Docstoc

FA

Document Sample
FA Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                    FA - Revision

                                                   FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
                                                                   - REVISION –
A/ Financial ratios
1. Profitability and return
a. Return on capital employed (ROCE)
                      ������������������������ ������������������������ ������������������������ ������������ ������������
       ���������������� =                                                               ���� 100 -> express in %
                                ���������������������������� ��������������������������������
    ���������������� = ������������ ������������������������ ������������������������ ���� �������������������� ��������������������������������
    Capital employed = shareholder equity + non-current liabilities (long-term loans)
    Express the relationship between the net profit generated during a period and the
     average long-term capital invested in the business during that period. It compare
     input (capital invested) with output (profit)
    The bigger ROCE, the stronger performance.
    Two companies have the same ROCE
         o One has low asset turnover and high net profit margin -> operating at the
              luxury end of the market.
         o One has high asset turnover and low net profit margin -> operating at the
              popular end of the market.
b. Net profit margin
                                                   ������������������������ �������� ���������������� ������������������������ ������������ ������������
    ������������ ������������������������ ������������������������ =                           ���� 100 -> in %
                                        �������������������� ����������������������������
    Compare one output of business (profit) with another output (sales revenue). The
     ratio is high or low depends on industry sector.
    Higher margin would mean higher profit per unit of sales.
c. Gross profit margin
                                                             �������������������� ������������������������
    �������������������� ������������������������ ������������������������ =                           ���� 100
                                            �������������������� ����������������������������
    Represent a measure of profitability in buying (or producing) and selling goods
     before any other expenses are taken into account.
    Higher ratio is good.
d. Asset turnover
                                                ��������������������
    �������������������� �������������������������������� =
                                           ������������ ����������������������������
    Measure how well the assets of an entity are being utilised to generate sale.
    Higher asset turnover is good.
2. Long term solvency and stability

ANH HO                                                                                                     Page 1
                                                                FA - Revision

a. Gearing (leverage) ratio
                                                             ���������������� −���������������� ������������ −���������������������������� ��������������������������������������������
    ���������������������������� �������������������� =                                                                                                                     ���� 100
                                     �������������������� ���������������������������� +�������������������������������� +���������������� −���������������� ������������ −���������������������������� ��������������������������������������������
    Assess risk of business and is influenced by the political and economic climate.
    High gearing is good for the firms. High geared companies offer potentially higher
     reward but higher risk to equity shareholders. The converse applies to low geared
     companies.
b. Interest cover ratio
                                                    ������������������������ ������������������������ �������������������������������� ������������ ��������������������������������
    �������������������������������� �������������������� �������������������� =                                                                            -> in number
                                                                        �������������������������������� ����������������������������
    Measure the amount of profit available to cover interest.
    The lower the level of profit coverage, the greater the risk to lenders and
     shareholders.
3. Short term solvency and liquidity
a. Current asset ratio (CAR)
                                                            ���������������������������� ������������������������
    ���������������������������� (��������������������) �������������������� =
                                                        ���������������������������� ������������������������������������������������
    A ratio in excess of 1 should be expected. An ideal current ratio is usually 2 times
     or 2:1 for all businesses.
    Different type of business requires different current ratio.
    Higher ratio is better than lower one. The higher the ratio, the more liquid the
     business is considered to be. With some companies that have high level of
     inventories, goods and materials -> not able to convert their current assets to cash
     quickly.
b. Acid test (Quick ratio/ Liquid Asset) (LAR)
                                ���������������������������� �������������������� −������������������������������������
    �������������������� �������������������� =
                             ���������������������������� ��������������������������������������������
    The minimum level of this ratio is often stated as 1.
4. Efficiency ratios
a. Inventory turnover
                                                       ������������������������������������
    ������������������������������������ �������������������������������� =                                         ���� 365 ����������������
                                                    �������������������� �������� ��������������������
    The lengthening turnover period year suggest:
        o A slowdown in trading
        o Investment in inventory is becoming excess
    A reduction in turnover could arise from a reduction in sales, poor management or
     positively an investment in preparation for sales.

ANH HO                                                                                                                                                 Page 2
                                                                        FA - Revision

b. Accounts receivable collection period (Debtors turnover)
                                                                                                        �������������������� ��������������������������������������������
    ���������������������������� ���������������������������������������� ���������������������������������������� ������������������������ =            ���� 365
                                                                             ��������������������
    Small number is good because company can get money back soon.
    Most commercial terms are around 30-45 days payment, except retail company.
     Exporting and manufacturing company may carry larger amount of receivable and
     the collection period can be excess 60 days.
c. Accounts payable payment period
                                                                                                      �������������������� ��������������������������������
    ���������������������������� ���������������������������������������� ���������������������������� ������������������������ =                                                                  ���� 365
                                                                                                     ������������������������ ���������������� ��������������������
    A lengthening payment period may be seen as a sign of lack long-term finance or
     a result of poor management credit control. It could damage supplier relationships,
     lead to increased costs and loss of discounts.
5. Shareholders and Investment ratios
a. Earnings per share (EPS)

    ���������������������������� ������������ �������������������� =
        ������������������������ �������������������� ������������������������ ������������ ������������ ������������ �������������������������������� �������������������������������� (������������������������ ������������������������������������ )
                                      ������������������������ �������� �������������������������������� ������������������������ �������� ��������������������
    EPS ratio is a fundamental measure of share performance. The trend in earning per
     share over time is used to assess the investment potential of a business’s share.
    Dividend per share
                                                                  �������������������� ��������������������������������
              �������������������������������� ������������ �������������������� =
                                                   ������������������������ �������� �������������������������������� �������������������� �������� ��������������������
b. Dividend cover
                                                    ���������������������������� ������������ ��������������������           ������������������������ �������������������������������� ���� ������������ �������������������������������� �������������������� ����������������������������
    �������������������������������� �������������������� =                                                      =
                                                   �������������������������������� ������������ ��������������������                     �������������������������������� ������������������������������������ ������������ ���� ����������������
    Show how sustainable dividend is.
    In some cases, this ratio can be very high because retained profits are sources of
     fund in most companies.
c. Dividend yield and Dividend payout ratio
                                                                �������������������������������� ������������ ��������������������
    �������������������������������� �������������������� =                                                                                  ���� 100
                                                  ���������������������������� ������������������������ �������������������� �������� ������������ ��������������������
                                                                              �������������������������������� �������������������������������� ���������������� ����������������
    �������������������������������� ������������������������ �������������������� =                                                                                                       ���� 100
                                                                    ������������������������ ������������������������������������ �������� �������������������������������� �������������������� ����������������������������
    The high ratio is better.
d. Price/ Earnings ratio (P/E ratio)


ANH HO                                                                                                                                                                      Page 3
                                                                     FA - Revision

                      ���������������������������� ������������������������ �������������������� ������������ ��������������������
    ���� ���� =
                                �������������������������������� ������������ ��������������������
    Measure market confidence. A high P/E ratio indicates expectations of strong
     profit growth in the future or if current earnings are very low, they are expected to
     recover. A low P/E ratio usually shows investors consider growth prospects to be
     very poor.
    Market capitalisation
        ������������������������ ��������������������������������������������������������
                             = ������������������������ �������������������� ������������ �������������������� ���� ������������������������ �������� �������������������������������� �������� ��������������������
B/ Earning per share
1. Difference between basic and diluted EPS
a. Basic EPS

    Basic EPS based on ordinary shares currently in issue.
                            ������������ ������������������������ ���������������� ������������������������������������������������ �������� ��������������������������������                         �������������������� ����������������������������
    �������������������� ������������ =
                                   ���������������� ���������������� ���������������������������� ������������������������ �������� �������������������������������� ������������������������ �������������������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������ ������������������������

b. Diluted EPS
    Diluted EPS based on ordinary shares currently in issue plus potential ordinary
     share.
    Securities which do not (at present) have any claim to a share of equity earnings
     but may give rise in such a claim in the future
           o Convertible loan stock or convertible preference shares.
           o Options and warrants.
           o Separate class of equity shares which at present are not entitled to any
                 dividend.
                             �������������������������������� + �������������������������������� �������������������� ��������������������������������
    ���������������������������� ������������ =
                                        ������������������������ �������� ������������������������ +�������������������������������� �������������������� ������������������������
    Always use worst possible scenario: earliest dates, smallest increase in earnings,
     and largest number of additional shares.
    Calculate diluted EPS for options
        o It is assumed that options are exercised and that assumed proceeds would
            have been received from the issue of shares at fair value.
        o Calculation for EPS in two parts:
                At average market price (not dilutive)
                For no consideration (dilutive)
2. Objective of EPS

    Provide a measure of the interests of each ordinary share of a parent entity in the
     performance of the entity over the reporting period.
    Shareholders use EPS to estimate future growth.

ANH HO                                                                                                                                                          Page 4
                                                         FA - Revision

    Earnings yield which is useful for comparing performance (better than dividend
     yield)
                               ��������������������������������
         o ������������ =                               ���� 100
                         ���������������� ���������������� ������������������������ �������� �������������������������������� ������������������������
                                                               ������������
          o ���������������������������� �������������������� =                                                    ���� 100
                                               ������������������������ �������������������� ������������ ��������������������

3. Reason for share buy-back

      Reduce cost of capital.
      The share is undervalued.
      Return surplus cash to shareholders.
      To increase apparent rate of growth of basic EPS
4. Limitation of EPS as a performance measure
a. Affecting inter-period performance measure

    EPS is based on historical earnings. Management decisions to encourage current
     earnings growth at the expense of future earnings growth (Growth in earnings per
     share cannot be relied on as a predictor of the rate of growth in the future).
    EPS does not take inflation into account. Real growth may be materially different
     from apparent growth.
b. Affecting inter-company comparisons

    EPS is affected by choice of accounting policies. Eg: whether non-current assets
     are to be revalued.
    EPS is affected by capital structure. Eg: changes in number of shares by making
     bonus issue, convertible loan stock.
C/ Investment appraisal
1. Understand criteria of making decision

    How much to spend on project?
    Which project to undertake?
    Focus on financial merits of particular investments although other aspects should
     be considered before a decision is undertaken.
    Model for investment decision
        o Origination of proposals
        o Project screening – purpose, objectives, resources, expertise
        o Capital budget
        o Analysis and acceptance – financial analysis, go/ no go decision
        o Monitoring and review
    According to theory,

ANH HO                                                                                              Page 5
                                                FA - Revision

          o The amount/ timing/ risk of cash flows should be considerable.
          o Managers should be able to consider one project independently of all the
            others. This is the value additive principle.
2. Calculation, discuss drawbacks and advantages
a. Payback period
    Advantages
        o Simple, quick and easy to understand.
        o Focus on early payback can enhance liquidity.
        o Eliminate time risk.
    Disadvantages
        o Ignore cash flows after payback.
        o Ignore timing of cash flows within payback period.
        o Ignore time value of money.
        o Unable to distinguish between projects with same payback period.
        o May lead to excessive investment in short-term projects.
b. Net present value (NPV)
                  ����=∞ ��������                                                 1
    ������������ =     ����=0 (1+����)����    and �������������������������������� ������������������������ =
                                                                         (1+����)����
    Theoretically it’s a perfect technique.
    NPV uses an adjusted rate to reflect project risk and uncertainly.
    Limitation of NPV method
        o Speed of repayment of initial investment is not highlighted – reason why
           payback is still in use.
        o Cash flow figures are estimates may be incorrect.
        o Non-financial managers have difficulty understanding.
        o Determination of correct discount rate can be difficult.
    Discounted payback -> cumulative NPV
        o Advantages
                Easy to understand
                Focus on liquidity
                Takes into account time value of money
        o Disadvantages: it ignores cash flows that occur after payback period
        o Discounted payback uses unadjusted cost of capital.
c. Internal rate of return (IRR)
                          ����
    ������������ = ����% +               ���� ���� − ����      %
                        ����+����
       Where: A – lower rate of return with positive NPV
              B – higher rate of return with negative NPV

ANH HO                                                                              Page 6
                                                            FA - Revision

             P – the amount of the positive NPV
             N – absolute value of the negative NPV
    Advantages
        o Intuitively easier to understand – use % rate.
        o Take into accounts time value of money.
    Disadvantages
        o Difficult to use with non-conventional cash flows – can yield multiple IRRs.
        o Mutually exclusive – can incorrectly rank project.
        o % rate of return can be misleading.
        o Difficult to use if discount rates offer in the course of project.
        o Ignore relative size of investment.
    Modified internal rate of return (MIRR)
        o Assume cash flows are reinvested at the opportunity cost of capital until
           end of project.
                                                                                                              ��������
        o ������������������������ �������� ���������������������������� = �������������������� ���� ���������������������������� = ���������������������������������������� �������������������� =      ����
                                                                                           (1+����������������)
            o MIRR is higher than the cost of capital -> project is accepted.
d. Accounting rate of return (ARR) = Return on investment (ROI)/ ROCE
    ARR method of appraising a project is to estimate the accounting rate of return a
     project should yield. If ARR exceeds this target, then the project should be
     undertaken.
              ���������������������������� ������������������������ ������������������������ ���������������� ����������������������������
    ������������ =                                                                  ���� 100
                            ���������������������������� ����������������������������������������
     Profits are calculated after depreciation.
    Advantages
         o Quick and simple to calculate.
         o It involves a familiar concept of percentage return.
         o Accounting profits can be easily calculated from financial statements.
         o Easily understood by non-financial managers and investors because it
            employs profit.
    Disadvantages
         o Ignores time value of money.
         o It takes no account of length of project.
         o It’s a relative measure rather than absolute.
         o Ignore size of investment.
         o Based on accounting profits which are subject to varied accounting
            treatments.
    Compounding, the formula for future value of an investment plus accumulated
     interest after n time periods is ���� = ���� ∗ (1 + ����)����
     Where: V = future value of investment with interest.
               A = initial or present value of investment.
               r = rate of return (interest)

ANH HO                                                                                                     Page 7
                                      FA - Revision

              n = the number of time period
    Discounting, calculates the present value A of future cash flow, V at the end of
                         ����
     time period ���� =       ����
                        (1+����)
    Present value: the cash equivalent now of a sum of money receivable or payable at
     a future date.
D/ Leasing
1. Impact of off-balance sheet
    Arises when accounting treatments can allow companies not to recognise assets
     and liabilities that they control or on which they suffer the risks and enjoy the
     rewards.
    Various accounting standards have been issued to try to ensure that the statement
     of financial position properly reflects assets and liabilities such as IAS 17 Leases.
    The conceptual framework is also important in how it requires the substance of
     transaction to be reflected when giving reliable information in financial statements.
2. Characteristic of Lease
    Must consider the characteristics of the lease to determine what finance lease is
     and what operating lease is.
    Focus on the significant risks and rewards normally associated with ownership.
    Substance over legal form – great weight to more commercial aspects rather than
     legal.
3. Difference between operating and finance lease
a. Finance lease
      Title transfer by end of term.
      Lease for most economic life.
      PV of lease payment > fair value
      Option to purchase < fair value.
      Lease of specialised assets.
      Costs of cancellation – borne by lease.
      Secondary term for a sum market value.
      Residual value to lease.
b. Operating lease

    Ownership does not transfer by the end of term.
    Lease does not contain bargain purchase option.
    No lease term for major part of asset’s useful life.

ANH HO                                                                            Page 8
                                    FA - Revision

    Present value of minimum lease payments is not greater than or substantially equal
     to asset’s fair value.
4. Accounting for operating lease
    The leaser
        o Treat the asset as a non-current asset and depreciate with normal way.
        o Rental received are credited to the income statement.
    The lessee
        o There is no control of asset therefore asset not recognised.
        o Lease payments/ rent classified as expenses and debited to the income
            statement.
    Annual charge for operating lease
     Dr Operating lease charges
     Cr Bank
    Year 1 pay in advanced, annual charge from year 2
        o Year 1: Dr Operating Lease charges
                    Cr Accrued lease charges
        o Year 2 to end:
                    Dr Operating Lease charges
                    Dr Accrued lease charges
                    Cr Bank
    Cash back incentive at beginning
        o Year 1: Dr Bank
                    Cr Accrued lease charges
        o Year 1 to end
                     Dr Operating lease charges
                     Dr deferred income
                     Cr Bank
5. Accounting for finance lease

    At start of lease
        o Lessee include asset in balance sheet.
        o Corresponding liabilities for the lease creditor.
            Dr Fixed asset (fair value of asset)
            Cr Finance lease creditor (leaser account)
    Over the lease term
        o Make payment – split capital and interest.
            Dr Finance lease creditor
            Dr Interest expense
            Cr Bank
ANH HO                                                                          Page 9
                                                       FA - Revision

             o Depreciate asset over lease term
               Dr Depreciation expense
               Cr Accumulated depreciation
6. Implied interest on finance lease

    IAS 17 requires constant periodic rate of interest on outstanding balance of
     liability = finance expense.
    3 methods of allocating interest
         o Straight-line method
         o Sum of digits method
         o Actuarial method
7. Process in finance lease

    Capitalise leased asset into PPE
    Calculate annual depreciation charge
    Reduce net book value of leased asset by annual depreciation
    Record the finance lease obligation as a liability
    Calculate the finance charge – allocate finance charge to accounting periods (using
     any of 3 methods)
    Reduce finance obligation
E/ Share valuation
1. Methodology
a. Asset based
                                                                         ������������ �������������������������������� ������������������������ ������������������������������������������������ �������� ���������������� ��������������������
    �������������������� �������� �������������������� �������� ���������������������������������������� �������������������� =
                                                                                      ������������������������ �������� ������������������������ �������� ���������������� ��������������������
    Intangible assets should be excluded unless they have a market value
    Problem of asset valuation
         o Historical value may not be realistic
         o Replacement value
         o Reliable value is not relevant if shareholders are selling their stakes.
    Use asset valuation
         o Asset backing provides measure of possible loss.
         o Comparison in the scheme of merge.
         o Floor value.
    Strengths
         o Valuations fairly readily available.
         o Provide minimum value of entity.
    Weakness
         o Future profitability expectations of the business are ignored.

ANH HO                                                                                                                                            Page 10
                                                    FA - Revision

          o Balance sheet valuations depend on accounting conventions which may
            lead to different valuations from market values.
          o Difficult to allow for value of intangible assets such as intellectual property
            rights.
b. Earnings based

    P/E ratio method: most common method of valuing large block of share or whole
     business.
                       ������������������������ �������������������� ������������ ��������������������
        o ���� ���� =
                                        ������������
        o A high P/E ratio will indicate
                EPS is expected to grow rapidly.
                Security of earnings (stable vs volatile)
                Status (predator – quoted or target – unquoted)
        o Problem in using P/E ratio
                Finding a company of a similar size and range of activities that is
                     quoted may be hard.
                One P/E ratio for the year may not be a good basis of valuation
                     because earnings may be volatile.
                P/E ratio is based on historic data
                Quoted company may have different capital structure to the
                     unquoted company.
        o Offer price – estimation of a reasonable P/E ratio in light of the particular
           circumstances.
    The earnings yield valuation method
                                                               ������������
        o ���������������������������� �������������������� =                                 ���� 100
                                          ������������������������ �������������������� ������������ ��������������������
                                            ��������������������������������
          o ������������������������ �������������������� =
                                        �������������������������������� ��������������������
          o This method is reciprocal of the P/E ratio, where there is high growth it’s
            envisaged the earnings yield will be low. A stable earnings yield may
            suggest a company with low risk characteristics.
c. Dividend valuation based
    The annual income for a share is expected dividend every year in perpetuity
                                                    ����0
                                             ����0 =
                                                   ������������
     Where: P0 = value of share
             D0 = dividend
             Ked = cost of capital
    Dividend growth model
                                           ����1         ����0 (1 + ����)
                                ����0 =              =
                                      ������������ − ����         ������������ − ����

ANH HO                                                                                Page 11
                                    FA - Revision


      Where: D0 = dividend in the current year (year 0)
             D1 or D0(1+g) = expected future dividend in year 2
d. Cash flow valuation

    Cash flow valuation
        o The value of firm will be the sum of discounted future free cash flow
                                             ����=∞
                                                         ��������
                                                            ����
                                      ���� =
                                                    (1 + ����������������)����
                                             ����=0
          Where CFn = operating free cash flow at time n
                 WACC = weighted average cost of capital
          Assumption all free cash flows are paid to shareholders rather than
          reinvested.
        o Operating free cash flow (FCFE) = Revenue – Operating costs +
          Depreciation – Interest payment – Working capital increases – Taxes –
          Capital expenditure on fixed assets
        o Or FCFE = EBIT (1 – tax rate) + Depreciation – Capital expenditure - ∆
          Working capital.
    Drawbacks of cash flows method of valuation
        o Selection of appropriate cost of capital may prove difficult.
        o Estimating future cash flows, particularly for the target company may be
          very difficult.
        o Expected cash flows may never be attained.
        o Free cash flows may fluctuate significantly and will depend considerably
          on the company’s capital replacement policy.
2. Reason for share valuation

    For unquoted companies
        o The company may wish to go public.
        o If there is a scheme for a merger.
        o Shares need to be valued for tax purposes.
        o Shares need to pledge as collateral for a loan.
        o When a shareholder wishes to dispose of his/her holdings.
    A group’s holding company is negotiating the sale of the subsidiary.
    For quoted companies – when there is a takeover bid.
    Company is being broken up in the event of liquidation.




ANH HO                                                                       Page 12

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:0
posted:11/3/2012
language:Unknown
pages:12
Description: basic understanding about financial analysis