""alpha"">If the
Vessel loads or carries cargo destined for the US or passing through US
ports in transit, the Charterers shall comply with the current US Customs
regulations (19 CFR 4.7) or any subsequent amendments thereto and shall
undertake the role of carrier for the purposes of such regulations and
shall, in their own name, time and expense:<br><ol><li
class=""roman"">Have in place a SCAC (Standard Carrier Alpha
Code);</li><li class=""roman"">Have in place an ICB (International
Carrier Bond); </li><li class=""roman"">Provide the Owners with a timely
confirmation of i) and ii) above; and </li><li class=""roman"">Submit a
cargo declaration by AMS (Automated Manifest System) to the US Customs
and provide the Owners at the same time with a copy
thereof.</li></ol></li><br><li class=""alpha"">The Charterers assume
liability for and shall indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Owners
against any loss and/or damage whatsoever (including consequential loss
and/or damage) and/or any expenses, fines, penalties and all other claims
of whatsoever nature, including but not limited to legal costs, arising
from the Charterers' failure to comply with any of the provisions of sub-
clause (a). Should such failure result in any delay then, notwithstanding
any provision in this Charter Party to the contrary, the Vessel shall
remain on hire.</li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">If the Charterers' ICB is
used to meet any penalties, duties, taxes or other charges which are the
responsibility of the Owners, the Owners shall promptly reimburse the
Charterers for those amounts. </li><br><br><li class=""alpha"">The
assumption of the role of carrier by the Charterers pursuant to this
Clause and for the purpose of the US Customs Regulations (19 CFR 4.7)
shall be without prejudice to the identity of carrier under any bill of
lading, other contract, law or regulation.</li></ol></td>
                 </tr>
                </table>
               </td>
                                        </tr>
                                      </table>
           </td>
                                </tr>
          <tr>
           <td class=""genText""><br>For more details,please proceed to
BIMCO website at <a href=""http://www.bimco.dk""
target=""_blank"">http://www.bimco.dk</a><br></td>
          </tr>"                                2004-04-07 2004-04-07
      stdforms002 stdforms002_27.htm       1
361         New Cases of Off Specification Cargoes         Several ships
have been delayed prior to discharging their cargoes of unleaded
petroleum (ULP)in Singapore "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"">Several ships have been
delayed prior to discharging their cargoes of unleaded petroleum (ULP)in
Singapore. Samples taken of recent cargoes loaded in Singapore have
indicated that they were off specification.<br><br>In one case the
samples taken onboard showed the presence of particulates. Arrangements
were made for joint samples to be taken. The report revealed the
following:<ol><li>Dead-bottom samples were taken from all cargo tanks
containing ULP. </li><li>It was confirmed that the cargo was off
specification due to the presence of particulates that were semi-
transparent and only visible in the dead-bottom samples. </li><li>The
ship's previous cargo was also ULP that had been loaded at Shanghai for
discharge at Singapore.</li><li>The cargo in dispute had been loaded at
Singapore. None of the quality certificates issued in respect of the
cargo at Singapore made mention of the particulates. </li><li>There have
reportedly been two or three other ULP cargoes recently discharged which
have been found to be off specification also on account of particulates.
In each case, the cargo had been loaded from the same cargo shore tank in
Singapore. One of the possible explanations being investigated is that
the problem may be due to the growth of organisms in the shore tank which
only become apparent once the product settles during the course of a
voyage. </li></ol>The last ship with a problem of this type was delayed
for more than two weeks. As a result, the master was asked to serve a
'Note of Protest' on the charterers.<br><br>
                                             </td>
                      </tr>"       singapore Asia Singapore Source: UK
Club Bulletin 355       2004-04-07 2004-04-07 notices     singapore006.htm
      0
362         Pirates in Indonesia alleged to be naval patrol boat
      The master of a general cargo vessel claims the Kal Youtefa fired
upon his ship and ordered it to stop     "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">The master of a general
cargo vessel claims the Kal Youtefa fired upon his ship and ordered it to
stop. He and the third officer were then ordered aboard the naval vessel
for documentation inspection.<br><br>Both the master and the third
officer were then allegedly beaten before the naval officer demanded
$5,000 in exchange for their release.<br><br>Reports say the master
negotiated this demand down to about half the amount plus provisions. The
third officer was held captive until the ransom was paid.<br><br>The
alleged incident took place in position 02¢X18.5'S, 140¢X38.5'E just off
the town of Jayapura in Irian Jaya, a part of Indonesia that neighbours
Papa New Guinea.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"        indonesia Asia Indonesia Source :
TradeWinds.no     2004-04-08 2004-04-07 notices     indonesia005.htm 1
363
                  0
364   43    P&I cover when Hull cover subject to PICC Hull Clauses.
      "Although the Chinese PICC HUll policy 1.1.86 covers 4/4th RDC
(Collision liability) and 4/4th FFO (contact liability) risks,"
      "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">Although the Chinese PICC
HUll policy 1.1.86 covers 4/4th RDC (Collision liability) and 4/4th FFO
(contact liability) risks, it is important to note that only the direct
loss arising from an FFO claim incident is covered under the Hull
insurance. Direct loss refers to the cost of repairs of reinstating the
physical damage caused by the contact. The indirect loss or consequential
loss of a FFO claim such as loss of profits is not covered under the Hull
insurance and should be a risk which ought to be covered under the P&I
cover. There is no such gap in cover with the RDC coverage under PICC
Hull terms which covers both direct and consequential losses.<br><br>It
is further usual for the P&I covers of Chinese vessels to exclude RDC and
FFO risks absolutely. We recommend Chinese shipowners whose Hull
insurance is subject to the PICC Hull clauses to clarify and amend the
P&I entry to read the following : <br><br>""Excluding collision and
contact liability in so far as covered under the Chinese Hull policy
subject to PICC Hull Clauses 1.1.86.""<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"                              2004-04-16
      2004-04-16 insurance_awareness     awareness043.htm 1
365         Piracy attacks off Philipines - Philippines         Recent
attacks has been violent and the pirates heavily armed. "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">Recent attacks have been
violent and the pirates heavily armed. Ships' cash and valuable stores
are stolen and crew have been taken away as hostage. The latest attack
occurred off South Philippines in Sulu Sea.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       philippines Asia Philippines
      2004-04-16 2004-04-16 notices      philippines003.htm     1
366         "Algeria - Cargo Claims, Escalating Arrests and Cash Demands"
            "When fixing vessels for bulk cargoes to the Mediterranean,
Owners need to be aware of the problems they are" "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">When fixing vessels for bulk
cargoes to the Mediterranean, Owners need to be aware of the problems
they are very likely to experience in Algerian ports, including Algiers,
Oran, Skikda, Arzew and Bejaia. Particularly, cargoes of cereal, sugar
and other bagged food products were at the top of the list during 2002 -
2003 of claims for shortage and damage.<br><br>The move away from a
government monopoly of imported commodities, most particularly food
stuffs, has permitted speculation by importers in the cargo market.
Sugar from Northern Europe, corn and animal feed from the Mediterranean
and Black Sea are attracting unwarranted attention. Particularly at the
end of the season speculation increases and buyers may even be looking
for consignments at prices where quality, colour, moisture content or
storage-life may be impaired, even before shipment.<br><br>In such
instances the Carrier is at risk of vessel arrest, incurring demurrage
and cargo claims that take exceptional time and expense to resolve.
<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"       algeria     Africa     Algeria
      Source : Navigators P&I Bulletin No 8    2004-04-16 2004-04-16
      notices     algeria006.htm   1
367   44    Cash on board          It is not commonly known that cash on
board and valuables are not covered under P&I Club rules and must be
insured     "<tr>
                       <td class=""genText"">It is not commonly known that
cash on board and valuables are not covered under P&I Club rules and must
be insured under additional insurances. Due to the increased risk of
piracy it is prudent to take out some insurances at nominal
premiums.<br><br>There is a standard market cover for cash on board and
cash in transit which we can arrange, the terms which are detailed
below.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
             <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""1"" cellpadding=""5""
bgcolor=""#9F9F9F"">
              <tr valign=""top"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
               <td><span class=""genText"">PERIOD:</span></td>
               <td><span class=""genText"">12 months</span></td>
              </tr>
              <tr valign=""top"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
               <td><span class=""genText"">INTEREST:</span></td>
               <td><span class=""genText"">(A) Cash on Board
Insurance<br>(B) Cash in Transit</span></td>
              </tr>
              <tr valign=""top"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
               <td><span class=""genText"">LIMITS:</span></td>
               <td><span class=""genText"">(A) USD 25,000 each vessel, at
any one time.<br>(B) USD 100,000 any one sending / location.</span></td>
              </tr>
              <tr valign=""top"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
               <td><span class=""genText"">SUM INSURED:</span></td>
               <td><span class=""genText"">100% of amounts.</span></td>
              </tr>
              <tr valign=""top"" bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">
               <td><span class=""genText"">CONDITIONS:</span></td>
               <td><span class=""genText"">Against all risks of Physical
Loss and /or Damage to cash and/or property whilst on board vessels as
may be declared L/U, in Masters Safe as per the Institute Cargo Clauses
(A) 1/1/82 (Clause 252). Institute War Clauses (Cargo) 1/1/82 (Clause
255). Institute Strikes Clauses (Cargo) 1/1/82 (Clause 256) so far as
applicable.<br>Institute War (Cargo) and Institute Strikes (Cargo) but
subject to automatic termination of cover clause as per Institute War and
Strikes Clauses Hulls Time 01/10/83 in respect of cash on board
vessel.<br>Breach of Warranty additional premiums t.b.a.
L/U.<br>Including burglary, theft, robbery and piracy.<br>Deductible USD
500 any one accident or occurrence.<br>Including transit of cash ship to
shore or vice versa with security mail and/or courier and/or Ships
Officer and/or Ships Agent. No waiver of recourse. Personal Conveyance
Clause. Hotel/Motel Clause.<br>Warranted:<br>1) Cash kept in locked safe
whilst vessel in port.<br>2) Key holders restricted to Captain and/or
Purser or Senior Officers.<br>Excluding Infidelity of Master, Purser
and/or appointed Custodian of Keys.<br>Excluding mysterious disappearance
whilst on board.<br>Subject to Brokers Cancellation Clause
(611LPB00073)<br>Institute Radioactive Contamination Exclusion Clause
1/10/90 (Clause 356). Liberty to settle additional
premiums/return/premiums/claims on copy policies/using copy
documents.<br>Policies to be signed in multiple copies as required, for
purposes designated therein, or as slip policies.<br>Including Co-
Assured and Waiver of Subrogation if required.<br>Including Assured,
Interest of Mortgages (and Notices of Assignment in respect thereof) and
Loss Payee Clause if and in terms as may be required.<br>Any amendments
and/or agreements and/or alterations and/or increases (not exceeding
written line) and/or decreases in value/amount/limit and /or order to be
agreed by the Leading Underwriter (Lloyd's or Company) and to be binding
on all remaining underwriters hereon.<br>Subject to LSW 1001 (Insurance)
or LSW 1001 (Reinsurance) as applicable.</span></td>
              </tr>
             </table>
           </td>
          </tr>"                                2004-04-16 2004-04-16
      insurance_awareness     awareness044.htm 1
368         Vessels must have P&I entry certificate on board          We
are advised all vessels entering port must have       "<tr>
                        <td class=""genText"">We are advised all vessels
entering port must have on board a certified copy of the P&I entry
certificate for inspection.<br><br></td>
                      </tr>"        israel      Middle East Israel
      2004-04-16 2004-04-16 notices       israel002.htm     1
369   45    Logging trade           "We have experienced on several
occasions that owners describe their vessels as general cargo, bulk
vessel when seeking"    "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">We have experienced on several occasions
that owners describe their vessels as general cargo, bulk vessel when
seeking quotes from Hull and P&I insurers. Many owners are not aware of
the importance to advise insurers the vessel will be carrying logs even
if this trade is infrequent. Vessels which engage in the logging trade
is a very different risk to the insurer and non disclosure of this
information may enable the insurer to decline any claims which may be
attributable to the vessel carrying logs.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                                2004-04-16 2004-04-16
      insurance_awareness     awareness045.htm 1
370         Ammonium nitrate        Owners should be careful to ensure the
carriage and import of this cargo is allowed by the country of
destination.       "<tr>
           <td>
             <table border=""0"" cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
              <tr>
                           <td class=""genText"">Owners should be careful
to ensure the carriage and import of this cargo is allowed by the country
of destination.<br><br>Although this cargo is a fertiliser and is safe if
carried in accordance with IMO regulations it can be used as a chemical
component in the manufacture of explosives.<br><br>Examples :
<br><br></td>
                         </tr>
              <tr>
               <td class=""genText""><a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('northkorea');"">The catastrophic explosion
of railway trucks in North Korea</a></td>
              </tr>
              <tr>
               <td>
                <table id=""northkorea"" style=""display: none"";
border=""0"" cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                                          <tr>
                                           <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                           <td width=""5""></td>
                                           <td class=""genText""
bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">The catastrophic explosion of railway trucks in North
Korea on 22/4/2004 which destroyed thousands of homes in the near
vicinity is reported to be attributable to the carriage of ammonium
nitrate fertiliser cargo in bulk being in contact with electrical
equipment. Ammonimum nitrate also known to be used for the manufacture of
explosives.</td>
                                          </tr>
                                        </table>
               </td>
              </tr>
              <tr>
               <td class=""genText""><br><a href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('tasman');"">MV 'Tasman
Independence'</a></td>
              </tr>
              <tr>
               <td>
                <table id=""tasman"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                                          <tr>
                                           <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                           <td width=""5""></td>
                                           <td class=""genText""
bgcolor=""#FFFFFF"">MV 'Tasman Independence' carrying a bulk cargo of
ammonium nitrate was refused entry into New Zealand and it is likely that
Australia would do the same.<br><br>It is likely this cargo would have
been allowed to be imported had the cargo interests notified, applied and
obtained approval from the relevant Government departments and it is
important that charterers assume liability for any vessel's loss and
delays arising from the refusal of some Governments from importing this
cargo. A clause should be included into the charterparty and our clients
are requested to contact us for assistance in this connection.</td>
                                          </tr>
                                        </table>
               <br></td>
              </tr>
             </table>
           </td>
          </tr>"                                2004-04-19 2004-04-19
      cargos      cargos002_012.htm 0
371         Logs        Logs "                       <tr>
                         <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('1');"">Logs</a></td>
                    </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
             <table id=""1"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                          <tr>
                                        <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                        <td width=""5""></td>
                            <td class=""genText"">Care must be taken by the
crew to note in detail any damage to the Hull plating whilst loading
round logs. If there is any damage, not only must the crew hold
charterers / stevedores liable and protect their rights under the
charterparty, it is especially important to determine whether the damage
requires immediate repair. In many places where logs are loaded such as
Papua New Guinea, there may not be immediately available a local Class
Society surveyor, and the crew must have the experience and willingness
to determine the extent of indentation which may necessitate plate
renewal or temporary repairs. <br><br>Another problem with the carriage
of logs is the vessel's safety is left to the sole experience of the
master to determine the vessel's GM or stability. In view the logs are
loaded wet from the sea, the actual weight of the cargo and its
metracentric centre can easily be wrongly estimated by an inexperienced
master.<br><br>In mid April 204, the MV 'Genius Star VI' sank enroute to
Calcutta with a cargo of logs off Haldia in heavy seas with 9 Chinese
crew missing. It was also reported the vessel sprank a leak through the
ship side platings. Such leaks are usually the results of damage /
indentation caused whilst loading logs.<br><br></td>
                        </tr>
            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                     <tr>
                       <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);""
onmousedown=""showSubSection('2');"">Carriage of sawn timber on
deck</a></td>
                   </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
            <table id=""2"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                        <tr>
                                      <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                      <td width=""5""></td>
                          <td class=""genText"">The UK Marine Accident
Investigation Bureau (MAIB) has reported its concern over eight
incidences in which sawn timber cargoes carried on deck of bulk carriers
have shifted and caused the vessel to list up to 45 degrees due to the
vessel encountering heavy weather and sustaining wave impact. It is said
the incidences all involve cargoes loaded from Russia and
Baltic.<br><br>MAIB suggests these vessels to increase the friction on
the deck by means of special paints, and the crew should take extra
precaution on the lashing and stowage of deck cargoes.<br><br>Owners
should endeavour to include a rider clause into the charterparty which
provides for the following.<ul><li>Charterers to assume all liability,
loss, damage and expense sustained by owners arising from the carriage of
deck cargoes regardless of fault on the part of the master or
crew.</li><li>Charterers to assume the additional cost of ensuring the
vessel is made safer for the carriage of deck cargoes if such
recommendations are in accordance with the vessel's insurers and any
national or international maritime body or organization.</li></ul></td>
                        </tr>

            </table>
           </td>
          </tr>
                     <tr>
                       <td span class=""genText""><img
src=""../img/common/bullet_square1.gif"">&nbsp;<a
href=""Javascript:void(0);"" onmousedown=""showSubSection('3');"">Oxygen
depleting cargoes</a><br><br></td>
                   </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
            <table id=""3"" style=""display: none""; border=""0""
cellspacing=""0"" cellpadding=""0"">
                        <tr>
                                      <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
                           <td><span class=""genBoldText"">A recent report
from The Nautical Institute International Marine Accident Reporting
Scheme (MARS) described an incident in which four stevedores
died.</span></td>
                       </tr>
                         <tr>
                                       <td bgcolor=""#F6DC8B""
width=""8""></td>
                                       <td width=""5""></td>
                           <td class=""genText"">After entering a hold,
one of them slipped on a cargo of logs which had been stripped of their
bark. When the other stevedores went in to try and rescue him, they too
were trapped in the deep spaces between the logs. All four were later
brought out unconscious and were pronounced dead on arrival at the
hospital. The inherent nature of the cargo, which lead to oxygen
depletion in the enclosed space, combined with the slippery surfaces of
the logs, created the hazard which led to this tragic
incident.<br><br>Logs are just one of several cargoes which are known to
have oxygen depleting properties. This oxygen depletion can be caused by
factors such as self-heating of the cargo, oxidation of metals and ores
or decomposition of vegetable oils, animal fats, grain and other organic
materials or their residues. The materials listed below are known to be
capable of causing oxygen depletion:<br><br><ul><li>Grain, grain products
and residues from grain processing (such as bran, crushed grain, crushed
malt or meal), hops, malt husks and spent malt;</li><li>Oilseeds as well
as products and residues from oilseeds (such as seed expellers, seed
cake, oil cake and meal);</li><li>Copra;</li><li>Wood in such forms as
packaged timber, round wood logs, pulpwood, props (pit props and other
prop wood), woodchips, wood shavings, wood pulp pellets and
sawdust;</li><li>Jute, hemp, flax, sisal, kapok, cotton and other
vegetable fibres, empty bags, cotton waste, animal fibres, animal and
vegetable fabric, wool waste and rags;</li><li>Fishmeal and
fishscrap;</li><li>Guano;</li><li>Sulphidic ores and ore
concentrates;</li><li>Charcoal, coal and coal products;</li><li>Direct
reduced iron (DRI);</li><li>Dry ice;</li><li>Metal wastes and chips, iron
swarf, steel and other turnings, borings, drillings, shavings, filings
and cuttings; and</li><li>Scrap metal.</li></ul>Failure to observe simple
procedures can lead to people being unexpectedly overcome when entering
enclosed spaces. While ship¡¦s staff will no doubt be aware of such
dangers and will observe sufficient precautions, it is also obligatory on
the part of the ship to ensure that cargo holds are well ventilated and
that the stevedoring company is warned of inherent dangers with the cargo
carried on board before commencement of work.<br><br></td>
                         </tr>
             </table>
           </td>
          </tr>"                               2004-04-19 2004-04-19
      cargos      cargos002_011.htm 0
372   46    Bills of lading issued by NVOCC          "It is common for
charterers to issue their own bills of lading as the carrier, especially
in liner or general cargo trades." "<tr>
           <td class=""genText""> It is common for charterers to issue
their own bills of lading as the carrier, especially in liner or general
cargo trades. A cargo receiver would claim the issuer of the bill of
lading who was a NVOCC. It is likely the NVOCC or the charterer would not
have any insurance as he believes himself to be untouchable from any
legal action. The cargo receiver issues legal proceedings against the
NVOCC and in view of the NVOCC's disregard, a default judegement is
obtained by the cargo receiver. In some jurisdictions, a default
judgement against the NVOCC can be enforced against the vessel and many
jurisdictions allow a marine claim which was caused during the period of
carriage to be directed against the material vessel. In this instance the
shipowner would need to respond and settle the judgement without any
chance of defence on liability or quantum. We advise it is important for
owners to ensure that all charterers and NVOCC has their own liability
insurance and owners should ensure they obtain a copy of the charterers'
NVOCC 's policy or entry certificate. We have encountered many instances
in which there is a warranty in the charterparty for the charterers to
have in place their own insurance but this term is usually not complied
with as owners do not take the trouble of verifying this. If owners wish
to verify an insurance which the charterers allege they have in place or
to enquire whether the charterers'
                                             insurance is sufficient, <br>
&nbsp;</td>
          </tr>
          <tr>
           <td>
                                             <p align=""center"">please
click in
                                             this box, <span
class=""genText""><a href=""javascript:void(0);""
onclick=""MM_openBrWindow('../htm/awareness/mail_bill_nvocc.htm','','widt
h=670,height=550')"">
                                             <img
src=""../img/common/button_ask_andrew.jpg"" border=""0""
align=""absmiddle"" width=""60"" height=""11""></a> whereupon we shall
contact you for details.</span></td>
          </tr>"                               2004-04-19 2004-04-19
      insurance_awareness    awareness046.htm 1
373   47    Beware of LOI countersigned by bank for delivery of cargo
without production of bills of lading          "It is customary for owners
to demand LOIs in this instance, and if the financial standing or
honourability of the party issuing"      "<tr>
           <td class=""genText"">It is customary for owners to demand
LOIs in this instance, and if the financial standing or honourability of
the party issuing the LOI is unknown, owners would require the LOI to be
countersigned by a first class bank, as recommended by the International
Group of P&I Clubs.<br><br>In an Australian litigation in 2002 (Pacific
Carriers v BNP), BNP bank who countersigned the LOI said they were not
liable to the owners under the LOI as they only signed to verify the
signature of their client, the primary issuer of the LOI, and they did
not sign to bind liability under the LOI for the bank. The bank argued
the person who countersigned the LOI was a clerk and had no authority to
sign for the bank so as to bind liability for the bank, and the signatory
was unknown.<br><br>The Court Of Appeal found for the bank and said the
owners could not plead an estoppel on basis there had been
misrepresentation by BNP which allowed the owners to act to his
detriment. The Court said once it was accepted that BNP's employee did
not have the authority to bind BNP, that BNP had done nothing to
represent that it intended to be bound by the LOI and there was no
misrepresentation.<br><br>The Court stated for such an important matter
as an LOI for such a large amount, the owners should have reasonably
checked with the bank whether the signatory was authorised and bound the
bank and it was their own negligence which had caused the
loss.<br><br></td>
          </tr>"                                 2004-04-20 2004-04-20
      legal_awareness awareness047.htm 1
374         Fines for breaching Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine
Park Act.          A Chinese vessel sailed in restricted area between
Fitzory Reef and Lamont Reef in April 2004.      "<tr>
                         <td class=""genText"&