th Anniversary of the Power Group home

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					20 February 2007
                       Serengeti Golf and Wildlife Estate

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Civil Services Site Progress

We continue to progress at a fantastic rate with our civil works. Blasting has been a
regular feature of construction on site this year, as Power Construction blast away
the rock in some of our dams to complete their construction.

Francois Voigt from Power Construction tells us that all Phase One’s pipe or
underground works are completed, and the Phase One road beds are now on ‘sub-
base level’. The laying of kerbstones on the roads has just begun, and the stands will
soon be trimmed to road level. Tractionel Enterprises, the appointed Electrical
contractor, will then commence with the installation of the streetlight network. Phase
one only requires further finishes such as these before it is ready to be transferred to
our first group of buyers.

Surveyors have been on Phase Two and the clearing of the road reserves in
preparation for the bulk services has commenced. There’ll be a lot of activity in this
area as it is prepared for transfer.

Serengeti Boulevard is the main road that runs through the Serengeti Estate, and all
its formation levels have been completed. Box cutting of the road has already begun,
and once the road is at formation level the pipe works will begin.

The planning for the link road between our northern entrance and the R25 has been
finalised.
March 2007
The man behind the concrete giants
Build SA Magazine

When I first heard about Graham Power’s road to success, I was marvelled
on how one person could be such an inspirational force within the industry
as a whole. Graham’s journey to where he is today is a true example of one
of his philosophies; “You have to work like a slave to live like a king”.
Through sacrifices, perseverance and excellent work ethics, Mr Power was
able to mould Power Construction into the pillar of strength that it is today.
Meeting such a remarkable man, who doesn’t only visualise South Africa’s
growth, but the growth of the continent as a whole and whose work and
beliefs has influenced and inspired people far beyond our boarders, is bound
to give anyone goose bumps. On meeting Graham Power, my first
impression of him was that he is a man of great wisdom and pure grace. This
soft-spoken, ageing man still sees himself as not having completed his
mission in life.

Power Construction has been in existence for over two decades and boasts
the record of not retrenching one of their staff members since its
inception. Starting from humble beginnings of an annual turnover of just
R300 000, Power Construction grew from strength to strength to become the
multi-billion rand company that it is today. Most people can identify good
business ethics and even luck as the main contributor to this business’
success. But after spending time with the man behind Power Construction, I
beg to differ. There is defiantly more to Power that has made him one of the
most respected and admired people within the industry and across others.
While most people of his age and statue are enjoying the fruits of their
retirements, Graham Power is still doing whatever he can to build South
Africa and contributes to the development and growth of the continent as a
whole. Our conversation left me with lessons and a sense of inspiration that
will last me a lifetime.

Sibu: Besides construction, which other career path did you consider
when you were growing up?

“If the finances where available for me during the time, I was very
interested in Law, but looking back I do not have any regrets about not
being a part of that industry.”
Sibu: When did your fascination or love for this industry begin?

“I grew up in a very poor environment where my siblings had to leave
school at the age of 16 to help take care of us. My involvement was by
chance really; my brother in law was a surveyor. After I left school, I did my
year of military service. After that I was privileged enough to join Savage
and Lovemore as one of their surveyors.”

Sibu: Who or what ignited your drive to become a part of this industry?

“This industry has always been very interesting to me. The one thing that I
enjoyed the most was that after a days work you could see your work come
alive and grow every day.”

Sibu: Your Company was established through you making the big
sacrifice of selling your home and properties. What drove you to make
such a decision?

“I had worked for Savage and Lovemore for 9 years. Although I had grown
considerably within the company and I was satisfied with my job, I got tired
of the red tape that would always come with me staying at that job. I got
frustrated of decisions not being made immediately. But most of all I had
always had the drive to start something on my own.”

Sibu: Any regrets?

“Zero, I would not have wanted anything to work out differently. I had to
gain adequate experience in the industry before I could take such a bold
step. With time everything worked out perfectly.”


Sibu: How has your family contributed to your success?

“From day one my family has contributed greatly to the success of the
business. During the initial stages my kids were very young and my wife was
in charge of all the admin work of the business.”

Sibu: Over the first five years since its inception, your company’s
turnover multiplied greatly. What was/is your secret?
“I could say that my ‘secret’ was the relationships I had formed with the
people who worked at my previous place of employment. They referred me
whenever there was a project in the pipeline. These were people that I
trusted. In the period between the 80’s and 90’s, the construction industry
was experiencing its lowest point. The relationships that I have formed prior
to that period caused my company to survive that period. Starting out small,
my business purely grew through profitability.”

Sibu: You were still young at the time, how did you handle the
increasing career pressures and financial growth?

“My father-in-law was in the hotel industry, he provided me with a lot of
much needed advice during the initial stages of my business. My biggest
achievement then was buying my first 2nd hand Toyota bakkie. As for the
pressure, I enjoyed it. I thrive on activity; it has always gotten my adrenaline
pumping.”

Sibu: During this period did you ever consider selling your business?

“Never.”

Sibu: What is the difference between Power Construction now and
Power Construction 24 years ago?

“Well, the difference is clearly evident. We started on a smallholding, which
cost R110, 000 on Sir Lowry’s Pass. There were stables on the holding,
which we gradually turned into workstations and offices. Through
dedication and hard work we now have four regional offices in Cape Town,
Knysna, Nelson Mandela Bay and Pretoria. We are also at a point of
considering African initiatives.”

Sibu: The most impressive aspect about your company is the fact that
since it’s inception there has never been a retrenched member of staff.
How did you manage the hard times?

“There were times when we lacked worked, this was mostly during the
period where the construction industry was experiencing a downward
slump. I can recall three occasions where there were great possibilities for
retrenchments. But the reason why we didn’t do this was because our
workers had always been loyal to the company. Letting people who were
loyal to you during the good times go, when the going got tough did not
seem like the right thing to do. On more than one occasion we tendered at a
loss.”

Sibu: What does transformation mean to you and how do you project
that in the way your company operates?

“Today, the word transformation is a very tricky word to use. Personally I
believe that transformation involves changing the mindset of people so that
they can reach their full potential. The change in systematic poverty is also
very important. We should not only focus on Cape Town or South Africa,
our responsibility is to focus on Africa as a whole. 10% of the Power
Group’s profits go to a trust fund, which is involved in feeding schemes,
ministries and HIV/AIDS.”

Sibu: What are your feelings about the potential and growth of the
construction industry in the Western Cape?

“I am very excited; the industry is going through its first boom since the
1970’s. I have confidence in the South African government and economic
growth and sustainability that we have maintained throughout the years.
Although apartheid is not a pleasant period to think about, the one positive
thing that came out of that period was the development of our country’s
infrastructure. That has made South Africa a key player within the continent.
I am confident that the growth in South Africa’s construction industry is
going to continue way beyond 2010.”

Sibu: Do you think that this industry enables those who were not
privileged enough to further their education great development
opportunities?

“The opportunities within this industry are huge. This is one, if not the only
industry, that gives semi skilled individuals the opportunity to be highly
productive within a short period of time. The construction industry has a
huge responsibility to develop these kinds of people skills. It will be a great
investment in the country’s future.”

Sibu: Do you think that South Africa has the adequate amount of skilled
and educated personnel to sustain and contribute to the growth of the
construction industry?
“There are sufficient people, but we lack in sufficient skills. Tertiary
institutions should make it a point that they should develop more people.
Companies also have the responsibility to train, sponsor and even educate
more people who are interested in becoming a part of this industry.”

Sibu: HIV/AIDS is one factor that seems to be dissolving our workforce,
what policies or programs does your company have to address these
social issues?

“For the last five years we have conducted voluntary testing for all our staff
members. Everyone has been given at least three opportunities to test him or
herself to find out their status. The Power Group provided its infected staff
with anti-retorial drugs before the government made such drugs readily
available for everyone. We had provided this in collaboration with trained
companies. Having returned from Uganda; a state which had turned its HIV
statistics from 30% to 6%, the one way to curb the spread of this disease is
through encouraging the youth to abstain from any sexual activities until
they are ready to commit in marriage.”

Sibu: Where do you rate the Western Cape among the other
regions/states in the world?

“The Western Cape is one of if not the most beautiful regions in the world.
Our weather and scenery will continue to cause us to be the gateway to
Africa.”

Sibu: You have travelled around the world, what do you think makes
you a proud Capetonian?

“Capetonians have this friendly and hospitable nature, which makes visitors
feel welcomed from every corner of the world. My one concern though is the
level of crime, violence and corruption. Such things should be taken
seriously because they tend to contribute to the hindering of the growth of
this nation.”

Sibu: What do you like doing when you are not working?

“My hobbies are rugby, water sports and reading.”
Sibu: Do you think the South African construction industry is well
equipped and ready to ‘polish up’ the country for 2010?

“I am optimistic that this industry is going to rise to the occasion.
Influencing the Diaspora to return home can always curb the skills shortage
issue.”

Sibu: What do you forecast for the industry after 2010?

“This industry will continue to grow after 2010. With the demand for
tourism in this country, I predict that the hype will continue up to about
2020. This will therefore create a platform for this industry to help with the
development of the continent as a whole.”

Sibu: What drives you to continue doing what you are doing?

“I believe that God has given me the responsibility to play a part, no matter
how big or small in Africa’s transformation.”

Sibu: How do you think we as individuals can contribute towards
building South Africa?

“We should see the glass as being half full and not half empty. Being
positive about this country and caring for your neighbour are the basic
things that we need to do. This nation has a special blessing. Its up to us to
use that blessing well.”

Sibu: Any last words to people who are aspiring to be where you are one
day?

“Everything starts with hard work. In order for anyone to achieve their goals
they have to commit themselves to work like slaves so that they can live like
kings. Another thing that most people should understand is that experience
comes with time. Humility and dedication are the two things that can take
you far in life.”
Februarie 2007, Rapport


Met ‘n toenemend diverse arbeidskorps, meen werkgewers al meer dat jy nie
verkeerd kan gaan deur polities korrek te wees nie.
Dit geld veral met godsdiens. Daar is ‘n groter sensitiwiteit oor verskillende
gelowe wat in een werkplek geakkommodeer moet word en baie werkgewers is
huiwerig om in die openbaar oor hul geloof te praat (etlike top-sakelui van
verskillende gelowe wou byvoorbeeld nie kommentaar lewer vir dié artikel nie).
Só word “Geseënde Kersfees” van kerskaartjies verban en voel baie werknemers
hulle moet hul godsdiens by die kantoordeur los.
Maar daar is steeds sakelui wat openlik hul geloof by die werkplek uitleef.
By die Power-konstruksiegroep – wat onder meer vir siviele konstruksie by
Century City, N1 Stad, V&A Waterfront, Thesen Eiland (Knysna) en golfbane
(onder andere Pearl Valley, Pinnacle Point in Mosselbaai en Serengeti in
Gauteng) verantwoordelik was - word daar op boupersele en in raadsale gebid
voor enige groot besluite geneem of kontrakte geteken word. Daar is ‘n
gebedskamer vir personeel by die hoofkantoor in Kaapstad, middagete-bidure en
‘n interne epos-nuusbrief met personeel se gebedsversoeke.
Die groep se uitvoerende voorsitter, mnr. Graham Power, hou ‘n halfuur stiltetyd
in sy kantoor voor hy met sy werk begin. Ná hy in 1999 tot bekering gekom het,
het Power onderneem om ‘n “24/7”-Christen te word en sy geloof te versoen met
sy sakebestuur.
Ed Silvoso se boek Anointed For Business het hom laat verstaan dat sy
onderneming sy bediening is, wat van hom ‘n “markplek-minister” maak.
“Dit is God se onderneming – nie my eie nie.”
Dit is egter nie altyd maklik om ‘n etiese, geloofsgebaseerde organisasie te
wees in die konstruksiebedryf, wat berug is vir omkoopgeld en ander
onreëlmatighede nie. Power sê daar kom gereeld “versoeke”, maar die groep
weier om omkoopgeld te betaal of te ontvang.
Power moes self ‘n paar jaar gelede erken dat hy oor die jare onwettiglik geld in
die buiteland gehou het. Hy het dit reggestel en ander Christen-sakelui as deel
van die regering se amnestie-proses aangemoedig om dit ook te doen.
Sedertdien het hy ook ‘n anti-korrupsieveldtog (“Unashamedly Ethical”) van
stapel gestuur waar individue en maatskappye ‘n onderneming teken (beskikbaar
by www.int.africa.com) om aan etiese waardes te voldoen. Aan die einde van
vanjaar sal ‘n “geelbladsye” publikasie met al dié name gepubliseer word.
Om volgens jou geloof sake te doen het ook ander uitdagings, sê mnr. Abeeb
Abrahams van die Islamitiese Albaraka Bank.
“Mens kan gemarginaliseer word vanweë jou geloofsoortuiging.”
Dit is ‘n uitdaging vir ‘n Islamitiese onderneming, wat ‘n Westerse sakekultuur
moet sake doen terwyl hy ook aan Islamitiese bepalings, wat onder meer rente
verbied, moet voldoen.
Maar Abrahams en Power glo dit is uiteindelik tot ‘n onderneming se voordeel om
dit volgens geloofsoortuigings te bestuur.
“(Geloof) voeg waarde toe tot sake, hoofsaaklik vanweë die manier waarin ons
mense hanteer - met menswaardigheid en integriteit,” sê Abrahams. “Dit gaan
dan daaroor om eerlik, deursigtig en regverdig te wees en alle mense dieselfde
te behandel. Dit gaan nie altyd oor die geld en titels nie.”
Om ‘n maatskappy openlik volgens geloofswaardes te bedryf, boesem ook
vertroue by ander in oor sy etiese handel en wandel.
Dit is ook goed vir moraal onder werkers om die vryheid te hê om hul godsdiens
na die werkplek te bring, sê mnr. Fanie Bekker van die Afrikaanse
Handelsinstituut. Hy begin elke dag met nie-verpligtende oggendgodsdiens vir
werkemers.
Te midde van toenemende gejaagdheid en spanning oor misdaad en
ekonomiese onsekerheid, kan godsdiens en die ruimte vir stiltetyd by die werk ‘n
anker vir baie mense wees.
“Een godsdiens moet net nie afgedwing word op werkers nie.”
Abrahams sê daar het die afgelope jare groter toleransie vir verskillende gelowe
gekom en daar is welkom erkenning vir belangrike religueuse dae van ander
gelowe.
“Hoewel tagtig persent van die Suid-Afrikaanse bevolking Christene is, móét
diversiteit in ag geneem word”, sê Power. Sy groep akkommodeer Joodse,
Moslem, ander-gelowige en nie-gelowige werkers.
Geloofsgebasseerde ondernemings kan ook ‘n rol speel in opheffing.
POWER glo dat sy geloof hom verantwoordelik maak om terug te ploeg in die
gemeenskap.
Tien persent van sy wins gaan sedert 2000 aan ‘n trustfonds wat gebruik word vir
opvoeding, vigs, opleiding, opheffingswerk en armoede.
Hier is die woorde van Spreuke 3 vir Power ‘n inspirasie: “Vereer die Here met
offerandes; uit al wat jy besit en met die beste uit jou oes; dan sal jou skure
oorvol wees en jou parskuipe oorloop van die wyn.”
November 2006
The Civil Engineering Contractor

Insiders’ opinions
What do contractors and consultants think: will they cope with the
construction avalanche coming their way?

Focus on support infrastructure by André du Preez, managing director of
Power Construction


“We are not the size of company that would put in a single-handed tender on
a stadium contract but we certainly have the resources in Cape Town, Port
Elizabeth and Gauteng, to handle the supporting infrastructure and roads
that must accompany such developments, either on our own or in joint
venture with others. While you’ll understand that I can’t disclose our
business strategies, our order book and future prospects means that we
won’t be tempted by high-risk contracts and we prefer to stick to our
knitting, doing what we do best. The industry is experiencing the longest
growth phase in its history and there are signals that this could level off after
2010 so one has to be circumspect about how one expands in terms of
personnel and capital equipment.

The biggest concern that faces the industry is not that we won’t have the
money to accomplish the 2010 stadiums and infrastructure, but whether or
not the public sector has the personnel to organise the work. We are facing a
capacity crisis even in the large metros and, while there are initiatives to get
professionals back into the sector, the seriousness of the shortfall is often
understated, meaning that it is worse than reported. This may lead to more
turnkey projects, such as the N2 Gateway sewer, which are being completed
in association with ASLA. It’s safe to say that, if the City of Cape Town hadn’t
gone the turnkey route, the job would probably not have been as advanced.
Design-and-build turnkey contracts are the only way to get the work done, in
my opinion. As far as equipment shortages are concerned, we seem to be OK
at the moment although there are periodic shortages of tyres. We do
supplement our fleet with plant hire on an ‘as required’ basis. Of greater
concern than equipment shortages is the lack of skilled operators and their
decimation through Aids and HIV infections.

There is little doubt that the pressure for qualified people is on, right across
the spectrum, and the Construction Education and Training Authority has
failed in providing a stream of trained artisans to the industry. Large
concerns, including us, have had substantial in-house training programmes in
place for several years, with great success, but the demand is pushing up
salary expectations and there is noticeable poaching going on within the
industry – that is not good in the long run. When the construction demand
flattens off, there could be an over-supply of skills and then we may see a
‘last in, first out’ scenario so staff will need to consider the longer-term
situation, and not just short-term gain.

We have structured employment packages to assist in withstanding the
temptation of being ‘poached’. The Power Group includes four black economic
empowerment (BEE) companies – all established for several years and each
with a BEE stakeholding of 51%. These companies tender for work
individually and partner with us, as well as other contractors, providing
specialised skills, but generally there are not enough BEE companies. While
efforts and initiatives such as the Construction Industry Development Board
are welcomes and encouraged, the generally limited levels of experience
available from emerging contractors means that there will be limited
opportunities in 2010 construction projects, which will almost certainly have
to be fast-tracjed if they are going to be ready on time.”
October 2006
The Civil Engineering Contractor

Golf course requires precision earthworks
Precision is the name of the game in the Serengeti golf estate earthworks
contract in Johannesburg.
Robin Hayes visits this massive cut-and-fill operation.

The Acu Dev group is developing the 840 ha Serengeti site adjacent to the
R21 highway, 7km north-west of Johannesburg International Airport (soon to
be renames OR Tambo International Airport). Main construction work has
been divided into two parts: golf course construction under Golf Data and the
R250-million residential component, including infrastructure and earthworks,
by Power Construction North.

Golf specialist as main contractor
Managing the construction of the golf course, Golf Dat is also the main
contractor. Fanie de Jongh, Golf Data’s construction director, clarified the
reasons for this decision to Civil Engineering Contractor: “We’ve taken this
step
November 2006
George Herald

Groot Rolbal Power uitdaag
In ‘n rolbaldag wat in baie opsigte ‘n eerste by die outeniqua rolbalklub was, het die
onderskeie afdelings can Power Konstruksie mekaar die stryd aangese in die groot
Power uitdaag.

Die kleurvolle uitrustings en tegnieke op die baan het nie baie aan rolbal herinner nie,
maar sommige van die spellers, het duidelik getoon dat hulle die talent he tom nog goeie
balle te rol. Teen etenstyd het Paul Thiart die voormiddag se uitslae aangekondig en dit
het tot verdure motivering vir die namiddag-sessie gedien.

Tydens die prysuitdeling was almal dit eens dat dit ‘n hoogtepunt-dag op die rolbal baan
was wat meer gereeld moet plaasvid.
September 2006
The Civil Engineering Contractor

R250-million earthworks contract underway

AcuDev’s 840 ha golf and wildlife estate, named Serengeti (perhaps
reminiscent of the Kenyan open plains topography) situated north-east of
Kempton Park and about 7km from Johannesburg International Airport (JIA)
on the R21 highway, is about four months into its construction contract.

Power Construction North negotiated the R250-million civils and earthworks
contract with AcuDev in May 2006 and work on the two Jack Nicklaus-design
golf courses commenced on June 1 – one 18-hole and one nine-hole course.
The first two phases of the development’s residential component, comprising

facilities is expected during 2008 with the balance, at least six residential
phases, lodges, themed residential villages, an international standard hotel,
environmental college, a 340ha wildlife estate, equestrian centre and other
sporting facilities, throughout a seven-year development period.

Serengeti might be expected to kickstart the proposed R21-Ekurhuleni
development corridor bounded by Olifantsfontein, Benoni and Germiston,
where an industrial development zone adjacent to JIA has been mooted.
September 2006
The Civil Engineering Contractor

Wet Ground conditions overcome
A R200 million sewer contract is a sizable undertaking, especially when wet
ground conditions pose many construction challenges. This is the case at the
N2 Gateway Delft Bulk Sewer project, Robin Hayes learned.

Sobambisane Community Developments (of which ASLA Construction and
Power Construction are members) was appointed the handle this design-and-
construct project. The tender contract followed International Federation of
Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) turnkey contract conditions. While a fixed price
was provided for the job, the fast-track nature of the project meant that,
from the outset, there would be extras and additions to be accommodated in
the works. ASLA Construction and Power Construction have partnered before
in other aspects of the Gateway project as contractors to Sobambisana
Conmmunity Developments but not in joint venture. So, while the two
companies knew each other, in this case extensive planning was required
and frank discussions on strengths and weaknesses lead to apportioning of
work and contract responsibilities. Once that was settled, a team approach
was adopted to address the seven major contract activities, which included
excavation and pipe laying, concrete work, materials store, workshops and
training, among others. Extensive use is made of local and emerging
contractors with training support provided to engineers from the City of Cape
Town.

In addition to the appointed contracting team, Sobambisana Community
Developments included consulting engineers Kewzi V3 and Bergstan in the
tender process and Chand environmental consultants in association with
Ecosense to supervise construction all of whom have permanent technical
staff in site offices. Looking after the client’s interests is project management
consultant Stewart Scott International.

Deviation from original plan
The new pipeline follows the route of the old fairly closely, through Delft and
sections of the Kuilsriver flood plain, but that doesn’t make its construction
wany easier, according to Tony Araujo, site agent for Asla/Power joint
venture (responsible for the technical aspects of the project). “The route
traverses existing services, protected wetlands, information settlements,
private farm land and crosses the Kuilsriver twice, the R300 main road and
the N2 Highway”, explained Araujo. Ground conditions are typical of the
Cape Flats: sand dunes, fine sandy soils with isolated areas of calcareous
sandy material mixed with some clayey/calcareous boulders.

There have been a number of administrative and planning issues that have
caused the construction programme to deviate from the original plan. Great
urgency to complete the pipeline in time for occupation of the houses, which
were scheduled for handover at 100 per week, led to the adoption of a fast-
tracking approach, which culminated in a tight contract period of just 11
months. The contract period-commencing in December 2005 – is particularly
challenging considering the high water table expected during the wet winter
months. While the project had received approval from the Department of
Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) technical approval and an environmental
impact assessment (EIA) record of decision (ROD) was imminent, several
other legal and administrative issues had not been resolved prior to the
contractors establishing on site.

Examples included the removal of informal settlements by city officials and
the granting of permission by land owners to cross their farms. These issues
and a late but unsuccessful appeal lodged to the Ministry for Environment,
Planning and Economic Developments for a change in the approved pipeline
route also resulted in substantial re-programming of the construction
schedule. Implications of the route change, upheld more than a month after
contract commencement, meant the partial destruction of seasonal wetlands,
which required permissions from DWAF in Pretoria. At the same time,
concerns were being expressed by environmentalists and others over the
impact of the Kuilsriver crossings and a special team was formed to examine
the issues, comply with the dictates of the National Water Act and
recommend a method of construction that lessened the environmental
impact.

The team’s proposals were accepted by DWAFm which issued authorisation
for the lower and upper Kuilsriver crossings during February and March 2006
but a decision on the seasonal wetlands would take a little longer. Three
types of wetland were affected: imperate cylindrical, degraded and
Renosterveld – each requiring a separate rehabilitation regime. To minimise
impact, it was a condition that construction work had to take place during the
dry season. The upshot was that method statements were devised and
issued and an environmental control officer appointed to ensure compliance
with the Construction Environmental Management Plan. DWAF in the Western
Cape approved the measures in June 2006, allowing construction to proceed
in sensitive areas. Notwithstanding these impacts, the flexibility of the
contracting organisation accommodated these changes while maintaining in
other less sensitive areas.

Why a new sewer?
The much-publicised and, at times controversial, N2 Gateway housing
project, involves the construction of 22 000 housing units and was scheduled
for completion in June 2006. Approximately 15 000 of these units were
construction in Delft Symphony, Delft extensions 7, 8 and 9 and Driftsands.
It was clear that the existing bulk interceptor sewer built many years ago,
was inadequate for the increased flow. The capacity was often exceeded,
especially in the wet season when the level of groundwater peaked above the
level of the sewer. In such cases, stormwater and groundwater entered the
pipelines through damaged couplings and cracks that had developed over the
years. Sewer overflow was not uncommon causing a major health risk to
communities and environmental concerns.

Under a Municipal Infrastructure Grant, the new sewer pipeline is under
construction for the City of Cape Town by Sobambisana Community
Developments, sub-contracted to the ASLA/Power joint venture. The pipeline
has been designed to address capacity requirements not only for the
Gateway project, but for the greater Tygerberg area. The project pipeline
starts in Delft at Sumphony Wat and terminates at the Zandvliet wastewater
treatment works – a pipe run of about 15,66km.

The project comprises two parts: Section 1 is known as the Delft Interceptor
Sewer that runs from Hindle Road to Kuilsriver (designed by Bergstan) while
the second section is known as the main sewer, commencing at Kuilsriver
(Mfuleni), running along Old Faure Road, turning to run along Baden Powell
Drive and then connecting into the Zandvliet wastewater treatment works,
which was designed by Kwezi V2 Engineers.

Pipe-jacking at road crossings
A number of pipe-jackings under roads and services was specified and the
work sub-contracted to specialist firm Escor, which was contracted to handle
four crossings, according to Escor director Arthur Field. HIndle Road, the
R300 and N2 are all road crossings between 50m to 70m in length and at a
depth between 4m and 8m, he said, adding: Hindle was 1 350mm diameter
and the other two were 1500 mm and 2 250 mm.

Further jacking took place under services adjacent to the R300 where the
pipeline corsses under existing large-diameter water mains, a 750 mm-
diameter sewer, bulk stormwater and power cables. “While the Hindle Road,
N2 and services crossings were fairly straightforward, except for the problem
of groundwater, the R300 presented a particular challenge as unidentified
concrete structures were found directly in our path at a depth of more than
8m,: explained Field. “Our conventional vacuum pump dewatering techniques
proved ineffective at these depths and well-point dewatering was employed,”
he elaborated. “We opted for an additional jacking pit in the central median.”
The underlying ground conditions and removal of the concrete structures has
led to some unexpected subsidence on the R300, which, although stable, will
form part of remedial work by the contractors during off-peak traffic
conditions. Ironically, the contractors requested that the Department of
Transport allow this crossing to be done by open-cut rather than jacking bu
the requested was declined due to heavy traffic volumes on the R300.
2006

Pearl Valley clubhouse on par with the world’s finest

Another prestigious project has earned its place in Power Building’s
portfolio.

Power Building’s new R50m clubhouse at 212 ha Pearl Valley Signature
Golf Estate was handed over to Novelway, its Malaysian developer, at
the end of May. The imposing two-storey building features large areas
of stone cladding and vast expanses of glass, offering views across the
greens and fairway to the backdrop of mountains in the distance.

Power Building MD, Poens Venter, said the finishes – exterior as well
as interior – are of the highest quality. “The levels of craftsmanship
and attention to detail are exceptional. There are three components to
the building: an office wing, the pro shop and sales office, and the
lifestyle centre with its restaurants, lounge, gym, Pilates room, health
and beauty spa area and children’s centre. The whole complex has
been designed to serve the estate’s community, their friends and
visiting golfers.”

Water is a recurring feature of the recreation areas. Pools, fountains,
cascades and even a sunken cocktail bar welcome players and
spectators to the outdoor areas. The children’s pool, splash pool and
water slide have been build around “his and her” changing rooms
reserved for brides and grooms who choose to host their wedding at
the clubhouse.

Inside, clever use of artificial lighting combines with natural light
flooding the restaurant and function rooms, to create a feeling of
understated opulence.

Werner Hugo, one of Power’s site managers alongside Shaheed
Jacobs, has seen the project through from start to completion. “This
must be the most exciting project we’ve ever done. Everything is just
the best. The finishes. The detail. And every piece of furniture has
been imported from Malaysia.”

Power Building’s contracts manager Bert Duncker said the innovative
design of the roof posed some challenges at first: “The combination of
steel and wooden exposed trusses and the different levels of roof
added an interesting dimension, and so too did the cupolas – or turrets
– on the roof.”
Malcolm Bam of Maas & Coetzee architects explained how the concept
designer, Dennis Maas, had arranged the entrance and public areas so
that the building directs the viewer’s gaze down the ninth fairway and
towards the Simonsberg range beyond the course, which was designed
by Jack Niklaus. “The building is on a grand scale, without being too
dominant over the rather flat surrounding landscape. It is not perfectly
symmetrical, which helps make it inviting”. He added that, in empathy
with the landscape, the entire building site was actually excavated so
that it is lower than the fairway.

The kiddies’ centre on the ground level features a big-screen home
theatre, and leads to an outdoor play area complete with a braai and
mini pizza oven for the kids. The crèche is run by Bridge House School
and caters for 2 to 4 year-olds.

Also on the lower level, the halfway house offers a drive-through
facility and a garage for golf cars, as well as luxuriously appointed
lockers and changing rooms.

Pearl Valley comprises 500 residential erven ranging from the smallest
at 650 square metres to the biggest in later phases of 2 200 square
metres. Power is no newcomer to Pearl Valley; Power Construction was
responsible for the civil works of the prestigious golf estate
development.
March 2006


Will HIV/Aids cripple SA construction?



The biggest threat to the growth of this country appears to be disease – the South

African construction sector has the third highest incidence of HIV/Aids after mining and

transport, according to statistics released on World Aids Day last 1 December. What will

this cost in terms of delivery, profits, absenteeism, insurance payouts, education and

healthcare? Edith Webster went in search of answers to these pertinent questions.



HIV/Aids runs rampant among South African construction workers largely because the

labour force is migratory; construction camps are a breeding ground for the spread of the

pandemic and sexually-transmitted diseases; and workers on contract generally

disregard the consequences of casual sexual relationships, according to the

Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB).

This being the case, the sector could be heading for a fall. How hard could it hit the

ground?



How bad is it?

“The impact is likely to be severe,” says Theo Haupt, research co-ordinator in the

Southern African Built Environment Research Centre at the Cape Peninsula University

of Technology. “The HIV/Aids pandemic in South Africa threatens to reduce the overall

construction labour force, shift the age structure of the work force due to increased

eventual mortality of HIV-infected workers and change the skill composition of the

construction labour supply. This is already under pressure due to skills shortages in the

artisan and management categories of employment, and results in increased labour
turnover,” he adds, quoting his research conducted with Professor John Smallwood,

head of the construction management department at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan

University in Port Elizabeth.



How much worse could it get?

If HIV/Aids is left to wreak havoc, Haupt predicts the costs facing construction employers

will grow exponentially and definitely affect the bottom line as well as survival in a highly

competitive environment. He believes this could be aggravated by the threat to overall

national productivity and the consequent displacement of regular spending on health –

HIV/Aids threatens to absorb resources at all levels and cost a fortune in terms of

medical aid claims, lower productivity and the replacement and training of new recruits.

“Given the present poor image of the construction industry and the consequent decline

in the numbers of new, younger persons choosing careers in construction, there is

already a steady increase in the size of the older cohort relative to the size of the

younger cohort,” he points out. “The situation is exacerbated by claims that the highest

rate of infection is in young people in the 15- to 25-year age cohort.”

Standing his ground where angels fear to tread, Haupt believes construction employers

are notorious for not providing sustainable employment for their older workers, opting

instead to retrench them and thereby suffer greater loss in terms of skills and knowledge

capital. “Additionally, a lack of adequate training and retraining of existing workers, and

those brave enough to enter the industry, in critically needed construction skills virtually

guarantee the inability of the industry to deliver and grow its capacity to deliver at a time

when it is experiencing an unprecedented boom phase.”



Is this the death knell?
To put it quite simply, if a large portion of the skilled construction labour force is dying

off, either due to old age or HIV/Aids in their youth, who’s going to build the country? If

the only option is to tap into an unskilled pool of resources, of course HIV/Aids will thwart

government’s infrastructure development and delivery efforts, Haupt warns. “The

tardiness of government to recognise the threat of HIV and Aids for what it is and commit

to and implement programmes that will improve the productive quality of workers

through increased access to life-extending treatment such as antiretrovirals (ARVs) will

negatively affect the government’s growth and employment expectations using the

sector as the vehicle of delivery,” he says.

South Africa must double its construction over the next 10 years, according to Spencer

Hodgson, CEO of the CIDB. “Going forward, the construction industry will need to rely

on a much higher level of skills than it has done in the past,” he says. “In the context of

growing construction demand and the existing skills shortage, it is critical that the drive

to recruit and train young people is supported by aggressive workplace HIV/Aids

programmes to reduce the risks of infection to the workforce, skilled artisans, the

professions and local communities.”



What can be done?

“The solution is to find infected people and keep them alive,” says Harry Lake of Care

Works, an organisation that undertakes HIV/Aids education, testing and intervention

mainly for construction companies since 2002.

One of the major differences between HIV and other infectious diseases is the very long

period between first infection and major symptoms, understands Lake. “This, together

with the many cultural issues that frequently surround sexually-transmitted infections

(STIs), lead to many people avoiding real discussion about HIV,” he says.
But this can be overcome by providing ‘personal knowledge’ as part of the solution. “By

personal knowledge we mean that all staff should know their own HIV status and have

adequate knowledge about HIV to be able to manage their own lives and be able to

positively influence the lives of those that surround them,” explains Lake.



Knowledge is power

When people have adequate knowledge, they will most likely want to know their HIV

status, continues Lake, but they are often held back by fear – fear of themselves, their

partners and families, their employers and their colleagues. “We remove the last three of

these fears by guaranteeing total confidentiality,” he says of the Care Works sessions.

“Skillful counselling can go a long way to limiting the first.” Lake’s team find there is so

much fear that people they test “literally jump with joy” when they are told they are HIV-

negative. “This, of course, creates fertile grounds for preventative measures.”

However, on the flip side, Care Works finds people who test HIV-positive go into denial

and the challenge then is to counsel individuals so that they open up to further

assistance. “Our minimum requirement before embarking on an HIV programme that

includes testing is to ensure that all those who test HIV-positive have access to free

follow-up counselling for a year thereafter,” explains Lake. “This counselling often

extends to the family and we offer assistance with registration on whatever treatment

programmes are available.”

Unfortunately, funding remains a problem for the Care Works and other HIV/Aids

programmes out there – particularly as the Construction Education and Training

Authority (CETA) has withdrawn its support now. “We believe that effective progress will

remain slow until meaningful funding is secured via a transparent delivery mechanism,

payable against clearly defined deliverables,” proposes Lake. “All of this can easily be

put in place once HIV is recognised as a threat that can and must be contained.”
While it costs about R150 000 to train an operator on a construction site (to drive a front-

end loader, for example), the cost of treating a 35-year-old, HIV-positive person on

antiretroviral therapy over their lifetime is around R110 000, according to Lake.



The bottom line

Ultimately, what is the likely effect HIV/Aids could have on construction sector profits?

“Unless clients are willing to foot the bill for increased construction costs as a result of all

the factors mentioned as well as the costs of recruitment and the increased wage and

salary rates that will have to be paid, construction employers will not be able to realise

returns that will sustain their financial survival and existence,” Haupt predicts. “However,

the majority of construction employers have as yet not recognised the threat of the

pandemic on their own business operations and eventual survival,” he points out. “They

have chosen not to become involved relegating the responsibility to other agencies

despite the demands of the Occupational Health & Safety Act (OHSA) of 1993 that

requires them to provide their workers with a work environment that is safe and does not

threaten their health.”

A survey conducted by the Bureau for Economic Research (BER) and funded by the

South African Business Coalition on HIV and Aids (SABCOHA) – The Impact Of

HIV/Aids On Selected Business Sectors In South Africa, 2005 – reports some building

and construction companies foresee appointing extra employees (‘work shadowing’) to

compensate for the impact of HIV/Aids on productivity, absenteeism and mortality.

The situation may look bleak but, although he concedes HIV/Aids will have widespread

effect on the construction sector, Muller Uys, speaking on behalf of SAFCEC, says “to

what extent we are not sure as no proper scientific study of the impact on the industry

has yet been conducted”. SAFCEC is currently considering a proposal to conduct this

study.
How easy (or not) is it to get treatment?

Nathan Geffen, Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) policy co-ordinator, tells Civil

Engineering Contractor there was a significant increase in rolling out ARV treatment in

2005.

The most recent model, ASSA2003, compiled by the Actuarial Society of South Africa

(ASSA) Aids committee – established in 1987 to assist actuaries and society in general

to estimate the impact of Aids in South Africa – estimates that 124 000 South Africans

were receiving ARV treatment on 1 July 2005. Geffen says the TAC played a critical role

here by advocating for an ARV treatment plan since 2000 – engaging with government,

business and the public through demonstrations, the mass media, litigation, literacy

workshops…and the work goes on.

The organisation has most successfully made drug companies reduce the price of the

‘first-line ARV regimen’ from over R2 500 per month in 2000 to R100 per month in 2005!

Drugs like fluconazole (for treating two common opportunistic infections), cotrimoxazole

and acyclovir are now available in many public clinics.

But the ASSA2003 model also estimates there are many more people – 521 000 – with

Aids who needed ARV treatment but were not receiving it on 1 July 2005. Geffen says

there are also reports of long waiting lists at many facilities – the TAC continues to lobby

government to correct this state of affairs.

What do construction employers say?

The CIDB urges its clients to include an HIV/Aids awareness and action specification in

all tenders and contracts for engineering and construction work. Contractors are required

to raise awareness through on-site workshops; provide workers with access to condoms;

facilitate HIV counselling, testing and referral services; and support STI diagnosis and

treatment. This helps the CIDB price and monitor HIV/Aids awareness.
So what’s happening on the ground?

Wayne Reddie, group human resources director, WBHO Construction:

“HIV/Aids will negatively affect all aspects of the industry – the magnitude of which will

depend on our willingness to act, and quickly. WBHO has recently completed a group-

wide HIV/Aids awareness, counselling and voluntary testing programme. Our objectives

were to identify the prevalence rate within the group and to provide each employee with

the opportunity of being tested and therefore knowing their HIV status: 98,9% of our

employees participated in the awareness and counselling sessions, of which 83,2%

volunteered for testing. Employees were given the option of not requesting their test

results if they did not want to know their status. This gave employees the opportunity to

contribute to the survey without having to know their status if they so wished. This

programme has enabled us to understand areas we need to concentrate on to ensure

WBHO is not detrimentally affected by the pandemic. Furthermore, 95% of our

employees who were tested now know their HIV status. This knowledge together with

the ongoing provision of counselling services will help keep the negatives negative and

provide support for the positives. The nature of the construction industry allows for the

spread of HIV. This will continue until the employees take responsibility for maintaining

their health and practice safe sex, and until the employers have provided the

opportunities for the employees to understand and become aware of the fundamentals

of the virus and what must be done to prevent it. This will take time and money but has

to be taken on. The industry will certainly feel the effects of the virus, not only in terms of

the inability to deliver and financial consequences but also in terms of loss of market

share with the possibility of foreign companies taking advantage of the economic

upswing that is taking place. Adding the chronic skills shortage to the mix certainly

makes the challenge more daunting but not insurmountable. To be successful, we need

to analyse and understand the magnitude of the problems. The skills shortage issue has
been analysed and a way forward proposed by Allyson Lawless in her book Numbers

And Needs – Addressing Imbalances In The Civil Engineering Profession, and the

HIV/Aids issue must be analysed similarly to the way WBHO has gone about it.”

Marlene Cronje, HR Director, Power Group of Companies:

“In our own company we forecast an HIV-positive infection rate of 9% but for the rest of

the industry my gut feel is that it is about 18%. One of the reasons why our infection rate

is lower is that we, five years ago, embarked on an intensive prevention and treatment

programme. We are most concerned about the HIV status of our operators as they are a

vital part of construction operations. There is a shortage of skilled operators in the

market and the average age of operators in the industry is high. If we cannot prevent the

problem from increasing, it could have a seriously negative effect on all of the above. I

believe that with adequate HIV prevention and treatment programmes we will be able to

prevent such a disaster. If the rate is too high, it would obviously make it impossible for

the sector to perform. Those contractors that are able to perform will probably be able to

increase their profits because of the scarcity of skills but the contractors that are not able

to perform would obviously suffer. It could make infrastructure development significantly

more expensive.”

Peter Rantla, human resources director, Grinaker-LTA:

“HIV/Aids will add to the skills shortage – companies make profits because they have

skilled people so there will obviously be an impact on profit. But we can do something: if

someone is HIV-positive, it isn’t the end of the world. We are of the opinion that we can

provide education, refer people to relevant institutions and still prolong their productive

lives. We want to keep them working for us as long as we can. We are better than our

competitors because of our people. We have a wellness programme throughout the

company which aims to support and encourage all measures and intentions aimed at

minimising the spread and impact of HIV/Aids; we educate and keep employees and
management informed of the basic HIV/Aids issues; we encourage employees and

managers to know their status and assist them to access appropriate health service

providers; we create an environment in the workplace for dealing with the pandemic

constructively; we eliminate the stigma and discrimination on the basis of real or

perceived HIV/Aids status. The programme covers awareness, non-discrimination

legislation, voluntary counselling and testing and care and support of affected

employees, and condom distribution. We have also embarked on peer educator training,

regarded as vital in the management of voluntary counselling and testing, the creation

and maintenance of awareness and the promotion of behaviour change.”



THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF HIV/AIDS

       DIRECT COSTS                INDIRECT COSTS                    SYSTEMIC COSTS

Benefits package               Absenteeism                   Loss of workplace cohesion

       Company-run health            Sick leave                    Reduction in morale,

        clinics                       Other leave taken              motivation and

       Medical aid/health             by sick employees              concentration

        insurance                     Bereavement and               Disruption of schedules

       Disability insurance           funeral leave                  and work teams or

       Pension fund                  Leave to care for              units

       Death benefit/life             dependents with               Breakdown of

        insurance payout               Aids                           workforce discipline

       Funeral expenses       Morbidity on the job                   (slacking, unauthorised

       Subsidised loans              Reduced                        absences, theft etc)

Recruitment                            performance due to    Workplace performance and

       Recruiting expenses            HIV and Aids          experience
       (advertising,                  sickness on the job      Reduction in average

       interviewing etc)        Management resources            level of skill,

      Cost of having                Managers’ time and        performance,

       positions vacant               effort for                institutional memory

       (profit the employee           responding to             and experience of

       would have                     workforce impacts,        workforce

       produced)                      planning prevention

Training                              and care

      Pre-employment                 programmes etc.

       education and                 Legal and human

       training costs                 resource staff time

      Salary while new               and HIV-related

       employee comes up              policy development

       to speed                       and problem

HIV and Aids programmes               solving

      Direct costs of

       prevention

       programmes

       (materials, staff etc)

      Time employees

       spend in prevention

       programmes

      Studies, surveys and

       other planning

       activities
        Direct costs                 Indirect costs                 Systemic costs




                                Total costs of HIV and

                                 Aids in the workforce

Source: Combating HIV and Aids in construction through improved communication



What about HIV/Aids tax?

Between 4,8-million and 5,3-million South Africans aged two years and older were living

with HIV/Aids in 2005, according to the South African National HIV Prevalence, HIV

Incidence, Behaviour and Communication Survey 2005.

Many of these people need ARV therapy but they are not all receiving it and the cost of

ARVs is likely to escalate so the survey recommends government explores a tax for

HIV/Aids.

Public healthcare funding in South Africa is heavily dependent on general taxation.

Among employed study participants, 47% of males and 44,2% of females said they

would be willing to pay the tax, and 29,3% of males and 27,1% of females would be

unwilling to do so.



Subhead: STATS: HIV/AIDS IN BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES

      31% have implemented an HIV/Aids awareness programme

      15% undertake voluntary counselling and testing

      10% offer HIV/Aids care, support and treatment

      3% provide antiretroviral therapy
      8% and 3% have conducted research to assess the impact of HIV/Aids on their

       labour force and production costs respectively

      7% report HIV/Aids is having a significantly adverse impact on business

      29% expect HIV/Aids to have a significant impact on business in five year’s time

Source: The Impact Of HIV/Aids On Selected Business Sectors In South Africa, 2005
April 2006

CONSTRUCTION REVIEW – MOUNTAIL MILL SHOPPING CENTRE

From the back of a bakkie to the forefront of the engineering industry, the
Power Group’s success story chronicles an entrepreneurial spirit, hard work
and unflinching faith. Established in 1983, the Power Group of Companies
has based its foundations on self-imposed standards, uncompromising quality
control, commitment to customer satisfaction and a commitment to business
ethics.


Steady growth has seen the Group expand its operations into a number of
different specialist companies. Whilst focusing on their own core strengths,
the companies nevertheless share the Power vision and values and operate in
accordance with The Power Ways – a set of benchmarks that govern the
ethics, performance and quality of each company within the Group.


One of our recent projects has been the 37 000 m3 Mountain Mill Shopping
Centre at the Worcester Dam. Though it is a worthy project, it had its
challenges as well. After stripping the soil down to the shallow bedrock, it
took a lot of drill and blasting to remove 37 000 m3 of rock. The massive
water pipeline from the Stettynskloof Dam, which was installed many years
ago, was positioned in a way that it cut through the centre of the new
parking area and a 500-metre section of it had to be rerouted. Pipe
manufactured of special ductile iron had to be imported from China. So as
not to disturb the water supply to the town’s reservoirs, this painstaking
operation of cutting the two connections had to be performed during two
weekends. Time was essential as the team placed the 800mm diameter pipe
in place.


All being said, we at Power Construction is happy to be affiliated with the
Mountain                Mill               Shopping                 Centre
May 2006

Small start for a big construction player

Tough road to height of success, writes Andrew Gillingham
Power Group’s journey to becoming a successful player in the engineering, building and
construction industry began on the back of a bakkie.
Graham Power, group executive chairman of the Power Group, says it was a chilly Cape April
morning 23 years ago when he drove from his Sir Lowry’s Pass smallholding in a second-hand
bakkie with two casual labourers to start Power Construction’s first civil engineering contract.

He says he faced an immense task in persuading clients and consultants – all wary of “the new
boy on the block” who had no machinery and no infrastructure – to give him work.

Power says the company’s turnover for that difficult first year was R300,000. However, he had a
track record of successfully completed contracts and was able to secure more work.

“As the scale of our contracts multiplied, so did Power Construction’s turnover.” Power says
systematic, strategic diversification over the years has led to the formation of a body of
companies covering civil engineering, blacktop paving (asphalt), manufacturing, building and
residential and township development services. Today, the group has a staff of more than 1850 in
12 companies and is active in the Western, Southern and Eastern Cape and for the past year and
a half, in Gauteng.

The civil engineering arms include Power Construction West Cape, based in Cape Town;
Power Construction Coastal with offices in Knysna and Power Construction North, in Gauteng.
Power Construction Roads operates throughout SA and is based at the Cape Town
head office, he says. Power Developments initiates and manages multi-million rand
turnkey developments. Power Building specialises in building services, including
affordable housing, institutional housing, upmarket residential projects,
industrial/retail/office developments and high-specification building work, he
says.


In the empowerment arena, the group is closely linked to the labour-
intensive construction initiative, as well as to strategies for the promotion of
emerging contractors, says Power.
The group has four empowerment joint ventures:
       Civil engineering contractors Hughmic Construction. Formed with
        Power Construction West Cape in 1997.
       Sibakhulu Construction in 1998 in the Eastern Cape.
      Khayalethu Projects, specializing in subsidized housing projects
       nationally, formed with Power Developments in 2003.
      Nikamandla Construction, focusing on rehabilitation of road
       infrastructure throughout South Africa, formed with Power
       Construction Roads in 2004.


Power says while the companies in the group focus on their own core strengths, they also
share the group’s overall vision, mission and values. The companies operate in
accordance with benchmarks that govern the ethics, performance and quality of each
company within the Group. Although the group is spreading its operations further into the
continent, it has managed to retain the unifying spirit and corporate consistency that has
characterised the Power “family feel” for 23 years.


He says the group is guided by its 100-year dream. “The 100-year dream is a
commitment, that our leadership made in 2001 to the prolonged existence of our
company. Far from being a fanciful notion or a pipedream, it is a long-term business
objective, with definite processes and courses of action put in place to ensure its
fulfilment in 10, 20 and even more decades from today.”


“This orientation towards the future underscores the strong spiritual side of
the Group, and embodies my personal belief that this is God’s business; not
mine or ours.” Says Power.


Personal development plans to help staff reach their goals

The building and construction industry is facing a growing growing shortage
of skilled workers, so training has become an essential strategy for continuity
and therefore skills development features high on the agenda of the Power
group, says organisational development director Marlene Cronje. Cronje says
the group is committed to social responsibility and its programme of
Workplace Skills Development reflects a responsibility towards the company,
staff, shareholders, and the industry as a whole.
“Each of our monthly salaried staff members has a Personal Development
Plan. This plan is custom designed to take into account an individual’s
personal aspirations and short, medium and long term career goals, as well
as his or her aptitudes, previous experience and current skills level.” She
says the plan is adjusted once per year.


The Group’s extensive Skills Development Plan is also updated annually to
match the changing dynamics in the industry, she says. This approach is in
line with the Construction Education and Training Authority’s (CETA)
objective of using Workplace Skills Development as “an instrument for
transforming the workplace and establishing a culture of lifelong learning”
she says.


“Despite our rapid growth, people – rather than plant and projects – remain
the focus. She says every monthly paid employee is given an average of seven days of
formal classroom training a year. “This compares well with the international average of
five days per year, and it is in addition to informal, on the job skills transfer that takes
place organically.


Cronje says the Power Group is committed to employment equity and to the
empowerment of women in the industry. “Women are represented at all
levels in the company and our intent is to not only to have women in clerical
or administrative positions but also in technical careers. We were proud to
appoint our first female engineer, Alex Capostagno in 2002. She says
learnership and student training programmes have been a key to the Group’s
ability to grow at a rapid rate, and the group facilitated 115 learnerships
during 2005.
Morkel Stofberg, training and development manager at Power Construction
says over the past six years about 200 civil trainees had been put through
on-site training at South African Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors’
member companies to find meaningful employment in the industry. “Some of
them are now quite senior Technical Assistants, so the training is really
bearing fruit.”


He says it is only during the past two years that the formal training route has
become a reality, largely through the efforts of the CETA, the employer
companies, accredited training providers and institutions of learning.


Graham Power, group executive chairman, says seeing the personal growth
of so many of the group’s staff is a major source of satisfaction. “Stemming
from my involvement as chairman of the National Commission for Labour
Intensive Construction from 1990 to 1997, and the negotiation of a
framework agreement with labour organisations, job creation has always
been a priority for the Power Group,” he says.
Power says the group is passionate about its employment equity goals and
the exposure that these offer to individuals for professional growth.
“People and their well-being are the most important motivator in everything
we do. Therefore, it is our heartfelt responsibility to train, mentor, empower
and identify successors to lead this company into the future.”


Property boom prompts move to Gauteng
The residential property market has boomed in SA over the past few years
and this has allowed Power Developments to expand from its established
Cape base into the Gauteng market.
MD Henrie Jonck says over the years the company has developed property
ranging from low-cost housing to high-incomce end of the market, such as
the R800m Thesen Islands project in Knysna. Jonck says the company has
been involved in developing industrial parks, retail shopping centres and
office parks.


He says they began exploring possibilities in Gauteng three years ago. “We
looked at the opportunities and began building relationships with potential
partners. We believe in relationship building and partnering existing
developers who have experience in the Gauteng market.
Currently we are partnering two property developers in Gauteng: residential
property developer and construction company Montagu Homes and C’est La
Vie, a strong developer in the retirement market.”
He says in Gauteng the company is focusing on lifestyle developments with
strict guidelines in the mid-to upper-income residential market as well as
retirement villages.


“We are working on complexes that offer a lifestyle theme and incorporate
additional elements that give our clients high quality investments.” Jonck
says on the residential side the company is selling services plots in its Stone
River comlex next to Dainfern, north of Johannesburg and Country View in
Pretoria East, overlooking Mooikloof Estate. Plots in these developments are
priced in the R350 000 to R700 000 range. The company is also developing
Featherwood retirement village east of Pretoria, where there are 160 2 to 3
bedroomed units in the R1m to R1.3m range.


He says the company is able to tacle a broad range of quality property
developments because of its dynamic teram and the expertise they have
developed over the years. “Our strength lies in our ability to manage our
projects hands on and through the involvement of our sister companies,
Power Construction (civil construction) and Power Building (building
construction).”


Jonck says that Tommie Richards, Power Developments’ Gauteng-based
project manager, is actively seeking additional opportunities in Gauteng, with
a focus on the middle-income residential market and on industrial parks.


Expansion provides a learning curve
Power Construction has a successful track record in the Cape and is now
spreading its wings in the Gauteng market. Francois Voigt, director of Power
Construction North, established in January 2005, says the company focuses
on the civil construction end of the market. It has completed a wide range of
construction projects in the Cape.


However, he says that about 44% of all South African construction takes
place in Gauteng. “Our sister company, Power Developments, has several
contracts that began in Gauteng at the beginning of 2005 and we moved a
team to Gauteng to participate in these projects, using them as a catalyst
from which to seek further opportunities. The move to Gauteng has been an
intense, but interesting learning curve.”


“We have had to learn everything from the best procurement options to
understanding the underlying geology and identifying sources of raw
materials.” In addition, he says the construction industry is very much based
on relationships and a large part of Power’s time has been invested in
making itself known to the Gauteng market and ensuring that it is included
on invited tender lists.


Voigt says Power Construction brings a wide range of expertise to the civil
construction market and its resume includes bulk earthworks, road works,
pipelines and services and reticulation in townships and residential estates.
“Our first project in Gauteng was the Featherwood Security Estate, in which
we have completed the first two phases. We also constructed the roads and
services in the Stone River development near Fourways, “ he says.


“In addition, we secured the roads and services for the Gateway project in
Centurion. We are currently busy with Country View Estate in Pretoria East,”
Voigt says. He says the company has also secured a tender to construct an
industrial park near Rand Airport and the project is in the final stages of
construction. Voigt says the company is at an advanced stage of negotiations
for work on several other projects.
He says the company has found that competition is fierce in Gauteng but that
it has demonstrated its ability to produce and to deliver in line with its
clients’ expectations. Voigt says good relationships between all the parties on
the projects and sound quality control systems mean the company’s clients
are prepared to cnsider further projects as a team.


“Moving into the Gauteng market has been good for us. It is giving us the
opportunity to expand and to provide more opportunities for the younger
members of our team.”
May 2006

The Power Within

Graham Power never had a kick start and had to overcome the obstacle of
absolute poverty to survive . . .

He worked hard, but then took the gamble to start his own company. Now 23
years later, this award-winning company director has become an inspiration
to the nation. He spoke to Leadership.

The account of his personal transformation from poor Goodwood child to an
award-winning corporate giant seems almost fictional, as if it were scripted
to create a feel-ggod effect for the sake of the audience.

Sometimes the truth is not only stranger than fiction, but also better and
more inspirational. And let’s face it: Graham Power is an inspirational
speaker and a leader in the South African construction industry.

Winning the coveted award as Die Burger and the Cape Town Chamber of
Commerce’s Business Leader of the Year in 2005, has also made him a more
sought after dinner and breakfast speaker than before.

Yet, he has always been in substantial public demand as a speaker because
of his initiatives as director of Transformation Africa and his position as
executive chairman of the Power Group of Companies. In April, for example
Power spent three days in New York and he was invited to address 200
prominent businessmen (most of whom are commercial high-flyers listed on
the stock exchange) as a breakfast speaker.

Power was born in Goodwood. He was one of five children who knew poverty:
fourth hand bicycles and parents who had to manage every penny carefully
to make ends meet. His father was a motor mechanic and a musician by
trade. He played in a boeremusiek orchestra over weekends to supplement
his income. A bicycle was his mother’s only source of transport, whether it
was sweltering midsummer-heat or a Cape of Storms winter. She worked as
a shop-assistant to help support her husband and children financially.

The two eldest children left school after grade 10 and started working to
ensure that the three youngsters could finish school. Graham decided to
climb the corporate ladder. “I was so focused on the top that I hurt people
along the way and trod on them to reach the peak. And for that I am sorry.”
When he finished school and army training, he joined the civil engineering
company Savage & Lovemore. His first salary package was R150 per month.
He wanted to go to Technikon, but the managing director of the company
convinced him to abandon hid dream of further tertiary academic training.
Instead, he promised him double his monthly salary package, as well as a
tutorship within savage & Lovemore of such magnitude that other students
would never be able to bridge the gap in terms of skills and knowledge that
he would acquire within the company. Within just less than 10 years, he was
promoted from surveyor to site agent and contracts manager. In April 1983,
he resigned from Savage & Lovemore and started his own construction firm.
Power sold his house in Somerset West and two plots of land to provide
enough collateral to buy a small-holding, Elandskloof, in Sir Lowry’s Pass,
where he generated a turnover of R300 000 in the first year of operation.

In his second year, the company improved its turnover to R3 million. The
next year it reached a whopping R6 million, the following year the turnover
jumped to an impressive R12 million, and then doubled again to R24 million.
In 1989, he received the award from the Johannesburg Afrikaanse
Sakekamer as South Africa’s Young Businessman of the year. It was a
celebration of the entrepreneurial spirit of Power. Today, the Power Group
employs 1 800 people, of whom 92 percent are people of colour. They
employ 96 students, of whom 90 are coloured and black members. Of the
12 companies in the Power Group, four are owned by Black Economic
Empowerment groups, with the Power Group having the minority share of 49
percent in each of them.

“If I look at our management, I am impressed by the quality of people who
are emerging,” says Power. “Seven or eight years ago, our HR department
was battling to get he quality they needed. But now we genuinely hope we
can employ more people, simpy because of the excellent quality of the
applicants.
“These people go through Model C-schools, technikons and universities and
are bright prospects. It is unbelieveable how things have changed in a
relatively short period of time.
“The migration of people to the larger cities, the availability of TV, electricity
and first-world education all played a role to promote top quality. “It gives
me so much hope for South Africa and Africa,” says Power.

“If we just give people the exposure in Africa, this continent will become one
of the most spectacular growing continents of the world. China has a growth
of 8 to 10 percent annually, but Africa can also gorw at that rate if we exploit
the untapped resources of brain power. “One of the factors that can aid the
transformation in Africa is through satellite dishes so that people in villages,
via solar panels, can get access to satellite TV and the Internet and can start
living their own dreams, with the help of a small personal investment.”

Power is immensely proud of his roots, not because of the fact that it
provided dramatic rags-to-riches footage, but because it made him realize
the vast potential of each person, whether they are cleaning ladies or
religious or corporate leaders. “I did not grow up with the midset that the
world owes me something,” he said. “My children have given me a plaque
with the words You have to work like a slave to live like a king inscribed on
it. And these words are so true.

“We average people have to work extremely hard to get to the top. I always
take my hat off to somebody who can sell his company for a few billion rand
at age 28 and then fly to the moon. “Honestly, I admire somebody as
brilliant and talented as Mark Shuttleworth. But there can be only one
Shuttleworth and one Tiger Woods endowed with those special gifts and
talents. Other ordinary guys like us have to work hard and show the
necessary dedication commitment and application to succeed.”

The Power Group is in its 23rd year in operation and will have an annual
turnover of close to R1 billion in 2006. Power is proud of the fact that his
group never retrenched anybody, even during the ebb and flow in the
construction industry during the past 25 years.
The senior management decided not to retrench any of their loyal staff
members through some tough times. Three months later, there would be an
economic upswing or a few new projects, which vindicated the decision by
management.

With the Power Group on its way to 25 years in operation, there are new
challenges, says Power. KP Yohannan, in his book Principles in maintaining a
Godly organization, maintains that every successful movement is radical, is
transformational and is relational. And the original life, passion and vision of
that movement are sustained for about 25 years. But after a quarter of a
century, it loses its freshness, vision and spark.

The vibrant movement is replaced by rules, regulation and bylaws and the
organizational structure becomes complex. It is vital to rejuvenate that spark
and excitement and to ensure that passion and energy remain more
important than titles, recognition and degrees.

“If there is not fire, fuel or steam, the train will go nowhere,” says Power.
“The average age of my employees is 34, and the executive is focused on
listening to young entrepreneurs and not inhibiting them so and forcing them
to find alternative passions, dreams and working places,” says Power.

Asked why his advice would be to inspiring entrepreneurs, Power said there
is no easy way to the top. You cannot go on a quick acceleration programme
and short circuit your way to 10 years of experience. “If I had quit my
previous job after four years, the chances of success would have been slim.
Youa re in for the long haul. You will not aquire riches overnight. You need
perseverance, hard work and absolute passion in what you do.”

One of his treasured possessions is the book Ethics in the Workplace. In it
there is a section titled: You don’t need to cheat to win. He adheres to its
ethical checklist. The book states that when confronted with a grey area, one
must answer the following questions: It is legal? Is is a win-win situation?
And how would one feel if one’s decisions were known to family and would
appear in a newspaper the next day? “I believe that if you are an ethical
firm, you can be as successful if not more successful than a company that
operates in another way,” he says.

Power, a dedicated Christian leader, says the calling of the Power group is to
make a positive contribution to the people of Africa. They want the people of
Africa to get better training, a better life and a better infrastructure so that
these benefits will enable the people to use their talents to play a positive
role within their communities.
May 2006

Power’s pow-wow wows the guests
Civil engineering group celebrates its Gauteng success


The charm of Michael Mol… The pulsating sounds of Tuxedo Junction… the
glam of government VIPs and the jovial company of some of the top construction
and property developers… These were the ingredients of an evening that has
made its mark on the Gauteng social calendar.

The venue: Gallagher Estate. The event: The celebration of the Power Group of
Companies’ first year and a half in Gauteng. The atmosphere: nothing short of
thrilling.

As Master of Ceremonies Michael Mol eased along the momentum of the
proceedings, the who’s who of industry rubbed shoulders with local government
figures.

Gauteng Public Transport, Roads and Works MEC Ignatius Jacobs was an
honourable guest. So too was Finance and Economic Affairs MEC, Paul
Mashatile. Clients, colleagues, friends and suppliers of Power Construction North
and Power Developments had the opportunity of hearing Group Executive
Chairman Graham Power tell the entrepreneurial tale of how a company that had
started on the back of a bakkie in 1983 has developed into a group of 12
companies employing 1 850 people today. Power concluded by giving thanks to
God, saying that “the company is blessed by God and all credit goes to Him for
what has been achieved”. He also thanked the guests and those who had
recently started doing business with the Group in Gauteng.

MEC Jacobs welcomed the Group and thanked Power for expanding the
business into the province.

André du Preez, CEO of the Construction Companies in the Group said that their
growth into Gauteng has been “a pleasant experience” and that they have
worked on “the most gratifying and fantastic projects in Gauteng”. He thanked
Power Construction North Director, Francois Voigt, Tommie Richards (Power
Developments Manager) and their staff for their loyalty and dedication.
Mei 2006

Power gaan van krag tot krag in Gauteng
Siviele ingenieursgroep vier sy welslae in die noorde


Die sjarme van Michael Mol… Die ritme van Tuxedo Junction… die glans van
groot name in die regering en die lekker samesyn van leiers uit die
konstruksie en eiendomsontwikkelingsbedrywe… ‘n wenkombinasie vir ‘n
swierige geselligheid.

Die plek: Gallagher Estate. Die geleentheid: Die viering van die Power
Maatskappyegroep se eerste jaar-en-‘n-half in Gauteng. Die atmosfeer: uit
die boeke.

Terwyl Seremoniemeester Michael Mol die verrigtinge vlot laat verloop, kon
‘n paar Baie Belangrike Persone van die bedryf ‘n slag met top
persoonlikhede uit die plaaslike regering bladskud.

Die Gautengse LUR vir Openbare Vervoer, Paaie en Werke, Ignatius Jacobs,
was ‘n geëerde gas. Mnr Paul Mashatile, LUK vir Finansiële en Ekonomiese
Sake, ook. Kliënte, kollegas, vriende en verskaffers van Power Construction
North en Power Developments was meegevoer toe die Groep se Uitvoerende
Voorsitter, Graham Power, vertel hoe ‘n maatskappy wat sy ontstaan agter
op ‘n bakkie gehad het, 23 jaar later in ‘n groep van 12 maatskappye
ontwikkel het, met 1 850 mense in diens. Power het sy verhaal van
vindingrykheid afgesluit deur God te bedank: “Alle krediet vir wat vermag is,
gaan aan Hom; hierdie maatskappy is werklik geseën.” Power het ook die
gaste en dié wat onlangs met die Groep in Gauteng begin sake doen het,
bedank.

LUK Jacobs het die Groep verwelkom en Power bedank dat hy sy
bedrywighede na dié provinsie uitgebrei het.

André du Preez, Uitoerende Hoof van die konstruksiemaatskappye in die
Groep, het beaam dat hul toetrede tot Gauteng ‘n “aangename ondervinding
is”, en dat hulle tot dusver by “fantastiese” projekte in Gauteng betrokke kon
wees. Hy het Power Construction North se Direkteur, Francois Voigt, Tommie
Richards (Power Developments Bestuurder) en hul spanne bedank, en hulle
geprys vir die geesdrif waarmee hulle die opleiding en ontwikkeling van
mense benader.
June 2006

Levendal Developments

Paarliete en ontwikkelaars gesels
DIE ontwikkelaars van die beoogde Levendal-projek in Simondium het onlangs 'n
openbare vergadering gehou om 'n oop gesprek met die gemeenskap aan te
knoop.
Levendal Developments, 'n ontwikkelingsmaatskappy wat bestaan uit Power
Developments, The Lord Trust en 'n swart bemagtigingsmaatskappy, l・tans 'n
ontwikkelingsvoorstel voor om gedeeltes van 14 plase en 'n bestaande oord in
die Suider-Paarl area onder te verdeel, te hersoneer en te herontwikkel.
Die voorgestelde ontwikkeling is 'n volhoubare ontwikkelingsinisiatief wat gemik
is daarop om maksimale geleenthede te verskaf vir sosio-ekonomiese opheffing
sonder om die landelike en landboukundige aard van die area in te boet.
Die vergadering is deur sowat 70 mense van die gemeenskap bygewoon, met 'n
goeie verteenwoordiging van alle partye - van boere en plaaswerkers tot sakelui
en inwoners van Suider-Paarl. Onder die plaaswerkersgemeenskap, met wie
daar reeds vantevore 'n afsonderlike vergadering gehou is om inligting te deel, is
daar 'n positiewe gevoel oor die feit dat behuising vir hulle op 'n eietitelbasis
aangebied word, en die ontwikkelaars het dit duidelik gemaak dat daar geen
verborge koste betrokke sal wees nie.
Die gesubsidieerde behuisingskema word beplan vir die area naby die huidige
ambagskool, wat as deel van die projek ook aandag sal kry.
Die plaaslike owerhede is positief oor die sosiale en ekonomiese bydrae wat die
Levendal ontwikkeling aan die area kan lewer.
Drakenstein uitvoerende raadslid vir behuising, Arthob Petersen, s・ "Enige
Ontwikkeling wat behuising probeer aanspreek, is uiters welkom - veral omdat
hierdie 'n gemengde behuisingsontwikkelingsprogram is, wat die lae
inkomstegroep sowel as die middel en ho・inkomste groepe dek. Dit lui 'n
opwindende nuwe fase in wat behuising in Drakenstein betref."
'n Bron van bekommernis vir die gemeenskap was dat die oorspronklike grootte
van die ontwikkelingsarea intussen verander het, en die vraag was of dit waartoe
hulle nou toestem, gaan ooreenstem met die uiteindelike produk.
Die ontwikkelaars het beklemtoon dat die huidige ontwikkelingsvoorstel in die
komende maande nog kan wysig tot 'n beperkte mate en dat dit juis die doel van
die publieke deelnameproses is om almal die geleentheid van deelname te gee.
Alle kommentaar, besware en ondersteuning wat deur die deelnemende publiek
voorgel・word, word aangespreek en deel gemaak van die uiteindelike finale
konsep wat deur die owerheid oorweeg word vir goedkeuring. Die proses bly
deurentyd deursigtig en akkomoderend van insette deur die publiek.
"Daar is 'n goeie begrip vir die feit dat die einste gemeenskap waarvan Levendal
deel sal word, ook toekomstige kli・te en bure gaan word en dat die produk wat
op die mark geplaas word, die produk moet wees wat die kli・t wil koop en die
bure geredelik mee kan saamleef," sê Josua van Tonder, projekbestuurder vir
Power Developments.
Die ontwikkeling sluit 'n woonwapark en openbare piekniekarea in, sowel as 'n
vo・reservaat op die eiland in die rivier.
Behuising sal die volle spektrum dek; vanaf gesubsideerde plaaswerkerbehuising
tot middelinkomste en eksklusiewe behuising.
"Die behuising sal grotendeels op reeds beboude of versteurde grond plaasvind,
met die minimum ontwikkeling op lae potensiaal landbougrond, sodat die
landbougrond in die area steeds vir landboudoeleindes aangewend word, en die
inwoners as te ware op 'n werkende plaas woon," sê Van Tonder.
Die steengroef oos van die hoofpad (McMillan Bricks) gaan herwin en
gerehabiliteer word, en inheemse fauna en flora sal aangemoedig word om die
area tot sy oorspronklike natuurlike toestand te herstel.
Om deel te neem aan die deurlopende gesprek met die ontwikkelaars of om by
te dra tot die omgewingsimpakstudie, kontak Belinda Gebhardt, Senior
Omgewingskonsultant van SRK Consulting, Postnet Suite #206, Private Bag X18,
Rondebosch, 7701 by tel 659-3060, faks 685-7105 of bgebhardt@srk.co.za.
Kommentaar of navrae oor die ontwikkeling kan oor gerig word aan Josua van
Tonder by jvtonder@powergrp.co.za of Posbus 129, Blackheath, 7581
June 2006

Nuwe aftree-ontwikkeling by Stellenbosch kry verdere
momentum

Verkope in la Clemence, die nuwe wynlandontwikkeling net buite
Stellenbosch wat op die aftreemark gerig is, is besig om fluks te vorder met
80% van die wonings in fase een en twee van die ontwikkeling wat reeds van
die hand gesit is.

Die ontwikkeling van R240 miljoen bestaan uit 138 wonings wat op ‘n perseel
van sowat 8 hektaar in vier fases oorkant die De Zalze-gholflandgoed op die
R44 tussen Stellenbosch en Somerset-Wes opgerig gaan word.

Inus Kempen van die Liberte Trust het gese dat hulle, as ontwikkelaars can
le Clemence, baie tevrede is met die momentum wat die bemarking geniet,
met veral plaaslike kopers wat groot belangstelling in die ontwikkeling toon.

Algemene opriuming van die perseel wat verwydering van die uitheemse
bome en afbreek van oorbodige structure behels, is reeds afgehandel. Die
bourommel word tans vergruis om as stutlae vir die paaie gebruik te word.
Na afhandeling van die opriuming, kon die posisie van die inheemse bome
(wat veral in fase drie en vier voorkom) akkuraat opgemeet word.

“’n Volledige studie van al die inheemse bome rakende die grootte, posisie en
die toestand van elke boom, asook ‘n aanbeveling in sake die toekoms van
elke boom, is pas afgehandel. Die studie, finale terreinontwikkelingsplan en
landskapsplan is nour deur die Stellenbosse Munisipaliteit en die Boom
advieskomitee van die munisipaliteit goedgekeur,” het Kempen gese.

Die Kultuurhistoriese waarde van die ou olienhoutbome word beklemtoon
deur die feit dat die ontwikkelaar sonder huiwering twee erwe in fase drie en
vier prysgegee he tom die ou bome te bewaar.

“Bome sou nooit onverskillig afgekap word nie. Die natuurlike boomrykheid,
uitsig oor die wynlande en die Stellenbosse berge was juis in die aanvanklike
beplanning geidentifiseer as ‘iets’ besonders, wat as pluspunt vir die
ontwikkeling sou dien,” het hy gese.

Die kontrak van ongeveer R3 miljoen vir die massagrondwerke vir die hele
ontwikkeling is pas aan Power Construction toegeken met die dienste vir fase
een en twee wat sal volg. Bouwerk aan die wonings in fase een en twee sal
teen die einde van die jaar begin.

Die sketsplanontwerp van die klunhuis is byna voltooi, met die ontwerp van
die kombuis wat in samewerking met die sjef van ‘n bekende plaaslike
restaurant gefinaliseer is. Die kombuis word so ontwerp dat dit in ‘n
noordelike rigting uitleef om die uitsig oor die berge te benut.
July 2006

New Garden Route Mall, the R180-million, 65 000m2 regional
shopping centre under construction beween the N2 and Knysna
Road, in George, is reaching peak activity as the end of the
construction programme is in sight.

Main contractors’ WBHO project director Wolfgang Neff is managing a team
of 200 hourly paid staff with 10 foremen and five site agents, plus co-
ordinating the teams of sub contractors in the frenzy to complete the first
phase of the complex according to the 27th October opening deadline.

At the time of writing, the 12 000m2 second phase had started and the 4 5—
m2 cinema complex foundation platform was well underway. According to
Neff, the challenges faced in a complex of this size are not in the complexity
of design and construction, as this is regarded as fairly conventional. “WBHO
has tackled retail shopping centres of this and larger sizes before and clearly
has the project experience, but where this one differs is in its location, being
outside a main metropolitan area where skilled trades’ people and material
supplies can be problematic at times,” he said.

Never the less, plans have been implemented to overcome these challenges
and despite some periods of wet weather, Neff is confident on meeting the
first phase deadline of end October. Power Construction Coastal, based in
KNysna, is a sub-contractor to WBHO for the original earthworks, (completed
last year) internal roads, services and the 100 000m2 parking areas.

Site agent Nick Shaw has also had his share of challenges echoing those of
Wolfgang Neff. “Our R18-million contract involves approximately 100 000m2
of parking spaces, 2.8km of stormwater, 10km of services ducting and 1.5km
of serwers, some of which are installed at depths of 7m” commented Shaw.
“The underlying clay whilst not active, does present an impermeable layer
causing flooding when the rain comes” he mused, which has been quite often
since the beginning of the year. Shaw and his team are now busy with an
additional 4 500m2 foudnation platform for the Ster Kinekor cinema complex.

The contract for the centre’s external roads and services has been awarded
to Sibakhulu Construction, a Power Group BEE company. This entails the
widening of the George-Knysna Road and N2 off ramp and constructing the
main access roads and services into the centre with an intersection from the
above roads. The value of the work amounts to about R10-million and has
already started.

The Garden Route’s developers are Attfund whose retail investments include
the shopping centres of Woodhill Boulevard, Clearwater Mall, Atterbury Value
Mart, Somerset Valeu Mart and Centurion Mall.
July 2006

From acorns oak trees grow
This section of Contractor is usually reserved for the smaller, up and coming
contractors but big established companies had to start somewhere and their
success is recognised as well as providing a beacon for the up and coming who
strive to make it in the rough and tough world we know as contracting.

On a much delayed country trip to the Western Cape, editor Robin Hayes
couldn’t help but notice the dominance that Power Construction has in the
coastal regions of the country, particularly the Peninsular and what we all call the
Southern Cape. A quick call to their head office in Blackheath landed the editor
with an interview with André du Preez, MD of the Construction arms of the
Group.

Evolution of the Power Group over 22 years.

1983 Graham Power started Graham Power Contractors (Pty) Ltd. Turnover in
     the difficult first year was around R300,000.

1986 The company moved to its present location in Wimbledon Road,
     Blackheath. Turnover that year was R6.3m.

1988 Blitz Asphalt established, initially to supply internal demand and to lesson
     dependence on sub-contractors. As resourced grew the company was
     able to undertake outside contracts and its name was changed to Power
     Construction Roads in 2002, to focus on major rehabilitation contracts.
     Today the company is a major contributor to the Group and specializes in
     major and minor road construction, premix / asphalting, general seals and
     surfacing, airport taxiways, runways and apron slabs.

1989 Power Construction South Cape, the first regional office, was established
     in George but after 12 years successful operations there, relocated to
     Knysna to coincide with the civil services contract at Thesen Islands.
     Upsurge in residential developments in Knysna and Plettenberg Bay
     assured success and the company was renamed Power Construction
     Coastal in 2002.

1990 Power Properties established, to be renamed, Power Developments.
     Realising the potential in middle and upper market residential
     developments, the company established Power Properties, which laid the
     groundwork for the anticipated upsurge in demand for not only upmarket
     but affordable properties.
1995   Core business renamed Power Construction West Cape. This was the first of the
       Group’s core companies to focus on a niche market of township developments
       and successfully services the Western Cape. This year also saw the
       establishment of Power Construction East Cape, although at the time there was
       little work and many competitors had packed up and left the area.

1997   Hughmic Construction established; the first of the Group’s empowerment joint
       ventures, with Chano Hughes and Abel Michel becoming 51% partners with
       Power Construction West Cape and able to draw on the Group’s experience as
       an established player. Glenville Cullum replaced Abel Michel as shareholder in
       2005. Hughmic operates as an autonomous entity whilst availing itself of the
       resources of the Group.

1998   Sibakhulu Construction formed through another jv, this time in the Eastern Cape.
       Growth opportunities and BEE imperatives were some of the reasons why Power
       Construction East Cape (Pty) Ltd was later sold to and incorporated into
       Sibakhulu Construction at the end of 2002. Joint shareholders Dumisa Mcetywa
       and Glenville Cullum own 51% of the company.

2000   Power Construction Plant and Power Group Financial and Management
       Services formed. The former was established to service the growing needs of
       the Group’s operations, which it was felt, would be better served by a separate
       company. Power Group Financial and Management Services was born out of the
       Services division, which looked after plant, financial and technical aspects of the
       Group’s operations. Steady growth meant that these essential services had to
       grow as well, and it was becoming clear that a comprehensive human resources
       development plan was needed. As a pure services company Power Group
       Financial and Management Services was established to manage the Group’s
       financial, organization and technical requirements in separate departments.

2002   Power Construction South Cape renamed Power Construction Coastal.

2003   Power Building formed. During this year it was decided to separate the building
       division from Power Developments and form a dedicated company focusing on
       building. Since being active in the field, Power has completed 28,000 affordable
       housing units and various other projects involving apartments, town house
       developments, and residential infrastructure buildings.

2003   Khayalethu Projects, another empowerment company was established. Meaning
       “our home”, which concentrates on the affordable housing sector nationally.
       Mark Julie and Sam Dube owns 51% of the equity whilst Power Developments
       the balance of 49%.

2004   Power Construction North established. This is the third regional office of the
       Group and situated in Gauteng to take advantage of the opportunities in that
       region.

2004   Nikamandla Construction formed as the fourth empowerment initiative, with
       Power Group employees Grant White and Gerard Gilbert securing a 51%
       shareholding whilst Power Construction Roads holds 49%. Aptly named –
       meaning “give power” – the company specializes in the rehabilitation of roads
       throughout Southern Africa, allowing Power Construction Roads to concentrate
       on reconstruction and the construction of new roads nationally.

Power Group as it is today

In just 22 short years, Graham Power, founder of the Power Group, has taken his vision
and enterprise from the back of a bakkie to a local conglomerate, employing more than
1700 people and in the process, dominating the construction scene in the Western,
Southern and Eastern Cape.

According to André du Preez “It’s the people who make a difference, strong leadership
and a vision of where we are going and where we want to be.”

“We have always had an unstinting commitment to providing quality work, on time and
at a reasonable price, and conducting our business in an ethical and honourable
manner, seeking negotiation rather than confrontation in resolving problems or
difficulties” he stated.

“Don’t get the idea though that we are some sort of push over, far from it, and we have
had a few situations where the legal route had to be followed, but it never results in a
satisfactory outcome for either party, win or lose: said du Preez.

It’s clearly a strategy that has stood the company in good stead and their dominance in
the region has created what every marketing text book states as a company’s prime
objective, “top of the mind awareness.”

But how have these lofty ideals been implemented and carried through the business?
100-year dream
CEO Graham Power states that the Group has a 100-year dream, a commitment made
by the company’s leadership in 2001 to prolong the existence of the company, its
culture and ethics long after the current management are gone. Far from being a fanciful
notion or pipedream, says Power, this is a long-term business objective, with definite
processes and courses of action put in place to ensure its fulfillment in the decades
ahead.

This is clearly a company with strong spiritual values, and as stated by Power, he and
his team are simply managing the business; it belongs to a greater being in his view.

It is clear that the core values are not merely lip service, but are an essential part of the
Group’s culture.

Power sees the people in the Group as key motivators in what they can achieve, and
consequently it is management’s responsibility to train, mentor, empower and identify
successors to lead the company into the future and realise the 100-year dream. Simple!

The company places great emphasis on their vision, mission statement and core
values and one comes away with the impression that they mean what they say,
and not just offer wise words as a sop to political correctness or current business
fashion.
According to André du Preez, the Group focuses on opportunities that provide
growth for their talented people and deliver returns for their shareholders.
“as opportunities are identified, we position ourselves to take advantage of them.
If we don’t have the resources available right now, we make sure we will have
them in the future. That is why the Group is so diverse and focused on
opportunity driven business” he says.

“We are encouraged by the Government’s commitment to increasing
infrastructure spending and as a consequence have entered into various exciting
and meaningful partnerships in both Government and the private sector. These
ventures will reinforce our ability to remain a catalyst for life enhancing projects
that will generate opportunities and contribute to upliftment for all in the country.”

Over the years, the Group has been recognised with independent awards
including:
     18th International Africa Award for outstanding management, quality,
       technical innovations, service and export achievements in the African
       market – 1997
     Institute of Housing Regional Award – developer of the year 1998, 2001,
       2003 & 2004
     Institute of Housing National Award – developer of the year 1998
     Professional Management Review Golden Arrow – 2000
     Steel Construction – 2001
     National Housing Awards – best established developer – 2002
     Merit Award Saldanha Project – 2002
     Since 2003 listed (Hughmic & Sibakhulu Construction) amongst Top 300
       Impumelelo companies in South Africa
     PMR Corporate Care Awards – National trophy for Environmental Care
       and Job Creation and Training – 2003
     PMR Corporate Care Awards – Industry winner for Black Economic
       Empowerment and Social Upliftment – 2003
     PMR Silver Arrow Award for doing the most to enhance the Province’s
       economic growth and development - 2005
October 2006

Interview
Graham Power, CEO of the Power Group of Companies


Graham Power was born and bred in the Western Cape, and today lives in
Somerset West. After school, Graham joined Savage and Lovemore (now Group
5 Roads), where he remained for 10 years, gaining invaluable experience on
projects such as the Saldanha oil storage, the Langebaan Veldrif West Coast
road and the Steenbras hydroelectric scheme. In 1983, he started his own
company, trading as Power Construction, which operated for four years from a
smallholding on Sir Lowry’s Pass before moving to its current premises in
Blackheath, outside Cape Town.

Provide a brief history of the company.
Power Construction was founded in 1983 and turned over just R300 000 in its
first year of operation. This became R3-million in the second year, R6-million in
the third, R12-million in the fourth and R24-million in the fifth year. Twelve
companies form part of the Power Group of Companies, of which four are
empowerment ventures. The empowerment ventures were all started from within
the company, all of the partners are fully active (no silent partners). The
partnerships do not include any big names or celebrity BEE partners, but rather
actual engineers and quantity surveyors who have come through the system at
the Power Group to assume positions of responsibility in the new companies. To
us, this is the true meaning of empowerment.

Ninety percent of the staff at the Power Group are people of colour. This is the
result of the company’s long commitment to transformation and to maintaining an
honest representation of the demographics of the province and the country. In 22
years, the company has never retrenched a member of staff. A record such as
this is unheard of in the industry, if not across all industries, in the country and
perhaps the world.

How is the construction industry faring in South Africa?
I am very excited about South Africa, not only today but over the past 20 years.
In the 1960s and 1970s, South Africa’s construction industry was developing the
infrastructure in the country on the level of first-world countries. The only good
thing to have come out of the years of apartheid is that South Africa now enjoys
infrastructure such as roads, ports, buildings and airports of the highest standard.
The construction industry peaked in 1976 when government was pouring 8.3% of
national GDP into construction, with 135 000 people directly employed by
contractors across the country. By 1997/98, government investment had dropped
to 2.4%, but it has now started to move on an upward curve again.
The construction industry is unique in that people with a lower level of education
or experience can, with a few weeks of training, be developed into individuals
who can add value to a company and earn a reasonable income. Indeed,
construction can play a key role in alleviating the unemployment problems facing
the country. There is plenty of work in the industry at present with the backlog of
affordable housing and the redevelopment and expansion that is required on
much of the infrastructure that was built at great expense in the ’60s and ’70s.

How successful have your four empowerment ventures been?
Hughmic Construction has been in operation for eight years, focusing primarily
on civil engineering and based in Blackheath in Cape Town. The company was
very involved with the development at Century City and the adjacent theme park;
it completed all the civil works on the roads infrastructure at Boschenmeer Golf
and Country Estate in Paarl; and it is currently busy on a landfill contract at
Vissershoek in Milnerton. Chano Hughes is the MD of the company.

Sibakhulu Construction has been in operation for seven years, and operates in
the Eastern Cape. Recent projects include the Njoli Road contract; Neptune
Road contract at Coega; IDZ East London and the excavation of the Coega
harbour basin in Port Elizabeth. Dumisa Mcetywa and Glenville Cullum are the
two shareholders managing the company.

Khayalethu Projects, formed in 2003, is the company’s third empowerment
venture, based in the Western Cape. The company specialises in all state
subsidised housing projects and tenders on state land countrywide. It is one of
the six companies, along with the Power Group, in the consortium that has won
part of the tender for Cape Town’s multibillion-rand N2 Gateway Project. Mark
Julie and Sam Dube are the two shareholders and directors of the company.

Nikamandla Construction, also based in the Western Cape, was a breakaway
company formed in 2004 from Power Roads. Nikamandla focuses on
rehabilitation of roads: milling, cold in-situ recycling, asphalting and general
surfacing throughout Southern Africa. Grant White was appointed as MD after
starting with the company as a student nine years ago. Grant and Gerard Gilbert
(employed with the company for 10 years) are the shareholders of the company.

What is your view of the Western Cape as a business destination?
I am highly optimistic about the Western Cape. If you believe the statistics,
tourism is growing rapidly, which means more hotels and further expansion to
roads, landing strips and residential developments. The Western Cape probably
has the least amount of development needed to prepare for 2010 Soccer World
Cup, but there will still be much work to be done. And you only need to look at
the numbers of people that want to buy homes in the Cape, or develop property
in the region, to see that the province has international appeal. The lifestyle, the
weather and the people all contribute to making the Cape a great place to do
business and to live.
What are your expectations for the company regarding 2010?
Though based in the Cape Town, the Power Group has offices in Knysna, Port
Elizabeth and Gauteng, so we are well represented wherever work may arise.
Further, our mobile units, especially in road works, can operate countrywide. The
N2 Gateway Project is a huge project moving towards 2010. When visitors arrive
at Cape Town International Airport, their first impression must be a lasting and
positive one.

What social investment programmes do you have?
We do a huge amount of training within the Group. We still work every second
Saturday, and on most of these days we conduct training workshops in every one
of our four training venues, covering everything from carpentry to bricklaying to
operations and management. We view this commitment as an investment in our
future, and in the future of our employees.

The other area in which we play a large role is in HIV/Aids in the workplace. Over
the past three years we have conducted voluntary testing for our staff, and to
date over 1 200 people have been voluntarily tested. While still an unfortunately
high level, we can say that the Western Cape, with only a 6.8% infection rate,
recorded the lowest rate of infection throughout our Group. As a result of the
testing, and the professional manner in which it is handled, people have had
access to assistance and to the various support programmes available. Our
stance on HIV/Aids, and our approach to dealing with it, is all about prolonging
and enhancing life, through creating a greater understanding of the virus, as well
as living and working with it. Our goal is that NO new infections should occur
through the training and knowledge transfer within the Group.

Is the Group involved in any community programmes?
Each of our twelve companies donates 10% of its profits into the Power Group
Charitable Fund, which is used to support various organisations and causes. We
are involved with a community centre in Mannenburg, through the donation of
computers and sewing machines; we have assisted in the purchase of a building
from the City Council, which will be used in part as a crèche and also as a
training and recruitment centre. We are also involved with The Beautiful Gate
Project providing care and support to children affected by HIV/Aids; and we also
have a strong involvement with The Ark school and home for unemployed and
homeless people, providing food and building material, and sponsoring teachers.

These CSI programmes are not in place because it is expected, or because it
looks good; they come from the heart, and they’re there because we are not only
in business to make a profit, but also to help build the community, the economy
and the country, in any way that we can.

What message do you have for potential investors into the Western Cape?
I firmly believe that anybody wanting to come into South Africa to do business,
whatever their industry, would be naïve to think they will survive without taking
advantage of local knowledge. Forming joint ventures with local businesses that
understand the politics, the labour and the laws and regulations, is critical to the
success of any investment. Partnering with local companies will not only add
value to the investment but will also build the local economy which will have a
positive effect on the investment itself.

We have a brilliant product – the Western Cape – and I am highly optimistic
about the economy in the region and in South Africa. My best wishes to you with
this publication, I think it’s an outstanding initiative. I support it; I think the need
therefore is great.
SEPTEMBER 2006

Sewerage: pipe installation

Wet and difficult ground conditions


The laying of this pipeline was certainly not all plain sailing for the civil
engineering contractor. The shallow water table and strict environmental
conditions, issued in the record of decision, have complicated matters.


Wet ground conditions overcome
A R200-million sewer contract is a sizable undertaking, especially when wet
ground conditions pose many construction challenges. This is the case at the N2
Gateway project, Robin Hayes learned.


ASLA and Power Construction have formed a joint venture to handle the design-
and-construct project. The tender contract followed International Federation of
Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) turnkey contract conditions. While a fixed price
was provided for the job, the fast track nature of the project meant that, from the
outset, there would be extras and additions to be accommodated in the works.
ASLA and Power Construction have partnered before in other aspects of the
Gateway project as contractors to Sobambisana Community Development but
not in joint venture. So, while the two companies knew each other, in this case
extensive planning was required and frank discussions on strengths and
weaknesses lead to apportioning of work and contract responsibilities. Once that
was settled, a team approach was adopted to address the seven major contract
activities, which included excavation and pipe laying, concrete work, materials
store, workshops and training, among others. Extensive use is made of local and
emerging contractors with training support provided by the City of Cape Town.
In addition to the contracting team, Sobambisana includes consulting engineers
Kwezi V3 and Bergstan, and environmental consultants EcoServe all of whom
have permanent technical staff in site offices while the laboratory and materials
store are located near Mfuleni on the Old Faure Road. Looking after the client’s
interests is project manager Stewart Scott International.


Scope of works
The ASLA/Power joint venture is contracted to expedite:
      detection and adjustment of existing services;
      site clearance and demolition of structures;
      supply and installation of the Delft main sewer and interceptor to Zandvliet
Waste Water Treatment Works;
      removal and relaying of existing services;
      connection to the existing main sewer;
      crossings of the Kuils River; and
      crossings of the N2 national road and the R300.


Deviation from original plan
The new pipeline follows fairly closely the route of the old, through Delft and
sections of the Kuils River flood plain, but that doesn’t make its construction any
easier, according to Tony Araujo, contracts manager for Power Construction, and
responsible for the technical aspects of the project.
“The route traverses existing services, protected wetlands, informal settlements,
private farm land and crosses the Kuils River twice, the R300 main road and the
N2 highway,” explained Araujo. Ground conditions are typical of the Cape Flats:
sand dunes, fine sandy soils with isolated areas of calcareous sandy material
mixed with clayey/calcareous boulders.
There have been a number of administrative and planning issues that have
caused the construction programme to deviate from the original plan.
Great urgency to complete the pipeline in time for beneficial occupation of the
houses, which were scheduled for handover at 100 per week, led to the adoption
of a fast-tracking approach, which culminated in a tight contract period of just 11
months. The contract period – commencing in December 2005 and scheduled for
completion in November 2006 – is particularly challenging considering the high
water table expected during the wet winter months.
While the project had received approval from the Department of Water Affairs
and Forestry (DWAF) technical approval and an environmental impact
assessment (EIA) record of decision (ROD) was imminent, several other legal
and administrative issues had not been resolved prior to the contractors
establishing on site.
Examples included the removal of informal settlements by city officials and the
granting of permission by a land owner to cross his farm.
These issues and a late but successful appeal lodged to the Ministry for
Environment, Planning and Economic Development for a change in the approved
pipeline route also resulted in substantial re-programming to the construction
schedule. Implications of the route change, upheld more than a month after
contract commencement, meant the partial destruction of seasonal wetlands,
which required permission from DWAF in Pretoria. At the same time, concerns
were being expressed by environmentalists and others over the impact of the
Kuils River crossings, and a special team was formed to examine the issues,
comply with the dictates of the National Water Act and recommend a method of
construction that lessened the environmental impact.
The team’s proposals were accepted by DWAF, which issued authorisation for
the lower and upper Kuils River crossings during February and March 2006 but a
decision on the seasonal wetlands would take a little longer.
Three types of wetland were affected: imperate cylindrical, degraded and
Renosterveld – each requiring a separate rehabilitation regime. To minimise
environmental impact, it was a condition that construction work had to take place
during the dry season.
The upshot was that method statements were devised and issued and an
environmental control officer appointed to ensure compliance with the
Construction Environmental Management Plan. DWAF in the Western Cape
approved the measures in June 2006, allowing construction to proceed in
sensitive areas.
Notwithstanding these impacts, the flexibility of the contracting organisation
accommodated these changes while maintaining progress in other less sensitive
areas.


Lower Kuils River crossing: the record of decision in terms of the environmental
impact assessment prescribed stringent conditions for river crossings. At places,
the pipeline route had to be adjusted and, where there were wetlands,
construction had to be completed in the dry season.


Why a new sewer?
The much-publicised and, at times controversial, N2 Gateway housing project,
involves the construction of 22 000 housing units and was scheduled for
completion in June 2006. Approximately 15 000 of these units were constructed
in Delft Symphony, Delft extensions 7, 8 and 9, and Driftsands. It was clear that
the existing bulk interceptor sewer built many years ago was inadequate for the
increased flow. The capacity was often exceeded, especially in the wet season
when the level of groundwater peaked above the level of the sewer. In such
cases, stormwater and groundwater entered the pipelines through damaged
couplings and cracks that had developed over the years. Sewer overflow was not
uncommon causing a major health risk to communities and environmental
concerns.
Under a Municipal Infrastructure Grant, the new sewer pipeline is under
construction for the City of Cape Town by Sobambisana Community
Development, and sub-contracted to a joint venture of ASLA and Power
Construction. The pipeline has been designed to address capacity requirements
not only for the Gateway project but for the greater Tygerberg area. The project
pipeline starts in Delft at Symphony Way and terminates at the Zandvliet Waste
Water Treatment Works – a pipe run of about 15,8 km.
The project comprises two parts: Phase 1 is known as the Delft Interceptor
Sewer that runs from Hindle Road to Kuils River (13 km) while the second phase
is known as the Main Sewer, commencing at Kuils River (Mfuleni), running along
the Old Faure Road, turning into Baden Powell Drive and connecting into the
Zandvliet Waste Water Treatment Works.


Construction step-by-step
Installation of this pipeline is more complex than it would seem at first glance,
reveals a detailed look at construction.


Concrete pipes between manholes
“Inspection/sluice manholes occur every 200 m and we use the concrete pipes
between manholes where we encounter shallow depth, difficult ground conditions
or road crossings for instance,” explained Tony Araujo of Power Construction.
“Each section of concrete pipe weighs between 6 t to 7 t so, while having greater
deformation strength and rigidity than the GRP, it is more difficult to handle,” he
said. GRP sections are comparatively light at about 1 t each.


Careful excavation at existing services
Mechanical excavation was the only viable method to meet production deadlines
although a combination of hand excavation was necessary in areas congested by
existing services (pictured). Labour-based sub-contractors were engaged in the
construction of the manholes and other on-site concrete work.


Special bedding materials
Deep trenches in variable soil conditions, a high water table and potential
deformation of the GRP pipes meant that special arrangements were made with
respect to bedding materials, backfilling and compaction. In some areas, stone
and imported material form the pipe’s support base.
ASLA’s Jeremy Donnelly, responsible for site supervision, explained that the pipe
laying has to be done to very tight tolerances – over a road crossing for example,
a fall of just 80 mm was specified over 80 m, which is virtually undetectable with
a spirit level!
Difficult excavations
Groundwater was found at depths varying from 1,5 m to 5 m and, in combination
with the different soil types, made excavation and laying extremely difficult at
times. Very wide excavations were sometimes necessary in the areas of fine
sandy soil while the stiff clayey/calcareous material allowed fairly vertical side
slopes. Calcareous boulders and old, unmarked concrete foundations, some at a
depth of 8 m presented the construction team with some serious challenges.


Groundwater a constant problem
“We devised special jigs and tools to handle and lay the pipes, a process that fell
into three categories: dry conditions with easy bedding, a high water table with
dry bedding material and lastly saturated soils which required extensive well
point dewatering,“ explained Jeremy Donnelly of ASLA. “So extensive was the
groundwater in places that it was difficult to prevent the pipe sections from
becoming buoyant so not only were tight tolerances a challenge but to get the
pipes backfilled and compacted in quick time required some ingenuity.” Despite
employing some hi-tech resistivity testing equipment, underlying conditions were
not easy to determine and random stretches of dry conditions would
unaccountably and suddenly become saturated, which kept the pipe laying team
on their toes.




Sensitive river crossings
River crossings have to conform to rigid method statements to minimise
environmental impact while diverting and restoring the flow. At crossings,
concrete encasement of the pipe is required as well as the use of gabions and
mattresses as protection measures. The Lower Kuils River crossing with
shuttering for pipe encasement is pictured.




Support for the old sewer
On the upper Kuils River crossing, the new sewer runs alongside the old and is
located in the river bed but scouring had completely exposed the old pipe and
was being used by local residents as a bridging point across the river, according
to Jeremy Donnelly of ASLA. “The environmental method statement calls for
rehabilitation of the old pipe crossing as well as the new and we have
constructed a wooden bridge to provide a safe crossing point for residents as the
rehabilitation work includes pipe cover with rip-rap and gabions – quite unsuitable
and unsafe for pedestrian traffic especially during flood conditions.” Heavy rains
upstream during construction were a challenge but good team work provided a
satisfying result that met the specifications, he added. A bailey bridge was used
to support the old sewer at the new sewer crossing point


Professional team
Client: City of Cape Town
Client’s project manager: Stewart Scott International
Principle contractor: Sobambisana Community Development
Contractors: Power Construction & ASLA JV
Consulting engineers: Kwezi V3 and Bergstan
Environmental consultant: EcoServe
Pipe-jacking sub-contractor: Esor
Pipe-jacking at road crossings
A number of pipe-jackings under roads and services was specified and the work
was sub-contracted to specialist firm Esor, which was contracted to handle four
crossings, according to Esor director Arthur Field. Hindle Road, R300 and N2 are
all road crossings between 50 m to 70 m in length and at a depth between 4 m
and 8 m, he said, adding: Hindle was 1 350 mm diameter and the other two were
1 500 mm and 2 250 mm. Further jacking took place under services adjacent to
the R300 where the pipeline crosses existing large-diameter water mains, a 750
mm-diameter sewer and power cables.
“While the Hindle Road, N2 and services crossings were fairly straightforward,
except for the problem of groundwater, the R300 presented a particular
challenge as unidentified concrete structures were found directly in our path at a
depth of more than 8 m,” explained Field. “Our conventional vacuum pump
dewatering techniques proved ineffective at these depths and well-point
dewatering was employed,” he elaborated. “We opted for an additional jacking pit
in the central median.” The underlying ground conditions and removal of the
concrete structures has led to some unexpected subsidence on the R300, which,
although stable, will form part of remedial work by the contractors during off-peak
traffic conditions. Ironically, the contractors requested that the Department of
Transport allow this crossing to be done by open-cut rather than jacking but the
request was declined due to heavy traffic volumes on the R300.


Contact
Glenville Cullum – CEO Sobambisana Community Development. 021 907 1300
gcullum@powergrp.co.za
August 2005


Power Building appoints MD


Poens Venter has been appointed as Managing Director of Power Building.

Venter joined the Power Group of Companies in 2000 as a Special Projects
Manager responsible for the design and large-scale master planning of
development projects for the Group.

In 2002 he was appointed as a director of Power Construction Roads. The
following year he became a director of Power Construction West Cape, and in
2004, he joined the board of the then newly formed Power Building.

Poens Venter graduated from the University of Stellenbosch and worked for the
Cape Peninsula Administration, and later Keeve Steyn, (now Goba) before
joining the Power Group.

Venter has ambitious goals for Power Building. He wants to develop it into a
frontline building company that will ultimately be involved in high-rise buildings.
He plans to develop Power Building into “a first choice company to work for, and
a place where people are cared for and opportunities are provided”.

Poens is married to Tania and has two sons, Stian and Martin.
October 2005

THESEN ISLANDS ‘CLEAN UP’ NATIONAL AWARDS

Knysna, 26 October 2005: Thesen Islands, the largest marina
development in South Africa, has walked away with two major national
awards in the construction and engineering industry.

Situated in the Knysna Lagoon, this unique residential and lifestyle
development was awarded the coveted SAFCEC (South African Federation of
Civil Engineering Contractors) Presidential award for Best Project 2005 and
the SAICE (South African Institution of Civil Engineering) award as the Most
Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement 2005.

The SAICE award recognised the consulting engineers on the Thesen Islands
project, Arcus Gibb for a well-engineered civil project that portrays the art
and science of civil engineering, presented to Thesen Islands in the category
of ‘Technically Challenging Projects’.

The SAFCEC Presidential award was presented to Power Construction in
recognition of the outstanding work delivered at Thesen Islands, particularly
in terms of Environmental Impact, Marine Technical Challenges, and Job
Creation.

Cited in 2000 by the (then) Deputy Minister of Environmental Affairs and
Tourism, Ms RT Mabudahfhasi as ‘the most comprehensive, professional and
detailed Environmental Impact Assessment ever undertaken in South Africa,
including St Lucia and Saldanha Steel’’, more than ten years of
environmental research by the CSIR and renowned environmental specialists
preceeded the Thesen Islands development. The project was undertaken in
an extremely sensitive environmental area where the old island, which was
utlised in a way that created a source of environmental pollution, was
transformed into the current environment where nature was not only
restored, but is in fact thriving.

With its location in a tidal zone, it was an extremely challenging project
technically. Various innovative environment friendly practises were
introduced, including the construction of natural rock packed gabions that
form the banks of the waterways.

In terms of job creation it was one of the first significant economic
developments seen on the Garden Route, creating some 2000 jobs and
injecting more than R100m per annum into the local economy.

Says Willem Scholtz, Managing Director of the Thesen Islands Development
Company: ‘These two significant awards are the result of a huge amount of
dedication and teamwork by all involved in this project since its inception,
including the recipients of the award - Power Construction and Arcus Gibb.
What makes the Thesen Islands project all the more unique, is that the fields
of construction and engineering do not generally go hand in hand with the
improvement of the natural environment. Environmentally speaking, Thesen
Islands is the most exciting development yet seen on the Garden Route, in
that it not only restored, but considerably enhanced and improved the
surrounding natural environment.’

He continued to say that the Thesen Islands development is a commercially
successful project that has provided environmental solutions, which have
added value to the greater Knysna area through engineering excellence. ‘I
believe I speak for everyone concerned when I say that we are all immensely
proud of what has been achieved here. It is not often that we as developers
have the pleasant experience of exceeding our own delivery expectations,’ he
concluded.

The 90-hectare private estate is spread across 19 islands in the Knysna
Lagoon. Eighteen of the islands are residential with six exclusive single
home islands. The islands are surrounded by tidal waterways, linked by
bridges, with waterfront properties offering private jetties and beaches.

The project is currently nearing completion, with all of the 522 freehold
stands sold out, and the second phase of the Dry Mill Apartments, the final
residential opportunity on Thesen Islands, have been released for sale.
Construction of the first phase of the Dry Mill Apartments is progressing well
and visitors can view the fully furnished show unit. The commercial and retail
hub Thesen Harbour Town is located in the historical heart of the old timber
factory area and offers a lively mix of speciality shops, coffee shops and
restaurants. Some of these are already operational and more will be
completed by the end of the year. An Environmental Centre is also planned,
which will be open to the public.
November 2005


My maatskappy in Sy hande


Om sukses to behaal is een ding. Maar om dit volgens Christelike beginsels
to doen is ‘n nog groter uitdaging.


God se manier beteken sukses. Dis skuins voor nege die oggend in
Blackheath, ‘n industriele gebied in Kaapstad. In die grys baksteengebou wat
dien as hoofkantoor van die land se grootste nie-genoteerde
konstruksiegroep, glip die bestuurders van die twaalf maatskappye binne die
growp in hul stoele rondom die lang konferensie tafel.
Dis tyd vir raadsvergadering.
Graham Power, besturende direkteur van die Power-groep van maatskappye
en onlangs aangewys as Die Burger en die Kaapstad Sakekamer se Sakeleier
van die Jaar, neem sy plek in aan die hoof van die tafel. Soos gewoonlik
begin hy by punt een op die agenda: Skriflesing en gebed.
Power is ‘n Christen-sakeman wat nie skroom om sedert sy bekering in 1999
sy Christenskap in sy werkplek uit te leef nie. Die uitmuntende sakeman is
ook international bekend as dryfkrag agter die Transformasie Gebedsdag
geleenthede wat in 2001 op Nuweland onstaan het.
“Daar behoort nie ‘n verskil te wees tussen gesonde sakestrategiee en
Christelike sakebeginsels nie. In ons maatshappy is dit een. God se
lewensreels is goeie sakebeginsels,” se Graham.


Meer as 1800 mense werk vir die 22 jaar oue, veelbekroonde
multimiljoenrand sakeryk. Die sleutel tot sukses? “Ons dra die gesondheid en
toekoms van ons maatskappy aan God op. Solank as wat ons aktief daaraan
werk om ons personeel geestelik te bemagtig, weet ons die maatskappy is in
God se hande. Ons glo ons bestuur dit net namens Hom.” Se Graham.
‘n Sterk gemeenskapsfokus is een van die praktiese uitvloeisels van Power se
Christelike bestuurs-etiek.


Graham het in 1984 ‘n stal op die plaas Elandskloof omgeskep in ‘n kantoor
en sy onderneming daar begin. Vandag is Elandsklood ‘n opvoedkundige
wegbreekoord waarheen kinders uit voorheen benadeelde gemeenskappe
naweke op geestelike kampe gaan. Die kampe is deel van ‘n uitgebreide lys
opheffingsprojekte in die gemeenskap waarby die Power-groep betrokke is,
onder meer Die Ark in Mannenberg (‘n tuiste vir haweloses) en Beautiful Gate
in Cross Roads (‘n heenkome vir straatkinders). Die groep het sedert 1998
meer as 40 000 huise gebou in gemeenskappe waarby hulle betrokke is.


Binne die maatskappy se vier mure is daar ruimte om Christenskap voluit uit
te leef. By die hoofkantoor is daar ‘n gebedskamer ingerig wat weekliks oor
etenstyd deur meer as ‘n honderd werknemers besoek word. ‘n Nuusbrief
hou almal ingelig oor versoeke vir gebed. Graham woon weekliks voor werk
saam met werknemers ‘n byeenkoms van ‘n selgroep by.


Hy glo sterk st maatskappy is sy bedizening. “Dit is ‘n opdrag waarmee ek
geseen is en ek wil graag die verantwoordelikheid dra solank as wat ek kan.”
Hy toets deurgans sy sakebeleid aan etiese vrae, soos of dit wettig is en hoe
sal die besluit jou oor jouself laat voel.” Die sterk sin vir etiek het hom twee
jaar gelede die respek van die sakegemeenskap gewen toe hy openlik bely
het dat hy geld onwettige landuit geneem het.

Soms is dit eensaam om ‘n Christelike sakeman te wees, erken Graham, want jy doen
dikwels dinge anders as die norm. “In ons bedryf, waar tenders voortdurend uitgesit
word, speel beinvloeding ‘n groot rol, iets wat teen Christelike sakebeginsels indruis.”
September 2005

Western Cape leads the way in empowering young construction
technicians


“Training in the construction industry in the Western Cape is in good hands.”
That’s the view of Themba Dlamini, CEO of the Construction Education and
Training Authority (CETA). He was speaking at a graduation ceremony at
Boland College in Paarl, where 18 learners received certificates of completion
after a year of intensive training at the college and on site. This was the first
Roadworks Technicians learnership to be completed in the Western Cape.

Significantly, two of these young civil technicians are women. They had been
encouraged by the Power Group to enter into the training, which was made
possible through CETA and a joint initiative by Power Construction, Haw &
Inglis and Tjeka Training Matters.

“The Western Cape was the first to take up the challenge of starting the
learnerships,” said Dlamini. “When we launched CETA in 2000 we decided
that irrespective of our differences, there was one group whose interests we
would not compromise: the learners. Making [this graduation] today a
reality, it is the same individuals, training providers, authorities and
companies who have been with us all along. And we will walk the road as we
build it.”

World Class for the World Cup and beyond

Narius Molato, Chairperson of CETA, said 2010 will pose a challenge to the
construction industry, and that he was pleased to see that the Western Cape
is taking training seriously. Addressing the newly qualified technicians, he
emphasised that “graduation is just the beginning. It takes lifelong learning
and development to succeed. For productivity, for quality, we need skills and
resources so we can compete with the best in the world.”

CETA financed the learnerships, and also acted as quality control body to
ensure that the training provider and the learners made the grade.

Morkel Stofberg, Power Construction’s Training and Development Manager,
said that over the past six years about 200 civil trainees had been put
through onsite training at SAFCEC member companies to find meaningful
employment in the industry. “Some of them are now quite senior Technical
Assistants, so the training is really bearing fruit.” He added, however, that it
was only during the past two years that the formal training route had
become a reality, largely through the efforts of CETA, the employer
companies, accredited training providers like Tjeka and institutions of
learning such as Boland College.
Private sector shows commitment

One of the highlights of the awards ceremony was the announcement that
Kemach in Cape Town had made available a brand new JCB 3CX4 Sitemaster
back hoe loader, which will be used by Tjeka Training Matters’ first intake of
learner operators from January next year. This generous social upliftment
gesture by Kemach came as a response to a request by the Power Group’s
Fanie van der Westhuizen and Morkel Stofberg, who are “very aware of the
dire need for trained operators in this country”.

Stofberg said that, while the figures for technical assistants were
encouraging, “this industry will be in trouble if we don’t start with serious
operator training. Aids and age are taking their toll and we need to fuel the
industry with new blood – especially at operator level. Fortunately we have
some exciting programmes running that will provide many more matriculants
with opportunities to enter the industry with a formal, accredited NQF3 or
NQF4 qualification.”

Ken Falkenberg of Tjeka says these learnerships “have brought a whole new
dimension to the construction industry. There used to be no formal training
route other than the technicons and universities. Now a whole new channel
of training and opportunity has been opened.”
September 2005

Helderberg inwoner Graham Power, uitvoerende hoof van die Power groep
- SA se grootste nie-genoteerde konstruksiegroep - is aan die einde van
verlede maand aangewys as Die Burger en die Kaapstad Sakekamer se
Sakeleier van die Jaar.

Tydens die glansgeleentheid in Kaapstad is 'n eretoekenning aan oudpresident
FW de Klerk gemaak vir sy bydrae tot die ontwikkeling van die land en die Wes-
Kaap se ekonomie.

Power het sy konstruksieonderneming 22 jaar gelede - met een bakkie en drie
werkers - in Sir Lowry's Pas begin. Vandag staan hy aan die hoof van 12
maatskappye - vier van hulle swart bemagtigings firmas - wat nie net by
gebouekonstruksie betrokke is nie, maar ook siviele ingenieurswese, dam en
kanaal-konstruksie, gholfbaan-infrastruktuur, behuisingsprojekte en padbouwerk.
Dit is vandag die grootste nie-genoteerde konstruksiegroep in SA.

Die Power groep se hoofkantoor is in Blackheath, Kaapstad en daar is verder
kantore in Knysna, Port Elizabeth en Gauteng.

Onder die projekte waarby die maatskappye betrokke is, sluit in die N2 Gateway-
projek van R3 miljard wat die bou van 22 000 huise binne 18 maande langs die
N2 en in Distrik Ses behels. In Knysna was die greop een van dié
verantwoordelik vir die Thesens Island-ontwikkeling.

In die Helderberg was die Power groep betrokke by die bou van
laekostebehuising in Broadlands Park, die ontwikkeling van die Firlands
Farmstall en die herstel van die teeroppervlak oor die Sir Lowry's Pass.

In 'n onderhoud met Die Burger kort na hy sy toekenning ontvang het, beskryf die
koerant hom as baie positief oor die toekoms.

"Met die regering se vasbeslotenheid om al meer aan infrastruktuurontwikkeling
te bestee, is die groep danksy sy bemagtigingsvennootskappe
geposisioineer om goed voordeel te trek uit die verwagte groei," lui die berig.

Vanjaar verwag die groep om baie na aan 'n omset van R1-miljard te kom -
aansienlik meer as die R300 000 omset wat sy maatskappy vir die eerste keer in
1983 vermag het.

Die groep het vandag 1 700 werknemers, waarvan 900 permanent is.
25/26 June 2005
New industrial park to be launched

In 1998, Power Developments established Saxenburg Park as a beautiful
upmarket industrial park in Blackheath.
With all the plots sold out and construction taking place at a tremendous pace,
Power Developments is building forth on this roaring success.
The company is now in the process of establishing another industrial park –
Saxenburg 2.

Increased demand

The South African economy is currently in a “bull run”, with similar projections for
the medium term, resulting in an increased demand for industrial land.
This segment of the property market is still in the beginning of its upswing, but is
already showing good growth for investors.
Saxenburg 2 is situated within 500m of the existing Saxenburg Park and will
qualify in terms of:
     Aesthetically, being one of the most attractive industrial parks in the
       Western Cape;
     Geographically, being positioned within easy reach of the N1, N2 and
       R300, resulting in quick access to the City of Cape Town, airport, harbour,
       northern areas, Somerset West, Strand, Stellenbosch, and so forth;
     Being located in a secure area;
     Providing a variety of plot sizes ranging from 1 000m2 to 5 000m2 offering
       great value for money; and
     Prices starting at R290/m2 plus VAT.

   For further inquiries contact the sole mandate agents.
June 2005


New Garden Route Mall takes shape for November opening.


The Garden Route Mall, the R180-million, 65 000 m2 regional shopping centre
under construction between the N2 and Knysna Road, in George, is reaching
peak activity as the end of the construction programme is in sight.
Main contractors’ WBHO project director Wolfgang Neff is managing a team of
200 hourly paid staff with 10 foremen and five site agents, plus coordinating the
teams of sub contractors in the frenzy to complete the first phase of the complex
according to the 27th October opening deadline.
Of the time of writing the 12 000 m2 second phase had started and the 4 500 m 2
cinema complex foundation platform was well underway.
According to Neff, the challenges faced in a complex of this size are not in the
complexity of design and construction, as this is regarded as fairly conventional.
“WHBO have tackled retail shopping centres of this and larger sizes before and
clearly have the project experience, but where this one differs is in its location,
being outside a main metropolitan area where skilled trades’ people and material
supplies can be problematic at times” he said.
Never the less, plans have been implemented to overcome these challenges and
despite some periods of wet weather Neff is confident on meeting the first phase
deadline of end of October.
Power Construction Coastal, based in Knysna and part of the Power Group of
Companies are sub-contractors to WBHO for the original earthworks, (completed
last year) internal roads, services and the 100 000 m2 parking areas.
Power Construction’s Site Agent Nick Shaw has also had his share of
challenges, echoing those of Wolfgang Neff. “Our R18-million contract involves
approximately 100 000 m2 of parking spaces, 2,8 km of stormwater, 1,5 km of
sewers and 10 km of services ducting, some of the sewers installed at depths of
7 m” commented Shaw. “The underlying clay whilst not active, does present an
impermeable layer causing flooding when the rain comes” he mused, which has
been quite often since the beginning of the year. Shaw and his team are now
busy with an additional 4 500 m2 foundation platform for the Ster Kinekor cinema
complex.
Power also reports that the contract for the External Roads and Services have
been awarded to Sibakhulu Construction, one of the BEE Companies in the
Power Group. This entails the widening of the George-Knysna Road and N2 off
ramp, and constructing the main access roads and services into the centre with
an intersection from the above roads. The value of the work amounts to about
R10-million, and has already started.
The Garden Route’s developers are Attfund whose retail investments include the
shopping centres of Woodhill Boulevard, Clearwater Mall, Atterbury Value Mart,
Somerset Value Mart and Centurion Mall.
The professional team includes:
LPA                               Architects
Nel & De Kock                     Town Planners
Norval Wentzel Steinberg          Quantity Surveyors
Arcus Gibb                        Civil, Structural, Traffic, Geotechnical and
                                  Environmental Engineers
Gaucon                            Electrical Engineers
TE Projects                       Mechanical Engineers
July 2005

Garden Route N2 rehab progresses despite contract delays

The R96-million special maintenance contract of the N2 between George and
Knysna currently underway by Power Construction Roads, is progressing
despite losing 30 days to the weather (as of end of May) and suspension of
the Kaaimans River Pass section, due to expropriation delays.

According to Power Construction’s contracts director Louwtjie Louw, progress
is being maintained and the 24-month contract, which was awarded last
September and is scheduled for completion in September 2006, will be
completed on time.

The contract, which involves the rehabilitation of some 60km of national
road, attracts more than its fair share of attention as it is the premier route
for the Garden Route tourist destinations in the Southern Cape. Commencing
at the Kraaibosch interchange just outside George and finishing 5km beyond
the White Bridge at KNysna, this route takes in some breathtaking sceneray
as it winds through the picturesque Kaaimans River Pass and the villages of
Wilderness and Sedgefield.

In addition to safety improvements at nine intersections along the route, the
special maintenance contract calls for:
    The repais of + 15% of the existing surface with asphalt or by in-situ
      bitumen emulsion stabilization of a portion of the existing base
      material, mixed with imported material.
    Increasing the pavement strength in selected areas by in-situ chemical
      stabilization of the subbase layer and/or by adding an asphalt overlay.
    Crack seal of affected areas.
    Improving the existing road by texturing with slurry seal.
    Construction of 19mm/6.7mm double seal with two applications of
      6.7mm aggregate on selected areas.
    Construction of ultra thin asphalt friction course in certain areas.
    Improvements to longitudinal, cross and sub-soil drainage.
    Relocation and protection of utility services.
    Ancillary road works including road markings, signs, finishing off of
      road reserves, installation of studs and fencing, etc.

Although temporarily suspended from the contract at the time of writing,
safety improvements on the Kaaimans Pass include the construction of a
1.6m high concrete median barrier and the re-alignment and reconstruction
of the carriageway, which involves a 45 000m3 cut into the face of the pass.
The logistics of the construction programme present some interesting
challenges over such a long distance of road repair. The entire route has
been broken down into 14 sections of approximately 4km each and only four
sections can be closed at any one time to minimize the disruption to traffic
flow.
The construction programme intended to commence at the George end and
work towards KNysna, but the suspension of the Kaaimans section and the
unavailability of quality materials in the George area necessitated some
rearrangements in order to keep to the construction programme. Suitable
quality stone was sourced in Knysna which has meant increased
transportation and delays caused by Power Construction’s own necessary
traffic management system which operates 24 hours per day, 7 days a week.

Power has 110 hourly pais workers on site and a supervisory staff of about
27 that will increase as sealing operations commence. Louwtjie Louw has
seven teams operating including asphalt, layer work construction, base
stabilization, slurry, traffic accommodation and road marking. Traffic
accommodation has been sub contracted to a local firm in George and sister
company Nikamandla Construction is handling slurry operations.

A full time safety officer continuously monitors the traffic management and
incidents have mercifully been few.
August 2005

Sukses is ‘n bysaak vir Power-groep se kragman

Dit is met ‘n onvermydelike skerp oog dat ‘n mens na die Power-groep se
geboue in Blackheath kyk, na doe mense in the voorportaal en in die gange
en na mnr graham Power, in soveel woorde die “krag” after die Power groep.
Want dit is maar die manier van mense. Iemand met die etiket “bekende
Christen-sakeman” moet weet die wereld gaan met ‘n baie meer kritiese oog
na hom kyk.

Graham Power slaag die toets. Daar is noe sprake van ‘n aangeplakte
stroperigheid nie. Later as ons deir die werkwinkel en agter in die werf
tuseen fir konstruksievoertiue en padtekenborde loop al mik-mik na stukkies
droe grond tussen die modderplasse op die reendag, groet die werknemers
vriendelik. ‘n Mens vind nie hier die gewoonlik dun repie geestelikheid wat
net Sondae anngeklee word of deur enige krisis of klein irritasie afgeruk word
nie. Dit is iets deipers wat deursyfer na sy lewe as sakeman en hoof van die
Power-groep.

Power is Vrydagaand by ‘n speggeleentheid aangewys as die 16de Sakeleier
van die Jaar van die Burger en die Kaapstad Sakekamer. Dit is die persoon
wat deesdae in Afrika en selfs internasionaal amper meer bekend is vir die
Transformasie-gebedsgeleenthede wat in Mei 2001 op Nuewland in Kaapstad
begin is as vir sy suksesvolle konstruksie maatskappy.

En vir sy erkenning twee jaar gelede dat hy ook een van die mense was wat
geld onwettig uit die land geneem het en van mnr Trevor Manuel minister
van finansies se belastingamnestie gebruik sou maak.

Hy het dit een naweek in Maart 2003 op ‘n geldinsamelingsgeleentheid in
Pretoria vir die Transformasiebeweging aan die gaste vertel – sonder dat he
geweet het daar was ‘n verslaggewer in die gehoor. Die Maandag het Die
Burger dit in ‘n koerantopskrif uitgebasuin: “Kerkman van die Kaap bieg oor
sy geld.”
Hy se self een van die vrae wat dakelui hulself moet afvra wanneer hulle voor
moeilike etiese kwessies te staan kom, is hoe jy sal voel as dit wat jy doen of
belsuit die volgende dag in die koerante uitegebasuin sal word. En hoewel dit
vir hom ‘n verleentheid was, het dit tog sy standpunt reg bewys; hy kon juis
sy kop hoog hou omdat hy dinge wat hy vroeer wou wegsteek, self in die ope
gebring het.

Hy vertel hoe hy enn van baie sakemense was wat elke keer as hulle oorsee
gaan, ekstra spaargeld saamgeneem het om in ‘n oorsese bankrekening te
los. Hy kon later ‘n woonstel in Spanje koop, ‘n klein boot . . . ‘n steweige
neseier is vir die toekoms opgebou.
Maar niemand wat alles in sy persoonlike lewe en in sy maatskappy aan ‘n
sekere etiese kode meet, het die punt in November 2002 gekom toe hy en sy
vrou, Lauren, vir mekaar gese het hier is die een ding in hull ewe wat
onwettig is en hulle is bereid om dit op te offer. Die besluit van Manuel in
Februarie 2003 om amnestie te verleen aan mense soos hy, was dus vir hom
‘n uitkoms uit die etiese dilemma. Hy het nooit verwag dat dit in die media
sou beland nie, maar hy glo vandag hy sou dit nie anders wou he nie. Hy
meen sy openhartigheid en die feit dat die media dit nog wyer uitgeblaker
het, het baie mense aangemoedig om ook van die amnestiegeleentheid
gebruik te maak. Op die ou end het Power sy 10% boetebelasting betaal en
die woonstel in Spanje gehou.

Maar alles het begin toe ‘n jong en waagmoedige graham Power in April 1983
by die siviele-ingenieursgroep Savag & Lovemore bedank en sy eie
konstruksie onderneming begin het.

Dit was ‘n klein en eenvoudige begin op sy eie bene nada thy vir tien jaar by
Savage & Lovemore vandag die paaie-afdeling van Group Five gewerk het.
Hy is in die noordelike voorstede gebore en is ‘n oud-leerling can die
Hoerskool Settlers. Sy pa, ‘n motorwerktuigkundige is tydens Graham se
diensplig oorlede en daar was nie geld vir studier nie. Hy het as
leerlingopmeter by Savage & Lovemore begin en oor die tien jaar gevorder
tot terreinagent, projekbestuurder en kontrakbestuurder. In 1983 het hy
geskuif van groot projekte by Savage & Lovemore soos die bou van
opgaartenks by Saldanha en die Langebaan-Velddrifpad na klein siviele
projekte soos om sypaadjies te bou.

Hy moes letterlik klein en van onder af begin. In die beginjare was sy
skoonpa, mnr Heinz Baumker wat in April vanjaar oorlede is, sy mentor. As
afgetrede sakeman het Baumker baie jare se ervaring in die hotelbedryf
gehad en het Power bygestaan met die stigting can die onderneming en met
die neem van sakebesluite. Baumker was vir die eerste vier jaar ook ‘n 50%
aandeelhouer. Power het sy huis verkoop en die Elandskloof-kleinhoewe by
Sir Lowry’s Pass gekoop. Met ‘n tweede handse bakkie as aanvanklik die
enigste voetuig het hulle in die eerste jaar ‘n omset van R300 000 gehaal.
Die voldenge jaar was dit R3miljoen en die jaar daarna R6 miljoen en daarna
R12 miljoen en R24 miljoen.

Power se prestasies is gou raakgesien. In 1989 het die Johannesburg
Afrikaanse Sakekamer hom aangewys as Suid-Afrika se Junior Sakeman van
die Jaar. Die toekenning is gegee aan sakelui jonger as 40. Vandag bestaan
die Power-groep uit 12 afsonderlike maatskappye wat elkeen op hul eie bene
kan staan. Vier van hulle is swartbemagtigings maatskappye. Daar is in total
1 700 werknemers, waarvan 900 permanent is. Die res word op kontrak
grondslag aangestel.

Power is trots daarop dat hulle nie in die 22 jaar van die groep se bestaan dit
nog nodig gehad het om weens rasionalisering een werknemer aft e dank
nie. Hy glo deel van die geheim is die sterk passie en familie-gees in die
werknemerverhoudinge, wat regdeur die groep strek.

Op meer as een manier is dit ‘n familie-onderneming. Sy dogter Nadene is
haar pa se persoonlike assistant. Hy en Lauren het ook ‘n seun, Gary, die
oudste, ‘n reisagent in Kaapstad en die jongste dogter, Alaine, wat in matriek
is. Soos general Motors se GM Way het die Power-groep wat hulle die Power
Ways noem. Power verduidelik dit behels onder meer ‘n motivering stelsel
waar elke afdeling en elke werknemer daagliks meetbare maatstawwe het
waarteen hulle hul prestasie of produktiwiteit van die dag kan meet, en
telkens nuwe teikens kan stel. “As jy vir ‘n werknemer ‘n doelwit stel
waarteen hy himself kan meet, asook teen ander werknemers of ‘n ander
span, maak dit die lewer interessant.”

Hy vertel die idees waarop Power Ways gegrond is, spruit uit sy dae in die
weermag toe hy as 18-jarige ‘n boek van Dale Carnegie gelees het oor hoe
Carnegie ‘n kommpetisie begin het tussen die dag-en nagskof in ‘n fabriek,
deur bloot die produksieteikens wat die vorige span behaal het, op die
kennisgewingbord te plaas vir die volgende span om te sien. Dit het hulle
gemotiveer om beter te probeer vaar as hul kollegas. Natuurlik gaan so ‘n
motiveringstelsel by die Power –groep gepaard met die betaling van die
nodige produkbonusse, voeg hy by.

Power se hy is al dikwels gevra hoekom die groep nie ‘n notering op die JSE
oorweeg nie. Hy se hy het ses jaar gelede dit oorweeg om tot so ‘n stap oor
te gaan, maar het daarteen besluit, en beskou dit by terugkouing as die
beste sakebesluit wat hy nog geneem het. Die Power-groep is vandag die
grootste nie-genoteerde konstruksiegroep in Suid-Afrika.
October 2005
A new CEO for Power and a new plan for the Power Group

Local government VIPs shared with leading figures from construction and
developments’ related industries on Thursday 3 November 2005 at Power
Construction Coastal’s year-end function on Thesen Islands.

While the band was thumping, the outlook of the speakers and guests was
equally up-beat: “South Africa and Africa are going through one of the most
positive phases of my life,” said chairman Graham Power. “I believe that God
has blessed this country of ours.”

Referring to his Group’s successes in helping to train up a skilled workforce
for the industry, Power quipped: “Having too few skilled people is a far better
problem to have than having to downscale.” He said that in 22 years of
industry ups and downs his company has never had to retrench anyone.

In what he described as “a very emotional, special and rewarding moment”,
Graham Power announced that André du Preez would take over the reins of
the construction legs of the group, as CEO of Power Construction. Power will
continue as chairman and major shareholder of all the group’s companies.

Power Coastal’s Paul Thiart accepted the SAFCEC Presidential Award of
excellence and Arcus Gibb was awarded the SAICE award, both for
achievements at the Thesen Islands project in Knysna.
November 2005


A new CEO for Power and a new plan for the Western Cape

Local government VIPs shared the dance floor with leading figures from
construction and development related industries last Thursday evening at the
Power Group’s year-end function at Ratanga Junction.

While the marimba players and rock band were thumping, the outlook of the
speakers and guests was equally up-beat: “Cape Town, South Africa and
Africa are going through one of the most positive phases of my life,” said
chairman Graham Power. “I believe that God has blessed this country of
ours.”

Referring to his group’s successes in helping to train up a skilled workforce
for the industry, Power quipped: “Having too few skilled people is a far better
problem to have than having to downscale.” He said that in 22 years of
industry ups and downs his company has never had to retrench anyone.

Picking up on the point of training, Marius Fransman, MEC for Transport and
Public Works, shared Power’s views: “Economic growth and growth in the
construction industry go hand in hand. The challenge confronting all of us
now is to deliver on the President’s vision of growing the economy by six
percent. We’ve put in place a programme – the ‘Skills for Jobs’ strategy –
and we aim to bring together the best minds in the Western Cape,
irrespective of race. We believe we will make a difference in the Western
Cape, the Home for All.”

In what he described as “a very emotional, special and rewarding moment”,
Graham Power announced that André du Preez would take over the reins of
the construction legs of the group, as CEO of Power Construction. Power will
continue as chairman and major shareholder of all the group’s companies.

Power Coastal’s Paul Thiart accepted the SAFCEC Presidential Award of
excellence and Phillip Grobbelaar received the SAICE award on behalf of
ARCUS GIBB, both for achievements at the Thesen Islands project in Knysna.
November 2005

‘n Nuwe hoof vir Power en ‘n nuwe plan vir die Wes-Kaap

Leiers in die plaaslike regering en bekendes uit die konstruksiebedryf het op
die dansvloer kennis gemaak tydens die Power Groep se jaar-einde funksie
verlede Donderdagaand in Ratanga Junction.

Dit was asof die rockmusiek en marimba-klanke saam met Graham Power die
oplewing in die konstruksiebedryf wou besing. “Die Kaap, Suid-Afrka en
Afrika beleef tans een van die positiefste tydperke wat ek nog ervaar het. Ek
glo dat God hierdie land van ons ryklik geseën het.”

Met verwysing na die groep se welslae in die opleiding van ‘n werksmag vir
die bedryf, het Power geskerts: “Om te min opgeleide mense te hê is ‘n beter
probleem om mee te sit as om mense te moet afdank.” Hy het bygevoeg dat
sy maatskappy in 22 jaar van goeie en taai tye nooit iemand weens
oortolligheid hoef afgedank het nie.

Marius Fransman, LUK vir Plaaslike Regering en Behuising, het die aspek van
opleiding verder gevoer: “Ekonomiese groei gaan hand aan hand met ‘n
opswaai in die konstruksiebedryf. Nou is die uitdaging vir ons almal om die
President se visie van ‘n groeikoers van 6% tot uitvoering te bring. Volgens
Fransman gaan hul nuwe “Skills for Jobs”-strategie die beste breinkrag in die
Wes-Kaap byeenbring, ongeag van ras of kleur. “Ons gaan werklik ‘n verskil
maak hier in die Wes-Kaap, die Tuiste vir Almal.”

In wat hy beskryf het as ‘n “baie emosionele, besonderse en verblydende
oomblik”, het Graham Power aangekondig dat André du Preez die leisels van
die konstruksie-sy van die groep sal oorneem. Du Preez is die nuwe
uitvoerende hoof van al die konstruksiemaatskappye, terwyl Power die
voorsitter en grootste aandeelhouer van al die groep se maatskappye bly.

Paul Thiart van Power Coastal het die SAFCEC-toekenning in ontvangs
geneem, en Pierre Grobbelaar het die SAICE-toekenning namens sy
maatskappye ontvang. Beide toekennings was vir uitnemendheid in die
Thesen Island-projek by Knysna.
November 2005

Power scoops SAFCEC Presidential Award for 2005

Power Construction Coastal – one of the Power Group of Companies – has
been honoured for “outstanding achievement” by the president of the South
African Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors (SAFCEC).

The accolade was presented in recognition of Power Construction’s innovative
approaches and solutions put to work during the construction of the highly
successful Thesen Islands marina development at Knysna.

SAFCEC president Bryan Westcott singled out this challenging project as the
best submitted for his adjudication. In its submission Power Construction had
focused on issues and solutions regarding environmental impact, job creation
and marine construction challenges.


Power MD André du Preez accepted the award at SAFCEC’s annual
convention at Sun City. For him, winning the award is a reflection of the
depth of commitment shown by the Power Construction teams over the many
phases of construction. “I would really like to thank all who played a part in
the success of the project – consultants, architects, project manager, each
representative of the client consortium… everyone. And from Coastal's
perspective, all those staff members who had been involved in the project
during any of the phases. Many thanks for the long hours and for tackling the
real challenges that we had to overcome.”

Power Developments is the largest shareholder in the Thesen Islands
Development Company. Power Construction Coastal was responsible for the
civil works. This involved the waterways, roads, bridges, sidewalks, water
supply and sewage reticulation.

Working constantly against the tides and the rising water table, and always
mindful of the sensitive wetlands eco-system, Power Construction Coastal
had to devise many resourceful solutions. The island was divided into 19
islands, separated by a maze of canals seven kilometres long, and connected
by a network of roadways and small bridges.

The Presidential Award is presented annually to a SAFCEC member in
recognition of “outstanding achievements”. These may range from a solution
to a difficult problem, to endeavours in the face of adversity, excellence
beyond the line of duty and innovative construction techniques.


THE POWER GROUP OF COMPANIES
Steady growth over the past 21 years has seen the Power Group expand its
operations into a number of different specialist companies. Today is founder
and CEO, Graham Power, heads up the Power Group of Companies,
employing more than 1600 people and providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services with regional offices in the Western Cape, Southern Cape, Eastern
Cape and soon Gauteng.


Marlene Cronje, Organisational Development Director, says: “The Power
Group      is   committed   to   Employment   equity   and   thus   also   to   the
empowerment of women in the industry. Women are represented on all
levels throughout the company and our intent is to not only have women in
clerical or administrative positions, but also in technical careers. We were
therefore proud to appoint our first female Engineer, Alex Capostagno, in
2002. We have also allocated bursaries to 3 female students for 2004, and
are proud to play an important role in their education and training.”


The Power Group furthermore focuses on the development of women within
the company. All staff members have personal development plans, which
address their aspirations, the competencies needed for present and future
positions, as well as the behaviour competencies required. This has played an
important role in the development of the female workforce and many women
have over the past years progressed to more senior positions as a result of
the latter.


Marlene holds Honours degrees in Social Work and Industrial Psychology.
She was appointed to the board of the Power Group in 2001, and after
consulting to the Group for five years, joined the company on a fulltime basis
in 2002.
She says: “I do not regard the Construction Industry as a man's world. It is
an industry for people, both male and female, with guts, tenacity, a
willingness to work hard, and for people who enjoy overcoming challenges
and have a passion for what they do.”
December 2005

Renting – a cost-effective means of boosting capacity

Western Cape-based Power Group of Companies, has ventured into Gauteng.
Because its extensive fleet of construction equipment is being used in an
array of other projects in the Western and Southern Cape, the company has
had to supplement its fleet with rented construction equipment for the
Gauteng contract. Henri-John Kock visited the site.

Power Construction North has been contracted to undertake the earthworks
and civils at the new Gateway mall project near Rooihuiskraal in Centurion.
Construction started in October 2005.
According to site agent, Wilhelm du Toit, time is critical. Work at the site
involves removing about 5 000 m3 of topsoil, then trucking in about 27 000
m3 of selected G7 material from a borrow pit located about 8 km from the
site.
Because Power Construction’s large fleet of vehicles and machines are being
employed in other projects in the Southern and Western Cape the most cost-
effective solution has been to supplement capacity with a significant number
of rented machines from a variety of plant companies in Gauteng.
Plant can report an interesting agreement with a specific rental company that
is saving Power Construction more money.
Jodan plant has a set of four Tata 10 m3 dump trucks. These Indian
workhorses sell for a price well under R700 000, which includes VAT. This
means that one can almost buy three Tatas for the price of two of the more
traditional names.
According to Nico Pretorius of Jodan Plant, the Tatas outperformed all the
other trucks on the site. At the time of going to print, the trucks had done
about 5 000 km each – a consequence of the fast-track nature of the
Gateway project. He said that the trucks work from 07:00 to 21:00 at times
to bring in enough material. The trucks have not had their first service yet,
so he is unable to comment on the back-up service offered by Tata. While
operational costs are therefore not totally clear, Pretorius reports that diesel
consumption is on par with the other brands of trucks used on site.

Divided site
Du Toit explains that the site has been divided into two. This includes the
building platform section and the roads/parking areas. As the project has
been accelerated, the building-platform portion is critical, and Du Toit has
therefore focused on completing the platform sections to allow the builder,
Concor, to proceed as quickly as possible.
Watching the trucks work in concert with other machinery on the congested
site is fascinating.
They travel on a clearly demarcated road on site and drivers practice
extreme caution. The material is dumped by the trucks and then spread by a
Komatsu grader. It is a slick operation. The truck arrives, parks at its dump
point and dumps, with the grader waiting a few meters behind it. The truck
has hardly left when the grader levels the material. Trucks arrived at regular
intervals – two to five minutes between each truck.
Compaction starts when the spreading is completed. Du Toit says that
compaction requirements changed from 93% to 95%. For this reason, the 10
t Hamm vibratory roller was inadequate. The company had to therefore bring
in an additional 20 t Hamm vibratory roller. “The difference in rates between
the two machines isn’t much – maybe R30/h – but once one starts operating,
the difference in fuel consumption is obvious. The 20-tonner uses just about
double the fuel that the 10-tonner uses,” he says.

Another interesting rental arrangement
Dolomatic rocks on site are being crushed on site for sub-base material.
Elphick Earthworks supplied a Metso crusher with accompanying loader and
excavator. Du Toit says that the hire agreement was based on the volume of
material crushed as opposed to being charged hourly rates. All he had to
ensure was that the crusher’s excavator could keep it fed with rocks and that
the loader had somewhere to dump the crushed material. However, Du Toit
had enough material to keep his processes running.

Centurion is well known for its dolomites. This site is no exception, and
excavations had to go down fairly deep in order for the geotechnical
specialists to assess the underground conditions. A decision had been made
to excavate the rocks, leaving Power Construction with an interesting
problem. The rocks were already open, so blasting in this built-up area was
out of the question.
Du Toit says that it would have been possible to blast using specialised
techniques, but given the timeframes involved, this would have taken too
long, and therefore the premium cost of the hammers became acceptable.
January 2004

Business and government leaders rate Power great

Power Group scoops “best of breed in construction”


Plus seven other prestigious PMR awards


South Africa’s business and government leaders have rated the collective
initiatives of the Power Group of Companies as “best overall” in the
construction sector – an accolade that once again underlines the Group’s
commitment to the well-being of the environment and the communities in
which it operates.

The annual Professional Management Review (PMR) corporate social
responsibility survey asked respondents in 500 companies to nominate
outstanding companies and government sectors, and to position each on a
rating scale.

To determine the perceived leader in each industry sector, the national PMR
survey sourced 11 861 such ratings across a list of 21 sectors.

In a repeat performance of previous years’ PMR achievements, the Power
Group walked off with no less than seven sector awards, plus a finalist
certificate and the “Best Overall” award.

Professional Management Review’s Corporate Care Awards recognise and
honour companies that are trying to build a better South Africa for all, and
aim to encourage others to follow their example.

The Power Group is no stranger to industry awards – or to social upliftment
projects. In 2003, Power Developments was lauded as the IHSA Housing
Developer of the Year for the Eastern Cape region, for its contribution
towards affordable housing during the R40 million projects at Peddie and
Ugie.

Power follows a holistic approach to Corporate Social Investment. It
contributes to numerous investment and outreach programmes, and involves
itself not only on a financial level, but on a physical and personal level as
well. The Group embraces a high commitment to social responsibility,
environmental stewardship and personal ethical responsibility.

A show of Power
PMR Corporate Care and Empower Survey.
(Power Group’s rating for each sector out of 5.)
BEE Sector: Rating of 4 – Silver Arrow Award.
Corporate Governance Sector: Rating of 4 – Silver Arrow Award.
Education Sector: Rating of 4 – Diamond Arrow Award (rated highest in
sector)
Environmental Care Sector: Rating of 3.71– Finalist Certificate
Job Creation and Training Sector: Rating of 4.18– Diamond Arrow
Award (rated highest in sector)
Primary Healthcare Sector: Rating of 4 – Golden Arrow Award.
Social Upliftment Sector: Rating of 4.29– Golden Arrow Award.
War against Crime: Rating of 4.20 – Diamond Arrow Award (rated highest
in sector)
February 2004

Power Group emPowered through caring
As a further demonstration of its commitment to the well-being of the
environment and the communities in which it operates, the Power Group of
Companies has been honoured with four PMR Corporate Care awards, also
known as the emPower or Corporate Social Investment awards, during 2003.

The group received two Category Trophies for Job Creation and Training
and Environmental Care, for the highest rated organisation overall (across
all industries). Furthermore, it was rated the Industry Winners in the
categories of Black Economic Empowerment and Social Upliftment.

For the second consecutive year, the Power Group was awarded for its efforts
in Environmental Care, whilst engaged in construction activities. The Group
has achieved success with “environmental friendly construction” contracts at
Thesen Islands, Pezula Golf Estate, Brackenridge as well as Sparrebosch
Clifftop Estate & Country Club, Big Bay in Cape Town and the various road
contracts they are engaged in, nationally.



The Power Group has formalised the value it places on caring for the
environment in a Corporate Environmental Policy, which has, as its key
priorities, performance with regard to the core elements of environmental
management and facilitation of employee environmental awareness, which
includes stakeholders and research activities.


The accolade for Job Creation and Training honours the awarding of
bursaries to students and employees, the development of employees, skills
training programmes, efforts to avoid retrenchments, and the development
of new job opportunities. The Group places a strong focus on community
development through the employment and training of local community
members in Labour Intensive Programmes.

The Group is closely linked to the labour-intensive construction initiative, as
well as strategies for the promotion of emerging contractors.
Three Empowerment Joint Ventures that are part of the Group, bear
testimony to this:
Hughmic Construction formed in 1997, in the Western Cape; Sibakhulu
Construction in 1998 in the Eastern Cape and Khayalethu Projects with
Power Developments in 2003.

“The partnership entered into 6 years ago between ourselves and the Power
Group of Companies, is a reflection of their belief in the potential of the
people and their ability to aid new opportunities. We believe that the
foundation we have laid, will enable our successors to continue building and
maintaining the relationship with the Group” says Dumisa Mcetywa, MD of
Sibakhulu Construction in Port Elizabeth.


The   Group   has   followed   a   holistic   approach   to   Corporate    Social
Investment. Various projects, communities and charitable organisations
receive regular support from the Group.
The Group is actively involved in the National Day of prayer in which all 58
African countries prayed for the continent on 2 May 2004. The Group took
the position and made a commitment to establish and implement an
HIV/AIDS Corporate Strategy and workplace programme. We serve our
communities through a variety of projects such as support for festivals and
the collection of funds for the disabled and underprivileged.


The Corporate Care awards identify companies that are not only in business
for business-sake, but are also "doing the right things", caring for their staff,
their communities and for South Africa – a definition that fits the Power
Group admirably.
April 2004



 THE POWER GROUP OF COMPANIES
 21 YEARS OF THE POWER WAYS


 Tackling the challenges to reach the peak

 Today, the Power Group is one of the largest unlisted companies in the
 industry in South Africa. Managing Director André du Preez recalls some of
 the highs and lows that have marked the Group’s rise to success over the
 past 21 years.

 “Setbacks have been our mentor. Hitches and challenges have helped us to
 discover inner strengths. And when everything has gone smoothly, we have
 found encouragement and motivation to strive harder, towards even greater
 success.

 Fortunately, our many achievements over 21 years greatly outweigh the
 obstacles. And thanks to these highlights and milestones, Power has managed to
 buck the trend during the industry’s continual process of downscaling over two
 challenging decades.

 A healthy body of workers

 While lay-offs have been the order of the day for most of our competitors, we
 have never retrenched a single person due to lack of work. We have always felt
 positive about the future.

 I believe the strength of our leadership team, together with a dedicated and
 passionate workforce, has largely contributed to our successes. The ability to
 read the trends of the industry and position ourselves ahead of our competitors,
 has created many opportunities that others may have missed.

   “The ability to read the
  trends of the industry and
  position ourselves ahead of
  our     competitors,   has
  created many opportunities
  that others may have
  missed.”
A sense of belonging

Our passion towards the training and development of our people has been
instrumental in creating an organisation that is uncompromising in standards. Our
culture reinforces our absolute pride in what we do. It underpins our caring and
the support we extend towards one another. Our work ethic is a major strength;
the envy of many a competitor.

Various milestones have provided challenges to our staff, thus providing growth
opportunities needed to build competencies, which were so sorely needed in a
declining industry.

The first was obviously the vision that Graham Power had that day in April 1983
when he decided to start up a company with precious few resources. [See
separate story herewith.]

The successes start adding up

Then in 1987, we were awarded a few hefty contracts. On completion, these
projects gave us much confidence and enabled us to become players in the
"major league”. One thinks of Plattekloof, which required a R2 million turnover in
eight weeks (at that time, an almost impossible task). Also, the N1 City roads and
services, and the Strandfontein Village roads and services. During this time, our
turnover doubled every year for the first five years. The company was then
known as Power Construction, later as Power West Cape.

In 1990, we opened an office in George. Paul Thiart was relocated and our first
regional office, Power South Cape, was established. Since then, Power Coastal
has grown from strength to strength.

Projects include Brackenridge Private Residential Estate in Plettenberg Bay, the
servicing of 4 000 plots in the Thembalethu township in George (both Power
Developments projects) and roads and services to Sparrebosch Golf Estate in
Knysna. The most recent project and flagship of the Group in the area, is the
Thesen Islands on the Knysna Lagoon.

Eastern challenges and achievements

In 1995, we opened another regional office, this time in the Eastern Cape.
Jacques du Preez was relocated to Port Elizabeth. Under the late Vaughn
Forrester-Jones, he began operating Power Construction Eastern Cape.

The economic climate in the Cape was pretty bleak at the time and, following the
success of the South Cape decentralisation, the intention was to provide the
same opportunity to Jacques and a few of his people who went with him. They
faced extreme challenges, where all the listed companies had moved their offices
from the Eastern Cape to Gauteng, due to lack of work.

Their first major contract was to build 2 000 schools throughout the greater
Eastern Cape and Transkei. This project was the largest ever tackled by the
company; a huge logistical challenge. Nevertheless, it was successfully
completed within the contract period.

In October 2000, Power Construction Eastern Cape was awarded the roads and
services contract for the R30 million Emfuleni Casino in Port Elizabeth – at that
stage a very large contract for the area. Louwtjie Louw and Francois Voigt were
sent from Cape Town to assist, until completion of the earthworks. It was also
then that Glenville Cullum was moved to the Eastern Cape as director of the area
and to set up a regional tender department.

Power Developments has played a critical role in sustaining Power’s presence in
the Eastern Cape, by bringing fruition to the Government's promise of housing for
all, through the Provincial subsidy scheme.

Taming the West

Back in the Western Cape, things started picking up nicely during 1996 with the
Saldanha Steel project. Century City commenced the following year.

At Saldanha, we built the construction village – a R22 million contract providing
accommodation for 4 000 people. It included admin offices, mess halls,
recreation centres, and so on. The accommodation units spanned 80 000 m 3 of
floor area. They were completed within five months, together with all the roads
and services! This project was executed through Power Developments. We were
also involved in the earthworks for the main project.

The contract of the Century

At the same time, Century City kicked off with its first project – a bulk earthworks
contract together with the main access road to the value of R6,5 million. Power
was awarded the contract. This was the beginning of what ultimately turned out
to be R200 million worth of work, completed in less than 2 years. The prestigious
project entailed about 3,5 million cubic metres of earthmoving, concrete and
gabion canal edges, roads and services, parking areas, platforms and services
for the shopping centre later to be called Canal Walk. Furthermore, it included
the provision of earthworks, canals and services to the Theme Park, today called
Ratanga Junction. The project also covered the Sable Road contract, a R50
million interchange over the N1, in consortium with Murray & Roberts. And the
same team completed the CD Road contract, the main access off the N1 into
Canal Walk.
All of these projects were executed within tremendous time constraints, where
nightshifts, continuous weekend work and many long hours were needed to meet
deadlines. The people involved were Louwtjie Louw, André Zandberg, Clint
Evans along with many of our site agents. In fact, at one time we had in excess
of 100 major items of plant and 11 different contracts being worked on
simultaneously. The turnover for one of the months totalled R17 million on the
project!

Homes, homes, homes

During 1990 to 2000, Power Construction became known in the industry as the
largest provider of township infrastructure in the country. Various persons were
responsible for this achievement. Projects include Khayelitsha, Lwandle, Philippi,
Gugulethu, Crossroads and Wallacedene, the Government subsidy scheme at
the time.

More upmarket projects include Zandkloof, Westlake, the V&A Waterfront and
Somerset Mall in the Western Cape, as well as Pearl Valley, the prestigious Golf
Estate in Franschhoek, and Big Bay in Bloubergstrand.

The largest subsidy scheme project ever undertaken by Government was the 6
000 serviced erven and houses in Delft. This project was managed by Power
Developments and completed in less than 12 months for the civils.

Empowering more people

Hughmic Construction was formed during 1997, when Channo Hughes and Abel
Michel became equal partners in an Empowerment Company with Channo as the
Managing Director.

Their first major works was in the Ratanga Junction project in 1998, where they
had to work really hard to establish themselves in the Group. From humble
beginnings, they have proved to be a formidable outfit where development is the
major buzzword. They were the first emerging company in the Group and have
earned the respect of all in the group and the industry at large. Some of their
projects include the Boschenmeer Golf and Country Estate, where they
completed 6 of the 7 phases; roads and services for Du Noon township, along
with 25% of the work at Delft. Louwtjie Louw and, more recently, Francois Voigt
have ably supported them over time.

Growing great

Sibakhulu Construction was formed in 1998 during another emerging
partnership, this time in the Eastern Cape. Sibakhulu Construction ("we are
great") was structured in the same way as Hughmic Construction, with Dumisa
Mcetywa as Managing Director, together with Mthiwabo (Mike) Ndube, Glenville
Cullum and Jacques du Preez as directors.

The first three years was a slow process of capacity building with low work
volumes making it difficult to generate much growth. However, the industry has
started to lift its head in the Eastern Cape, which has provided the opportunities
required for growth. For that reason Power East Cape was sold to Sibakhulu
Construction at the end of 2002 and is now operating as Construction.

Sibakhulu’s current workload is phenomenal. Projects include the bulk
excavation of 5 million m3 to the harbour basin at Coega; Neptune Road, a major
access road into the Industrial Development Zone from Coega Harbour; and
Fairview, a major township in PE worth in excess of R30 million.

Milestones for Roads

Another milestone was when Blitz Asphalt (started in 1988 as an internal paving
company, and run by Dieter Vietze) grew to be one of the top specialised
surfacing contractors operating in the Cape. Blitz had completed some
rehabilitation projects in rural areas, such as Kokstad and various other local
Authority projects like Vissershok Road and the N7 rehab for PAWC in JV. The
local annual tenders still provide the company with important work in this market.
In 2002 it was decided to combine the then Blitz teams with the management and
plant resources of the rural roads team in the West Cape who had completed
Sable Road, Mossel Bay N2 rehab and Hanover on the N1 for SANRAL. The
company underwent a name change to Power Roads.

The management team consists of Dieter Vietze, Louwtjie Louw, Poens Venter,
Percy Knight, Clint Evans and Deon Ferreira, together with their site agents.

It’s all about people

Looking back at these milestones one can see the impact that they have had one
the growth and development of our people.

The other important factors determining our future is our aggressive student
programme where we are passionate about our Employment Equity goals as well
as the exposure we offer these individuals to grow. Developing our future leaders
is also a major challenge and we believe that we have the talent in our
organisation to take the group to even greater heights. As far as is practical, we
develop from within, creating opportunities for our loyal workforce.

Looking ahead
We are really positive regarding the economic outlook for South Africa and the
Civil Industry and we feel that for the foreseeable future, there will be sufficient
work to ensure steady growth, development and employment.

Lastly we have a wonderful relationship with all our clients and would like to
thank them for their continued loyalty and confirm that we will always strive to go
the extra mile and exceed their expectations.”


People – not plant – represent the Power of Success
says Group CEO, Graham Power


“What sets our organization apart from other companies? It’s a question I
have often been asked.


Firstly the people relationships in the organisation are very special, and love and
care for each other is undoubtedly the key to our success.


Measure for success
I also believe our success hinges on the benchmarking of all operations,
where we set goals for hourly or daily productivity. This process is transparent
and our people know where the break-even point is, in whatever they do. This
encourages the continuous improving of yesterday’s productivity and keeps work
life stimulating and exciting.


To complement this system of goal-setting, we have devised The Power Ways,
a guideline for the way in which we conduct our business. This, together with our
company values and mission, guides our people clearly and steadily in our quest
to be the industry leader.


Creating satisfied clients, creating jobs

Stemming from my involvement as Chairman of the National Commission for
Labour Intensive Construction from 1990 to 1997, and the negotiation of a
framework agreement with labour organisations, job creation has always been a
priority for the Power Group. We have very strong labour initiatives in place and
have directly and indirectly provided jobs for tens of thousands of people,
particularly as part of the many affordable housing projects.


Another key to our ability to grow at such a rapid rate, is our student training
programme. This initiative has always had an aggressive empowerment angle,
even long before it was expected by our communities or prescribed by
government. Year on year, those students have been employed within the Group
and today more than 83% of our labour force is black South Africans.


It gives me great satisfaction to witness the personal growth of so many of our
staff. We have numerous examples of people who started with us as labourers or
junior clerks, who have grown and excelled to become stars in our company and
who have developed and gone through all the different rankings and
responsibilities to where they are today - in charge of teams, departments and
even companies. One such example is Glenville Cullen who is a director and
shareholder of Sibakhulu Construction, and who joined me straight after school
as a clerk.


  “People who started with
  us as labourers or junior
  clerks… have grown and
  excelled to become stars
  in our company.”




Our relationships with our clients have been an integral part of our ability to
grow, and in most cases when working with private clients, we strive to become
their number one choice for repeat projects.
We are very conscious of our social responsibility. We like to get involved in
the communities in which we work, often in extremely disadvantaged areas.
Against this background, it was an honour to receive recognition from our
community with the Helderberg Afrikaanse Sakekamer Award as Businessman of
the Year in 2002.


Many awards followed, more recently in the form of kudos from Professional
Management Review.


As a further demonstration of our commitment to the well-being of the
environment and the community, the Group was honoured in 2003 with four
PMR Corporate Care awards, also known as the emPower or Corporate Social
Investment awards.

One of the trophies recognises the Group’s contribution towards Environmental
Care another acknowledges the significant advances made by Power in Job
Creation and Training. Furthermore, the Group walked off with two Industry
Winner awards - one for Black Economic Empowerment, the other for Social
Upliftment.


Another important aspect is our active involvement in Transformation Africa.
Through a spiritual revival, I am convinced that Africa, which is often referred to
as the ‘dark continent’, with all the negative sentiments of poverty,
unemployment, crime and corruption, prostitution, drug and alcohol abuse and
HIV/Aids, will see a major turn-around. I firmly believe God has a plan for Africa,
and that we have a role to play in the Transformation of our continent.


The Way Forward


We have twice in the past, in 1995 and 2001, gathered more than 400 people
from all levels in our company, to strategise and to agree on a mission, vision,
and values for our Group. In 2001 we jointly committed to a 100-year vision for
Power.


We have all acknowledged that long after our time, this company must still exist
and that it is our role to train, mentor, and identify successors to lead this
company into the future.


We therefore see ourselves casting a strong foundation as base for the next
eighty or a hundred years, during which we will strive to be recognized and
respected as the first choice supplier of civil, development and building
services and related products in Southern Africa.



From the back of a bakkie to tops in the industry

 On a chilly April morning, exactly 21 years ago, Graham Power drove from his
 Sir Lowry’s Pass smallholding in a second-hand bakkie, with two casual
 labourers, to start Power Construction’s first civil engineering contract.

 The months of agonising, which had culminated in his decision to “go it
 alone”, lay behind...


Immediately ahead lay the immense task of persuading clients and consultants –
all wary of the “new boy on the block” who had no machinery and no
infrastructure – to give him work.

To this day, Graham Power remembers his disappointment when, after being the
lowest tenderer, a consultant nevertheless awarded a valuable R26 000 contract
to a competitor.

Disappointed, yes. Daunted, not at all. Power secured proof that whatever
machines he needed would be available to him, and only six months later that
same consultant handed him a R260 000 contract. This breakthrough allowed
him, less that a year later to buy his first second-hand grader, the first of
hundreds of vehicles and earthmoving machines which today make up the Power
Construction fleet.
The company’s turnover in that difficult first year was R300 000, but with his
personal reputation now endorsed by a track record of successfully completed
contracts, Power was able to secure more and more work. The scale of contracts
multiplied, as did Power Construction’s turnover.

Today the company employs more than 1400 people working from its head office
in Blackheath and branches in Knysna, Port Elizabeth and soon Gauteng.

From that humble start with just a single bakkie, the Power Group this year
celebrates its 21st anniversary.
April 2004

POWER MAATSKAPPYEGROEP
21 JAAR VAN KRAG TOT KRAG



Met vasbyt en volharding die bult uit

Die Power Groep is vandag een van die grootste ongenoteerde
maatskappye in die Suid-Afrikaanse bedryf. Die Groep se Besturende
Direkteur, André du Preez, kyk terug oor die afgelope 21 jaar.

“Ek glo dat ’n sterk leierspan en ’n geesdriftige personeel, plus die vermoë om
tendense in die bedryf juis te interpreteer en onsself daarvolgens te posisioneer,
gesorg het dat ons oor die jare talle geleenthede kon benut.

Terwyl die meeste mededingers oor hierdie twee dekades personeel moes laat
loop, het ons nog nooit iemand weens ’n gebrek aan werk afgelê nie..

“Die         vermoë      om
tendense in die bedryf
juis te interpreteer… het
gesorg         dat      ons
geleenthede kon benut.”




Ons groei

Verskeie mylpale langs die pad het gesorg vir uitdagings, elk ’n geleentheid vir
groei. So kon ons mense hul vaardighede verder ontwikkel.
Die eerste mylpaal was natuurlik die visie wat Graham Power in April 1983
gehad het. Sien storie hiernaas.]

Nog ’n hoogtepunt was Blitz Asphalt: Begin in 1988 as ’n interne
asfaltmaatskappy, nou een van die top oppervlakkontrakteurs in die Kaap..

1989 - Ons eerste streekkantoor in George: Power Construction South Cape.
Tien jaar daarna skuif dié kantoor Knysna toe, en word later herdoop as Power
Coastal.

1990 - Die ontstaan van Power Properties, later bekend as Power
Developments,      lê   die    grondslag     vir   ’n   eiendom-ontwikkelings-en-
bestuursmaatskappy.

1995 - Port Elizabeth, nog ’n streekkantoor: Power Construction East Cape.

1995 - Power Construction West Cape word in ’n divisie in eie reg, sodat hy die
Wes-Kaap beter kon dien.

Ons bemagtig ander

Hughmic Construction is in 1997 gestig as Power se eerste ontluikende
maatskappy.

Sibakhulu Construction word in 1998 in die Oos-Kaap ons volgende
ontluikende vennootskap.

In 2000 stig ons ’n maatskappy wat hom toespits op die finansiële, tegniese en
organisatoriese ontwikkelingsdienste van die Groep, Power Group Financial
and Management Services.

In dieselfde jaar begin Power Construction Plant as ’n aparte maatskappy met
die verhuring en onderhoud van toerusting.

Ons slaan ’n nuwe rigting in
Khayalethu Projects is die Groep se derde bemagtigende gesamentlike
onderneming. Die maatskappy is in 2003 gestig. Sy klem is op bekostigbare
behuising landswyd.

Power Building is ook in 2003 gestig, met residensiële en kommersiële geboue
as hooffokus.

Ons beplan vanjaar ’n derde streekkantoor in Gauteng. Power Construction
North sal help om ons bedrywighede in die streek te stroomlyn.

Ons mense, ons toekoms

Ons studenteprogram is belangrik vir ons toekoms. Ons is erg gesteld op Gelyke
Indiensneming, en hoe ons dit vir hierdie individue moontlik maak om te groei.

Ons voel positief oor ons land en die siviele ingenieursbedryf se ekonomiese
vooruitsigte.

Laastens wil ek al ons kliënte en konsultante bedank vir hul volgehoue lojaliteit
en wonderlike verhoudings. Ons sal altyd ons bes doen om hul verwagtinge te
oortref.”



Mense – en nie masjiene nie – is die sleutel tot sukses
sê die Power Groep se Uitvoerende Hoof, Graham Power


“Wat maak ons anders as ander maatskappye? Mense vra my nogal
dikwels dié vraag.


Eerstens: menseverhoudings in die organisasie is baie spesiaal. Liefde en
sorgsaamheid teenoor mekaar speel ‘n groot rol.
Ek glo ook ons sukses is te danke aan die doelwitte wat ons stel vir daaglikse
of uurlikse produktiwiteit. Dit spoor ons aam, en maak die werkdag stimulerend.


Voortspruitend uit my voormalige Voorsitterskap aan die Nasionale Kommissie
vir Arbeidsintensiewe Konstruksie, en die bedinging van ’n raamwerkooreenkoms
met arbeidsorganisasies, was werkskepping nog altyd ’n prioriteit vir die Power
Groep.


Ons verhoudings met ons kliënte was nog altyd ’n integrale deel van ons
vermoë om te groei.


Ons is baie gesteld op ons sosiale verantwoordelikheid. Die Groep is betrokke
by die Nasionale Biddag op 2 Mei waar al 58 Afrikalande vir ons vasteland gaan
bid. Ons is verbind tot ’n MIV/VIGS Korporatiewe Strategie, en werkplekprogram
en ons bedien ons gemeenskappe deur verskeie projekte, en steun gestremdes
en minderbevoorregte organisasies.


Nog ’n belangrike aspek is ons betrokkenheid by Transformation Africa. Ek glo
vas dat God ’n plan vir Afrika het, en dat gebed ons grondslag is vir
transformasie in ons vasteland.


Die Pad Vorentoe


Ons sien onsself as die bouers van ’n sterk fondament vir die volgende tagtig of
honderd jaar, waartydens ons sal strewe om as die eerstekeurse-verskaffer
van siviele, ontwikkelings- en boudienste en verwante produkte in Suider-
Afrika erken en gerespekteer te word.”


Van ’n bakkiebouer tot ’n bielie in die bedryf
Presies 21 jaar gelede, op ’n April-oggend naby Sir Lowry’s Pas, vat Graham
Power die pad in sy tweedehandse bakkie. Met twee handlangers en baie moed,
sit hy af om Power Construction se eerste siviele ingenieursprojek te pak.


Maande van wik en weeg lê agter die rug. Wat sou voorlê, was ‘n haas
onbegonne taak: om moontlike kliënte en konsultante te oortuig om van hierdie
nuweling – sonder masjinerie en met geen infrastruktuur se dienste gebruik te
maak.


Vandag nog onthou Graham Power sy eerste groot teleurstelling: al was sy
tender die laagste, het ‘n konsultant nietemin ’n waardevolle kontrak van R36
000 aan ’n mededinger toegeken.


Dit sou hom nie nie onderkry nie. Net ses maande later ken daardie selfde
konsultant ’n R260 000 kontrak aan hom toe.


In daardie eerste moeilike jaar was die maatskappy se omset R300 000. Danksy
’n goeie reputasie en ’n hele streep suksesvol voltooide projekte, kon die
maatskappy al hoe meer werk inwin.


Vandag het die maatskappy meer as 1 600 mense in diens met die hoofkantoor
in Blackheath, en streekkantore in Knysna en Port Elizabeth en binnekort ook in
Gauteng.


Power Groep staan sterk deur te sorg

As ’n verdere bewys van sy verbintenis tot die welsyn van die omgewing en die
gemeenskappe waarin hy werk, is die Power Maatskappyegroep met vier PMR
Corporate Care toekennings vereer.
Die Groep het twee Kategorietrofeë ontvang: vir Werkskepping en Opleiding
en vir Omgewingsorg. Ook is hy aangewys as die Bedryfswenners in die
kategorieë Swart Ekonomiese Bemagtiging en Sosiale Opheffing.


Professional Management Review se Corporate Care toekennings vereer
maatskappye wat uithaal en wys om ’n beter Suid-Afrika vir almal te bou. Dit is
die Power Groep se tweede toekenning vir Omgewingsorg.


Die toekenning is in erkenning van die maatskappy se Korporatiewe
Omgewingsbeleid, die procedures in plek op konstruksie terreine en die nodige
opleiding aan personeel-lede.


Die toekenning vir Werkskepping en Opleiding huldig die toekenning van
beurse aan studente en personeel, die ontwikkeling van werknemers,
vaardigheidopleidingsprogramme, en die ontwikkeling van nuwe
werksgeleenthede. Die Groep fokus op gemeenskapsontwikkeling deur lede van
plaaslike gemeenskappe in diens te neem en op te lei.


Die Groep het hegte bande met die inisiatief vir arbeidsintensiewe konstruksie,
asook met strategieë vir die bevordering van ontluikende kontakteurs.


Drie Bemagtigende Gesamentlike Ondernemings is deel van die Groep:
Hughmic Construction, gestig in 1997; Sibakhulu Construction in 1998; en
Khayalethu Projects in 2003.


Die Groep volg ’n holistiese benadering tot Korporatiewe Sosiale Investering.
“Die ondersteuning van die gemeenskappe waarin ons dien deur hulle te
transformeer gaan oor trots, verantwoordelikheid, eienaarskap en
sorgsaamheid,” is die slotwoord van Power se Uitvoerende Hoof, Graham
Power.
April 2004

EAST LONDON - The East London Development Zone Corporation
(ELDZC) has already commissioned construction work to the value of
about R400million, with a further R9m in tenders to be focused on
black economic empowerment.


Speaking at the annual general meeting of the Border-Kei Chamber of
Business, ELDZC chairperson Des Halley said to date 501 jobs had been
created by the industrial development zone project.

Construction work on site included:

lThe completion of the R28m 132kV Leaches Bay sub-station to be
commissioned next month;

lProgress by Power Construction on the R80m spent on external roads,
including the harbour arterial and Breezyvale roads, which are to be
completed in August; and

lSibakhulu Construction's work on the internal roads and township services.
The R105m contract includes stormwater drains and sewer lines.

Other IDZ-related projects include:

lA R4,5m sewerage project;

lA R40m treatment works project;

lThe R22m West Bank land restitution housing site; and

lA R6m solid waste cell disposal site near Berlin.

Halley said Performance Electrical and Consolidated Power Projects were
working on electrical services - street lighting along Chester Road and the
laying of 11kV underground cables from the
Leaches Bay sub-station to the Buffalo City Municipality transformers.

In September, perimeter walling and fencing, valued at R20m, along the
various zones will be completed.

Meanwhile the relocation of the Leaches Bay informal settlement was
progressing well, said Halley.

He said 400 temporary homes had been constructed and 350 families had
been settled.
"This process is a joint undertaking between the BCM and the IDZ."

Halley said the IDZ had allocated R2m for the temporary homes while the
municipality allocated R1,3m. The homes are expected to be completed in
June.

Halley was also upbeat about possible investment possibilities in the customs
controlled area.

He said three very promising investors, two in the textile and one in the
agricultural processing sector, were currently negotiating with the IDZ.

The IDZ has been registered as a private company and all its assets and
permits are currently being transferred from the Section21 company.

"This brings exciting new challenges, with the focus on investment promotion
and black economic empowerment."

Halley said the new company would be more reflective of the demographics
of the province and would be in line with the government's policies on BEE.

Future tenders that will focus on this will be for a R2,5m electrical substation,
a R2m pump station and the main entrance to the customs controlled area,
which is valued at R6,5m.
April 2004


WOMEN OF POWER


Steady growth over the past 21 years has seen the Power Group of
Cmpanies expand its operations into a number of different specialist
companies. Founder and CEO Graham Power heads up the Group, which
employs more than 1 600 people and provides a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services. The Group has regional offices in the Western Cape, Southern
Cape, and Eastern Cape. Its Gauteng regional office will be opened shortly.


Marlene Cronjé, Organisational Development Director, says: "The Power
Group is committed to Employment Equity and thus also to the
empowerment of women in the industry. Women are represented on all
levels throughout the company and our intent is to not only have women in
clerical or administrative positions, but also in technical careers. We were
therefore proud to appoint our first female engineer, Alex Capostagno, in
2002. We have also allocated bursaries to three female students for 2004,
and are proud to play an important role in their education and training."


The Power Group focuses on the development of women within the
company. All staff members have personal development plans, which
address their aspirations, the competencies needed for present and future
positions, as well as the behavioural competencies required. This has played
an important role in the development of the female workforce, and many
women have over the years progressed to more senior positions.


"I do not regard the construction industry as a man's world. It is an industry
for people, both male and female, with guts, tenacity, a willingness to work
hard, and for people who enjoy overcoming challenges and have a passion
for what they do,” says Marlene Cronje.
It’s neither black nor white.
It’s capable.


When it comes to knuckling down at the Power Group of Companies,
Employment Equity wins hands down. For to make a real difference in the
workplace and empower the communities in which we serve, we look beyond
stereotypes and prejudices to discover true talent. In this way we can set the
best hands to the task, no matter what their shape, size or colour.
July 2004

Power bags civils contract for estate

Kiam Properties’ director Juri Steyn turned the symbolic first sod at
Pepperwood Country Estate recently after Power Construction had been given
the go-ahead to lay in the civils.

And with him was his devoted dog, Kiam, a Great Dane who gave the six-
month-old company its name. “Kiam (the dog) was named by my wife,
Petro,” he said. “She saw the word somewhere and learned that it meant “a
giant to grow”. My partner, Stefan Bothma and I felt it was also an
appropriate name for our company.”

Since construction of the freehold houses on the estate will be within a single
contract, the separate civils contract was only awarded once the sales target
had been reached.

“The Power Group will do all construction because they are known for quality,
integrity and commitment.” Says Stefan, who is himself a former managing
director of the Power Group of Companies’ Power Developments.
Pepperwood Country Estate will be situated on the site of the historic
Berghoewe Farm below the R44. It is envisaged that the services and roads
will be complete by September and that construction of the houses will begin
shortly after that.
September 2004

Another win for Power Developments – Eastern Cape Housing
Developer of the Year.


Power Developments has done it again! This time the company has been
lauded as the IHSA Housing Developer of the Year for the Eastern Cape
region.


The Institute for Housing of South Africa bestowed the kudos on Power
Developments, for its contribution in 2003 towards affordable housing during
the R40 million projects at Peddie and Ugie.


In a record time of less than nine months, the company had managed to
deliver homes to 664 families in Ugie and 710 in Peddie – to the same
exacting standards adhered to by the rest of the Power Group of Companies.


The company was named Western Cape Housing Regional Developer in 1998,
2001 and 2003. In 1998 it won the National Award as market leader in
affordable housing, and in 2002 Power Developments took Best Established
Developer Award at the National Housing Awards.


Notwithstanding Power Developments’ award-winning performance in
affordable housing, that side of the business now falls under Khayalethu
Projects – the empowerment company formed in September 2003 to
specialise in affordable housing projects nationally and in tenders on state
land.


Khayalethu (meaning “Our Home”) has already proven itself as worthy
successor to the Power Developments trail of tributes, while Power
Developments itself is now concentrating on multi-million Rand turnkey
developments such as Thesen Islands at Knysna.
Mark Julie is Managing Director of Khayalethu Projects and a director of
Power Developments. He attributes Power’s exceptional performance at Ugie
and Peddie to the company’s approach of “single-point responsibility”, in
which the developer is accountable for the entire process – including efficient
communication with all government departments and other role players.


Julie explains: “In each project we employed only a core management
structure on site. About 10 staff members managed the distribution of
material to builders, and     maintained    efficient quality   control. Power
Developments appointed the entire professional team and followed an
integrated design process in order to maximize the funds available for the
top structures in each of the two developments. We used about 311 local
sub-contractors and their teams for house construction, and a total of 1 200
local labourers and artisans. In this way we created jobs, trained people,
transferred skills, and ultimately empowered more than 1 500 people in the
process”, he said.


Power Developments had accepted all risks in the two developments, with
zero financial risk to either the Eastern Cape Provincial Housing Department
or the Municipality. In both cases a Housing Support Committee was formed,
consisting of Power Developments, community leaders and the Municipality.
The committees met monthly to review and discuss the progress of the
projects, the quality of production as well as the resolution of any problems
within each project.


Other efficiencies also came into play to ensure the success of the two
projects, which provide housing for those living on incomes of under R1 500
per month. Materials were of very high quality, and had been ordered in bulk
from local suppliers where possible. These stocks were kept on site,
eliminating unnecessary delivery delays – a further cost and time saving.
Furthermore, Power Developments had designed a unique computerised
system to manage material distribution, control waste, ensure quality and
speed up payment of local contractors.


About the Power Group


The Cape-based Power Group of Companies was formed by Graham Power in
1983. It is a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of civil
engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services.


Steady growth over the past 21 years has seen the Group expand its
operations into a number of different specialist companies. Whilst focusing
on their own core strengths, these companies nevertheless share the Power
vision, mission and values and operate in accordance with The Power Ways –
a set of benchmarks that govern the ethics, performance and quality of each
company within the Group.


Today many of these companies are joint ventures or Black Economic
Empowerment enterprises, each the product of Power Group’s commitment
to upliftment and empowerment.
September 2004

PMR Corporate Care Survey - 2004

PMR.Intelligence has completed its annual survey of companies, government
(national, provincial and local) and NGOs in South Africa perceived to
enhance stability, growth and economic development in SA through their
corporate care programmes and initiatives. The results are planned for
publication in the November 2004 issue of PMR.

In each of the pre-defined sectors below, corporate/government initiatives
were nominated and then rated by appropriate senior management of
financial services, listed and unlisted companies, trade unions, SOEs,
stockbroking firms, government (national, provincial and local) and business
associations. The survey was conducted nationally.
 21 sectors were surveyed namely:
Automotive                                 Media owners
Banking                                    Mining
Beverages                                  National government
Cellphone service providers                NGOs
Chemicals, oils & plastics                 Paper/forestry
Construction                               Pharmaceutical
Education                                  Provincial government
Food                                       Retail
Hotels & leisure                           SOEs
Insurance/assurance
IT
Local government

Respondents were asked to nominate outstanding companies/government
sectors and then rate them on the following corporate care definitions, on a
rating scale where 5 is excellent, 4 is very good and 3 is good, in the
following corporate care categories:

      BEE – Equity, BEE ownership in the company, in management and
       development in the company of previously disenfranchised people
      Corporate governance – Triple bottom line reporting, transparency
       and ethics
      Education – Primary, secondary and tertiary education. Bursaries,
       building and upgrading schools, providing computers, etc
      Environmental care – Enhancing the South African environment,
       making good any possible damage to the environment, teaching staff
       and communities how (ie saving water, eco tourism, etc)
      Job creation and training – Creating extra jobs within the company,
       learnerships, active training within the job environment
           Primary healthcare – In-house clinics and health education for staff.
            Community support, sponsorship of health centers, training and
            financial support for combating Aids, TB, malaria, etc
           Social upliftment – Provision of housing (inc staff loans),
            development of communities and community centers, sport and
            recreation centers, support of NGOs
           War against crime – Support and sponsorship of the police, support
            community policing forums, training staff and communities in self
            defense and crime fighting efforts

    11 861 ratings were sourced from financial services, listed and unlisted
    companies, Trade Unions, SOEs, stock broking firms, government (national,
    provincial and local) and business associations. See back page for a further
    sample breakdown.

    Finalists are those companies and government sectors who have made the
    cut-off criteria in their sectors of being rated by at least 10% of the sample
    and with a minimum overall rating of 3.00 out of 5 (applicable both to
    categories and overall).


    How the survey was conducted
    Universe: A database of 500 companies including financial services, listed and
    unlisted companies, and Trade Unions, stock broking firms, government
    (national, provincial and local) and business associations. The survey was
    conducted nationally.
    Timing: Interviews were conducted during September 2004.
    Sample: A total of 150 respondents were interviewed. 52 comprising
    directors/deputy directors and communication directors/managers from national,
    provincial and local government. 20 comprising MDs, executive directors and
    other senior personal form trade unions, SOEs and business associations. 78
    companies comprising analysts, stock brokers, asset managers, MDs, executive
    directors, marketing directors/managers and corporate communication
    directors/managers.
    Methodology: Interviews were carried out telephonically utilising semi-
    structured questionnaires. The survey was conducted on a national basis. Back-
    checks were conducted at all stages of the fieldwork, data capture and analysis
    stages. A full 100% of the questionnaires were checked for input quality and
    completeness prior to data capture.



                         Individual industry sector tables

    587 ratings sourced overall

Corporate    care Industry - Construction                  Overall    Award
category                                      rating   eligibility
                   Grinaker-LTA Ltd             4.29      Diamond

                   Murray & Roberts             4.06        Gold
BEE
                   Power Group of Companies     4.00       Silver

                   Group Five Ltd               3.93       Finalist

                   Murray & Roberts             4.04        Gold

Corporate          Power Group of Companies     4.00       Silver
governance         Group Five Ltd               3.91       Finalist

                   Grinaker-LTA Ltd             3.67       Finalist

                   Power Group of Companies     4.11      Diamond
Education          Murray & Roberts             3.76        Gold

                   Group Five Ltd               3.47       Silver

                   Group Five Ltd               3.95        Gold

Environmental      Murray & Roberts             3.82       Silver
care               Power Group of Companies     3.71       Finalist
                   Grinaker-LTA Ltd             3.70       Finalist

                   Power Group of Companies     4.18      Diamond

Job     creation Grinaker-LTA Ltd               4.00        Gold
and training     Group Five Ltd                 3.93       Silver

                   Murray & Roberts             3.88       Finalist

                   Power Group of Companies     4.00        Gold
Primary
                   Murray & Roberts             3.90       Silver
healthcare
                   Group Five Ltd               3.67       Finalist

                   Grinaker-LTA Ltd             4.31      Diamond

Social             Power Group of Companies     4.29        Gold
upliftment         Murray & Roberts             4.19       Silver

                   Group Five Ltd               4.00       Finalist

War        against Power Group of Companies     4.20      Diamond
crime              Murray & Roberts             3.92        Gold
Group Five Ltd     3.73   Silver

Grinaker-LTA Ltd   3.43   Finalist
October 2004

Another win for Power Developments . . Eastern Cape Housing
Developer of the Year

Power Developments has done it again! This time the company has been
lauded as the IHSA Housing Developer os the year for the Eastern Cape
region. The institute for Housing of South Africa bestowed the kudos on
Power Developments for its contribution in 2003 towards affordable housing
during the R40 million projects at Peddie and Ugie. In a record time of less
than nine months, the company had managed to deliver homes to 664
families in Ugie and 710 in Peddie – to the same exacting standards adhered
to by the rest of Power Group of Companies.

The company was named Western Cpe Housing Regional Developer in 1998,
2001 and 2003. In 1998 it won the National award as market leader in
affordable housing and in 2002 Power Developments took Best Established
Developer Award at the National Housing Awards.

Notwithstanding Power Developments’ award winning performance in
affordable housing, that side of the business now falls under Khayalethu
Projects – the empowerment company formed in September 2003 to
sepcialise in affordable housing projects nationallt and in tenders on state
land.

Khayalethu (meaning “our Home”) has already proven itself a worthy
successor to the Power Developments trail of tributes, while Power
Developments itself is now concentrating on multi-million Rand turnkey
developments such as Thesen Islands at Knysna.

Mark Julie is Managing Director of Khayalethu Projects and a director of
Power Developments. He attributes Power’s exceptional performance at Ugie
and PEddie to the company’s approach of “single-point responsibility” in
which the developer is accountable for the entire process – including efficient
communication with all government departments and other role players.

Julie explains: “In each project we employed only a core management
structure on site. About 10 staff members managed the distribution of
material to builders and maintained efficient quality control. Power
Developments appointed the entire professional team and followed an
integrated design process in order to maximize the funds available for the
top structures in each of the two developments. We used about 311 local
subcontractors and their teams for house construction and a total of 1 200
local labourers and artisans. In this way we created jobs, trained people,
transferred skills and ultimately empowered more than 1 500 people in the
process.” He said.
Power Developments had accepted all risks in the two developments with
zero financial risk to either the Eastern Cape Provincial Housing Department
or the Municipality. In both cases a Housing Support Committee was formed
consisting of Power Developments, community leaders and the Municipality.
The committees met monthly to review and discuss the progress of the
projects the quality of production as well as the resolution of any problems
within each project.

Other efficiencies also came into play to ensure the success of the two
projects, which provide housing for those living on incomes of under R1 500
per month. Materials were of very high quality, and had been ordered in bulk
from local suppliers where possible. These stocks were kept on site,
eliminating unnecessary delivery delays – a further cost and time saving.

Furthermore, Power Developments had designed a unique computerized
system to manage material distribution, control waste, ensure quality and
speed up payment of local contractors.
10 NOVEMBER 2004

POWER GROUP: 21 YEARS OF SUCCESS

The Power Group recently celebrated 21 years of success at its annual cocktail
function, which was held at the Durbanville Racecourse. Today the Power Group
employs 1700 people and is not only at the forefront of the construction industry,
but is widely recognised as an industry leader in terms of empowerment.

Graham Power, the Executive Chairman of the Group, and André du Preez, MD
of Power Construction, thanked stakeholders for their support and introduced
Nikamandla Construction, the latest BEE initiative, specialising in the
rehabilitation of roads: milling, cold in-situ recycling, asphalting and general
surfacing throughout Southern Africa. This announcement follows on the success
of Khayalethu Projects, Sibakhulu Construction and Hughmic Construction.

During 2004 the Group also expanded to Gauteng with the establishment of
Power Construction North. Other divisions within the Group include Power
Construction West Cape, Power Construction Coastal, Power Developments,
Power Building and Power Construction Roads.
December 2004


  Power Developments launches Atlantis Shopping Centre
  Puts people's spending power back into the community

  For the previously disadvantaged community of Atlantis, shopping used to be an
  inconvenient and often unsafe trip. Much of the town's retail spend was also
  finding its way to Table View and elsewhere.

  That's history, thanks to the opening of the Atlantis Shopping Centre earlier this
  month by the new owners, Power Developments.

  "A gift that keeps on giving"

  The opening ceremony was accompanied by another, equally meaningful event -
  with far-reaching benefits for residents of Atlantis: Graham Power, CEO of the
  Power Group of Companies, has pledged a commitment to giving 10% of the
  centre's profits back to the community. This will be put to work to "meet the
  needs of the people".

  Shoprite is the anchor tenant of the sprawling centre along Wesfleur road. Of the
  tenant mix, 75% are national companies. This demonstrates the optimism that
  business people have in Atlantis and its economy. The mix includes retailers like
  Pep, Dunns, Ackermans, Choice Clothing and Vodacom, eateries like Wimpy,
  and financial institutions such as ABSA, Standard Bank, African Bank and
  Capitec Bank.

  Keeping it local

  Centre Manager Tony September says the centre is already providing
  employment opportunities; service contracts such as cleaning and security went
  to local companies.

  Another community figure and representative of small business development in
  Atlantis, Clive Snyers, says that despite joblessness, the 120 000 strong
  community has the buying power to support the centre. It will also create social
  upliftment and economic empowerment. And it will attract shoppers from Mamre
  and Darling, increasing local retail spend, even at the informal traders around the
  centre.

  At the opening, Power Developments Director Gerhard Nel thanked various role-
  players and wished the community well.
Kevin Momberg and Danny Olifant, councillors for Atlantis, expressed their
thanks and appreciation on behalf of the people of Atlantis.
December 2004

  Atlantis kry nuwe koopsentrum - en Power Developments laat
  die Rande vir die gemeenskap inrol.

  Vir die voorheen benadeelde mense van Atlantis was inkopies doen altyd
  ongerieflik, en dikwels gevaarlik. Boonop het baie besteebare geld die dorp
  uitgevloei, Table View toe of selfs verder suid.

  Nie meer nie. Die spoggerige Atlantis Winkelsentrum is pas deur die nuwe
  eienaars, Power Developments, oopgestel.

  "'n Krismisboks wat aanhou gee"

  Die nuwe sentrum beteken 'n dubbele bonus vir Atlantis: Graham Power,
  Uitvoerende Hoof van die Power Maatskappyegroep, het hom daartoe verbind
  om 10% van die sentrum se winste aan die gemeenskap terug te gee. Dit sal
  help om "in die behoeftes van Atlantis se mense te voorsien".

  Shoprite is die ankerhuurder, en 75% van die huurders is groot maatskappye
  soos Pep, Dunns, Ackermans, Choice Clothing, Vodacom, Wimpy, ABSA,
  Standard Bank, African Bank en Capitec Bank.

  Tony September, die Sentrumbestuurder, sê die sentrum skep reeds
  werksgeleenthede; dienskontrakte vir die skoonmaak en sekuriteit is aan twee
  plaaslike maatskappye toegeken.

  "Van ons mense vir ons mense"

  Clive Snyers, ook 'n gesiene gemeenskapsfiguur en verteenwoordiger van
  kleinsake, sê die sowat 120 000 inwoners het ten spyte van werkloosheid, tog
  die koopkrag om die nuwe sentrum te ondersteun. Boonop sal dit klante uit
  Mamre en Darling trek, wat plaaslike besteding sal bevorder, selfs by die
  informele handelaars buite die sentrum.

  By die opening het Power Developments Direkteur, Gerhard Nel, vele rolspelers
  bedank en die gemeenskap alles van die beste toegewens.

  Raadslede Kevin Momberg en Danny Olifant het hul dank namens die mense van
  Atlantis uitgespreek.
March 2003


Environmental care makes Power Group a winner


The Power Group has received the PMR Diamond Environmental Care Award in
recognition of the efforts the company has made to promote environmental care on site,
wherever it is engaged in construction.


The group provides a range of civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and
township development services with major contracts that spread across the Western,
Eastern and Southern Cape. The PMR award is based on the                cmpany’s overall
environmental management policy and plan, the procedures that have been put in place
to ensure that construction work has the minimum effect on the natural environment and
that all site personnel are inducted and adhere to the environmental policy.


Significant environmental issues include the protection of fauna and flora during
cnstruction and prohibiting tree removal without approval from the person in charge.
Special areas such as wetlands are demarcated and protected. The Power Group’s
standard operating procedures outline the safe storage and use of hazardous materials
to prevent spillage and contingency plans in the event of such as accident.


Another important aspect is waste management and separation of hazardous and
general waste. Hazardous waste is kept in special bins and disposed of at an approved
waste disposal site.


Graham Power, chairman of the Power Group, said these principles were also applied in
the Thesen Islands development in Knysna.
March 2003

PMR Diamond Omgewingsorg Toekenning vir die Power Groep

 Die Power Groep het die gesogte PMR Diamond Omgewingsorg Toekenning
ontvang as erkenning van die goeie praktyke wat die maatskappy handhaaf
om omgewingsorg te bevorder op alle boupersele waar daar besig is met
konstruksiewerk.

Die Groep voorsien ‘n volledige spektrum dienste wat siviele ingenieurswese,
teerplaveisel, vervaardiging en dorpsgebiedontwikkeling insluit, en is
betrokke by groot kontrakte regoor die Wes-; Oos- en Suid-Kaap.

Die PMR Toekenning is gebaseer op die maatskappy se algemene
omgewingbestuursbeleid; die prosedures wat in plek is om te verseker dat
konstruksiewerk minimum impak maak op die omgewing; en dat all
personeel op boupersele daareenkomstig opgelei is en die omgewingsbeleid
noukeurig navolg.

Belangrike omgewingsake sluit in die bewaring van Fauna and Flora
gedurende konstruksieaktiwiteite en ‘n verbod op die verwydering van bome
sonder toestemming van die Bou-Ingenieur of Omgewingsbeampte. Die
bougrense word verder duidelik gemerk en spesiale sorg word toegepas om
byvoorbeeld te verseker dat moerasareas gemerk en beskerm word.

Die Power Groep se omgewingsbeleid bevat ook riglyne vir die veilige
berging, en gebruik van gevaarlike materiale om stortings te voorkom, en
gebeurlikheidsplanne is in plek gestel ingeval van moontlike ongelukke.

‘n Ander belangrike aspek in terme van afvalverwydering is die sortering van
gevaarlike materiaal en algemene rommel. Gevaarlike afvalmateriaal soos
petroleum produkte, verf, olielappies en chemikalieë word in spesiale houers
geberg in ‘n gespesifiseerde area, en word van tyd tot tyd verwyder en by
goedgekeurde stortingsareas afgelaai. Gewone rommel word op so ‘n manier
geberg dat die wind dit nie op die bouperseel kan rondwaai nie. Groot
hoeveelhede sementsakke en plastiekvelle word bymekaar gemaak om te
hersirkuleer, en rommel word nooit op die bouperseel begrawe nie.

Daar word verder ook gehou by ander riglyne soos byvoorbeeld
noodprosedures, die beheer van konstrukiegeraas en stofkontrole, sowel as
die beheer van vry-vloeiende water om erosie te voorkom.

Graham Power, die Voorsitter van die Power Groep het gesê dat die
maatskappy trots is op die toekenning. “Hierdie toekenning onderstreep ons
goeie reputasie as omgewingsvriendelike ontwikkelaars en kontrakteurs, en
ons is in ons noppies met hierdie pluimpie. Ons ondervinding strek oor
twintig jaar waartydens ons voortdurende Alles in ons vermoë gedoen het om
goeie boupraktyke te handhaaf in terme van ons omgewingsbestuursplan.
Die bewaring van ons natuurlike hulpbronne is ‘n prioriteit en ons streef
gedurig na die ontwikkeling van nuwe maniere waarop ons proaktief kan
wees wat betref omgewingsake.”

“Dit het ons baie gehelp met verskeie projekte, maar veral by Thesen
Islands, die eksklusiewe marina ontwikkeling in die Knysnameer, wat bekend
staan as Suid-Afrika se bes nagevorsde- en beplande residensiële projek. Na
jare se omgewingstudies, werk ons spanne nou binne streng gekontroleerde
parameters om te verseker dat die ontwikkeling in volkome harmonie
bestaan met die Knysna Seemeer omgewing.” het hy gesê.
April 2003



Building roads to the future

Cosntruction of the bulk external infrastructure commenced on site during May 2003
after several months of detailed planning, call of tenders, tender adjudication and
contract award.


The contract for the first stage of the external bulk infrastructure encompassing the
construction of approximately 10km’s of major arterial roads which included the
following:
      The reconstruction of the main access road of Settlars Way; being the
       reconstruction of Chester Road;
      Construction of a new road linking the various zomes being the Harbour Arterial
       Road link;
      Completion of the earthworks for the new 132 Kv/11kv Eskom Leaches bay
       substation;
      Installation of new street lighting along Chester Road and the Harbour arterial
       Road is well underway.


Stripping of the busch and pushing aside the top soil for reuse, on the Harbour Arterial
Road running East to west as well as the clearing of the road reserve along Chester
Road is well progressed. The contractor has also commenced with the construction of
the “culvert” for the river crossing over the Mvubukazi River, having already started to
cast the concrete base.


Reconstruction of Chester Road has also involved the temporary diversion of several
Telkom cables as well as electrical overhead power cables alongside this road.


Temporary road closures along the top end of Chester Road have been put in place to
facilitate the reconstruction of this road, with traffic having been diverted through the
lower end of Chester Road and through a temporary gravel road leading through
Siyakha into Millard Road and back onto Sttlars Way. Alternate access to the site can
also be gained via Potters Pass and travelling along the coastal road and turning up into
Chester Road.


Power Construction Roads (Pty) Ltd, who were awarded the contract for the first stage of
the external bulk infrastructure, includes the roads, have completed the cut and fill and
layer works for the new Leaches Bay; Eskom sub station, with construction of the
electrical substation programmed to commence in July 2003. Completion of the sub
station as well as the transmission lines is scheduled for April 2004.


Planning of the deisng and execution of the perimeter walling and fencing has been
tackled in such a way to allow substabtial involvement from SMME’s as well as Energing
Building Contractors for the various projects to be let in the next few weeks.
All systems are go on programme and ahead of programme in some areas, with the bulk
external infrastructure now well underway and construction of the internal services to the
Customs Secure Area programmed to commence during July / early August 2003. with
completion to be tackled on a phased basis set for mid 2004.
April 2003


Power Group celebrates 20 years


As the Power Group reaches this important 20 year milestone, I would
like to take this opportunity to express our sincere thanks and
appreciation to our valued clients for their support during the past
years.

We look forward to many exciting new projects and to continuing our
excellent working relationshipf or another 20 years and beyond. Rest
assured that we shall always strive to go the extra mile and to exceed
our clients’ expectations.

We would not have been here today without the support of the various
communities that we work in. I would like to pay tribute to the city
councilors and other leaders, the professional teams we work with, our
bankers and the many suppliers that have made it possible for us to
deliver top quality services on time. It is also an honour for me to
thank our directors, management and every single staff member, for
their invaluable contribution to our organisation.

Reflecting on the past 20 years, I am extremely thankful for the
fantastic opportunities we have had as a group, which enabled us to
grow to where the company is today. I am proud of our people who
have, through hard work and dedication, helped us to achieve so
much. This includes accolades such as Power Developments receiving
the coveted Department of Housing award as South Africa’s Best
Established Developer in 2002, which followed two Institute of Housing
for South Africa (IHSA) awards – Developer of the Western Cape in
2001 and South Africa’s Developer of the Year in 1998.

Power Construction reveived the Professional Marketing Review Golden
Arrow Award as the highest rated construction company in the
Western Cape in 2000, as well as the 1997 International Africa Award,
presented to Power Construction in Tunis. And recently, towards the
end of last year, the Power group received the PMR Diamond
Environmental Care Award for the promotion of environmental care
taken while engaging in construction activity on all projects.

We came from operating in a stable that was converted into an office
at Elandskloof in Sir Lowry’s Pass in April 1983, having just left Savage
& Lovemore and all the infrastructure which one enjoys in a big
company. We suddenly found ourselves all alone, having to tender for
contracts, getting quotes from suppliers, and worrying about not
having plant and equipment or back-up services. My wife, Lauren was
in charge of the administration and looking after the salaries, wages
and book work. Turnover for the first year of operation was R300 000.

From 1983 to the mid-nineties, our industry suffered in a steadily
declining market and during that period the total employment in this
sector, countrywide, was reduced to half. During the same period, we
were fortunate enough to grow steadily and many of our first
management and other personnel who had worked with me previously,
joined the Power Group within the first three to four years of
operation.

The foundation of our company was therefore based on strong
personal bonds and friendships that have grown even stronger during
the past 20 years. During this period, from zero-base, we managed to
pick up sufficient market share in tough market conditions to survive
and grow at a fairly rapid rate thanks to our team spirit, “familie-gees”
(family spirit), dedication and the fact that our people treat the
company as their own.

Today we have in excess of 1400 employees, working in eight
companies within the group and thankfully we have never needed to
retrench staff. We are also extremely fortunate that our staff
understand that if it goes well with the company, it will go well with
everyone. I have been asked many times what makes our organisation
different to other companies. The relationships in the organisation are
very special. People love and care for wach other, which is
undoubtedly the key to our success. I also believe our success hinges
on the benchmarking of all operations, where we set goals for hourly
or daily productivity.

This process is transparent and our people know where the break-even
point is. In whatever they do. This encourages the continuous
improvement on yesterday’s productivity and keeps work life
stimulating and exciting. We have devised the “Power Ways”, as
guidelines for the way in which we conduct our business. This,
together with our company values and mission, guides our people
clearly and steadily in our quest to be the industry leader.

Stemming from my involvement as chairman of the National
Commission for Labour Intensive Construction (NCLIC) from 1990 tp
1997 and the negotiation of a framework agreement with labour
organisations, job creation has always been a priority for the Power
Group. We have strong labout initiatives in place and have directly
provided jobs for tens of thousands of people, particularly as part of
the many affordable housing projects.

Another key to our ability to grow at such a rapid rate, is the fact that
we have from our second or third year of operation, commenced with
a student training programme. This initiative has always had an
aggressive empowerment angle even long before it was expected by
our communities or prescribed by government. Year on year, our
students have been employed within the group and today more than
83% of our labour force is non white.

We have recognised these initiatives as some of the other important
factors that will determine our future and we are passionate about our
Employment Equity goals as well as the exposure we offer these
individuals to grow. Developing our future leaders is also a major
challenge and we believe that we have the talent I our organisation to
take the group to even greater heights. It gives me great satisfacation
to witness the personal growth of so many of our staff members.

Wherever possible we develop from within and in doing so create
opportunities for our loyal workforce. We have numerous examples of
people who started with us as labourers or junior clerks, who have
grown and excelled to become stars in our company and who have
developed and gone through all the defferent rankings and
responsibilities to where they are today – in charge of teams and
departments and even companies. One such an example if Glenville
Cullum who is a director and shareholder of Sibkahulu Construction
and who joined our group as a clerk straight after school.

Our relationship with our clients have been an integral part of our
ability to grow and in most cases when working with private clients,
we strive to become their number one choice for repeat projects. In
the 20 years we have only on one occasion found the need to go to
court and on only five occasions needed to go to mediation, which
clearly reflects the excellent relationship we have with our clients. We
try to resolve problems through good communication and positive
attitude rather than fight it out in the courtroom.

We are highly conscious of our social responsibility and like to get
involved in extremely disadvantaged areas. One of the ways in which
we assist is the construction of a materials store on site wherever we
are appointed as developer in affordable housing projects. This is
donated to the community on completion of the project and together
with some of the other programmes we have initiated, provides care
and support to homeless people, Aids centres, schools and clinics.

Another important aspect is our active involvement in Transformation
Africa. Through a spiritual revival, I am convinced that Africam which
is often refered to as the “dark continent”, with all the negative
sentiments of poverty, unemployment, crime and corruption,
prostitution, drug and alcohol abuse and HIV/AIDS, will see a major
turnaround. I firmly believe God has a plan for Africa and that we have
a role to play in the transformation of our continent.

We have twice in the past – in 1995 and 2001 – gathered more than
400 people from all levels in our company to strategise and to agree
on a mission, vision and values for our group. In 2001 we jointly
committed to a 100-year vision for Power. We have all acknowledged
that long after our time, this company must still exist and that it is our
role to train, mentor and identify successors to lead this company into
the future.

We therefore see ourselves casting a strong foundation as a base for
the next 80 or 100 years, during which we will strive to be recognized
and respected as the first choice supplier of civil, development and
building services and related products in Southern Africa.

May God continue to bless this company and each of its stakeholders
and employees. Congratulations and happy 20th birthday!
Baie dankie en veels geluk met ons groot verjaardag!
Siyabulela ngempumelelo yethu yokufikelela iminyaka engamashumi
amabini!
Warm regards
Graham Power
Chairman: The Power Group

Infrastructure development the backbone of
renowned civil engineering group
The Power Group provides a comprehensive range of civil engineering,
blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development services
with major contracts that spread across the Western, Eastern and
Southern Cape.
The Power Group consists of eight companies:
   1. Power Construction West Cape;
   2. Power Construction Coastal;
   3. Sibakhulu Construction (49% shareholding in this empowerment
      company);
   4. Power Developments;
   5. PowerRoads;
   6. Power Plant; and
   7. Power Group Financial & Management Services.

Power Developments reaching new heights
Power Developments focuses on various market segments including
affordable housing, upmarket residential, middleincome, golf course as well
as commercial and industrial developments.

As a leading developer of subsidized housing in the Western and Eastern
Cape, the company has come a long way since it tackled its first affordable
housing projects and has delivered more than 30 000 subsidised houses in
the Eastern and Western Cape to date, providing an all-inclusive package to
local authorities, communities and first time homeowners to become a
turnkey player in the industry.

Major projects include one of the Western Cape’s largest single phased
affordable housing projects, the R116 million project at Delft which comprises
a total of 6 320 houses. The development commences in December 2001 and
is scheduled for completion this year. Construction is taking place at a
record-breaking pace and 5 000 houses have already been completed.

The company works closely with Power Construction on certain projects and
Bloekombos is an excellent example of a project where teamwork paid off. A
township of more than 5 000 squatters was transformed into a house-proud
community by building more than 4 400 homes to the value of R62m. Power
Developments initiates and manages multi-million Rand turnkey projects
developing and building residential, industrial and commercial properties
within a wide-ranging portfolio.

It has been a natural progression for Power Developments to broaden its
focus from the execution of these types of housing projects to the building of
high income, upmarket projects that include some of thecountry’s most
sought after residential developments, such as Brackenridge and Thesen
Islands, both on the Garden Route. Thesen Islands in the Knysna Laggon, is
a R2 billion project that comprises a 90-hectare private estate that is spread
across 19 islands. It is one of the most upmarket residential estates ever
developed in the Southern Cape and the project is set for completion by the
end of 2004. To date more than 70% of the stands have been sold.

Brackenridge Private Residential Nature Reserve is located adjacent to the
Plettenberg Bay Country Club. The security estate is set on a high ridge
overlooking the Indian Ocean and stretches across 125 hectares of
indigenous coastal fynbos, including more than 8 500 flowering plant species.
Phase Two – which consists of 280 plots – has recently been released.
A more recent focus for Power Developments is the construction of multi-
storey buildings, which has resulted in projects such as the R5.5m Boa
Esperanca project – the upmarket residential development in Mossel Bay; the
R6m contract for an emergency call centre in Strand and the residential units
of Cabernet in Stellenbosch, due to completion in June 2003.

Power Developments also undertakes commercial and industrial projects,
such as shopping centres and industrial parks and during 2001/2002
received a R30m contract for upgrades and extensions to five Medi-Clinic
hospitals.
Stefan Bothma, managing director of Power Developments says: We share a
passion to be the best in whatever we do. We want to make a real difference
in the lives of all people. We strive to understand and meet our clients’ needs
from the most exclusive development to the most cost effective affordable
housing project.
“I believe we have a winning recipe and our unique company structure, which
encompasses civil engineering, building and property development skills,
provides us with the capacity to undertake large projects and to generate
work across the various divisions.
“This results in a win-win situation for our clients and for the Power Group
and it is with this in mind that we look forward to the next 20 years.”

Island living on the Garden Route
Recently, the official opening of the new bridge to Thesen Islands in the
Knysna Lagoon marked an important environmental achievement for Knysna.

Power Construction built the attractive new arched bridge – which has
replaced a 40m section of the causeway to the Islands – for the Thesen
Islands Development Company. This has restored the natural tidal flow of the
lafoon in the surrounding area and has had a positive impact on the natural
environment, considerably improving the water quality and conditions for
marine life.

Contracted to execute the civil engineering of the project, Power Constructio
is responsible for the construction of the waterways, roads, bridges,
sidewalks, water and sewer systems.

Accolades and achievements
The Power Group’s achievements have been acknowledged in several
prestigious national and international awards. In June 2002 Power
Developments received the coveted Department of Housing award as South
Africa’s Best Established Developer, following two Institute of Housing for
South Africa (IHSA) awards: Developer of the Western Cape in 2001 and
South Africa’s Developer of the year in 1998.
Power Construction received the Professional Marketing Review Golden
Arrow award as the highest rates construction company in the Western Cape
in 2000 as well as the 1997 International Africa award, presented to Power
Construction in Tunis.
Graham Power received the Helderberg Afrikaanse Sakekamer award as
Businessman of the Year in 2002. In 1989 he received the Johannesburg
Afrikaanse Sakekamer award as Junior Businesman of the Year and in 1993
the SA Institution of Civil Engineers Presidents award for Meritorius Service –
for assistance rendered to small and emerging contractors in their efforts to
build financial and management independence.

In 2002 the Power Group received the PMR Diamond Environmental Care
award for the promotion of environmental care taken while engaged in
construction activity on all projects.

A Story of successful construction
Since its small beginnings in 1983, Power Construction has experiences many
highlights and milestones which have catapulted it into what it is today; one
of the largest unlisted companies in the South African construction industry.
The company has generally managed to beat the trend in a time when the
industry had continually downscaled over the past 20 years.

Andre du Preez, managing director of Power West Cape says:”Our passion
towards the training and development of our people has been instrumental in
creating an organization that is uncompromising in standards and that will
always strive to deliver what it promises. Our corporate culture reinforces our
absolute pride in what we do and our strength lies in the care and support of
our people.”

During the course of the past 20 years, various challenges presented
themselves as opportunities to build the competencies needed in this
industry. In 1987 Power Construction was awarded a number of contracts
which, upon successful completion grew the company’s confidence and
enabled it to become a player in the major league.

Those projects included Platterkloof – which required a R2 million turnover in
eight weeks – which at that time was thought to be almost an impossible
task; N1 City roads and services; and Strandfontein Village roads and
services.

During the first five years turnover of the company – then known as Power
Construction, but subsequently changed to Power West Cape – doubles every
year.The company continued to grow steadily and in 1989 Power South Cape
was established in George as the company’s first regional office. Since then
Power Coastal as it is now known, has gone from strength to strength and
together with Power developments, has been responsibe for generating a
substantial portion of the Group’s turnover. Projects include Brackenridge
Private Residential Estate in Plettenberg Bay, the servicing of 4 000 plots in
Thembalethu township in George – both Power Development projects – as
well as roads and services to Sparrebosch Golf Estate in Knysna.
Power Developments is also part-ownder of the prestigious Thesen Islands
marine development in the Knysna Lagoon.
In 1995 the company opened another regaional office – Power Contruction
East Cape. The economic climate in the Western Cape was bleak at the time
and following the success of the South Cape decentralization, the intention
was to provide the same opportunity to a number of key staff members. The
firm’s first major project was to build 2 000 schools over the greater Eastern
Cape and Transkei. It was a logistical challenge and the single largest project
ever tackled by the company, but it was successfully completed within the
contract period. In October 2000 the firm was awarded the roads and
services contract for the Emfuleni Casino in Port Elizabeth. At R30m it was
considered a major contract for the Port Elizabeth area.

Back in the Western Cape, the prosptects were improving in 1996 with the
Saldanha Steel project and Century City commencing in 1997, with both
projects instrumental n boosting the economy in the Cape. Power
Construction was contracted by Power Developments to build the
construction village at saldanha. This R22m contract provided 80 000m2 of
accommodation for 4 000 people, together with administration offices, mess
halls and recreation centres and was completed in a record breaking five
months together with roads and services.
Power Construction was also involved in the earthworks to the main project.
At the same time Power’s first project commenced at Century City, a bulk
earthworks contract together with the main access road, to the value of
R6.5m. This paved the way to Century City contracts to the total value of
R200m, which were successfully executed in less than two years, with
turnover in a single month totaling R17m.

Power Construction in consortium with Murray & Roberts, also completed the
CD Road contract, the main access off the N1 into Canal Walk. All of these
projects were completed under tremendous time contraints, where night
shifts, continuous weekend work and many long hours were needed to meet
deadlines. At the height of the project, Power had in excess of 100 major
items of plant on site where 11 different contracts were being executed
simultaneously.
Hughmic Construction was established as a small, equal partnership company
within the Power Group in 1997, and has become a success story as the first
emerging company associated with the Power Group. The firm’s first major
works was at the Ratanga Junction project in 1998, where their effort and
dedication established the company’s reputation as a formidable outfit.

In 1998 another emerging partnership was born, this tome in the Eastern
Cape. Sibalhulu Construction was structures in the same way as Hughmic.
Although the first three years were dedicated to the slow process of capacity
buiding, the economic climate has shown signs of improving in the eastern
Cape, providing the opportunities required for growth.
Power East Cape was sold to Sibakhulu at the end of 2002. The current
workload is phenomenal when one considers that in the past both companies
could barely achieve a combined turnover of R30m and now boast an order
book of R150m.
Between 1990 and 2000, Power Construction became known in the industry
as one of the largest providers of township infrastructure in the country.
Projects included developments in Khayalitsha, Lwandle, Phillipi, Gugulethu,
Crossroads and Wallacedene. Another milestone was achieved when Blitz
Asphalt, which was initially started in 1986 as an internal paving company,
grew to be one of the top specialsed surfacing contractors operating in the
Cape.

Blitz had completed some rehabilitation projects in rural areas such as
Kokstad and various other local authority projects like Vissershok Road, the
N7 rehabilitation for PAWC in Joint Venture and the N2 Sir Lowry’s Pass
project. Local annual tenders still provide the company with important work
in this market.

In 2002 the management and plant resources were combined with the rural
roads teams of Power West Cape – who had compelted Sable Road, Mossel
Bay N2 rehabilitation and Hanover on the N1 for SANRAL – with the existing
Blitz teams and the company underwent a name change to become Power
Roads.

The new company sets out to provide a focused service and to take
advantage of the backlog of road rehabilitation work that is required to
maintain the standard of road infrastructure in South Africa. The current
workload includes two major rehabilitations at Richmond on the N1, as well
as Butterworth on the N2, both for SANRAL, each to the value of R60m.

“We are really positive regarding the economic outlookf or South Africa and
the civil engineering industry and we feel that for the foreseeable future,
there will be sufficient work to ensure growth, development and
employment,” Du Preez concludes.

A 20/20 visio for the future
For 20 years the power Group of Companies has remained steadfastly
committed to social and economic reconstruction of South Africa through
investment in infrastructure, job creation and the development of human
resources, empowering people wherever it developes and deliveres.
Positive transformation
Seeing the positive transformation made to the lives of individuals is
confirmation enough: Its vision for the next 20 years must remain as clear
and focused as it has been for the past 20 years.
April 2003

20th Anniversary of the Power Group
The Power of One
20 years ago new ground was broken as one man dared to pursue the power of
his dream. Today, nearly 2000 others share in this dream, to be Southern
Africa’s leading supplier of civil engineering services. It is with pride, that we, the
Power Group of Companies, celebrate the pioneering spirit that’s brought us this
far.

G. Power
The Power Group of Companies is not my company alone, it’s ours. We employ
above average people, expect above average performance, for which we’ll
provide above average rewards.

Bulldozing over many obstacles on the road to success, we’ve left no stone
unturned in reaching our dream. We’ve laboured through steep learning curves,
setting new records along the way.
In an industry that revolves around the might of the machine, it is people that
make the world of Power go round.

A. du Preez:
At Power, we really believe in the value of our people. Anybody can buy the
same equipment, but it is the passion of our people that really makes the
difference.

We are more than a company, we are a family. Through the cool interiors of head
office to the most remote, dusty site, flows the power of one. A sense that every
one of Power’s people count. Roping in our individual strengths, we make
diversity work for us. Dedication to the Power Ways is what unites us in purpose.
As our vision expands, we are planning ahead to see the Power family grow in
strength and number.
Strategic partnerships with Empowerment companies have made us a leading
force in Employment Equity.

D. Mcetywa:
The partnership entered into 4.5 years ago between ourselves and the Power
Group of Companies, is a reflection of their belief in the potential of the people
and their ability to aid new opportunities.
We believe that the foundation we have laid, will enable our successors to
continue building and maintaining the relationship with the Group.

C. Hughes:
Over the past 5 years, we had a very fruitful and exciting relationship with the
Power Group of Companies. Their Technical, Financial and Services support
were absolutely amazing. It has been a real honour and privilege for us to be a
part of this company.

Brick by brick, worker by worker, we’re committed to building a nation. As South
Africa’s leader in the field of township development, we’re proud of the record
30,000 roofs we’ve provided over the heads of the poor. Hope, dignity and quality
of life, this is our legacy of upliftment in townships across the Western and
Eastern Cape. We are committed to constructing a future for the nation, builders
of tomorrow.

S. Bothma
It is our passion to be the best in whatever we do. We want to make a difference
in the lives of our clients, from the poor to the rich.

Building on the foundation of our successes in the affordable housing sector,
we’re solidly cementing our reputation in property development. As we’ve
explored new territory, we’ve increased our portfolio to include multi-million rand
turn-key developments.

We have indeed come a long way. The road to achievement has been paved by
our ability to predict market trends and gear ourselves for change. Innovative
developments have kept us on the cutting edge, while strategic repositioning has
taken us to new levels of performance.
Our numerous awards are tokens of the hard-earned respect of a tough industry.
As we look ahead, these tributes will continue to point us towards reaching our
100-year dream.

G. Power:
Each company, like a person, I believe needs a clear vision and dream in order
to achieve its purpose or its calling on earth. We recently had a strategic planning
session where 400 people from the Group, from all levels in the company,
reviewed our vision, mission and values and during those deliberations, we
clearly set ourselves a 100 year dream for the organisation. That means that
each of us have committed to train and mentor our successor to do a far better
job than we are even doing today. I truly believe that this Group is a gift from God
and that we have a responsibility to influence the industry in which we operate,
the community in which we operate, South Africa, Africa and I’m convinced that
through a spiritual revival Africa can become a light to the world and that this
dark continent can be turned around and that we have a key role to play in
seeing God’s will done in Africa.

As we head for the future, we prepare for greater growth, greater influence and
greater impact. The secret to success, we know, lies in the welding together of
our most precious resources, the potential of a people committed to creating
something bigger than themselves and the power of a dream, with the promise to
outlast us all.
2003

Take Five!

As the IHSA’s Developer of the Western Cape for 2003, Power Developents
would like to thank and congratulate the following for their role in making the
Delft leiden project such a resounding success:
   1. Housing Person of the Western Cape – Herman Steyn. Thanks for your
       superb leadership!
   2. Best Housing Practice – The professional team. Well done!
   3. Merit Award – Delft Integrated Builders. Great work!
   4. Local Authority of the Year – City of Cape Town. Congratulations!
   5. Developer of the Western Cape – Our colleagues at Power
       Developments.

Way to go Power!
This takes some doing! Displaying their usual staying power, pioneer spirit
and team work, Power Developments once again delivered the caliber of
work that has earned them three previous “Developer of the Year” awards.
Awards and contracts are welcome rewards, but for Power the lasting value
lies in the benefits that the Delft Leiden project has brought to the
community.

In less than 19 months, Power Developments completed houses and services
for 6 320 families – six different types of houses at an average of 500 oer
month! Job opportunities and the acquisition of skills are further spin-offs.
Power and five local builders formed a joint venture, the Delft Integrated
Builders. Together with the community, they employed 2 000 local labourers
and artisans every day – for 12 months.

The R116 million development – one of the biggest single-phased subsidy
projects yet in South Africa – was managed as a turn-key project, with a
single developer (Power Developemtns) assuming responsibility for the entire
process.

Thanks to excellent liaison with government departmenets, everything went
smoothly – including the coordination of facilities such as schools,
recreational amenities and churches, which are essential for ensuring
sustained development.

And through sustained development – of the community as well as the
environment – we at Power Developments strive to create a win-win situation
for all.
May 2003




Thesen Islands celebrates environmental achievement



Last Friday marked an important environmental achievement for Knysna with
the official opening of the new bridge to Thesen Islands in the Knysna Lagoon
by the Mayor, Clr. Charles Thobi.


The Thesen Islands Development Company was responsible for the attractive
new arched bridge, which has replaced a 40-metre section of the causeway
to the Islands. This has restored the natural tidal flow of the lagoon in the
surrounding area, and has had a very positive impact on the natural
environment, considerably improving the water quality and conditions for
marine life.



Clr. Charles Thobi said at the opening function that the stringent design
standards and restrictions imposed on the development by both the
authorities and the Thesen Islands Development Company have "had a rub-
off effect on other developments in the region because it set aesthetic
standards for architects and planners."


The waterways around the 19 islands have also proved highly successful
from an environmental perspective. The gabion rock construction of the
waterway edges are not only very sturdy from an engineering perspective,
but have provided an ideal habitat for the establishment of a diversity of
marine organisms. These organisms 'filter' the seawater resulting in superior
water quality in the waterways and lagoon around Thesen Islands. The
sheltered waterways also provide a refuge for tens of thousands of small,
and some much larger, fish. It is predicted that soon some of Knysna's best
fishing will be within the Thesen Islands waterways.


Most recently the environmental monitoring team discovered that the Knysna
seahorse has taken up residence in the waterways. This has caused major
excitement in conservation circles as the 20 hectares of new sheltered water
area will provide important additional habitat for these endangered creatures.
April 2003

Work begins on R12m bridge over R44


Work has begun on a new overhead bridge that will significantly improve the flow of
traffic which exists from Somerset Mall.


The overhead bridge will be built from the Mall over the R44 to connect with Kynoch
Road. Work began on April 1 and will be completed in December.
The R12 million private sector project has been awarded to Power Construction’s road
division. The construction of the new three-lane overhead bridge is the first phase of a
two-phase project. This phase will allow Mall shoppers to drive straight from the Mall
back onto the R44 in the direction of Stellenbosch, or to access the light industrial
development area across the road from the Mall.


The second phase will see the doubling of the works and will include the constructrion of
a new off-ramp from the R44 to the Mall. The good news is that this new off-ramp will
have a wider angle than the present off-ramp that connects the R44 to the Mall. Phase II
will be tackled once a traffic impact assessment necessitates it.


The project is funded by Heartland Properties – the property arm of AECI, which has
systematically been developing the Mall and Surrounding sites. Customarily, projects of
this nature with a major regional impact are jointly implemented by provincial and local
governments. IN contrast, the R44 bridge will see 100 percent private sector funding.
The new infrastructure is an integral part of the AECI macro plan that will eventually form
part of the proposed activity spine that will link Somerset West and Macassar.
April 2003

Sibakhulu Construction
Moving earth at Ngqura Harbour

Sibakhulu Construction one of two contractors on site has been tasked with
the bulk earthworks of the quay walls and the harbour basin excavation of
Ngqura Harbour in Port Elizabeth and has already moved more than a million
cubic metres of earth.

Subcontracting to Ngqura Harbour Contractors (NHC), Sibakhulu has been
awarded the contract for the excavation and redistribution of 5 million cubic
metres of earth over a 17-month period.

According to site agent Fahiem Ortell “of the total earth excavated + 2
million cubic metres is being moved to the western reclamation to form part
of the buildings and offices that will eventually form the harbour
administrative base”

A further + 1.5 million cubic metres will be moved to the eastern reclamation
area, which once completed, will form the area for the re-establishment of
the endangered species of flora that was removed at the commencement of
the contract to an area of safekeeping. The balance will go to the outer basin
that will form the stacking areas for the containers in the future.

“In terms of the contract stipulation we are required to move an average of
18 000m³ a day – which we are achieving comfortably” said Ortell. If this
progress continues, the company expects to complete its contract ahead of
schedule.
“The basin excavation will be done to + 17m below MSL. As we go deeper we
expect the conditions to become more difficult. Although they have a well-
point system on the perimetre of the excavation, we expect the ingress of
water and the hardness of the material to make life a little more difficult, but
we have the right equipment and the people to complete this contract
successfully,” said Ortell.

This R8-m contract is by far the largest contract ever undertaken by
Sibakhulu Construction, an affiliate of the Power Group of Companies. Ortell
said “the construction of the Ngqura deepwater harbour is a significant
milestone in South Africa’s development, providing the Eastern Cape with
much needed investment. We are proud to be associated with the
construction of this world-class project.”

Emerging contractors still face uphill battle
Although lauded as an excellent way of redressing the economic imbalances
brought about by Apartheid, Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) has come
under fire from some sectors in the country. One of the criticisms levelled
against it is that those who benefit from it are those with political
connections or that wealth is merely rotating within certain circles and not
trickling down to those who need to be empowered. This also applies to the
construction industry where many emerging contractors still feel left out in
the cold. Despite this criticism, many emerging contractors have had
success stories and efforts have been made by various role players to assist
emerging contractors. Karen Makgamathe spoke to some of these role
players and emerging contractors to find out how far efforts to assist
emerging contractors have gone.


Body
An emerging contractor is a black contractor whose annual turn over is less
than R5million. Emerging contracting companies are often regarded as high-
risk businesses run by inexperienced management and many of them find it
difficult to remain afloat for lengthy periods.


In line with the government’s policy on Black Economic Empowerment,
various industries that Historically Disadvantaged Individuals (HDI’s) were
previously excluded from are now opening their doors and transforming by
trying to create an environment whereby they can participate and thrive. One
such industry is the civil engineering industry. However, many emerging
contractors still face many challenges, the main challenge they face is the
lack of capital. Recognising the challenges that emerging contractors face,
the Department of Public Works and other civil engineering bodies have set
up programmes to assist them.


The Department of Public Works and the Emerging Contractor Development
Programme
In an effort to assist emerging contractors, the Department of Public Works
has set up the Emerging Contractor Development Programme (ECDP), also
known as ‘Sakhasonke’ (building together). The objective of the programme
is to help emerging contractors overcome some of the obstacles that stand in
their way of emerging into the mainstream construction industry.




The programme, which was launched as a national initiative in 1997, has
offices in each region, which consist of a help desk and a database of
emerging contractors. The help desk plays advises emerging contractors on
support provided by bodies such as the Ntsika Tender Advice Centres and
Khula’s financial services.


The Construction Industry Development Board has begun plans to compile a
register of contractors and projects; they hope to have completed this
registration by the year 2005. With regards to the CIDB’S plan to set up a
register of contractors and projects, German Mphahlele, Director of the
ECDP, said, “this register aims to do a number of things, such as supporting
risk management in the tendering process; reducing the administrative
burden associated with the award of contracts; reducing tendering costs to
both clients and contractors; enabling effective access by emerging
contactors to work and development opportunity; assessing the performance
of contractors in the execution of contracts and thus provide a performance
record for contractors.” He also said the register will regulate the behaviour
and promote minimum standards and best practice, store and provide data
on the size and distribution of contractors operating within the Industry and
the volume, nature and performance and development of contractors and
target groups and to enable access by the private sector and thus facilitate
provide sector procurement. According to Mphahlele, the CIDB register
covers all contractors emerging and non-emerging, and its purpose is much
wider than that of the ECDP database.
SAFCEC’s involvement


The government is not the only body that is trying to facilitate the entry and
growth of emerging contractors. Recognising that emerging contractors have
struggled to enter the industry and that the majority of those that do enter,
have a very short lifespan, the South African Federation of Civil Engineering
Contractors (SAFCEC) has embarked on a development programme for them.
As part of the programme, SAFCEC has put in place a mentorship scheme.
Under this scheme, an emerging contractor will be put under the mentorship
of an established company.


Michele Gilbert, acting mentor programme director, said with regards to the
mentor programme, their plan is that the relationship between an emerging
contractor and established contractor will last between three to five years.
She said, “the big company will act as a big brother to the emerging
company, but the idea is to develop the emerging company and not for them
to remain as a sub contractor. During the relationship with the big
contractor, the emerging contractor will be supervised and after a while, the
emerging contractor will gradually withdraw and work on his or her own.”


She said the benefit to the established contractor will be that this partnership
will add value to the company in that if they are looking for a joint partner
venture they can source from the emerging contractors they already know.
She also added that: “there isn’t enough capacity for government projects
and this capacity needs to be grown and that is why it is important to have
more contractors entering the industry.” Training of emerging contractors
under this scheme is facilitated by the Construction Industry Education and
Training Services (CIETS)


Contractors


Emerging contractors tend to have the same views about the challenges that
they face, the main one being the lack of capital. Nic Grobler, contracts
director of Sakhizwe Con Roux, said the main challenges they have faced in
entering the industry have been: “the lack of management and technical
skills and the absence of suitable finances for emerging contractors in an
industry known as being capital intensive”. Sakhizwe is one of three
empowerment firms working on the construction of the Port of Ngqura at
Coega.




Sakhizwe is in partnership with Con Roux Ltd. Asked if he feels Sakhizwe
would be able to sustain itself were it not for Con Roux, Grobler said, “no it
would not, the requirement for technical skills and management experience,
track record of contracts completed, financial demands and support services
are necessary when competing for larger contracts.” He also added, “to
survive in a highly competitive industry like ours, one must do everything
right the first time. The risks are great, the demands are tough and the
banks are ruthless, therefore ones chance will be better to succeed if going
into partnership with more established companies and gain the required
muscle needed.”



Many other emerging contractors have entered into joint ventures with more
established companies to remain sustainable. Richard Arnott, site manager
for Chavani Civils, which is one of the emerging companies working on the
upgrading of roads in Soweto, said what has helped them has been their
partnership with Black Top Surfaces. He said, “we don’t have enough
finances to purchase materials and we use Black Top’s buying power and
credit facilities.”


Another company that feels that it is better to work in partnership with a
more established company is Motsweding Civils, they are less than a two
years old and are currently working on their first 2 projects, a sewer pipe line
in Thokoza and laying raft foundations at a school in Vosloorus. They have
been sub-contracted on both projects by two established black empowerment
companies. Paul Mofokeng, director of the company said that cash flow is the
main problem faced by emerging contractors. He added that, “as a sub-
contractor you have to deliver the product to the client and contractor,
otherwise if you don’t they won’t use you again and as a new company it is
sometimes difficult to get equipment and other resources that you need to do
the job.” He added that because they are a new company they would not be
able to survive if they were working on their own.


Zomba Constructions is an emerging company that has had a number of
success stories; they are currently working on eight projects, mostly for
Spoornet. Managing director, Charles Modise, said what they have found
most challenging, is the capital outlay for rail maintenance machinery. He
also said: “the normal five year contracts awarded by Spoornet do not permit
sufficient time to repay capital outlay in view of the low tender rates paid for
maintenance work and unaffordable security to access higher purchase
facilities for equipment and machinery and performance guarantees for
maintenance contracts.” He added that the combination of all these factors
result in low profitability and losses in many instances, making rail
maintenance unsustainable for emerging contractors.


Percy Tloubatla, director of Tloubatla Civils was very critical of how tenders
are awarded to contractors. He said the current environment does not allow
emerging contractors to grow and that it is extremely difficult for them to
penetrate the market. The main reason for this is that emerging companies
have to compete with bigger, well-established companies who have the
finances and equipment to get contracts. He also said that consulting firms
are also to blame as they always use the same, established contractors and
feel it would be a risk to award contracts to emerging contractors.


Tloubatla also said that there is still a lot of corruption with regards to the
awarding of tenders. He said “to get a contract you need to have connections
either in government or with consulting firms, the bottom line is, if you do
not have connections, you don’t get a job.”


He added that consulting firms already know which contractors they have in
mind when contracts are to be awarded and they can sometimes manipulate
decisions. Either by making recommendations to a client about using certain
contractors instead of others and because the client might not know which is
the best contractor to use, they take the consultants recommendations. He
also said the client sometimes also tells the consultant which contractor they
prefer.


With regards to the government’s Emerging Contractors Development
Programme, he does not feel that their plans have been implement properly
and that Government is not doing enough to sustain it’s BEE initiatives. He
also feels that they are also contributing to contractors failures, he said their
policies should be in tender documents. He said that with contracts under R1
million contractors do not require surety, whereas with regards to contracts
R10 million or more they do require surety. He said “where are you supposed
to get surety if you are given small tenders, banks see emerging companies
as risk, this sometimes forces them to go into joint ventures with bigger
companies as they often cannot survive as stand alone contractors.


He stressed again that; “emerging contractors don’t grow, I also don’t think
that going into a joint venture with a bigger company will help, because the
emerging company is not growing on its own.” He did acknowledge however,
that there are some organisations that assist emerging civil engineering
companies, he mentioned SAFCEC as one of them and said they assisted him
when he entered the civil engineering industry. He reiterated that the main
challenge for emerging contractors is trying to find work. The company is
currently working on a water reticulation project in Kuruman.
Sibakhulu, which means ‘we are great’, is quite a fitting name for one of the
Eastern Cape’s most successful emerging civil engineering companies, the
company, which celebrated its fifth anniversary late last year is currently
involved in one of South Africa’s largest civil projects - the development of
the R2, 65 billion Port of Ngqura, Sibakhulu is carrying out the bulk
excavation of five million cubic metres to the harbour basin at Coega. It is
also busy constructing Neptune Road, a major access road into the Industrial
Development Zone (IDZ) from Coega, and Fairview, a major township in Port
Elizabeth.


With regards to them achieving what they have Mcetywa said “there are
qualities that have helped us with their achievements; patience and
determination. You can’t go into the construction industry hoping to make a
quick buck. Our links with Power Construction have also helped us, as they
are a well established company, they have assisted us financially and also in
the training of up and coming engineers. Sibakhulu has had their fair of
challenges like other emerging contractors, Mcetywa says when they entered
the industry, they entered at the wrong time because the economy was not
doing very well, but added that “ based on our determination, we had to
work hard and try to keep the people who worked for the company motivated
and reassure them that things will improve. Mcetywa also added that in
terms of equity there still aren’t enough black people in the industry, many of
them are still at tertiary institutions or have recently completed their studies
and it will take a several years for them to be trained.
With regards to the company’s achievements, Sibakhulu’s managing director
Dumisa Mcetywa said: “Our patience and determination have contributed to
our achievements. You can’t go into the construction industry hoping to
make a quick buck. Our links to Power Construction have also helped in the
sense that it is a well established company, especially in terms of financial
assistance and helping to train young engineers.” Sibakhulu has faced its fair
share of challenges, as has been the case for other emerging contractors.
Mcetywa commented that Sibakhulu entered the industry in an unfavourable
time. “The economy was sluggish but based on our determination we worked
hard to keep our staff motivated, reassuring them that things would improve.
However, now that the economy has started picking up we are facing a new
problem: some staff members have left for higher salaries elsewhere.” This
problem could negatively impact on a lot of emerging companies. Mcetywa
added that, in terms of equity, there still aren’t enough black people in the
industry. “Most of them are still at tertiary institutions or have only recently
completed their studies and it will take several years before they are fully
trained.”


Grinaker-LTA does its bit for empowerment
Grinaker-LTA has recently landed a contract to refurbish two buildings for
Cell-C, at the value of R29 million; the building they are currently working on
is Esher Place on Rivonia Road. The job involves building work, dry wall
partitions, ceilings, and electrical and mechanical work. The project has a big
black empowerment component to it in that it has a black contracts manager
working on the project. John Sambo has been with Grinaker for 15 years.
Contracts director for Grinaker, Mark Meire, says there are a number of ways
of satisfying BEE. For instance: black ownership, joint venture with a black
owned company, awarding contracts to black sub-contractors or lastly having
the right employment equity. Meire said that with regards to numbers and
percentages, Grinaker does not meet requirements of black ownership, but it
performs well when it comes to equity in that over the years it has trained
many people who are now in senior positions.


Meire feels that actually using a black person has more value than going into
a joint venture, as this is more sustainable. He added that “the person gains
more experience and there is not fronting or window dressing.”


The refurbishment of the Esher Place has proved to be rather challenging for
the team. Meire said, “it’s like performing open heart surgery, as we have
had to work around the major data centre and it is a 24 hour operation. So it
would be disastrous if we were to accidentally cut a wire.” They hope to finish
the project in May and have recently completed tenant installation in Marion
place, also using a black contracts manager.
Sibakhulu
Construction of the multimillion-rand Neptune road systems interchange on
the N2 highway, which is one of the key stages in the progress of the R3,4-
billion Coega industrial development zone (IDZ) and deep-sea harbour
development, in the Eastern Cape, started in mid-October.

The R37,8-million contract to construct Neptune road and a link to the port
boundary was awarded earlier this year to Sibakhulu Construction, a Western
Cape black economic empowerment construction company.

The new interchange will comprise four bridges over Neptune road and two
road-over-rail bridges.

The interchange is necessary for access to the aluminium smelter to be built
by French company Pechiney in the metallurgical cluster of the IDZ.

Due to the specialised skills and techniques required for the interchange
project, no contractors were found in the Eastern Cape.

But, in line with the CDC's procurement policies, the winning contractors
were required to have a local partner, which they found by forming a joint-
venture partnership with Port Elizabeth-based Msele Civils. They were further
required to subcontract portions of the work to local companies.

As a result, at least 17 of the 22 subcontracting firms – all of which are
small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) – are based in the Eastern
Cape. Part of the road construction will provide for the crossing of a railway
yard, which will serve as a bulk ore-storage facility.

The storage facility will be linked by rail to the new deep-water harbour and
the IDZ.

Meanwhile, CDC communications manager Raymond Hartle tells Engineering
News that the corporation has awarded the R40,2-million contract to build
400 medium-cost dwelling units for construction workers engaged on the
development of the Coega project to 17 SMMEs.


Sibakhulu are currently busy on Njoli Road a R23 million project. The project
started in February 2004 and is due for completion in June 2005. We regard
this as a prestigious contract, which forms part of the Njoli Square
Development. The team on site has just finished the Neptune Road contract
at Coega, which was a R45 million contract. The other contract, which
Sibakhulu is busy with, is IDZ East London valued at R105 million. Other big
contracts completed by Sibakhulu include a R70 million contract for the
excavation of the Coega harbour basin and a R40 million contract for the
roads and services at Fairview.
The Njoli Road Contract covers the construction of approximately 2300m of a
new dual carriageway, each carriageway being 5.2m wide.

The huge amount of existing services that need to be moved is currently the
reason of low activity on the site

The excavation of the road layers is what can be seen as the bulk excavation.
All the unsuitable material has been excavated and spoiled off site. The next
operation will be the building up of the road layers up to the basecourse layer
and the premix-surfacing layer thereafter.

The road carries a significant number of vehicles in each direction daily. The
accommodation of this significant traffic flow cannot be accommodated
through bypasses (suitable bypass routes are too narrow and structurally
deficient) and the road must therefore be constructed in one carriageway at
a time.

Sibakhulu is working in a close relationship with the community associated
with the project and a steering committee consisting of all the ward leaders
has been formed. The vendors in conjunction with the steering committee
will be moved to other locations along Njoli Road. The road is constructed in
phases to accommodate both the vendors and the commuters.
June 2003


All smiles as over 70 prime stands sold


Houses worth over R35 million awaiting planning approval.


Power Developments, the majority shareholders of Brackenridge Property Pty Limited
has pleasure in announcing that as of 15 August 2003 the number of confirmed stand
sales is seventy four (74) with seven (7) sales awaiting confirmation.


Over R35 million worth of house plans are in various stagesof the planning approval
process. “All the hard work put into the site together with considered targeted advertising
has paid off and the results are there for all the see,” commented Roger Oakes, the
Project & Administration Manager of Brackenridge. “We confidently expect this positive
trend to continue especially during the coming September and Christmas school holiday
periods when enquiries escalate in direct proportion to the influx along the Garden
Route.”
June 2003


Environment a big priority for Power Construction

Following Power Construction’s award-winning work on environmentally sensitive
projects, it has been awarded a R50m contract for the civil works on the first phase of
Big Bay, Bloubgerstrand.


The award was announced by Rabcav, development facilitators for the City of Cape
Town on the R2 billion project, during August 2002. The contract covers the construction
of bulk and linking services such as earthworks and the provision of water, sewerage,
electricity and storm water infrastructure that will unlock approximately 40ha of
developable land. Work includes the realignment of Otto du Plessis Drive, which has
been upgraded to two lanes in each direction, separated by a landscaped median island.


Making their mark, treading lightly
During   last   year,   Power   Construction earned the pretigious PMR            Diamond
Environmental Care Award. This was in recognition of their efforts in promoting on-site
environmental care. The PMR Award is based on the company’s overall environmental
management policy and plan, the procedures that have been put in place to ensure that
construction work has the minimum effect on the natural environment, and that all site
personnel are inducted and adhere to the environmental policy. It is therefore fitting that
Power Construction be awarded the contract to provide services and infrastructure at a
site where environmental ussues are of such major importance. More than 40% of the
Big Bay terrain will be retained as green open spave. The ridge of dunes traversing the
site from north to south will be rehabilitated and set aside as a conservation area.


Caring about the wellbeing of the environment goes hand-in-hand with Power
Construction’s commitment to social upliftment, some 40 members of the labour force
are previously unemployed people from Du Noon, Joe Slovo and Atlantis, who are being
trained in basic construction skills while on the job.


Approximately 20% of the cost to date has been carried out by local ABE Contractors.
Consultants during this phase of the project are Hawkins Hawkins Osborn, Arcus Gibb
and The Planning Partnership. The environmental consultants are de Villiers Brownlie,
Coastec and the Agency for Cultural Resource Management.
2003

Action is the challenge
“In business, would you have achieved what you have, had you not trodden
on others on the way up.”

This often-asked question was recently put to top businessman Graham
Power, ceo of the Power Group of Companies which he formed 20 years ago
and which has ben acknowledged be several prestigious national and
international awards.

Power – who received a vision to hire the Newlands rugby stadium for a
prayer assembly in 2001, since then an annual event which has grown
significantly – had admitted that he “. . .used to be a typical South African
businessman . . .going to church on Sundays, but from Mondays to
Saturdays seeing it as a question of doggie in and doggie out. I did
everything to be awarded projects, although maybe I served on the finance
commission of the church or similar commitment.” Power was the guest
speaker at a business breakfast in aid of Bellville Care Mission, a Vredelust
DR church initiative which gives a physical and spiritual helping hand to the
homeless and jobless. It was then that the inevitable question followed and
his unexpected reply was: “I would have achieved more. If we think of all the
problems facing this country and the rest of the continent we might wonder if
Africa can be saved. We need the good and the bad times. It is so sad when
a young person gets involved with drugs, but if that same youngster is
rehabilitated he or she may be able to work under other young people ten or
fifteen years later.

“The challenge in our country is how to really become involved. I am excited
and we live in exciting times in this wonderful country. Go abroad for a year
or so to broaden your vision but some back to your fatherland to make a
difference here. It is all fair and well to say we must join hands and pray, but
one or other time we need to take action and start doing things. What do we
do with our short lives here on earth? We are in an apprenticeship for heaven
here, but what do we give to the homeless, to gangsters? If we cannot afford
financial contributions, are we then prepared to give of out time?
June 2003

Ngqura: ultimate challenge for emerging contractor
A very tight construction schedule and extreme site and climatic conditions have
presented the ultimate challenge. Sibakhulu Construction informs Civil
Engineering Contractor on its contracts at Ngqura. Excavations for the harbour
basin and work on the dual-carriageway entrance road were completed on
schedule.

The excavation of millions of cubic metres of earth for the construction of South
Africa's biggest-ever harbour - the Port of Ngqura - would be a challenging task
for any contractor, and so it has been for the emerging Port Elizabeth contractor,
Sibakhulu Construction, who took up the R80-m contract and has shown
perseverance, courage and commitment.

Development of the R2,65-bn Port of Ngqura, an integral part of South Africa's
first industrial development zone at Coega, is a complex project with severe time
constraints.       Early completion dates for certain aspects of the massive
earthmoving exercise were essential to enable contractors to start work on
almost 2 kms of concrete quay structures.

To meet its first deadline, Sibakhulu Construction had to excavate down more
than 40 metres through sand dunes and rock - to 17m below sea level - to clear a
300m-long strip for construction of the concrete quay on the western side of the
harbour to begin.

Next month Sibakhulu Construction will complete its R80-m earthmoving
contract, one month ahead of the scheduled date of completion, having moved
5,4 million cubic metres of earth in 15 months' operation in sometimes extreme
conditions. As an affirmative company, this is the biggest contract Sibakhulu
Construction has undertaken in its five years of successful operation.

In another area of achievement, Sibakhulu Construction is busy constructing a
3,2 km double carriageway that will become the main access route to the R3,4-
bn Coega IDZ that is being developed separately, and simultaneously with the
Port of Ngqura, by the Coega Development Corporation.

The development of the IDZ will eventually extend over 17 000ha and is taking
place in phases. Development of the first phase is expected to cost about R800-
m. The IDZ and the harbour development projects, among the largest seen in
South Africa in decades, have created a wealth of opportunity 20 km east of Port
Elizabeth, in the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality, Eastern Cape, for
professionals, contractors and the local business.

South Africa’s largest port
The new port will provide a draught of 16m to accommodate vessels of up to 80
000 tonnes in the first phase. The development is to be South Africa's eighth and
largest port.

The Port of Ngqura is designed to provide a 200m-wide approach channel
ending in a 600m turning basin. The port will be characterised by breakwaters;
one 2,76km long on the western side of the harbour entrance and the other
1,23km long - protected by 30t dolosse - on the eastern side.

According to the NPA, giant international container vessels - far too big for any
existing South African port - will soon be sailing the High Seas. The new harbour
is necessary for South Africa to handle this shipping, while the IDZ will provide
investment opportunities and employment in the Eastern Cape.

Excavating the harbour basin

Sibakhulu Construction has sub-contracted to the main contractor, the Ngqura
Harbour Contractors Joint Venture (NHC) and is one of two sub-contractors
required to excavate more than 13 million cubic metres of earth to create the
harbour basin.

Timeous completion of phases of excavations was also critical for work to start
on construction of the 1,96 km of mass-gravity voided-concrete quay walls in the
harbour area.

The NHC Joint Venture comprises the German-based Hochtief Construction,
Concor of South Africa, and Nqqura Empowerment Contractors made up of four
black economic empowerment companies.

Explaining the task set for Sibakhulu Construction, Glenville Cullum, the technical
director, said that the excavation of the harbour basin had been divided into two
sections. Sibakhulu Construction started excavations in the western half in
October 2002, and 5,4 million cubic metres of earth will have been moved by the
time the contract is completed next month.

"We have about 400 000m3 to go," said Faahiem Ortell, site agent for Sibakhulu
Construction.

Equipment

"We have a fleet here of 12 Cat 740 ADTs of 40t capacity and we have two 85t
Cat excavators," explained Cullum. "We have allocated six dumpers to each
excavator, and we work two nine-hour shifts. The first shift starts at 3 a.m. and
continues until 1 p.m. The second shift starts at 3 p.m. and finishes at 1 a.m.
"Sibakhulu is hiring the whole fleet of earthmoving machines from Barloworld
Equipment Cat Rental. They have supplied the operators for the dumpers and we
have supplied our own operators for the excavators. Excavators determine
production, so we have put our own experienced operators on the excavators,"
said Cullum. "The equipment we have on site is worth about R40-m."

"These machines definitely work well under extreme conditions, " said Ortell,
commenting on operating conditions in an environment where sea sands and salt
air are known to be abrasive and corrosive elements.

"Availability has been very good with these machines, probably because of the
way we have structured our shifts. Barloworld Equipment Cat Rental provides a
good maintenance service. This is one reason why we have a two-hour window
between each shift. This provides them with an opportunity to inspect and
perform any necessary repairs," Ortell added.

Ortell went on to say that there were two areas where mudstone and siltstone
occurred. Blasting had to be performed at the early stages where construction of
the concrete quayside had to start. More recently, blasting had to be carried out
within the basin area.

"On higher planes we have also found some sandstone but generally we have
been able to rip out these deposits with dozers," he said.

"In hindsight it looks easy , but there were some difficult times during the first 300
metres of excavation," said Cullum.

"We had some critical handover dates right at the beginning. Initially we had to
get down to a level for other contractors to lay their concrete foundations to start
construction of the west quay wall," explained Cullum. "We had to go down to
17m below sea level, which is the foundation level of the wall. Our top level was
about plus 26m. Effectively, we had to move 44m down and create sufficient
space for contractors to start work on the quay wall.

"The water drainage system installed around the development area to prevent
seepage into the excavation is relatively effective, but there is always some water
in the basin," he said.

Extreme climatic conditions

Describing working conditions, Ortell commented that temperatures in the
excavation for the harbour basin were usually about five degrees higher than on
surface, and often around 35 deg. C., while humidity was usually in excess of
80%.
"We speak about how high the temperatures are on site on a summer's day, we
should also talk about how low the temperatures are at one o'clock on a winter's
morning," said Cullum. "At that time everything is just on freezing point. This was
another challenge for our team.

"Of course, one cannot talk about the Eastern Cape without talking about the
wind. Port Elizabeth is known as the 'windy city', but we have been fortunate. I do
not think we had to stop operations on more than a couple of days. Of course, we
could have continued, but work was stopped for safety reasons because of poor
visibility during strong winds.

Working to the production schedule

"When we started we put together a young team. We have a team that is really
committed, and we are happy with their performance," stated Cullum.

"We monitor our production on an hourly basis," continued Ortell. "Our operators
on site have targets that have to be met every hour. We have checkers who
monitor the number of dumpers loaded every hour, and a record is kept of where
they go dump the material. This is controlled daily by our site manager. Work is
planned for us to continuously achieve maximum production.

"Barloworld Equipment Cat Rental has had a close look at our production rates
and they have commended us for our achievement.

Cullum commented: "We set targets for ourselves. I would not like to compare
ourselves with other contractors because the circumstances in each project are
different. Our objective is to satisfy ourselves and not to better the performance
of another contractor."

Double carriageway entrance road

The 3,2 km four-lane double carriageway, north and south bound, under
construction by Sibakhulu Construction is the main entrance to the Coega IDZ. It
provides access from a road that is to become a major access route during
Phase 2 of the development to the IDZ. The double carriageway continues
through the industrial area to the main interchange at the N2 highway, between
Grahamstown and Port Elizabeth, from where it gives access is to the Port of
Ngqura. The value of the contract is R42-m, and includes the construction of
storm water drainage.

The layer works of the road comprise of an in sutu road bed of 150mm,
2x150mm selected sub-grade, 2x150mm layers of sub-base of which the top
layer of sub-base is cement stabilized, 1x150mm layer of macadam base course
and 40mm premix.
“The client opted for the macadam base course to enhance the employment of
local labour,” said Mr Dumisa Mcetywa, managing director of Sibakhulu
Construction. Currently we employ 40 people for the macadam operation and
this is to be increased to 50 as we go along. We only use a grader to level the
material, thereafter all the work is done by hand.

 "A very fine calcrete material is being used as a filler for the macadam base
course," explained Mr Bertrand Oppelt, Sibakhulu Construction's site agent. It fills
the voids between the ballast stone - which varies in size from 37mm to 53mm -
and binds well to provide a better surface. Once this is level we put on a primer
and then 40 mm of premix.

Mr Mcetywa said that Sibakhulu had constructed about 20% of one lane of the
double carriageway by conventional means to speed up completion for an early
handover. However, the rest of that carriage way and the whole of the second
carriageway are being constructed by hand providing a Macadam base.

"We are ahead of schedule and it looks as though we will finish our work two
months ahead of the scheduled completion date in June."

Training

He went on to add that R150 000 was allowed in the contract for the training of
local people. Sibakhulu Construction involved Tjeka, a training organisation, to
help with the training of people in the work required on site. Tjeka also trained
people to assist an emerging local sub-contractor, Sisalinga Building and Civil
Construction, engaged to install Telkom ducting and to construct the kerbing and
edging for sidewalks. The value of the contract being carried out by the local sub-
contractor is between R1,5-m and R1,8-m.

“Quanita 4 Projects is handling all our paving on site, which provides us with the
opportunity for participation by women. The value of the contract is just on a
million rand,” concluded Mr Mcetywa.
June 2003


ELIDZ Construction Works Starts


East London – The company awarded an R80-million contract for the construction of the
East London Industrial Development Zone’s external infrastructure has started work.


The Western Cape based Power Construction, started on the site late last month and a
steam-roller is flattening the soil. Work at the site is expected to continue for 14 months.


The IDZ has been allocated R99,1m by the provincial government for the 2003/4
financial year.


Finance MEC Enoch Godongwana announced during this year’s budget speech that the
IDZ could receive more than R130m for infrastructure in the next financial year.
July 2003


R80 million is put to work


Tangible progress is being made on the site of East London’s industrial
development zone (IDZ) where it is no longer a proposal but a R80 million
working reality.


Work on the initial infrastructure was handed over to the contractors, Power
Construction, on May 20 and in just two months parts of the project are
already four weeks ahead of schedule. Basic infrastructure work on the site
for the customs secure area, on the West Bank, near the DaimlerChrysler
Siyakha housing project, is already making freat progress as is the access
road to the site from Settlars Way.


The Mvubukazi River has been diverted to allow contractors to shore up the
banks and build a bridge over it. “We will get the river back on its original
course once the bridge has been built and we will maintain the ecological
integrity of the area,” ELIDZ technical project manager Johan Burger told
GO! While on a site inspection this week.


A lot of the vegetation has to be removed, but many indigenous plants will
remain or be put back while the alien vegetation is being removed and
turned into mulch or firewood and charcoal. “This part of the operation is a
project that encompasses a nursery where we are keeping some of the
indigenous plants and will be replanting them when the infrastrucure is
completed.”
Another ecological aspect of the project is one of noise pollution. The sire will
be separated from residential areas by walls which will not only add security
but should absorb a lot of the noise.
One of the initial objections to the siting of Phase I of the IDZ was the noise
that would be generated by trucks passing the Eurotype test centre. To
accommodate this onjection, planners have re-sited the access road away
from the centre. The road will also have sound deadening construction along
its sides, Johan said. Within two months the contractors have literally moved
mountains to set up the road. Eskom is busy with the construction of a 132-
kilovolt substation to feed the industry expected to be housed in the IDZ.


The access raod that is being constructed on the site is expected to be 65
metres wide and will be a four-lane highway with two lanes of traffic in each
direction. The access road is going to be the same width.


The Hood Point inverted siphon Line, although it is not strictly part of the IDZ
but the proposed zone cannot function without it, is also around halfway
completed. The line will carry water to the new treatment works at Hood
Point and will eventually lead to a marine outfall kilometres out to sea.


”We hace completed more than 3km of trenches and are laying pipes in the
area already, “ civil engineer Paolo Ferrucci told GO! The trecnches average
more than 2.5m deep and the heavy duty pipes are glass-fibre coated.
It seems the East London Industrial Development Corporation is already
living up to tis slogan on its offices and vehicles: “Proudly developing East
London.”
July 2003


Bridge over R44 on schedule for December


Work on the new R44 bridge that will significantly improve the flow of traffic exiting the
Somerset Mall is well on schedule for completion by December.


The infrastructure is an integral part of the AECI macro plan that will eventually establish
an activity spine linking Somerset West and Macassar. The R12 million project is funded
by Heartland Properties, the property arm of AECI and is being handled by Power
Construction’s roads division.


The new three-lane bridge will allow Mall shoppers to drive staright from the Mall back
onto the R44 towards Stellenbosch or to access the Interchange light industrial
development to the west of the R44. The bridge is expected to unleash the full potential
of Heartland’s various projects around the Mall. Without the bridge, The Triangle,
Heartland’s commercial node, can attain approximately 60 percent of the capacity its
been designed for. The bridge will allow it and the Interchange to achieve 100% of their
design capacity.


The construction of the bridge is the first phase of a two-phase project. The second
phase will see the doubling of the works and will include the construction of a new off-
ramp from the R44 to the Mall. Phase II will be implemented once a traffic impact
assessment necessitates it. Last week provincial and local government representatives
visited the site for an update on the progress of work. They were told that work has been
progressing smoothly, without major complaints from the public or disruptions to traffic
flows. The new intersection in front of the Mall has been completed during off-peak time,
safely out of the school holiday period. Earthworks are ahead of time due to the dry
winter.


The bridge decks will be cast in September and the bridge should be completed by
December 12. The biggest threat to the project is yet to arise, though in that temporary
supports will be erected in the centre of the double lanes of the R44 while the bridge
deck is under construction.
Should a motorist collide with one of these temporary supports, disaster will unfold. The
public is requested to respect the temporary speed restrictions and to drive cautiously
near the bridge.
July 2003


East London Development Zone Corporation issues R80m Tender


The East London Developemtn Zone Corporation announced a major breakthrough with
the awarding of an R80 million contract for cnstruction of external infrastructure to
support the development of the ELIDZ in April.


Making the announcement, chairperson of the ELIDZ board, Des Halley said Power
Construction, a Western Cape based omcpany, had been awarded the tender to
construct major roads and appurtenant works to support the first stage of the industrial
zone developemtn. The board awarded the contract as per recommendation of the
chairman of the Technical Commettee, Craig Sam.


The contract for Power Construction is expected to inject close to R13.5 million into the
Buffalo City economy as the contract includes the use of local enterprises, suppliers and
manufacturers. “AS a company that prides itself in the support of local business, it was
important for us to specify this aspect in the contract,” said ELIDZ CEO Peter Miles.


Work is expected to srtart in late May and continue for the next fourterrn months. It
involves the construction of external doads, storm water systems, construction of a
bridge, street lighting and landscaping for major access and arterial roads leading into
and out of the IDZ.


Miles said the construction of the infrastructure was a sign that the IDZ is realising a
dream which would prove to be a great boost for economic development of East London,
Buffalo City, and the greater Eastern Cape.


“The construction of the infrastructure means that there will soon be a gateway into the
zone for everyone, there is no looking back afer that,” he said.


Consultants Ninham Shand, Lukhozi, taylor and Associates Consortium were appointed
in 2002 to commence with the detailed planning of all external and internal infrastrucure.
This contract is a result of their successful work in this regard. Tenders for the internal
infrastructure will be advertised before the middle of 2003.


The project is still on track to support the start of the manufacturing operations in the
Customes Secure Area and the associated private industrial park by August 2004, which
will make the ELIDZ the first operating IDZ in South Africa.
August 2003


EAST LONDON IDZ BECOMING A REALITY

THE East London Industrial Development Zone has been a concept for four
years — but now the reality is starting to dawn with the provision of
infrastructure taking place at quite a pace.


The concept of an industrial development zone (IDZ) had been an idea long
before the establishment of the East London Development Zone Corporation
(ELZDC) in 1999. Two projects have been signed up for the zone already and
delays of different sorts have led to the stalling of the building of a condom
factory as part of the arms deal offset and a German wheat beer brewery —
which now seems to have its finances back on track.


Contractors for various infrastructure have been identified and the roads
contractor Power Construction moved onto the phase 1 and phase 2 sites to
build roads on May 20. In the short time it has been at work the company
has literally moved a mountain at the Leaches Bay site, clearing a path for a
roadway running from Settlers Way to the area and the road that will the
customs secure area.


Eskom is also on site busy with a massive substation with a 130 000 volt
system to strengthen the IDZ. The area falls within the municipal boundary
but because of the amount of high-voltage power that needs to be generated
Eskom is providing the substation.


The Mvubukazi River has been diverted to allow contractors to shore up the
banks and build a culvert over it. “We will get the river back on course once
the bridge has been built and we will maintain the ecological integrity of the
area,” ELIDZ technical project manager Johan Burger said during a site
inspection this week. A lot of the vegetation has to be removed but many of
the indigenous plants will remain or be put back — while the alien vegetation
is being removed and turned into mulch, compost or firewood and charcoal.
“This part of the operation is a project that encompasses a nursery where we
are keeping some of the indigenous plants and will be replanting them when
the infra structure is completed.”


Another ecological aspect of the project is one of noise pollution where the
site will be separated from the residential areas around it by landscaped two-
metre high earth berms and, in some instances, walls. This should not only
add security but also absorb a lot of the noise.
Because of an objection to some of the noise that is expected to be
generated by the industry, planners resited the access road away from the
Eurotype Test Centre and the road will also have sound attenuation in terms
of “landscaped berms” constructed along its sides, Burger said.


The main access road that is being constructed on the site is expected to be
58 metres wide and will be a four-lane highway with two lanes of traffic in
each direction. The harbour arterial road will have a 65-metre-wide road
reserve and will be a two-lane highway initially to be increased to a four-lane
road when traffic demand dictates this.


The Hood Point inverted siphon line is about halfway completed. Although it
is not strictly part of the IDZ, the proposed zone cannot function without it.
The line will carry water to the new treatment works at Hood Point and will
eventually lead to a marine outfall kilometres out to sea.
“We’ve completed more than three kilo- metres of trenches and are laying
pipes in the area already,” civil engineering con tractor Paolo Ferrucci said
this week. The trenches average more than 2,5m deep and the heavy-duty
pipes are glass fibre coated.


ELDZC CEO Peter Miles said that the building of the infrastructure was a
necessary part of attracting investment. “Investment takes time. The
investment of millions of dollars, pound or euros takes time, so for people to
expect immediate investment after we were licensed in September last year
seems to be optimistic to say the least. “We have a number of interested
parties but at this stage they have to sign on the dotted line.”


The infrastructure that is being worked on at present is due to be ready for
manufacturing to start in the duty-free area and associated private industrial
park by August or September next year.
Miles added that The ELDZC’s role was to ensure that investment could be
attracted from the people who had shown interest in the zone and “we would
like to have something on paper by the end of this year”.
The corporation was working hard at trying to attract industry that would
have upstream benefits for people in the rural areas or downstream where
people can make products from what is being manufactured by IDZ tenants.
“For example, if we can attract a factory making fibre from cotton we would
like to see people here making cloth or the opportunity to grow the cotton
locally,” Miles said.


One of the main aims of the IDZ is to turn East London into the hub of the
South African motor industry with the new car terminal being used for
imports and exports of vehicles and because of this attracting component
manufacturers producing items for use in South Africa and for export.
Other industry the zone is trying to attract includes the manufacture of
optical fibre, pressed metal, pressure-moulded aluminium and magnesium
products, pharmaceuticals, ceramics, wood products and textiles.
August 2003

POWER CONSTRUCTION (ROADS) COMPLETES THE FIRST TWO PHASES
OF CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE AT EAST LONDON IDZ


East London, August 2003: Power Construction (Roads) is ahead of schedule
and has completed the first two phases of civil infrastructure at the East London
Industrial Development Zone (ELIDZ).

The East London Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) is part of an initiative
endorsed by the South African Department of Trade and Industry to encourage
economic growth, and to attract investment by offering world class infrastructure
and services. The East London IDZ, located on the city's West Bank, adjacent to
the existing port and airport, has over 1,500 ha available for new industry. Forty
two projects have been identified such as motor component manufacturing,
optical fibre manufacturing, metal press stamping mill, aluminium and
magnesium high pressure moulding, pharmaceuticals, ceramics, wood products
and textiles, and of these, 12 pre-feasibility studies have already been
completed.


Power Construction won the tender and was awarded the R80 million contract for
construction of external infrastructure to support the development of the ELIDZ. It
includes the building of major roads and other works, construction of
approximately 6 km of arterial roads, and the supply of bulk electricity by April
2004, for which Power has built an ESKOM platform of 7 700 square metres.
The project furthermore involves storm water systems, construction of a bridge,
street lighting and landscaping for major access and arterial roads leading into
and out of the IDZ.



Thirty percent of the Power Construction Roads’ contract has been
subcontracted to local service providers and ABE’s (Affirmative Business
Enterprises) including an electrical sub-contracting project to the value of R6
million.

Site work commenced on the 26th of May 2003 with the clearing of 24 hectares of
bush, followed by removing 20 000 cubic metres of topsoil, excavating 600 cubic
metres of rock for culverts, and diverting the flow of the Mpuvukazi stream.
Building roads in demanding situations and within limited time constraints is
nothing new to Power Construction (Roads). The company has proven itself in
both major and minor road construction projects, rehabilitation of roads,
premix/asphalting, general surfacing (seals), airport taxiways, runways, apron
slabs and parking areas.




Power’s Site Agent Martin Naude says that progress has been excellent, despite
particularly challenging environmental and safety standards: “There are sensitive
areas on-site, and some protected plants needed to be relocated before we could
commence.”


The Power Group won the prestigious PMR Diamond Environmental Care Award
earlier this year in recognition of the efforts the company has made to promote
environmental care on its construction sites. The award is based on the
company’s overall environmental management policy and plan, the procedures
that have been put in place to ensure that construction work has the minimum
effect on the natural environment, and that all site personnel are inducted and
adhere to the environmental policy.


Considering the rate at which Power is establishing the road system and other
works, the ELIDZ project should be completed well within its projected 14-month
span. It is estimated that 38 000 jobs will be created during the first ten years of
the IDZ project. Power Construction (Roads) will be a major contributor to job
creation in the region, injecting close to R13,5 million into the Buffalo City
economy as the contract includes the use of local enterprises, suppliers and
manufacturers.


More about the Power Group
Power Construction Roads is a division of the Cape-based Power Group of
Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of civil
engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services.
September 2003


Behuisingspanne bekroon by jaarlikse behuisingstoekennings

Presteerders in die behuisingsbedryf is onlangs weer vereer met die Nasionale
Behuisingstoekennings tydens die Instituut van Behuising can Suid-Afrika se jaarlikse
toekenningsaand.


Die instituut is in 1941 gestig duer ‘n klein groepie persone wat behuisingsbelange op
die hart gedra het. Sedertien het die instituut van krag tot krag gegaan as ‘n nasionale
beweging. Vandag het hulle takke in Gauteng, Noordelike Provinsie, KwaZulu-Natal,
Oos-Kaap, Wes-Kaap en Vrystaat. Die missie van die instituut is om die welstand van
Siud-Afrikaners te bevorder deir bekostigbare behuising.


Mnr Herman Steyn is as die Behuisingspersoon van die Weskaap aangewys in
erkenning van sy toewyding en leierskap op die gebied van die verskaffing van huise,
uitsonderlike bestuursvermoiens en toewyding tot die verbetering van die lewens van
behorftige gemeenskappe.


Power Developments (Bpk) het die toekenning vir Ontwikkelaar van die Wes-Kaap
ingepalm vir hul rol in die verskaffing van laekoste behuising in die provinsie. Hulle het in
agtien maande meer as 6000 huise in die Delft Leiden-projek gebou. Die projek het ook
die Wes-Kaapse Beste Behuisingspraktyk-toekenning losgeslaan.


Die voorsitterstoekenning is toegeken aan Mnr. Dibanisa Lintsapho, wat hostelle in die
Langa, - Nyanga en Gugulethu gebiede in huise omskep het. Mnr Safoedien Sampson
het die meriete toekenning gwwen vir sy ondersteuning vir “The People’s Housing
Process”. Hy het vier projekte suksesvol gekoordineer en boumateriaal en opleiding op
die bouperseel verskaf. “n Meriete toekenning is ook aan die Mooiwater Projek op
Franschhoek bemaak. Dit was ‘n gesamentlike poging tussen die Stellenbosch-
munisipaliteit en The New Housing Company. Meer as 700 gesinne het deur die projek
huise gekry.
Die laaste meriete toekenning is toegeken aan Delft Integrated Builders, wat plaaslike
arbeiders aangestel het tydens die Delft projek en wonings van goeie kwaliteit gelewer
het. Meer as 6000 huise is oor ‘n tydperk van twaalf maande voltooi.
September 2003


Van Krag tot Krag met Power


‘n man wat al streng veroordeel is vir sekere misstappe vertel die storie agter die
storie


In ‘n perdestal het hy jare gelede met sy konstruksie-onderneming, Power Construction,
begin. Dit met net matriek after sy naam en nege en ‘n half jaar se ondervinding.
Vandag is Graham Power, wat op eie stoom sy onderneming gevestig en uitgebrei het
tot agt maatskappye, ‘n bekende sakeman en oortuigde Christen wat vanjaar sy
maarskappy se twintigste bestannsjaar vier. ‘n Dinamiese, maar nederige man wat
openhartig oor himself gesels.


Magtige mammom
Waar het alles begin?
“Ek het nooit ‘n nuwe first gekry of meer as een paar skoene gehad nie. Daar was ook
nie geld om te gaan studeer nie. My pa is oorlede en ek het besef dat ek heelwat ekstra
sal moet insit om bo uit te kom. Ek het ‘n passie gehad om eendag meer vir my kinders
te kan gee as wat ek gehad het.”
Graham het dae en nagte deirgewerk en sukses op sukses behaal. Later is hy ook
verkies as president van die South African Federation of Civil Engineering Contractors,
die jongste en enigste nie-ingenieur ooit in so ‘n posisie. Totdat sy lewe vier jaar gelede
eensklaps handomkeer verander het: hy het tot bekering gekom.


Hy vertel self:”Ek het vroeer gereeld kerk to gegaan en selfd op die kerkraad gedien. IN
die week het ek egter sukses nagejaag. Ek het mense probeer beinvloed en op hulle
getrap. Ek was behep met materiele welvaart; dit het my denke totaal oorheers.
“Totdat ek twee ontbyte bygewoon het met Michael Cassidy en Graeme Pollock as
sprekers. Dit het my ernstig laat nadink. Toe kry ek boonop ‘n oproep om vier weke later
as spreker by ‘n ontbytsessie op te tree en oor Christenskap in die werksomgewing to
praat. Ek besef toe ek is glad nie reg hiervoor nie en kry by ons plaaslike predikant ‘n
paar boeke om te lees. Aand vir aand het ek gesit en lees en so ‘n passie ontwikkel vir
die Bybel en ander geestelike leesstof.
“Een week voor die praatjie het ek een aand laat in my studeerkamer op my eie
eenvoudige manier vir doe Here gevra om my lewe te kom oorneem, asook my familie
en maatskappy s’n. Dit was die keerpunt in Februarie 1999. Ek het skielik besef how
sinneloos my gejaag na wind was.”


‘n Kwaliteit lewe
Vertel ons van jou gesin. . .
“Ek kan met blydskap se dat my vrou, Lauren, en drie kinders, Gary (23), Nadene (21)
en Alaine (16) almal wedergebore Christene is. Lauren het vyf maande na my tot
bekering gekom. Voorheen het ek my verbeel day my gejaag na hoer posisies alles
dinge is om beter vir my familie te voorsien. Ek het myself gebluf. Nie net my familie nie,
maar ook elke ander faset van my lewe het onder my besige program gely.”
Sedertien het Graham se lewe soos handomkeer verander. He het sommer heelwat
afgeskaal en probeer nou om minstens drie aande van die week by die huis te wees.
Sondae is nou ook ‘n gesinsdag en werk is heeltemal taboe.


Goeie gewoontes
Hoe leef jy as sakeman jou Christenskap uit?
“By welkw ontvangspunt van die maatsjappy is ‘n vierstap-boekie (drietalig) om te wys
how maklik dit is om die Here aan te neem. Elke direksie vergadering word met
skriflesing en gebed geopen. Die aantal Christene op die direksie het sedert drie jaar
gelede verdubbel.”
Een keer ‘n maand kry Graham ‘n spreker om tussen vyftig en hondered werknemers
toe te spreek. Hy moedig ook sy mense aan om vroeg oggend of gedurende middagete
‘n Bybelstudie of selgroep te begin en hul persoonlike probleme te bespreek. Net so
belangrik is dit nou vir hom om ‘n etiese komitee en waardes daar te stel.


Krisisse en terugslae hanteer Graham saam met God. “Soggens as ek op kantoor kom,
spandeer ek ongeveer ‘n halfuur agter geslote deur met Bybelstudie en gebed. Daardie
tyd is vir my krities en help my deur enige dag. Dit is vir my belangrik om my tiende vir
die kerk te gee, asook ‘n persentasie van die maatsjappy winste. Vandat dit on beleid is,
het ek gevind dat ons omset en wins van krag tot krag gaan.”
Verander en Vernuwe
Dit het seker ‘n groot impak op ‘n mens se lewe . . .
“Sedert ek my lewe aan die Here gegee het, behiirt ek aan drie verskillende
Bybelstudiegroepe. Een oggend vieruur het ek wakker geskrik met ‘n opdrag van God
om alle Christene van alle denominasies in die Wes-Kaap vir ‘n dag bymekaar te kry op
Nuewland vir verootmoediging en gebed. Oral het God deure oopgemaak sodat mense
ingestem het daartoe. Dit was ‘n wonderwerk. Ek ket absolute sekerheid dat Afrika, met
al sy probeleme, ‘n lig vir die wereld gaan word.”


Wat was een van die moeilikste situasies waarmee Fraham al as sakeman
gekonfronteer is? “Ek het ‘n oorsese spaarekening geopen as gevolg van ons ekonomie
en die dinge wat in Zimbabwe gebeur het. ‘n Paar jaar gelede het ek vir my gesin ‘n
woonstel in Spanje gekoop, wetende dat dit in Siud-Afrikaanse terme onwettige is. Dit
het my baie gepla en toe amnestie aan mense toegestaan word wat geld uit die land
geneem het, was ek verheug en het indie openbaar my fout erken. Die koerante het krad
oor my misstap gepraat.”
Lesse wat hy daaruit geleer het? “Ek dink om kort paaie te neem en dinge te doen was
oneties is, nie vir ‘n mens vooruitgang inhou nie. AS jy sou wegstap van dinge wat nie
reg is nie, gaan jy steeds vind dat werk in oorvloed na jou kant to kom.”


Hierdie sakeman wat glo iets is reg of verkeerd, se lewenslus is Spreuke 3:5-10: Vertrou
volkome op doe Here en moenie op jou eoe insigte staatmaak nie. . . “Ek weet dat ek nie
op my eie krag kan staatmaak nie. Dit is ook nie te danke aan my harde werk dat ek
suksesvol is nie, maar die Here wat my krag gee en help. ‘n Mens moenie wag dat jy
deur trauma gaan om op jou kniee te kom nie.”
October 2003

BUILDING OUR FUTURE

Infrastructure developments on the IDZ
The Eastern Cape economic development dream is steadily becoming a
reality in East London. The East London Industrial Development Zone is
one of the projects that are being implemented and will have high returns
for the province's economy.

The greatest challenge for the ELIDZ, however, is creating world class
infrastructure for world class investors. This has started with the
construction of the bulk external infrastructure which encompasses 10
km's of major arterial roads. This contract, worth R80 million was
awarded to Power Construction at the end of May 2003.
Five months later, all bush clearing and topsoil stripping has been
completed, the bulk of the earthworks is complete and the storm water
drainage is well underway.
The road works are underway, ahead of schedule and the current trend is
set to continue.
However, while that maybe so, the greatest achievement is the positive
contribution that the project already has had on the surrounding West
Bank Community in East London.
Take Nontinam Vusani, a mother of two school going children for an
example. Vusani has been unemployed for more than 3 years and
depended on selling fruit and sweets by the side of the road. Vusani is
one of the ladies that were employed as casual labours to do bush
clearing on site.
“The ELIDZ is starting to bring us hope, we are already seeing the fruits
of them being our neighbours,” she said.
More than 400 local people, men and women all from previously
disadvantaged backgrounds, have gained employment since the inception
of the contract and many more are set to benefit once the manufacturing
phase begins.

Mzimkulu Sili, labour co-ordinator for East London IDZ believes that the
best way to deal with casual labour is to rotate the appointments to
ensure the spread of wealth in the community.
“I am currently liaising with the community leadership for each of the
West Bank areas to ensure that we have some sort of a structure to keep
us in check and give everyone a chance to get a piece of the pie,” he
said. Sili added that the communities had been very co-operative.

But proudly developing East London goes beyond employing people. In
excess of R2.3 million has been contracted to Affirmative Business
Enterprises, and more than R4 million has been spent in the local
community. With just the R80 million Power Construction contract alone
there is currently seven subcontractors working on site, six of which are
black empowerment contracts. Currently in the pipeline are tenders for
internal infrastructure to the value of R125 million and fencing for R25
million. Tenders are also due to be issued for landscaping and for the
administration building.

The following summary of the major works completed to date is
testament to what has been mentioned above:

* Bush clearing: 30 hectares (300,000m2)
* Topsoil stripping: 37000m3 stockpiled
* Earthworks: 107000m3 of soft material and with the aid of 11 ton of
liquid explosives, 33800m3 of rock has been moved
* Storm water drainage: 1600m of concrete pipes has been installed
* Concrete work: 670m3 of concrete has been cast for a culvert across a
stream

Subsequently, work has accelerated, with a substantial amount of plant
being hired locally, together with supplement from the Western Cape.
Environmental compliance on the project is being achieved by the
Contractor as a result of past experience and diligent procedures being
implemented.
October 2003

Sibakhulu’s achievements add sparkle to Eastern Cape

Sibakhulu Construction is a name that has become almost synonymous with
development in the Eastern Cape. Within five years of its establishment this
emerging company, has established its reputation and the English meaning
of its name - “we are great.”

Currently, Sibakhulu in involved in one of South Africa’s largest civil projects
- the development of the R2,65-bn Port of Ngqura, South Africa’s newest
deepwater port that is to form an integral part of the Coega Industrial
Development Zone (IDZ). Sibakhulu is carrying out the bulk excavation of
five million cubic metres to the harbour basin at Coega. It is also busy
constructing Neptune Road, a major access road into the IDZ from Coega,
and Fairview, a major township in Port Elizabeth.

The Coega IDZ is 20km east of the city of Port Elizabeth, in the Nelson
Mandela Metropolitan area.

Speaking at a function to mark Sibakhulu’s fifth anniversary - and the 20th
anniversary of the Power Group - Sibakhulu’s managing director, Mr Dumisa
Mcetywa, said his company is more than ever optimistic about the future of
the region. Prospects are good, though challenges lay ahead especially those
arising as a result of the AIDS pandemic.

The function was held in the Tsitsikamma Conference Centre at the Emfuleni
Boardwalk Resort in Port Elizabeth, where a few years ago Sibakhulu
Construction had completed the civils work for this newest landmark in the
Nelson Mandela Metropole.

He told a gathering of guests, including politicians, professionals associated
with the construction industry, senior government officials and clients, that
looking back it was hard to believe that Sibakhulu could achieve what it had
done in only five years.

“Teamwork that exists within the Power Group carried us through the difficult
period that we experienced during our first two and a half years, and Graham
Power’s leadership was a strong motivator that kept us going and prevented
us from disinvesting and walking away from the region,” he said.

Mr Mcetywa added that prospects had heightened during 2002 and there are
now indications that government spending may increase and a number of
projects in the pipeline, especially on the former Transkei region, may
eventually get underway.
“There is a need for infrastructure in this province, and it is possible that we
may become involved in the development of roads. Rail links are also to be
created, especially as a result of the Coega development,” said Mr Mcetywa.

“There has also talk in the past few years about rural housing development in
the Eastern Cape, more especially in the former Transkei region. We see this
as an opportunity that could soon arise because of the need.”

“I am most optimistic about the future, but we have to look at our
challenges. The most serious of these is the question of AIDS, and the only
way that we can cope with this problem is for us to continue training people,
especially machine operators,” he said.

“Apart from this there is the need for social upliftment, and the continued
training and development of people, and while spending money on all of
these programmes we still have to maintain a sound and strong business so
that we can always provided service excellence,” he said.

Foundation

With its vision - “to be recognised and respected as the first choice supplier
of civil engineering services in the Eastern Cape” - Sibakhulu Construction
started as an empowerment joint venture with Power Construction East Cape
in 1998. This came a year after the establishment of Hughmic Construction in
Cape Town - the first emerging company to be associated with the Group.
Sibakhulu Construction’s first project was to build 2 000 schools throughout
the Eastern Cape. In 2002 Power Construction East Cape was sold to and
incorporated into Sibakhulu Construction.

The directors of Sibakhulu Construction include prominent leaders within the
former company. They are Mr Dumisa Mcetywa (managing), Mr Mthiwabo
(Mike) Ndube, well known in Eastern Cape political circles, Mr Glenville
Cullum, and Mr Jacques du Preez.

Because of Sibakhulu Construction’s association with the Power Group, the
company has a culture that is aimed at restructuring community pride. While
its focus is on creating functional structures in concrete and steel, the
company takes a wider view of the heart and soul of the community from
which it draws its workforce. The company is proud of its true community
orientation, ever involved in training and providing utilities and facilities for
the community. The company believes it is positioned to play a significant
role in shaping the future of the Eastern Cape.

Housing

At the celebration in Port Elizabeth, Mr Mark Julie, of Power Developments,
announced that in a further restructuring of the Group, Khayalethu Projects
had been established. This newest and third emerging company in the Group
is to comprise a shareholding of 51% held by previously disadvantaged
people and 49% Power Developments. The objective of Khayalethu Projects
is to provide affordable homes throughout South Africa.

Guests were told that the Power Group had provided more than 30 000
affordable homes in the past 5 years.

The Chief Executive of the Power Group, Mr Graham Power, told guests that
he had started business from a stable converted into an office at Elandskloof
on Sir Lowry’s Pass in 1983.

“I am extremely thankful for the fantastic breaks and positive opportunities
we have had, which have enabled us to grow to where the company is
today,” he said.

He added that he was pleased that the Power Group had invested in the
Eastern Cape, and it was a joyous occasion when the Power Group decided to
sell a 51% shareholding to Sibakhulu Construction.

Genuine

“This is not a fronting organisation, but it is indeed a genuine empowerment
company,” said Mr Power. “Through the Group to our associates 88,5% of
our 1 600 people are people of colour,” he told guests. “I am also happy to
say that within the 20 years of our existence we have not had the need to
retrench one person, which is a unique achievement in business today.

“There is a family spirit within our group and one of the cornerstones of
which we are proud is that we talk about promotion from within. We hope
that we can continue to grow at a reasonable pace to give people the
opportunity to develop from within our organisation.

“We have a 100-year dream. It is true that none of us will be around to see it
happen, but we are committing ourselves to developing and training people
and not to say that we want to make as much money as we can in our
lifetime, and what follows is somebody else’s problem,” he said.

“I am absolutely convinced that South Africa’s, and Africa’s, time has come.
The dark continent, with all the problems we hear about - we hear about 20-
million AIDS orphans by the year 2020 in sub-Saharan Africa - will see a
major turnaround through a spiritual revival,” he concluded.

Mr Andre’ du Preez, the managing director of Power Construction, said it was
good to be visiting an area where the construction industry is showing good
signs of revival, with an increase in government and private spending.

“We see a great opportunity for the construction industry in this region,” he
said.
“Education and training is a passion of our Group and last year we employed
more than 60 students with a view to picking the top candidates for bursaries
for this year. We provided 17 full-time bursaries, and in other cases part-
time bursaries, for young people. We have a similar vision for the year
2004,” he told guests.

Projects

Some of the projects in which the Power Group has been involved,
include:

           In 1996 the Power Group secured a R22-m contract to build a
           temporary township to house 4 000 workers at Saldanha Steel. A
           sub-contractor consortium, headed by Power Construction,
           undertook the R3, 8-m civil; services contract for the new
           township. They were also involved in the earthworks to the main
           project;
           In 1996 Power Construction West Cape completed 20 infrastructure
           contracts at the R2-bn Century City development. Turnover in a
           single month totalled R17-m;
           In 2000, Power Construction started development on Thesen
           Islands, Knysna, the largest marina development yet seen in South
           Africa. The project has a R100-m civil component;
       In 2001 Power Construction carried out the bulk earthworks and
   installation of services for 6 320 erven at Delft, and Power Developments
   was appointed as developer for Towns 10 to 13 - a project value of R113-
   m - where an average of 500 houses/month were delivered by seven local
   emerging contractors;
           In 2002 the award of the contract to Sibakhulu Construction for
           bulk earthworks to the harbour basin, the construction of Neptune
           Road, and civils work at Fairview Township, came as a major
           breakthrough for Sibakhulu Construction and Eastern Cape
           business.
           This year the Institute for Housing in South Africa Award for
           Developer of the Year has gone to Power Developments for is work
           in the Western Cape and the Group received the Professional
           Management Review's Diamond Award for Environmental Health
           Care.
October 2003

Business Focus : World Summit on Sustainable Development


Thesen Islands – Sustainable Development Success


“We stand today on the threshold of a new era in the history of Knysna. An era
that will be characterised by development that is sustainable, that takes into
account, very seriously, environmental concerns and the need for the future
generations to also sustain themselves.” This was the opening address of Deputy
Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Ms. R.T. Mabudahfhasi, to
celebrate the start of construction of the re-development of Thesen Island in the
Knysna lagoon.


Replacing an 80-year old timber factory with an attractive 19 island marina,
Thesen     Islands   is   South     Africa’s   most   extensively   researched   and
environmentally investigated residential development. Over the 10 year planning
of the project, Cape Nature Conservation, Department of Environmental Affairs
and Tourism, S.A. National Parks, Department of Water Affairs and Knysna
Municipality, together with the development research and planning team, were
involved to ensure that an environmentally friendly, sustainable development was
achieved. Of paramount importance was that the project would be in harmony
with the    lagoon, it would be sustainable and that jobs would be created,
particularly for local residents.


Cape Town based, Power Construction, is responsible for the major construction
work on the development of the waterways, roads, bridges, sidewalks, water and
sewerage reticulation. With a team of 240 local workers, the construction of the
waterways has proceeded quickly. Designed by international marine consultants,
the waterways are retained by natural packed stone gabion wire baskets.
Geofabric material on the inside prevents fine sand filtering through between the
stones. The top edges of the gabions in the inter-tidal zone, are planted with
indigenous, inter-tidal groundcovers. A state-of-the-art modelling system
developed by The Danish Hydraulic Institute was used by the CSIR to assist
with the design and layout of the waterways. The tidal flow around the islands is
proving to have excellent natural circulation.


The waterways are already populated by a diversity of marine life and the 11ha.
bird reserve / parkland provides a safe haven for both aquatic and terrestrial
birds. With 230 stands sold and 50 homes already under construction, Thesen
Islands is achieving its objectives.
October 2003

PMR’s Corporate Care Awards
PMR’s Corporate Care Awards were launched in 1990 by PMR’s founder, Ray
Wood. The aim – then as now – was to recognise and honour companies trying
to build a better SA for all (“the good face of capitalism” as he liked to say!) and
to encourage others to follow their example.

Initially comprising two categories, Social Upliftment and Environmental Care, the
project currently encompasses an additional five major areas of social
responsibility: BEE, Corporate Governance, Job Creation & Training, Primary
Healthcare and War Against Criminals. The overall winner in each category
receives a trophy, while the overall top achievement receives the National
Renaissance Award.

Coverage of these activities has also widened to include achievements by
government (at all levels) and NGOs as well as corporates. Similarly, the
project’s name – amended in the late ‘90s to the PMR emPower Awards –
reverted back to its original branding this year, mainly due to external perceptions
that the term ‘empower’ has become linked only to BEE and/or more often than
not infers intention rather than action.

Since it’s actions – and impact – which PMR measures, the standard procedure
of organisations submitting social responsibility programmes for adjudication was
supplemented this year by a research project.
The highest accolade – the National Renaissance Trophy – went to Telkom SA
for their broad and bold corporate care programmes across all seven categories.
As a previous sponsor of this trophy, it’s a special honour for Telkom SA to win
the title they initially endorsed and to be recognised as the organisation doing
most across the board to uplift and build South Africa.

Individual trophies were awarded to the company rated highest overall in each
category. The Power Group of Companies – a top three finalist in three
categories – won two trophies, Environmental Care and Job Creation and
Training.
ABSA Group and Standard Bank stood out both in their industry and on overall
scoring, with each ranking in the top three in two categories. ABSA won the
Social Upliftment trophy while the Black Economic Empowerment trophy,
sponsored by Cliffe Dekker, went to Standard Bank.

A deserved win in the Primary Healthcare category was Spoor Fisher. With
neither the force nor the funding of many other finalises, this legal firm
nonetheless supports 103 charities – mostly healthcare-related – while running
its own projects to empower people to reach their full health potential.
Crime Buster’s self-empowerment programmes once again won the War Against
Criminals (WAC) trophy, sponsored this year by TransUnion ITC.
Across the seven categories, WAC and Corporate Governance (won by Telkom
SA) had the least finalists, indicating that more action is required.

Representing all facets and sizes of enterprise, their one unifying factor is
recognition for what they’ve done. Like the story of the stranded starfish on the
beach where throwing one back into the sea made a huge difference (to that
one), so each of this year’s Corporate Care finalists is making a difference in
South Africa.

Award eligibility – as based on ratings by survey respondents and/or the
Corporate Care judging panel – was determined as follows:
Citations: One or two commendation(s) in an industry sector
Roll of Honour: Ranked second or third in industry sector
Top rated in industry: Ranked first in industry sector
Category Trophy: Highest rated organisation overall (across industries) in each
category
National Renaissance Award: Highest rated organisation across all 7 corporate
care categories
October 2003

CAPE TIMES WOMEN IN BUILDING

THE POWER GROUP

Marlene Cronje is the Organizational Development Director of the Power
Group of Companies, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. The
Group employs more than 1600 people and provides a comprehensive range
of   civil    engineering,   blacktop   paving,   manufacturing   and   township
development services with major contracts that spread across the Western-;
Eastern-; and Southern Cape.


She says: “The Power Group is committed to Employment equity and thus
also to the empowerment of women in the industry. Women are represented
on all levels throughout the company and our intent is not to only have
women in clerical or administrative positions, but also in technical careers.
We were therefore proud to appoint our first female Engineer, Alex
Capostagno, in 2002. We have also allocated bursaries to 3 female students
for 2004, and are proud to play an important role in their education and
training.”


The Power Group furthermore focuses on the development of women within
the company. All staff members have personal development plans, which
address their aspirations, the competencies needed for present and future
positions, as well as the behaviour competencies required. This has played an
important role in the development of the female workforce and many women
have over the past years progressed to more senior positions as a result of
the latter.


Marlene holds Honours degrees in Social Work and in Industrial Psychology.
She was appointed to the board of the Power Group in 2001, and after
consulting to the Group for five years, joined the company on a fulltime basis
in 2002.
She says: “I do not regard the Construction Industry as a man's world. It is
an industry for people, both male and female, with guts, tenacity, a
willingness to work hard, and for people who enjoys overcoming challenges
and have a passion for what they do.”


            Woman in Industry - Power Group of Companies

The Power Group is committed to Employment equity and thus also to the
empowerment of women in the industry. At the moment we have employed
the following females at the following different levels:
Level                                    Number
Senior Management                        1
Middle Management                        2
Junior Management                        12
Administrative/clerical                  45
Entry level workers                      44
Total                                    104

We intend to increase the above and will also have 3 female bursars for
2004. Our intent is not to only have woman in clerical/administrative
positions, but also in technical positions. Our first female Engineer, Alex
Capostagno was appointed in 2002.


We also focus on the development of women in the Company. All monthly
paid staff members have personal development plans which addresses their
aspirations, competencies needed for present and future positions as wel as
behavior competencies needed. Various females have over the past years
progressed to more senior positions as a result of the latter.


Information on Marlene Cronje
   Married with twins aged 13
   Honours degree in Social Work - University of Stellenbosch
   Honours degree in Industrial Psychology - UNISA
   Started career as a social worker in 1983 and while working at the
    Koeberg nuclear power station as an industrial social worker, decided to
    change career to human resources field. Specialised in Organizational
    Development.
   Started own consulting business in 1997 with partner - Helene du Toit
   Involved with the Power Group since 1997 as a consultant.
   Appointed to the Board in 2001 as Organizational Development Director
   Full time employee from 2002


I believe that one should live a purpose driven life. If you understand your
calling in life, you develop a passion for what you do. My passion is the
development of people.       I further do not believe that women need to
compete with men. We have other qualities and talents that we can bring to
the table, which are very needed in any industry today, especially with
regards to motivation, intuition, teamwork and interpersonal skills and even
leadership in general. I am a firm believer in the value of diversity. It is in
valuing our differences that we can achieve so much more.


I do not regard the Construction Industry as a man's world. It is the industry
for people (male and female) with guts, tenacity, a willingness to work hard
and for people who enjoys overcoming challenges and has a passion for what
they do.


I regard myself as a very privileged person, although life was not always
easy. I had to overcome many challenges and disappointments in life. I fully
enjoy what I do and believe that our Industry can also provide other females
with the same opportunity.
OKTOBER 2003

POWER GROEP: 20 JAAR MYLPAAL


Op 16 Oktober 2003 het die Power Groep sy 20 jaar mylpaal gevier ten tye van
die maatskappy se jaarlikse skemerkelkie wat by die Durbanville se resiesbaan
gehou is.

Die maatskappy word wyd erken as een van die provinsie se voorste konstruksie
en eiendom-ontwikkelingsmaatskappye. Gestig in 1983 deur Graham Power, die
Uitvoerende Voorsitter van die Groep, het die maatskappy oor die jare
uitstekende groei ondervind met meer as 1600 personeellede in diens, sonder
dat enige personeelverminderingsaksies ooit genoodsaak is, selfs gedurende
tydperke van swak groei en lae aktiwiteit.


Die Power Groep het ook takke elders in die Kaap, naamlik Power Construction
(West) in Kaapstad en Power Construction (Coastal) in Knysna. Power
Construction Roads, ‘n ander maatskappy binne die groep, is baie suksesvol aan
die werk aan groot padprojekte regoor die land, en dan het Power ook ‘n 49%
aandeelhouding in twee florerende, opkomende maatskappye, naamlik Hughmic
Construction in die Wes-Kaap, en Sibakhulu Construction in die Oos-Kaap.

Power Developments het vanjaar vir die derde keer in ses jaar weer die SA
Instituut vir Behuising se gesogte toekenning as Ontwikkelaar van die Jaar vir die
Wes-Kaap, ontvang uit erkenning van sy bydrae tot die lewering van massa-
behuising aan minderbevoorregtes. Power bou gemiddeld 8 000 tot 12 000 huise
per jaar as deel van verskeie Bekostigbare Behuisingsprojekte, soos
byvoorbeeld die R116 miljoen projek by Delft.


Aan die ander kant is die Power Groep ook trots op sy deelname in sommige van
die mees gesogte ontwikkelings in die land, soos byvoorbeeld Thesen Islands in
die Knysnameer, wat tans in sy finale fase is. Power het hier die PMR se
Omgewingsbewaring toekenning verwerf vir die uitstekende omgewingsorg wat
gehandhaaf is op die eko-sensitiewe bouperseel.


Ander belangrike projekte sluit in die gholfontwikkelings Boschenmeer, Pearl
Valley en Pezula, sowel as Big Bay in Bloubergstrand, en in die Oos-Kaap, die
Coega hawe ontwikkeling en die Oos-London Industriële Ontwikkelingsone.
November 2003



ANOTHER MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL MILESTONE FOR THESEN
ISLANDS



Thesen Islands today celebrated another major milestone with the opening of
the main lagoon access channel, which passes close to the old Thesen jetty,
to complete the linking of the 19 islands and waterways with the Knysna
Lagoon. This, together with the 40m long bridge which connects the
causeway to the historic Garden Route town of Knysna, will have a positive
environmental impact, improving the ecology by fully restoring the water
flow around the islands.


With over nine years in the planning, this blue-chip development is South
Africa's most thoroughly researched and planned residential project.
Extensive environmental studies were conducted to ensure that the
development exists in harmony with the Knysna Estuary environment.


Thesen Islands is the largest marina development in South Africa and is said
to offer the some of the most desirable real estate in the country. 97% of the
522 freehold stands has been sold and more than 100 families have either
taken residence or are building their dream homes. At completion, the low-
density estate will also have 64 exclusive apartments/townhouses and the
small Thesen Harbour Town commercial area. The buyer profile consists of a
mix of local residents, Capetonians and up country families, as well as a
small percentage of international investors.


The 90-hectare private estate is spread across 19 individually named islands
in the Knysna Lagoon. Eighteen of the islands are residential. Six are
exclusive single home islands. The islands are surrounded by tidal
waterways, linked by bridges, with waterfront properties offering private
jetties and beaches. Thesen Harbour Town is located in the historical heart of
the old timber factory area and will offer a lively mix of speciality shops,
coffee shops and restaurants, and an Environmental Centre, which will be
open to the public.


The needs of the community have been in the forefront of the planning. Local
professionals, contractors and labourers have, wherever possible, been given
preference in the development construction. The project will run over
approximately eight years during which it will support local enterprise and
create 2000 jobs, injecting more than R100m a year into the local economy.
It is thus earmarked as one of the most significant economic developments
on the Garden Route in many years.


The Power Group has a major shareholding in the development. Other
shareholders include Chris Mulder and Gray Rutherford who are also part of
the development team, and who were responsible for the well-known
Belvidere Estate (Knysna). The development is funded by the shareholders
and Investec Bank, and has proved itself as an excellent investment
opportunity for buyers.


PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT


The Thesen Islands project has been praised by the Deputy Minister of
Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Ms RT Mabudahfhasi as 'the most
comprehensive, professional and detailed Environmental Impact Assessment
ever undertaken in South Africa, including St Lucia and Saldanha Steel'.


The masterplanning of the project included research by the CSIR and other
renowned bird, plant and wildlife specialists. Eleven hectares of the
development has been preserved as parkland and a bird reserve. Careful
planning and construction has ensured that the new islands and waterways
exist in harmony with the Knysna Estuary. New habitats have been created -
in the waterways, the parklands and bird reserve - to enhance and protect
the natural environment.


Renowned estuarine marine ecologist Dr Allan Heydorn was appointed to
head the Independent Environmental Monitoring Committee to oversee the
project. An Environmental Control Officer was also appointed to monitor
activities such as the protection of the salt marshes and wetlands, the
construction of the waterways, building procedures with a zero-tolerance for
any form of environmental damage.


An example of environmentally friendly practice is the natural rock packed
gabions that form the banks of the waterways. These provide excellent
shelter, feeding and breeding opportunities to marine organism. An 'eco-belt'
has been created around the waters' edge throughout the development,
where salt marsh vegetation was planted, recreating a natural inter-tidal
wetland.


The natural planting of trees, shrubs and grasses provides food, nesting and
shelter and attracts birdlife to Thesen Islands. The islands are becoming a
breeding ground for bird species such as the endangered Black
Oystercatcher, Dikkop, Stilt, Egyptian Geese, and Blacksmith Plover, to name
but a few.


Marine life has prospered too with small fish and creatures, including the
Knysna seahorse, seeking food and shelter in the natural rock along the long
bank edges of the waterways, which in turn attracts a diversity of birds and
larger fish such as Cape Stumpnose and Cob.
November 2003

20-year milestone for Power Group

On October 16, 2003, the Power Group celebrated its 20-year milestone at
its annual cocktail function at the Durbanville Racecourse.

The Group, which comprises several companies, eas established by Graham
Power the executive chairman, and includes Power Construction with
branches in Cape Town and Knysna as well as Power Roads and Power
Developments. The Power Group has a 49% shareholding in successful
emerging companies Hughmic Construction in the Western Cape, and
Sibakhulu Construction in the Eastern Cape. It was announced at the
function that a third empowerment company has been formed. Known as
Khayalethu Projects, it will develop affordable housing projects across South
Africa.
NOVEMBER 2003

The Power Group of Companies – 20 years and counting . . .

The Power Group celebrated its 20th anniversary in April of this year and this was
emphasised at the recent client cocktail held on Thesen Islands in Knysna.

Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman, Graham Power, the Power Group is
known as one of the province’s leading suppliers of civil engineering services and
property developers. With more than 1600 employees, the company spans the
Western, Southern and Eastern Cape. Civil engineering arms include Power
Construction (West), based in Cape Town; Sibakhulu Construction, operating
from Port Elizabeth; and Power Coastal, with offices in Knysna. Power Roads,
another company in the Group, operates throughout the country on major road
projects, while Power Developments’ focus is on turn-key property development.

The Power Group also has a 49% shareholding in emerging companies Hughmic
Construction in the Western Cape, and Sibakhulu Construction in the Eastern
Cape.


Power Coastal under the guidance of Paul Thiart, is currently engaged in
Thesen Islands which is in its final phase and Pezula Private Estate. They
are also involved in various other smaller projects in the Southern Cape.
06 NOVEMBER 2003

The Power Group of Companies – 20 years and counting . . .

The Power Group celebrated its 20th anniversary in April of this year and this was
emphasised at the recent client cocktail held on Thesen Islands in Knysna.

Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman, Graham Power, the Power Group is
known as one of the province’s leading suppliers of civil engineering services and
property developers. With more than 1600 employees, the company spans the
Western, Southern and Eastern Cape. Civil engineering arms include Power
Construction (West), based in Cape Town; Sibakhulu Construction, operating
from Port Elizabeth; and Power Coastal, with offices in Knysna. Power Roads,
another company in the Group, operates throughout the country on major road
projects, while Power Developments’ focus is on turn-key property development.

The Power Group also has a 49% shareholding in emerging companies Hughmic
Construction in the Western Cape, and Sibakhulu Construction in the Eastern
Cape.


Power Coastal under the guidance of Paul Thiart, is currently engaged in Thesen
Islands which is in its final phase and Pezula Private Estate.They are also
involved in various other smaller projects in the Southern Cape.
October 2002

A powerful housing contribution

Power Developments last month handed over the first thousand homes which
are currently under construction at Delft. The project is not only providing
homes to thoudands of families, but also creates jobs for around 3 000
artisans and casual labourers.

The R116 million project consists of a total of 6 320 houses of 30sqm each
and is the biggest single phased affordable housing project ever undertaken
in the Western Cape. The development commenced in December 2001 and is
scheduled for completion in June next year. Construction is taking place at a
record-breaking pace, and 1 500 houses have already been completed.

The project is a 50% joint venture with five local emerging contractors who
formed Delft Integrated Builders: Amandla Construction, Delftcon
Constrcution, Delft South Builders, Group 6 and African Construction.
Tygerberg Administration initiated the project early last year, calling for
proposals for the development at Delft Central. One of the conditions of the
proposas was that the successful developer had to make use of the local
small builders in Delft.

Power Developments tendered successfully for the Delft project and entered
into a contract with the five emerging contractors in December 2001. The
company has much experience in empowerment joint ventures of this kind
and the Power Group has held equal partnerships with prominent emerging
companies such as Hughmic Construction and Sibakhulu Constrcution. It is
the leader in affordable housing in the province and recently received the
coveted Department of Housing award as South Africa’s Best Established
Developer, following two Institute of Housing for South Africa (IHSA) awards:
Developers of the Western Cape in 2001 and South Africa’s Developers of the
year in 1998.

Prior to commencing work on site, Power Developments applied to the
Department of Labour for training funding. The Delft Integrated Builders
were trained in basic business principles, tendering and so on whilst around
300 artisans were trained in the various trades with those skills remaining in
the Delft community after the completion of the project.
2002

Emerging construction company celebrates 5th anniversary


In 1997 Hughmic was established as a small, equal partnership company
within the Power Group. Since its small beginnings five years ago, it has
become a success story as one of the first emerging companies associated
with the Power Group.


Today Hughmic is an independent, privately owned company that employs 22
permanent staff and 30 contract employees, and takes on multimillion Rand
projects. The dynamic young team is lead by managing director Channo
Hughes, and Abel Michel, the technical director, who together established the
company in 1997.


Hughmic has come a long way since its first project at Delft township, which
was followed by its big break in 1998, when the company was contracted to
install a large portion of the services at the Ratanga Junction Theme Park.
This watershed project comprised of canals, secondary earthworks and
extensive pathways, which ‘paved the way’ for bigger, high profile projects.


Those include work at Dunoon townships and the construction of its
sportsfields and its current project at the prestigious Boschenmeer Golf and
Country Estate in Paarl, which consists of earthworks and services for the
entire project.
“I would like to thank the Power Group for their guidance and support. Also a
special word of thanks to Louwtjie Louw, Director of Power Construction West
Cape, for his mentorship and guidance to the company for four and a half
years. To my own team, who is the future of this company, thank you for
their hard work, commitment and loyalty over the past five years.” Says
Channo Hughes.
The company is also grateful to its various clients and suppliers for their most
valued support over the past five years.
May 2002


N1 FREEWAY/GIEL BASSON INTERCHANGE OPENS AT N1 CITY
(TYGERBERG)

Cape Town, 10 May 2002: The Minister of Transport, Public Works and
Property Management, and Provincial Administration of the Western Cape, Ms
Tasneem Essop, today conducted the official opening of the first phase of the
new Giel Basson Interchange on the N1 freeway, at N1 City (Tygerberg).


The Minister indicated that this R13,7 million project consisted of the
construction of two ramps, which link the N1 freeway with Giel Basson Drive.
By utilising these ramps, and taking into account the current improvements
to Giel Basson Drive itself, it will shortly be possible to access from the N1
freeway to the airport in the south, and Rothschild Boulevard in the north.
Ultimately this route will become a major arterial in the Cape Metropole as it
will permit a direct link from the West Coast to the Cape Town International
Airport, via the N7 freeway.


According to Minister Essop, construction of the Giel Basson Interchange is
another perfect example of co-operation between Government and the
private sector in terms of upgrading the infrastructure of the city.


The Head of Transport Infrastruture, Mr Jakkie Van Heerden, indicated that
personnel from his Department had controlled the planning, design and
supervision phases, but that the funding for the first phase of this project
was a joint venture between the public and private sectors. Seventy five
percent (75%) was financed by a consortium that consists of the Provincial
Administration of the Western Cape (PAWC), the City of Tygerberg and the
Cape Metropolitan Council (CMC), the latter two now incorporated in the City
of Cape Town.
Syfin Properties (Pty) Ltd, developers of the N1 City Complex, and one of the
leading landowners and property developers in the Western Cape, financed
the balance of 25%.


The project was designed by Arcus Gibb Consulting Engineers who describe
the project as challenging in terms of the technical complexity of joining the
new ramps to the existing post tensioned concrete structure, but also
rewarding in terms of the teamwork and cooperation this multifaceted project
required. Arcus Gibb has a strong empowerment focus and were pleased to
have a number of female and affirmative staff assigned to the project.


The new interchange will play an important role in alleviating traffic
congestion in the area by improving traffic flow and providing alternative
access to Cape Town International Airport. Simultaneously, it will facilitate
the further development of the N1 City complex as the only retail and
business complex in the Western Cape that offers the benefit of two access
points from the N1 freeway (Monte Vista Interchange at Vasco Boulevard and
the new Giel Basson Interchange).


The N1 City complex, South Africa’s first self-contained “mini-city” is a 62
hectare, R1, 8 billion development with a gross lettable area of 200 000m2,
that includes retail and office space, as well as the N1 City Hospital. The
development commenced in 1989 with the completion of the N1 City
Shopping Mall that currently offers 57 000m2 of retail space.


Says Willem Scholtz, Managing Director of Syfin, developers of N1 City: “We
are pleased to play a part in the construction of the Giel Basson Interchange
and the improved access it will provide our tenants to and from the N1, and
enhanced exposure to the passing traffic to the airport. A number of high
profile corporations had the vision to recognise the potential of N1 City as an
ideal central location, and the anticipated convenience and exposure which
was envisaged to result from the (then planned) Giel Basson Intersection.
These include landmarks such as M-Web, Multichoice, Orbit Motors (Daimler
Chrysler), Atkinson’s Toyota, Fedics and Bankfin, and these businesses will
certainly reap the benefits of the improved road network at the new
interchange.”


He continued to say that a number of new office park developments have
been completed on the eastern boundary of N1 City, adjacent to the Parow
Golf Course, and that those have been very popular, and demand for office
space overlooking the golf course has been excellent.


“The improved access to Giel Basson Road from the N1 freeway provides
Syfin with the opportunity to further develop the full potential of N1 City. A
number of exciting new business park developments are planned for the
remaining open land within and around N1 City”, Scholtz concluded.


The construction work on the Giel Basson Interchange was completed on 30
April 2002 after it was delayed by five months due to the liquidation of the
first contractor. Power Construction had been appointed on the 13th
September 2001 to complete the project.


Power Construction West Cape is a division of the Cape-based Power Group
of Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services.


Power Construction is renowned for enriching the communities in which it
operates in terms of skills transfer, training and the building of relationships
with previously disadvantaged communities. The construction of the Giel
Basson Interchange was no exception and R28 000 was spent on training 44
people in road safety, 8 as flagmen and 10 as shutter hands.
Construction consisted of two 13 000 m3, 6m high reinforced earth ramp
embankments and 12 000m² of roadway. 1 300 m3 Of concrete was utilised
in total, with no disabling injuries or deaths taking place.


This Contract has also provided opportunities for the emerging contractors to
participate in a multifaceted civil engineering project. Amounts in excess of
R2,7 million were paid to affirmative business enterprises for production of
reinforced earth panels, kerbing and concrete works.


Power Construction sub-contracted to Blitz Asphalt, Peak Projects, Johannes
Koopman Kerbing (ABE), Centremark Roadmarking, Cape Otto Signs, Triple
C   Concrete   (ABE),   Concrete   Worm,    Seymour     Paving   and   Tygerberg
Electrotechnical.
May 2002


N1 FREEWAY/GIEL BASSON INTERCHANGE OPENS AT N1 CITY
(TYGERBERG)

Cape Town, 10 May 2002: The Minister of Transport, Public Works and
Property Management, and Provincial Administration of the Western Cape, Ms
Tasneem Essop, today conducted the official opening of the first phase of the
new Giel Basson Interchange on the N1 freeway, at N1 City (Tygerberg).


The Minister indicated that this R13,7 million project consisted of the
construction of two ramps, which link the N1 freeway with Giel Basson Drive.
By utilising these ramps, and taking into account the current improvements
to Giel Basson Drive itself, it will shortly be possible to access from the N1
freeway to the airport in the south, and Rothschild Boulevard in the north.
Ultimately this route will become a major arterial in the Cape Metropole as it
will permit a direct link from the West Coast to the Cape Town International
Airport, via the N7 freeway.


According to Minister Essop, construction of the Giel Basson Interchange is
another perfect example of co-operation between Government and the
private sector in terms of upgrading the infrastructure of the city.


The Head of Transport Infrastruture, Mr Jakkie Van Heerden, indicated that
personnel from his Department had controlled the planning, design and
supervision phases, but that the funding for the first phase of this project
was a joint venture between the public and private sectors. Seventy five
percent (75%) was financed by a consortium that consists of the Provincial
Administration of the Western Cape (PAWC), the City of Tygerberg and the
Cape Metropolitan Council (CMC), the latter two now incorporated in the City
of Cape Town.
Syfin Properties (Pty) Ltd, developers of the N1 City Complex, and one of the
leading landowners and property developers in the Western Cape, financed
the balance of 25%.


The project was designed by Arcus Gibb Consulting Engineers who describe
the project as challenging in terms of the technical complexity of joining the
new ramps to the existing post tensioned concrete structure, but also
rewarding in terms of the teamwork and cooperation this multifaceted project
required. Arcus Gibb has a strong empowerment focus and were pleased to
have a number of female and affirmative staff assigned to the project.


The new interchange will play an important role in alleviating traffic
congestion in the area by improving traffic flow and providing alternative
access to Cape Town International Airport. Simultaneously, it will facilitate
the further development of the N1 City complex as the only retail and
business complex in the Western Cape that offers the benefit of two access
points from the N1 freeway (Monte Vista Interchange at Vasco Boulevard and
the new Giel Basson Interchange).


The N1 City complex, South Africa’s first self-contained “mini-city” is a 62
hectare, R1, 8 billion development with a gross lettable area of 200 000m2,
that includes retail and office space, as well as the N1 City Hospital. The
development commenced in 1989 with the completion of the N1 City
Shopping Mall that currently offers 57 000m2 of retail space.


Says Willem Scholtz, Managing Director of Syfin, developers of N1 City: “We
are pleased to play a part in the construction of the Giel Basson Interchange
and the improved access it will provide our tenants to and from the N1, and
enhanced exposure to the passing traffic to the airport. A number of high
profile corporations had the vision to recognise the potential of N1 City as an
ideal central location, and the anticipated convenience and exposure which
was envisaged to result from the (then planned) Giel Basson Intersection.
These include landmarks such as M-Web, Multichoice, Orbit Motors (Daimler
Chrysler), Atkinson’s Toyota, Fedics and Bankfin, and these businesses will
certainly reap the benefits of the improved road network at the new
interchange.”


He continued to say that a number of new office park developments have
been completed on the eastern boundary of N1 City, adjacent to the Parow
Golf Course, and that those have been very popular, and demand for office
space overlooking the golf course has been excellent.


“The improved access to Giel Basson Road from the N1 freeway provides
Syfin with the opportunity to further develop the full potential of N1 City. A
number of exciting new business park developments are planned for the
remaining open land within and around N1 City”, Scholtz concluded.


The construction work on the Giel Basson Interchange was completed on 30
April 2002 after it was delayed by five months due to the liquidation of the
first contractor. Power Construction had been appointed on the 13th
September 2001 to complete the project.


Power Construction West Cape is a division of the Cape-based Power Group
of Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services.


Power Construction is renowned for enriching the communities in which it
operates in terms of skills transfer, training and the building of relationships
with previously disadvantaged communities. The construction of the Giel
Basson Interchange was no exception and R28 000 was spent on training 44
people in road safety, 8 as flagmen and 10 as shutter hands.
Construction consisted of two 13 000 m3, 6m high reinforced earth ramp
embankments and 12 000m² of roadway. 1 300 m3 Of concrete was utilised
in total, with no disabling injuries or deaths taking place.


This Contract has also provided opportunities for the emerging contractors to
participate in a multifaceted civil engineering project. Amounts in excess of
R2,7 million were paid to affirmative business enterprises for production of
reinforced earth panels, kerbing and concrete works.


Power Construction sub-contracted to Blitz Asphalt, Peak Projects, Johannes
Koopman Kerbing (ABE), Centremark Roadmarking, Cape Otto Signs, Triple
C   Concrete   (ABE),   Concrete   Worm,    Seymour     Paving   and   Tygerberg
Electrotechnical.
May 2002

Power-2

Power Construction, 19 years old this year, is the flagship of the Power Group
of Companies, which includes, amongst others, a property development
company and a blacktop road surfacing company.


Komatsu’s popular D65E-12 and D65EX-12 bulldozers, first introduced into
the local market in 1998, have undergone periodic modifications recently.


The latest upgrades of the 20,5 t D65E-12 unit, equipped with wet multiple-
disc steering clutches, and the 20,6 t D65EX-12, which incorporates
hydrostatic steering, include improved productivity, easier maintenance,
improved operating comfort and
reduced noise and vibration.


The productivity enhancements consist of a significantly increased blade
raising speed, - from 3,0 cm/sec previously to 9,5 cm/sec in the latest model
– and a reduced turning radius for improved manoeuvrability in confined
areas.


Komatsu’s new decal design for all its latest model equipment – adopted
since last year co-inciding with Komatsu Ltd’s celebration of its 80th
Anniversary – also applies to the latest versions of the D65E-12 and D65EX-
12 dozers.


The D65E-12 dozer has a flywheel power of 135 kW, an operating weight of
20 465 kg and a blade capacity of 5,61 cu m. The D65EX-12 dozer has a
flywheel power of 142 kW, an operating weight of 20 635 kg and a blade
capacity of 5,61 cu m.
May 2002

POWER CONSTRUCTION COMPLETES THE FIRST TWO PHASES
OF CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE AT PEARL VALLEY SIGNATURE
GOLF ESTATE


Cape Town, May 2002: Power Construction West Cape has completed
phases 1 and 2 of the bulk earthworks at the prestigious Pearl Valley
Signature Golf Estate in the Franschhoek winelands, for Client Novelway
Investments (Pty) Ltd, a subsidiary company of MRCB, Malaysia.


Construction of phases 1 and 2 valued at R11 million, commenced in March
2001 with the excavation of dams and earthworks for the first nine fairways,
was completed in January 2002. Bulk earthworks for phase 3, plus a one
kilometer access road, together with the first phase of civil infrastructure, are
currently under construction to the value of R40 million. After completion of
phase 3, a total of 1 million m³ of material would have been moved. The
expected date of completion for the current contract is set for 25 August
2002. Golf Data, a Golf Course Construction Specialist, will be completing the
finishes to all 18 holes by May 2003. Weather permitting no delays will be
expected and transfers of the properties of phase 1 should take place in
September 2002.


Power Construction, who has become a leader in the field of providing bulk
earthworks, roads and services for golf estate developments, is currently
busy with services for Boschenmeer Golf and Country Estate in the Paarl
Franschhoek    valley.   Its   Southern   Cape   branch   has   completed    the
construction of bulk earthworks, roads and services at Sparrebosch Golf
Estate in Knysna.


More about the Power Group of Companies
Power Construction West Cape is a division of the Cape-based Power Group
of Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services.


Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman of the Group, Graham Power, the
Power Group now employs more than 1500 people and spans the Western,
Southern    and    Eastern   Cape.    Civil   engineering   arms   include   Power
Construction (West), based in Cape Town; Power Construction (East),
operating from Port Elizabeth; and Power Construction (South), with offices
in Knysna. Hughmic Construction (Pty) Ltd and Sibakhulu Construction (Pty)
Ltd, operates as empowerment joint ventures to Power Construction West
Cape and Power Construction East Cape respectively. Other divisions within
the Power Group include Power Developments; Blitz Asphalt, A.V. Mouldings
and Derby Materials, suppliers of quarry products, operating in Knysna.


The Power Group’s achievements have been acknowledged in several
prestigious national and international awards, including the Professional
Marketing Review’s Golden Arrow Award as the highest rated construction
company in the Western Cape (September 2000). Another is the Steel
Construction Award in the category for Bridges to Power Construction West
Cape (August 2001).


Other accolades to the Group include the International Africa Award in Tunis
in 1997. Power Developments received the Institute of Housing for South
Africa (IHSA) award as South Africa’s Developer of the Year for 1998 and in
2001. In 1993, Graham Power was also rewarded the SA Institution of Civil
Engineers Presidents Award for Meritous Service for assistance rendered to
small and emerging contractors in their efforts to build financial and
management        independence   as   well    as   the   Johannesburg   Afrikaanse
Sakekamer Junior Businessman of the Year Award in 1989.
June 2002

More affordable stands at Brackenridge

Power Developments, the majority shareholder in the Brackenridge estate,
Plettenberg Bay has given the go-ahead to release to the market a further 35
stands being phase 2.

Stands in Phase 2 are more affordable than those on the millionaires row which
is now over 65% sold, a notable acceleration in sales since March. This
exceptional development is set on just 40% of one of the last great unspoilt tracts
of elevated land in Plettenberg Bay and is close to unspoilt Robberg beach.

Stands in phase 2 start from as little as R200 000 which represents great value
when considering current plot prices in sought-after Pletten-berg Bay. When
balanced against the bonus of being located in an high-end secure development
such as Brackenridge the starting price represents exceptional value.

“Brackenridge offers the highest standards of security what with electrified
fencing, on-site security personnel and 24-hour access control,” says project
manager Roger Oakes.

“Couple that with exceptional service infrastructure, sensitive street lighting, a
high-tech communications facility and the coastal fynbos, you’ve a winning
investment in phase 2.”

Brackenridge estate affords impressive views over the Indian Ocean, the verdant
fairways of the adjacent Plettenberg Bay Golf Club and the Outeniqua mountains
beyond. Less than 40% of the 125 hectare ridge and the surrounding valley is
being developed however, the remainder being retained in its pristine state as an
increasingly rare example of endangered coastal fynbos.

This coastal habitat has over 8500 flowering plant species and Brackenridge’s
policy is to be a development where active preservation of the fynbos and the
indigenous bird and animal life is practiced, rather than relying on passive
conservation. To this end an independent environmental consultant has been
retained.

The recently launched one-stop plot and plan buiding service offered at
Brackenridge is specifically designed to meet the needs of those purchasers who
are at present resident far from Plettenberg Bay and cannot therefore stay in
daily touch with the building process on the ground.

“This service has been provided to alleviate a plot-purchaser’s stress and
hassles,” says Henrie Jonck, the operational director of Brackenridge Property
(Pty) Ltd and a director of Power Developments.
An integral part of this service will be the presentation of several distinctive basic
house styles and plans from which to choose and adapt to ones needs within the
prescribed building guidelines.

“It gives the purchaser a basic idea from which to develop their own homes with
the appointed architects, or their own architects.” The architectural guidelines are
designed to build homes that reflect current styles and tastes whilst maximizing
the ambience of the immediate surroundings. Building types, materials and
construction methods have been carefully selected to reinforce the character of a
development in harmony with its natural setting.
July 2002

Graham Power – “Don’t give up in the tough times”


Graham Power is a hands-on man. In the construction industry he loves
working outdoors despite the sometimes adverse weather conditions and
when he is not working he throws himself into rugby, squash and water-
skiing, grasping life with both hands.


Graham is a man who doesn’t wait for other people to open doors for him. At
28, after working as a surveyor and contracts manager with Savage &
Lovemore for nine and a half years, he started his own company, Power
Construction and six years later in 1989 won the Johannesburg Afrikaanse
Sakekamer Junior Businessman of the Year Award. Now at 47, he’s director
or board member of 40 companies and has no doubt made his mentors Noel
Shackleton (managing partner of Kantey & Templer Construction
Engineering) and Geoff Woodland (director of Savage & Lovemore) proud.


He says, “Noel and Geoff taught me to be conscientious, diligent and
dedicated in all I do and not to give up in the tough times. As Noel reminded
me, there has never been a drought which has not been broken; for every up
there is a down.” But Graham’s commitment to his work is not self-centred.
Despite being in an industry where in the current climate, emerging
contractors are often given preferential treatment of the “old names”, he was
awarded the SA Institution of Civil Engineers Presidential Award for
Meritotius Service in 1993 for assisting small and emerging contractors in
their efforts to build financial and management independence.


He is also focused on hands-on-development in South Africa and the rest of
the continent. “One of the roblems in South Africa today is unemployment
and lack of skills. We need to improve the average level of education of our
youth and give them encouragement and support to be innovative. I believe
our future is positive with the infrastructure we have in place we can play a
great role in development in Africa.” He says. This commitment is not purely
lip service as evidenced by the Power Group’s receipt of the International
Africa Award in 1997 and the Institute for Housing for South Africa Award as
developer of the year in 1998.


But international awards, monetary success and the admiration of his peers,
are not as important to Graham as the approval of God. He says, “My vision
is to live a happy, fulfilled life on a personal as well as a business level,
guided by Christ. I aim to do everything I can to help make the world a
better place; to be the very best I can be abd ti use my God-given talents for
Him.”
July 2002

Asphalt upgrade features French mix design

Several asphalt manufacturing innovations have been introduced to meet the
specifications of a R42 million contract, now underway for the rehabilitation
and resurfacing of 26kms of the N7 highway between Cape Town and
Malmesbury.

“The asphalt mix design, developed in France is complex in both its
aggregate and grading specifications and also demanded innovative
treatment of the bitumen additive process,” according to Garth Miller, branch
manager of the Much Asphalt plant at Contermanskloof.

In terms of the contract, Much Asphalt will supply 35 000 tons of asphalt and
329 000 m2 of ultra thin friction course (UTFC), which is being laid at a
nomial thickness of 18mm. A further 28 000m3 of existing surface is being
recycled in situ using foamed bitumen.

The UTFC specified for the contract is a proprietary thin layer asphalt product
licenced to Murray and Roberts Civils and marketed under the name
Novachip. The 14-month contract is a joint venture between Martin & East
and Blitz Asphalt, with sub contractors Murray & Roberts Civils, Zebra
Bituminous Surfacing and A&R Construction. The consulting engineers are
Jeffares & Green and the client is the Provincial Administration Westerm
Cape.

Miller said that the aggregate for the UTFC was graded through only four
sieves, resulting in a uniquely uniform 9mm grading, which was also
specified at a shape (square with rounded edges) and flakiness index of very
specific tolerance. Of the total aggregate content 22 percent was a specific
type of crusher dust which has to be imported from Worcester to meet the
French specifications.

“Bonding between aggregate and binder is critical to the long-term
performance of the UTFC,” Miller explained. “The polymine we have used to
enhance adherence in the past has always been blended with the base
bitumen, but for this contract we modified our plant with the addition of a
fully automated injection system which sprays the polymine directly into the
mixer.”
“This is a new concept for us and it is working perfectly, although we have
found it is best to mix the total day’s requirements between 300 and 400
tons in one batch.

A further constraint is that the UTFC has a thickness of only 18mm and is
being liad in the Cape winter over a total distance of 26km. This means
temperature control of the asphalt has been critical to both the aesthetics
and the narrow compaction window with which the contractors have had to
work.”

Varying rehabilitation strategies are specified for different sections of the
highway to achieve optimum cost-effectivess. For example a survey of the
road surface found that deterioration was most afvanced closer to industrial
areas such as Milerton and Montague Gardens. These areas required more
radical rehabilitation work, including milling and replacement with emulsion
treated base (ETB) than sections of the north bound carriageway, which
required only a surface overlay.
July 2002


POWER DEVELOPMENTS RECOGNISED AS SA’S ‘BEST ESTABLISHED
DEVELOPER’

Cape Town, July 2002: The National Minister of Housing, Ms Sankie Mthembi-
Mahanyele recently presented the coveted “Best Established Developer Award”
to Power Developments at the National Housing Awards ceremony, which was
held in Johannesburg.

Power Developments was nominated for this prestigious award by the Western
Cape Department of Housing, in recognition of its contribution to the mass
delivery of houses to the poor. A panel consisting of various role players in the
housing industry from each of the provinces, travelled throughout the country to
visit each of the nominated companies and their developments.

To date, Power Developments had successfully delivered more than 25 000
subsidised houses in the Eastern and Western Cape. It has established itself as
the leading developer of subsidized housing in the Western Cape, and acts as
turnkey developers of various types of affordable housing, by providing an all
inclusive package to local authorities, communities and first time home owners.

The Power Developments delivery model is based on a zero financial risk to local
authorities; training and empowerment of the communities in which it works;
establishment and support of small business enterprise; mass delivery of housing
using only local labour and artisans; and providing quality/low maintenance
houses.

Power Developments designed a low maintenance house with options to extend,
and has become renowned for providing quality products which includes the
design of holistic neighbourhoods with educational, recreational, business and
other facilities.

It is the largest turnkey developer of affordable housing in the Western Cape and
has the resources to deliver hundreds of quality houses in the shortest time
possible, eg 450 houses per month at Tygerberg Administration’s 6320 house
development at Delft.

It also provides an in-house project management service, which ensures that the
various teams work closely together: from the professional team, to the sales and
administration teams, and those responsible for the physical construction of
services and houses.
Power Developments sources all labour and artisans from local communities in
the form of subcontractors, and provides accredited training in various fields to
emerging contractors and various civil and building trades, as well as Home
Owners Responsibility for first time home owners.

It also involves itself in an all inclusive and thorough community liaison process
before the start of any project, and provides workshops to obtain information and
to communicate effectively with the beneficiary communities.

On completion, Power Developments provides ‘after-sales service’ by running a
complaints office that rectifies any latent or patent defects.

The Power Group also has various social responsibility projects that support
educational, community and welfare organizations. It believes in leaving behind a
community facility on completion of each project, typically a large material store,
which is changed and renovated into a community facility such as a clinic or
crèche, at the end of the project. The company’s latest initiative is to donate a
tree to all new homeowners to encourage the establishment of a garden and
turning a new house into a home.

Graham Power, the Chairman of the Power Group said that Power
Developments is honoured to be the recipient of the country’s top housing award.
“I would like to thank the Western Cape Department of Housing who nominated
Power Developments for this award, as well as the Power Construction Civils
division who played an instrumental part in the delivery of our turnkey projects.”

The company also won the regional award from the South African Institute for
Housing (IHSA) in 1998 and 2002, and in 1998 went on to win the national IHSA
Award as recognition of its status as the market leader in affordable housing.

MORE ABOUT THE POWER GROUP

Power Developments is the property development division of the Power Group, a
dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of civil engineering
services, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development services.


Through its unique synergy of complementary in-house services and a
commitment of the Reconstruction and Development Program (RDP), the Group
has achieved unequally cost efficiency in supplying South Africa’s most vital
needs – potable water, paved roads and affordable housing in fully-serviced
townships.
Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman of the Group, Graham Power, the
Power Group now employs more than 1700 people and spans the Western,
Southern and Eastern Cape. Civil engineering arms include Power Construction
(West), based in Cape Town; Power Construction (East), operating from Port
Elizabeth; and Power Construction (South), with offices in Knysna. Power Roads,
another division of the company, is also based at the Cape Town head office.


The Group also has equal partnerships with emerging companies such as
Hughmic Construction and Sibakhulu Construction.




Power Developments initiates and manages multi-million turnkey developments –
developing and building residential, industrial and commercial properties within a
wide-ranging portfolio across the full spectrum: from affordable housing projects,
to Thesen Islands in Knysna, the country’s top residential development:
September 2002

POWER DEVELOPMENTS HANDS OVER THE FIRST THOUSAND OF THE 6
320 HOUSES AT DELFT, CREATING JOBS FOR ± 3 000 PEOPLE


Cape Town, 17 September 2002: Power Developments have handed over the
first thousand homes which are currently under construction at Delft. The project
is set to uplift the community by not only providing homes to thousands of
families, but also through the creation of jobs for ± 3 000 artisans and casual
labourers.


The R116 million project consists of a total of 6 320 houses of 30m² each, and is
the biggest single phased affordable housing project ever undertaken in the
Western Cape.


The development commenced in December 2001 and is scheduled for
completion in June 2003. Construction is taking place at a record-breaking pace,
and 1500 houses have already been completed.


The project is a 50% joint venture with five local emerging contractors who
formed Delft Integrated Builders: Amandla Construction, Delftcon Construction,
Delft South Builders, Group 6 and African Construction.


Tygerberg Administration initiated the project early last year, calling for proposals
for the development at Delft Central. One of the conditions of the proposals was
that the successful developer had to make use of the local small builders in Delft.


Power Developments tendered successfully for the Delft project, and entered into
a contract with the five emerging contractors in December 2001. The company
has much experience in empowerment joint ventures of this kind, and the Power
Group has held equal partnerships with prominent emerging companies such as
Hughmic Construction and Sibakhulu Construction. It is the leader in affordable
housing in the province and recently received the coveted Department of
Housing award as “South Africa’s Best Established Developer”, following two
Institute of Housing for South Africa (IHSA) awards: “Developer of the Western
Cape” in 2001, and “South Africa’s Developer of the Year” in 1998.


Prior to commencing work on site, Power Developments applied to the
Department of Labour for training funding. The Delft Integrated Builders were
trained in basic business principles, tendering etc, whilst ± 300 artisans were
trained in the various trades, with those skills remaining in the Delft community
after the completion of the project.
October 2002


Big Bay Contract


Rabcav, the Capw Town City Council development facilitators at the R2 billion
Big Bay project, have signed a R50 million contract with Power Construction for
the civils work on the first phase of Big Bay. Further work will be added to this
contract later this year.


The contract covers the construction of bulk and linking services that will unlock
approximately 40ha of developable land. This work includes the realignment of
Otto du Plessis Drive which will be upgraded to two lanes in each direction,
separated by a landscaped median island.


About 20% of the total workload is being handled by previously disadvantaged
contractors. In addition, some 40 members of the labour force are previously
unemployed people from Du Noon, Joe Slovo and Atlantis whoe being trained in
basic construction skills while on the job.


The human scale in this large development will be preserved by subdividing the
area into separate small village precincts and by ensuring that about 30% of the
total area is kept under indigenous vegetation.


The key consultants during this phase of the project are Hawkins Hawkins
Osborn, Arcus Gibb and Planning Partners.
6 NOVEMBER 2002

POWER GROUP GROWTHS FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH


On 16 October 2002, the Power Group held its annual cocktail function at the
Durbanville Racecourse.

Graham Power, the Executive Chairman of the Group thanked the company’s
clients, representatives of local Authorities, the community and the staff members
of Power for their continuous support that enables the Power Group to keep its
promise of top quality service delivery.

Graham Power formed the company in 1983, and next year will see the 20 th
anniversary of the Power Group, which today employs more than 1700 people.
The company spans the Western, Southern and Eastern Cape. Civil engineering
arms include Power Construction (West), based in Cape Town; Power
Construction (East), operating from Port Elizabeth; and Power Construction
(South), with offices in Knysna. Power Roads, another company in the Group,
operates throughout the country on major road projects.


2002 was another good year for the Power Group, during which many milestones
were achieved such as Power Construction’s completion of construction at Pearl
Valley Signature Golf Estate, as well as services to 6 500 erven at Delft, six
weeks ahead of schedule. The company’s new roadworks units handed over two
completed projects to SANRAL in Bontebok and Zouthfontein on the N1, and
have concluded new contracts in Butterworth, Richmond and Florence (Du Toit’s
Kloof tunnel). The training and development of people is top priority and Power
Construction has awarded 12 bursaries in the past year and sent eight students
to the Technikon to further their studies.



During the past year, Power Developments received the coveted Best
Established Developer in South Africa Award in recognition of its contribution to
the mass delivery of houses to the poor, during which thousands of jobs were
created. This division of the Power Group is currently engaged in new initiatives
totalling R120 million contracts in the Eastern Cape, the R117m project in Delft,
and on the top end of the scale, the development of Thesen Islands in the
Knysna Lagoon, one of the most sought-after residential development in the
country.


The Power Group also has a 49% shareholding in emerging companies Hughmic
Construction in the Western Cape, and Sibakhulu Construction in the Eastern
Cape.


Hughmic Construction is celebrating its 5th anniversary this year. Its successes
include civil works at the Port of Saldanha for Portnet, a large portion of the
services at the Ratanga Junction Theme Park, all civil works at Boschenmeer
Golf and Country Estate in the Paarl Franschhoek valley, and a 25% partnership
with Power Developments at Delft.


Port Elizabeth based Sibakhulu Construction, launched in 1999 was recently
awarded R155m worth of work in the Eastern Cape, which includes major
portions of the Coega Harbour project. Coega is expected to boost the Eastern
Cape economy and impact positively on the construction industry in the
province.
2001


NEW AFFODDABLE HOME OWNERSHIP SCHEME FOR WORKING
FAMILIES


       The Oostenberg Housing Association has started work on their 1 154
       home Highbury Development.


   The new village is designed for families who cannot access normal bond
   finance but have stable incomes of between R1 750 and R3 500 per
   month.


   Using the Provincial Housing Development Board’s Institutional Subsidy
   Scheme, together with loan finance and employer assistance, families can
   achieve phased ownership over a four-year period.


   Oostenberg Housing Association is a joint venture between the
   Government, Power Developments, Greenstart Finance and Sithembe
   South Projects. The Association will continue to own the property and
   guarantee the payment of rates and taxes for the first four years, after
   which the resident owner takes transfer of the property. Only at this
   point will the government subsidy be allocated to resident owners, which
   turns “instalment sales” into a unique educational tool that will greatly
   assist resident owners with the management of their financial and home
   ownership responsibilities.


     Graham Power, Executive Chairman of the Power Group said that the
Highbury project reinforces the company’s position as the leader in affordable
housing development in the province.


NEW HOME LOAN SCHEME
   Finance is not widely available for the purchase of homes between R20
000 and R120 000. As a result, people who can afford to repay a housing
loan are not able to access one, hence cannot buy a starter home, be it a
new house in a subsidised project, or an existing house.
     Greenstart Home Loans (Pty) Ltd. assisted by the state-owned National
Housing Finance Corporation Ltd (NHFC) was established to facilitate the
provision of home loans for affordable housing.


     Mr Nick Tremaine, Managing Director of Greenstart Home Loans said
that their prime objective was the provision of financial assistance to
individuals in the lower to moderate-income group, enabling this sector of
the community to acquire residential properties in the form of individual title
or sectional title.


     Greenstart’s market is defined as formally employed lower income
employees who have the definite need, ability to pay and sincerely require to
become home owners, but who do not have sufficient collateral or security to
qualify for traditional mortgage loans, or may have a compromised credit
history which is restricting their access to said products.


     The project will be marketed by Sithembe South Projects, who will also
manage the construction as well as four-year ownership transition period.


     “This is a real opportunity for families with moderate incomes to move
into a fully landscaped, secure and managed environment” said Mr Fonny
Meyeridricks of Sithembe South Projects.


     “Although final transfer only occurs after four years, buyers enjoy many
benefits of ownership from day one.”


     The project is situated near the R300 highway, on the corner of the
Stellenbosch Arterial road and the Nooiensfontein road. Work is well under
way and the show houses will be handed over to the Association by Power
Developments on 11 June.
    Details of the home ownership scheme can be obtained from Greenstart
Home Loans on telephone no. (021) 910 3222
May 2001


Thesen Islands Development – Here comes the water!

The opening of the Phase 1A waterways to the lagoon on the Thesen Islands
Development took place on Monday, coinciding with a visit from the Premier of the
Western Cape, Cabenet Minister and senior officials.


This long awaited event took place at low tide when the earthen wall separating the
waterways fro the lagoon was carefully removed. To slow down the flow of the water into
the waterways, water was pumped into the waterways to equalise the flow of the water
into the waterways, prior to the removing of the wall. The incoming tide then slowly flled
the waterways for the first time, witnessed by an excited group of workers.


The whole process took place under the watchful eye of Pieter Badenhorst, the
Environmental Control Officer, who is tasked with ensuring that the redevelopment takes
place within the guidelines laid down by the Department of Environmental Affairs. The
tidal flow around the islands promises excellent natural circulation. The CSIR (Council
for Scientific and Industrual Research) have used a state of the art modeling system
developed by the Danish Hydraulic Institute to assist with the design and layout of the
waterways.


With a team of 240 local workers, the construction of the waterways proceeded quickly.
Seventy meters of the natural stone packed gabions waterway sides were completed
daily. The top edges of the gabions, above the intertidal zone, are planted with
indigenous groundcovers. The sides will be planted with intertidal plants from the onsite
nursery. The bottom of the thee waterway is the existing fine white sand. The average
water depth of the waterway is 1.6 metres.


Waterfront properties have private timber jetties, with stairs down to the water
and low intensity lights. The first phase of the re-development, now 80% sold out,
is scheduled for transfer in mid June. The second phase, already 50% sold out,
will be complete in November 2001. To date, 177 stands have been sold. A
number of owners are planning to start building their homes immediately. Many
of them will be spending Christmas 2001 on Thesen Islands.
September 2001

Thesen Islands Estate, Knysna
On 31 May 2001 Power Construction completed Phase 1 of the prestigious
Thesen Islands development in Knysna. Power Construction is contracted to
execute the civil engineering of the entire project and is responsible for the
construction of the waterways, roads, bridges, sidewalks, water- and sewer
systems.

During Phase 1 approximately 232 000 cubic metres of sand was excavated to
form the canals with the bulk of the material used as fill to raise the level of erven
on the islands. Another 83 000 cubic metres of soil was stockpiled and will be
utelised as topsoil for erven or the parkland. The greater portion of the 6800
metre canal embankment construction consists of a reno mattress/garbion
combination while a smaller section is protected by timber pole barriers.

Thesen Islands is the largest marina development in South Africa and is said to
offer the most desirable real estate in the country. The development consists of a
five phase project of 600 residential stands and approximately 23 000m²
commercial property. To date, sales have exceeded the R115 million mark, with
phases 1 and 2 almost completely sold out and transfer of the first 150 stands
has commenced.

With over nine years in the planning, the development is South Africa’s most
thoroughly researched and planned residential project. Attention is paid to detail
such as architectural guidelines to keep all construction within the Colonial
Maritime style, and extensive environmental studies were conducted to ensure
that the development will exist in harmony with the Knysna Estuary environment.

Thesen Islands is a private estate of 90 hectares spreading across 19 islands in
the Knysna Lagoon. Eighteen of the islands are residential, surrounded by tidal
waterways and linked by bridges. The 19th island located in the historical heart of
the old timber factory area and will offer a lively mix of shops, pubs and
restaurants.

Power Developments and WesCape have a larger than 50% shareholding in the
development. Other members of the development team including Chris Mulder
and Gray Rutherford who played major roles at Belvidere Estate, one of
Knysna’s most successful property developments to date; Arcus Gibb; the Fisch
Group; and T&B Construction, Knysna’s largest timber building company.

Thesen Islands will feature superb security, a pedestrian-friendly lay-out, private
waterfronts and jetties, a sports club and beaches, and an eleven hectare
Parkland and Bird Reserve with spectacular views of Knysna’s green forests and
rolling hills.
OKTOBER 2001

MAATSKAPPY KRY TOEKENNING VIR BEKOSTIGBARE BEHUISING


Die Instituut vir Behuising van Suid-Afrika (IHSA) het onlangs die gesogte
“Ontwikkelaar van die Wes-Kaap” toekenning aan Power Developments
oorhandig as erkenning van die maatskappy se status as leier op die gebied van
bekostigbare-behuising in die provinsie.

Mnr CB Herandien, die Minister van Behuising vir die Wes-Kaap het by die
oorhandigingsfunksie hulde gebring aan die ontvangers van die Instituut vir
Behuising se Toekennings en die rolspelers bedank vir hul bydrae tot die
voorsiening in die vraag na behuising in die Wes-Kaap. Hy het ook die Instituut
vir Behuising geluk gewens met hul jubileum jaar en sy waardering uitgespreek
vir 60 jaar se toewyding tot behuising.

Graham Power, die Voorsitter van die Power Groep het gesê dat dit ‘n eer vir
Power Developments is om hierdie invloedryke toekenning te ontvang. “Ek wil
graag die Instituut vir Behuising bedank vir hierdie wonderlike bekroning, en
graag ons waardering uitspreek aan die plaaslike Owerhede en die
gemeenskappe waarbinne ons werk – u voortdurende ondersteuning stel ons in
staat om ons beloftes van top kwaliteit dienslewering na te kom. Dan wil ek ook
graag die geleentheid gebruik om hierdie toekenning op te dra aan die personeel
van Power Developments. Hartlik dank aan elkeen van u wat hierdie toekenning
vir ons maatskappy verwerf het deur u harde werk en toewyding tot die Power
Ways, die wyse waarop ons besigheid doen”, het hy afgesluit.

Eiendomsontwikkelaars verskaf wye reeks dienste aan gemeenskap

Power Developments is die eindomsontwikkelingsdivisie van die Power Groep, ‘n
dinamiese   konglomeraat     wat    ‘n   wye   reeks     dienste     verskaf:     siviele
ingenieurswese,    teerbedekking     ,   vervaardiging     en      ontwikkeling      van
woongebiede.


Power   Developments     inisieer   en   bestuur   multi-miljoen     Rand       “turnkey”
ontwikkelingsprojekte – die ontwikkeling en bou van residensiële, industriële en
kommersiële eiendomme binne ‘n omvattende projek portefeulje wat die volle
spektrum dek: van bekostigbare- behuisingsprojekte, tot Thesen Islands in
Knysna, die land se voorste residensiële ontwikkeling.
Die maatskappy spesialiseer in:
 BEKOSTIGBARE-BEHUISING EN INSTITUSIONELE BEHUISING VIR DIE
   RESIDENSIëLE MARK
 HOë INKOMSTE RESIDENSIëLE BEHUISING (Thesen Islands: 90 hektaar
    mariene-ontwikkeling wat oor 19 eilande strek: 600 residensiële erwe en
    23000m² kommersiële eiendom)
   INDUSTRIëLE/KOMMERSIëLE/KLEINHANDEL/KANTOOR
    ONTWIKKELINGS (namens kliënte, of eie beleggings soos Saxenburg Park,
    ‘n R45 miljoen, topklas industriële ontwikkeling in Blackheath)
   Hoë SPESIFIKASIE GEBOUE (Trauma eenheid by Louis Leipoldt Hospitaal
    en ‘n R20 miljoen kontrak vir die opgradering van vyf Medi-Clinics regoor
    Suid-Afrika)


Power Developments is die voorste ontwikkelaar van bekostigbare-behuising in
die provinsie en het tot op hede behuising aan meer as 15 000 gesinne, en
werksgeleenthede aan meer as 9 000 mense verskaf.

Stefan Bothma, die Besturende Direkteur van Power Developments sê dat die
maatskappy toegewyd is tot die verbetering van die kwaliteit van lewe van almal
in Suid-Afrika, deur voormalige plakkerskampe in model behuisingsprojekte vir
lae-inkomste groepe te omskep. “Power Developments is ‘n baanbreker in die
soeke na verbeterde oplossings vir die nasionale behuisingsnood”, het hy gesê.

In terme van Regeringsubsidies en verbruikersfinansiering, bied Power
Developments bekostigbare-behuisingsoplossings vir die totale spektrum en
inkomstegroepe.

-   Regeringsubsidie alleen plus, in sekere gevalle addisionele mikro-lenings, bv
    die Bloekombos en Du Noon projekte. Die R48 miljoen Bloekombos
    ontwikkeling is ‘n suksesstorie: ‘n plakkerskamp wat in ‘n dorpsgebied met
    4413 nuwe huise ontwikkel word (huisverkoopprys R18400), en wat 17000
    mense gaan akkommodeer wat kwalifiseer vir die Regeringsubsidie vir die R0
    – R2000 per maand inkomstegroep. Die projek verskaf ook werk aan 1000
    mense.

-   Institusionele Behuising (Inkomstegroep R2000 – R3500 pm), bv die
    Highbury       Institusionele   Projek.   Power   Developments    is   die   eerste
    ontwikkelaar in die Wes-Kaap wat die behuisingsbehoeftes van hierdie sektor
    suksesvol aanspreek en innoverende finansiële pakkette en privaat sektor
     finansiering beskikbaar maak as aanvulling tot Regeringsubsidies. Highbury
     Park in Kuilsriver is een van die eerste Regeringgesubsidieerde Institusionele
     Behusingsprojekte in die Wes-Kaap. Dit sal hoë digtheid deeltitel huise in ‘n
     gelandskapeerde sekuriteitsomgewing aan 1165 gesinne verskaf, met
     werkskepping vir 600 mense. Huise sal verkoop word tussen R56000 en
     R82000.


-    Tradisionele verbandlenings bv Highbury Park en Blueberry Hill projekte. Die
     R170 miljoen Blueberry Hill ontwikkeling bestaan uit 2319 erf-en-ontwerp
     eiendomme. Die eerste fase bied 218 huise wat wissel tussen R67 000 en
     R125 000, en is gemik op die R3000 – R3500 per maand inkomstegroep wat
     kwalifiseer vir die R11 500 maksimum Regeringsubsidie vir “Eerste-
     huiseienaars”. Verskeie finansiële instansies verskaf reeds verbandlenings vir
     die balans van die kooprys.

Power Developments en hul bekostigbare-behuisingontwikkelings het dus ‘n
positiewe impak op gemeenskappe. Dit sluit in werkskepping deur die
indiensneming van plaaslike arbeid en deurlopende opleidingsprogramme wat op
die langtermyn, lank na die voltooing van ‘n projek, vaardighede in die
gemeenskap agterlaat.




                                    INSTITUUT VIR BEHUISING
                                                    VAN
                                              SUID-AFRIKA
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                    2001

                                Ontwikkelaar van die Wes-Kaap
                                        toegeken aan

                                     POWER DEVELOPMENTS

“Ter erkenning van hul toegewydheid en leierskap in die bekostigbare-
behuisingsveld in die Wes-Kaap. Power Developments het op ‘n groot skaal
presteer en op ‘n deurlopende basis ‘n goeie standaard van behuising en dienste
aan gesinne in die laer inkomste groep verskaf.
Hulle het verskeie werksgeleenthede geskep deur die indiensneming van
plaaslike arbeid en die nalaat van vaardighede deur die implementering van
opleidingsprogramme, waardeur die gemeenskap bemagtig is.”
John Hopkins, Voorsitter van die Wes-Kaapse tak van die Instituut vir Behuising
van Suid-Afrika.
October 2001

Top property developer scoops up prestigious award

The Institute for Housing South Africa (IHSA) recently presented the coveted
Developer of the Western Cape award to Power Developments of its status as a
leader in providing affordable housing in the province.

At the awards ceremony the Minsiter of Housing for the Western Cape, Mr Cecil
Herandien paid tribute to the recipients of the Institute for Housing awards and
thanked the roledplayers for their contraibution towards meeting the housing
needs in the Western Cape.

He also congratulated the Institute of Housing on celebrating its jubilee year and
expressed appreciation for its 60 years of dedication and commitment to housing.

Graham Power, chairman of the Power Group said that Power Developments is
honoured to be the recipient of this prestigious award. “I’d like to thank the
Institute of Housing for this wonderful accolade and express my appreciation to
the local authorities an the communities in which we work. Your continued
support enables us to keep our promises of delivering top quality service.

“I would also like to dedicate this award to the staff of Power Developments. A
warm word of thanks to each of you who earned this prestigious award through
your hard work and commitment.” Power Developments initiates and manages
multi-million rand turnkey developments, developing and building residential,
industrial and commercial properties within a wide-ranging portfolio across the
full spectrum.

Power Developments specializes in:
Residential developments: Affordable and institutional housing
High-income residential developments: High income housing such as Thesen
Islands – a 90-hectare marine development spead over 19 islands which consists
of 600 residential stands and 23 000m2 of commercial property.
Industrial, commercial, retail and office developments on behalf of clients or
Power Group’s own investments: Investments such as Saxenburg Park – a R45
million, upmarket industrial development in Blackheath.
High-specification buildings: The trauma unit at Louis Leipolt Hospital and a
R20million contract to refurbish five Medi-Clinics in SA.

Power Developments has an impeccable reputation for paying on time and
adhering to deadlines. It also has an excellent track record of supporting local
businesses in terms of speed of delivery, quality of services and houses, training
of local labour forces, good relations with communities and support in joint
ventures with emerging contractors.
Affordable housing in the Western Cape
Power Developments has emerged as a leading developer of affordable housing
in the province and has been instrumental in not only providing housing for more
than 15 000 families, but also creating job opportunities for more than 9000
people.

Managing director of Power Developments Stefan Bothma says the company is
committed to improving the quality of life for all in South Africa by transforming
erstwhile aquatter settlements into model housing developments for low-income
groups.

“Power Developments has led the way in a quest for improved solutions to the
national housing need. It has adopted an innovative, cost-effective approach to
the use of alternative materials and pleasing designs,” he says.

The company believes that the government’s housing subsidy scheme is a once-
in-a-lifetime gift to individuals and it believes in maximizing the subsidy according
to the varied needs of the community.

It therefore involved the community, Local Authority and the professional team in
the entire planning process. Housing solutions offered by Power Developments
include:
A Government subsidy only for income groups of between R0 to R2000 a month,
as well as micro loans in some cases. This gives prospective buyers the
opportunity to invest in the Bloekombos and Du Noon projects.
Institutional housing for income groups of beween R2000 and R3500 giving
prospective buyers the opportunity to invest in the Highbury institutional project.

Power Developents was the first company in the Western Cape to be granted an
institutional housing project.

Traditional bond financing for income groups form R3000 a month giving
prospective buyers an opportunity to invest in the Highbury Park and Blueberry
Hill projects.

Power Developments sets out to effectively promote the positive impact of
affordable housing developments on local communities. This includes
empowerments through job creation by employing a local labour force and
downloading skills through the implementation of various top quality training
programmes. This process ultimately gives something constructive back to the
community which remains long after the completion of the project.
6 NOVEMBER 2001

POWER GROUP EXCELS


The Power Group held its annual cocktail party on 18 October 2001 at the
Durbanville Racecourse. The Power Group is a dynamic conglomerate providing
a comprehensive range of civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and
township development services.

Graham Power, the CEO thanked the company’s clients, representatives of local
Authorities and the community for its continuous support which enables the
Power Group to keep its promise of top quality service delivery.

He also thanked the Group’s 1700 staff members for their commitment and said
that the company is very proud of the family-culture within the Power Group. “We
are very fortunate that we have never needed to retrench staff in our 19 years’
existence - even in the less favourable years. We are currently training and
developing a new generation of leaders who will manage the company during the
next decades, in line with our ‘Hundred Year Dream”, he said.

He also congratulated Power Developments, the company’s property
development division for winning the prestigious Institute for Housing South
Africa (IHSA) “Developer of the Western Cape” award.

According to John Hopkins, Chairman of the Western Cape branch of the
Institute for Housing of South Africa, Power Developments received the award in
recognition of their commitment and leadership in the field of affordable housing
in the Western Cape. “On a large scale, Power Developments have excelled and
consistently delivered housing and services of a good standard to families in the
lower income group. They have created many employment opportunities by
engaging local labour and downloading skills through the implementation of
training programmes, thus empowering the community”, he said.

Power Developments has emerged as the leading developer of affordable
housing in the province and has been instrumental in not only providing housing
for more than 15 000 families, but also creating job opportunities for more than 9
000 people. The company initiates and manages multi-million turnkey
developments – developing and building residential, industrial and commercial
properties within a wide-ranging portfolio across the full spectrum: from
affordable housing projects, to Thesen Islands in Knysna, the country’s top
residential development:
November 2001

Power Group Excels

Power Construction South Cape held its annual cocktail party on 22 November
2001 on the prestigious Thesen Islands Development.

The Power Group of Companies is a dynamic conglomerate, providing a
comprehensive range of civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and
township development services.

CEO Graham Power, thanked the company’s clients, representatives of local
authorities and the community support which enables the Power Group to keep
its promise of top quality service delivery.
He also thanked the South Cape team for their commitment and said that the
company was very proud of the family culture within the Power Group.

“We are very fortunate that we have never needed to retrench staff in our 19 years of
existence – even in the less favourable years. We are currently training and developing a
new generation of leaders who will manage the company during the next decades, in line
with our Hundred Year Dream”, he said.
August 2000



Professional Appointments Made – Thesen Islands


Power Construction - Lead Contractors. - Western Cape’s largest
civil engineering contractor Construction of the waterways, roads,
sidewalks and water & sewer systems

Chris Mulder & Associates, Inc. – Urban Design & Landscaping.
Previous projects include Belvidere Estate & Kirstenbosch Gardens
Project Design Co-ordination, Landscape & Urban Design and
Architectural Implementation

Arcus Gibb – Lead Consultant Engineers. Gibb Africa and Arcus
Engineering Consultants have merged. This first major empowerment
initiative in the sector establishes Arcus Gibb as leaders of
transformation. Part of the Lawgibb Group, one of the world’s leading
engineering consultants. Civil, electrical and marine engineering
consultants

Norman Leite & Associates – Project Managers. Previous projects
include N1 City, Cape Town, Saldana Steel Accommodation Village
Overall management of the project

Steele & Strong – Quantity Surveyors. Previous projects include
Granger Bay Marina Residential, Offices & Villa Via Hotel, Dolphin
Beach Residential & Hotel in Cape Town Estimation and supply
management of materials

Nieuwoudt & Hofmeyr – Knysna Consultant Engineers. Previous
projects include Belvidere Estate, Leisure Island Boat Harbour, Knysna
Log Inn Internal Bridge Design

Murray & Roberts – Sub Contractor to Power Construction. Internal
Bridge Construction
September 2000

WESTERN CAPE’S POWER CONSTRUCTION SCOOPS
PMR GOLDEN ARROW AWARD

Cape Town, 4 September 2000: Power Construction (West Cape) (Pty) Ltd
today received the Professional Marketing Review Golden Arrow Award as the
highest rated construction company in the Western Cape. It was also
nominated for Golden Star Awards for the company attributes: “Quality of
Workmanship”, and ”Range of Products”.


The company was rated by 90 business leaders of companies and
government decision makers operating in the Western Cape, which were
selected randomly from a comprehensive database.


South Africa’s largest civil engineering contractor in the field of township
infrastructure, Power Construction has developed specialist expertise in the
installation of civil services, roadworks, pipelines and concrete works. The
company is closely linked to the labour intensive construction initiative, and
to strategies for the promotion of emerging contractors.


Power   Construction   specialises   in   earthworks   bulk   services,   road
construction, pipelines and concrete works, and has established enviable
track records for high quality performance, often well ahead of schedule,
whatever the time constraints. This is in line with the company philosophy of
commitment to “Power Ways”, a disciplined adherence to control, planning,
measurement and management, which sets and ensures the achievement of
exceptional standards of operational excellence, that has become the
company’s competitive edge.


Recent and current major projects of Power Construction (West Cape) include
20 infrastructure contracts at the R2 billion Century City development; the
Boschenmeer golf and country estate in Paarl; a seven month contract for
civil works at D’Urbanvale, the 100 ha upmarket residential township
development at Durbanville; the housing and office park development at
Westlake, as well as the development of 2590 erven at the Bloekombos
squatter community east of Kraaifontein.


Power Construction (West Cape) has good working relationships with all the
SMME companies in the Western Cape, and has done Consortium and Joint
Venture projects with most of them in the past.


Andre du Preez, MD of the Construction Companies in the Group said: “We
are very honoured to receive this prestigious award. We have a dedicated
and loyal work force who are driven by customer satisfaction, quality and
adherence to contract deadlines. Our people and resources are aligned with
our vision: to be the top civil contractor in the Western Cape. Everyone can
buy the same equipment – it is out people that set us apart and who earned
this accolade for Power Construction.”


More about the Power Group of Companies
Power Construction is a division of the Cape-based Power Group of
Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services. Through its unique synergy of complementary in-house services
and a commitment of the Reconstruction and Development Programme
(RDP), the Group has achieved unequally cost efficiency in supplying South
Africa’s most vital needs – potable water, paved roads and affordable
housing in fully-serviced townships.


Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman of the Group, Graham Power, the
Power Group now employs 1400 people and spans the Western, Southern
and Eastern Cape. Civil engineering arms include Power Construction (West),
based in Cape Town; Power Construction (East), operating from Port
Elizabeth; and Power Construction (South), with offices in George.
Other divisions within the Power Group include Power Developments; Blitz
Asphalt; as well as AV Mouldings.


The Group also has equal partnerships with emerging companies such as
Hughmic Construction , and Sibakhulu Construction as well as a majority
share in Derby Materials, suppliers of quarry products and ready mix
materials, operating from Knysna, George and Plettenberg Bay.


The Power Group’s achievements have been acknowledged in several
prestigious   national   and   international   awards,   including   the   1997
International Africa Award, presented to Power Construction in Tunis, and the
Institute of Housing for South Africa (IHSA) award to Power Developments as
South Africa’s Developer of the Year for 1998. In 1993 the Graham was
awarded the SA Institution of Civil Engineers Award for Meritous Service for
assistance rendered to small and emerging contractors in their efforts to
build financial and management independence.
October 2000


Graham Power
(Uitvoerende Voorsitter van die Power Groep)

Suid-Afrika is ‘n land wat wonderlike geleenthede bied en dit is vir my en die
Power groep ‘n voorreg om te help bou aan ons nuwe Suid-Afrika, ‘n land
waarvoor ek baie lief is.

Ek is ‘n optimis van nature, en ek glo dat die potensiaal van die "reënboognasie"
binne die volgende tien jaar volledig ontwikkel sal word. Ons het almal egter ‘n
groot rol om te speel hierin en ek glo ons moet betrokke raak en daadwerklik iets
doen aan die probleme waarmee ons land kampe het.

Persoonlik was emigrasie nog nooit vir my ‘n oorweging nie, selfs ons lieflike
klimaat en die lewenswyse wat daarmee saamgaan is rede genoeg om hier te
bly! Rugby, braavleis en sonskyn is steeds vir my ‘n goeie opsomming van die
Suid-Afrikaanse lewensstyl wat my na aan die hart lê.

Van ‘n besigheidsoogpunt is dit ons maatskappy se filosofie om terug te ploeg in
die gemeenskap waarbinne ons werk, en ons raak graag betrokke by die oprig
van kleuterskole and ander fasiliteite in die gemeenskappe waarin ons projekte
loods.

Aangesien ons werk baie arbeidsintensief is maak ons ook gebruik van sub-
kontrakteurs en arbeiders vanuit die gemeenskappe waar ons elke projekte
bedryf. Power projekte word tipies gedryf deur ‘n klein nukleus van senior
bestuur en die oorgrote meerderheid arbeiders en sub-kontrakteurs word uit
daardie gemeenskappe gewerf, opgelei en in diens geneem. By voltooing van
sulke ontwikkelings- en konstruksiekontrakte word hierdie opleiding,
werksondervinding en nuwe vaardighede basies in die verskillende
gemeenskappe agtergelaat. Dit stel individue wat letterlik as "rou" arbeiders op
projekte begin het, in staat om hul eie klein besighede te begin deur byvoorbeeld
die maak van stene, konstruksie, of die lê van waterpype in die gemeenskap.

Hierdie aspek van ons werk vind ek baie bevredigend en ons is baie trots op die
suksesverhale van verskeie subkontrakteurs wat na hul opleiding en onderviding
gedurende kontrakwerk by Power, nou suksevolle besighede van hul eie bedryf.

Die Power groep is ook omgewingsbewus en alle ontwikkeling en konstruksie
word in ‘n balans met die sensitiewe, natuurlike omgewing gedoen soos
byvoorbeeld die Thesen Eiland ontwikkeling in Knysna. Dit is vir ons belangrik
om nie die natuurlike omgewing te plunder nie en te sorg dat wat ons ookal bou,
wel ‘n aanwins vir die natuurlike omgewing en die gemeenskap sal wees. In ons
land met sy pragtige natuurskoon is dit ‘n belangrike aspek wat ons graag in ag
neem.

Ten slotte, op ‘n geestelike vlak glo ek dat ek met ‘n doel hier geplaas is om die
Woord uit te dra en ‘n rol te speel in die opbouing van die land en ons mense.
Die Power groep gaan volgende jaar byvoorbeeld betrokke raak met die
organisering van ‘n inisiatief om 50 000 gelowiges by Nuweland saam te bring
waar ons deur gebed en geloof gaan poog om ons stad letterlik om te draai in die
stryd teen dwelms, bendegeweld en misdaad.
October 2000


POWER DEVELOPMENTS INITIATE R60 MILLION PROJECT AS
ONE OF THE WESTERN CAPE’S FIRST INSTITUTIONAL HOUSING
PROJECTS

Cape Town, 26 October 2000: The Power Group today announced that its
subsidiary, Power Developments has been granted a R60 million contract to
develop Highbury Park in Kuilsriver, one of the first government subsidised
Institutional Housing projects in the Western Cape.

This development, officially known as the Oosterberg Housing Association will
provide high density, sectional title homes in a fully landscaped village
environment for 1165 families who earn between R1500 as R3500 per
month. The project will commence in November 2000 and will run over a
period of two and a half years.

Oostenberg Housing Association is a joint venture between the government,
Power Developments and Greenstart Finance, who is financing the scheme
and selling the units on an installment sale basis to resident owners. The
company will continue to own the property and guarantee the payment of
rates and taxes for the first four years, after which the resident owner only
takes transfer of the property on the first day of the fifth year. Only at this
point will the government subsidy be allocated to resident owners, which
turns “installment sales” into a unique educational tool that will greatly assist
resident owners with the management of their financial responsibilities.

Graham Power, Executive Chairman of the Power Group said that the Higbury
Park project reinforces the company’s position as the leader in affordable
housing development in the province. “Power Developments is also currently
busy with its first CTCHC (Cape Town Community Housing Company)
contract, the R6 million Luyoloville housing project of 252 houses, and have
commenced with a joint venture with Power West Cape on a R14 million
turn-key development of 349 houses in the Mitchells Plain CBD. CTCHC is a
private company with enormous potential and is owned by the Municipality of
Cape Town and the NHFC (National Housing Finance Corporation). This is
therefore an excellent opportunity for Power Developments and Power
Construction to showcase the benefits of working together as a team to
provide the best possible delivery rate”, he said.

Other affordable housing projects in the Power Developments stable include
the development of 2300 plot-and-plan stands at Blueberry Hills (Blue
Downs/Eerste River), a proposed R18,4 million development of 1000 houses
in Grahamstown, as well as the development of 633 houses at DuNoon Phase
3.
Stefan Bothma, the Managing Director of Power Developments added: “At
the other end of the scale, we are the proud co-developers of Thesen Islands
on the Knysna Lagoon where pre-sales of R80 million have already been
achieved. We are currently installing services for phase 1A which consists of
150 plots, with transfers expected from July 2001. In line with our company
philosophy, we are using the local labour force and are providing jobs and
skills development through the implementation of various training
programmes which ultimately gives something back to the community that
remains long after the completion of the project.”


More about the Power Group of Companies
Power Construction is a division of the Cape-based Power Group of
Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services. Through its unique synergy of complementary in-house services
and a commitment of the Reconstruction and Development Programme
(RDP), the Group has achieved unequally cost efficiency in supplying South
Africa’s most vital needs – potable water, paved roads and affordable
housing in fully-serviced townships.


Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman of the Group, Graham Power, the
Power Group now employs more than 1400 people and spans the Western,
Southern     and   Eastern   Cape.   Civil   engineering   arms   include   Power
Construction (West), based in Cape Town; Power Construction (East),
operating from Port Elizabeth; and Power Construction (South), with offices
in George.


Other divisions within the Power Group include Power Developments; Blitz
Asphalt; as well as AV Mouldings and Derby Materials, suppliers of quarry
products and ready mix materials, operating from Knysna and George.


The Group also has equal partnerships with emerging companies such as
Hughmic Construction and Sibakhulu Construction.
The Power Group’s achievements have been acknowledged in several
prestigious national and international awards, including the Professional
Marketing Review’s Golden Arrow Award as the highest rated construction
company in the Western Cape (September 2000). Other accolades include
the Johannesburg Afrikaanse Sakekamer Junior Businessman of the Year
Award to Graham Power in 1989; the 1997 International Africa Award which
was presented to Power Construction in Tunis; and the Institute of Housing
for South Africa (IHSA) award to Power Developments as South Africa’s
Developer of the Year for 1998. In 1993 Graham Power was also awarded the
SA Institution of Civil Engineers Presidents Award for Meritous Service for
assistance rendered to small and emerging contractors in their efforts to
build financial and management independence.
November 2000


Deputy Minister praises Thesen Islands - Very Best SA Research


On Monday a party was held on Thesen Islands to celebrate the start of
construction of the re-development of Thesen Island into a marina with 19
islands. The Deputy Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Minister Ms.
R.T.Mabudahfhasi opened the event after welcoming addresses by Chris Nissen,
Community leader and Arcus Gibb director and Knysna Mayor, Alan Kock.
Graham Power, on behalf of the Development Company, gave a brief history of
the planning of the project, which was begun in 1990, and thanked all those who
had been supportive, particularly the Knysna Town Council.

In her well received, passionate address, Deputy Minister Mabudahfhasi said "
We stand today on the threshold of a new era in the history of Knysna. An era
that will be characterised by development that is sustainable, that takes into
account, very seriously, environmental concerns and the need for the future
generations to also sustain themselves."

She expressed her appreciation to Thesen & Co for the "for the most responsible
manner in which they conducted, supported and financed the environmental
research, which probably represents the most comprehensive, professional and
detailed Environmental Impact Assessment ever undertaken in South Africa,
(including St Lucia and Saldanha Steel). The cooperation between Thesen & Co.
and the Thesen Islands Development Company with all the authorities was
evident."

She ended by saying that Thesen Island has "evolved into a symbol of sound
public participation, the successful management of environmental concerns, and
a fresh and meaningful thrust for the socio-economic sustainability of Knysna and
the South Cape Coast."

Mayor Alan Kock said that the Council had looked at all aspects of the planned
redevelopment. Recognizing the need for environmental sensitivity, the Council
had ensured that strict controls were imposed to ensure that the environment
would be safe guarded before deciding to approve and support the project.

The Knysna Choral Choir, who the Thesen Islands Development Company have
sponsored for some time, performed a number of foot tapping traditional songs to
the enthusiastic response of the audience. Led by Graham Power, a number of
the professional team as well as owners pledged donations totaling more than
R20 000 to the choir.
With the construction of the first phase of the R800 million project having been
underway since June, the guests enjoyed "Island Safaris" to view the progress
achieved. Guests were dropped off at "lookouts" where construction and
environmental experts were on hand to talk about the project. Already 3.4
kilometres of waterway frontage have been constructed. Guests expressed
amazement at the size and scale of the waterways and at how much had already
been done. Graham Power announced that construction was 2 to 3 weeks ahead
of schedule.

The first phase of the development, which consists of 150 single residential
stands, is scheduled for completion in July 2001. Virtually all the stands in the
first phase have water frontage.

With over 120 stands sold, sections of the second phase have now been
released. Included is "North Beach", a select group of North facing stands all with
a private jetty and beach, smaller "Tidewater" stands set next to the wetlands
and "Edgewater" stands on the banks of the Waterway. The prices of these
stands start at R385,000.

The Thesen Island Development Company shareholders which include Power
Developments and Wescape have provided substantial internal financing for the
project. Further development funding is being supplied by Investec Bank
November 2000


SA firsts at Thesen Islands development

The development of a marina at Thesen Islands in Knysna is not only the largest marina
development ever in South Africa, it is also the pfirst such development to take place in
South Africa on an island.
Errol Symons reports from Knysna.


Work on infrastructure development has started on the project where a marina known as
Thesen Islands will provide up-market living on a scal hiterto not seen in South Africa.
The prices of stands start at about R300 000 and for those investors who want
something special, like their own exclusive island, this will be available at a cost of R2m.


Civils work, which is likely to cost of the order of R230m and could take up to five years
in the development of fice phases, started at the begiining of August this year. When
The Contractor visited the site recently some 700m of canal was already under
development.


In the development the 90,6ha Thesen Island will be divided into 19 islands, connected
by roadways and small bridges. However, just over half of the islands – 48ha in all – will
remain as open spaces that will include 20ha of sheltered waterways created by the
developers. The island on which the development is taking place is larger than the
nearby inhabited Leisure Island in the Knysna Lagoon. When the Thesen Islands project
starts, there will be about seven kilometres of canals in the marina. In some areas the
canals will be up to 60m wide. Design guidelines have been set for housing development
on the islands, and these concern external appearance and the positioning of the
islands’ buildings and structures. The islands’ architecture is “colonial maritime”,
identifying with Knysna’s historic vernacular architecture and seafaring connection.


The concept is based on Cape colonial buildings, without the Victorian embellishments.
Wooden verandas, decks, railings, boardwalks, gazebos and picket fencing will reflect
the Thesen Isllands’ and Knysna’s timber heritage.
Colourful
The intention of the developers is to high-light the colourful history of Knysna, which
spans the days of sailing ships, timber extraction and even a brief period of gold
discovery. It was in 1870 that Arnt Thesen and his family, from Stanger in Norway,
settled in Knysna. In 1904 Charles Thesen bought Paarden Island, as it is known then,
which had been part of the estate of George Rex – the founder of Knysna. The Thesens
started processing timber on the Island in 1922.


Some unusual features of the Thesen Islands development will be mooring underneath
some dwellings with access from floating jetties to luxurious homes above. A number of
private beaches will be available and plans are to incorporate a bird sanctuary and in
“old town” shopping precinct.


Decontamination
Dr Chris Mulder, managing director of Chris Mulder Associates Inc, said that a part of
the island had been contaminated over the years with chemicals used in the treatment of
timber. However, the previous owver of the island, Barlows, is to spend R10m on a
decontamination programme.


“We have identified in exhaustive testing the extent of the contamination, what
contaminants there are as well as the area contaminated,” he said. “Based on that they
have come up with a clean-up programme. Part of the contamination is shallow at about
200mm below surface. Where the contamination is much deeper, in the core area where
the treatment vesseld are located, this will be treated and then encapsulated with an
impermeable layer. We will then cover it with top soil of between one and two metres
deep and there will be a double seal because over this we will construct tennis courts
and a parking area. The remainder of the decontaminated area will become a parkland
and bird sanctuary.”


He said that some of the buildings which form part of the old Thesen’s saw mill and
timber treatment plant would be retained. Some of these structures had been on the
island since the turn of the century. “These wll become part of the village and will provide
a suitable venue for shops and restaurants. Because of their age they qualify under the
SAHRA (Aouth African Heritage Resource Angency) and these will be restored for use,”
said Dr Mulder.


Environment
Dr Mulder is probably South Africa’s most experiences property master planner. His
award-winning firm is a multi-disciplinary practice covering environmental planning,
landscape and building architecture and town planning. The firm has been involved in
the planning of numerous southern African coastal projects from Mozambique to the
West Coast, including the master plan for Knysna’s Belvidere Estate and the
Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens.


Responsible for the design and planning aspects of Thesen Islands, Dr Mulder and his
team have been working on the Thesen Islands project for nearly ten years, and much
time has been taken on research and on developing plans to protect and even improve
the environment in one of South Africa’s most scenic regions. Indeed, Thesen Islands
has become one of the most extensively researched and environmentally investigated
properties in South Africa over the seven-year planning of the project.


During 1991, a team of nine specialist consultants led by Dr Mulder produced the first
environmental impact study of 250 pages covering aquatic and land ecology, water
quality, hydrodynamics, engineering, town planning and architecture. Between
September 1994 and September 1996 the Integrated Environmental Management (IEM)
process, as laid down by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, was
followed and a further environmental impact report (EIR) was completed. This was
supported by specialist reports covering all the matters in the first report as well as
further environmental research and planning and reports on groundwater, avifauna,
socio economics and heritage assessment and input from public participation meetings,
universities and other institutions. All the principles and recommendations of the EIR
have been incorporated in the plan adopted as well as requirements of a range of
bodies, such as the Knysna Town Council, the SA National Parks Board, Cape nature
Convervation and the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism.


The EIR was also submitted for independent review by the well-known ecologist Dr Allan
Heydorn.
Construction
The major construction work – on the development of the waterways, roads, bridges,
sidewalks, water ans sewerage reticulation – is to be done by Cape Town-based Power
Construction. Waterways are currently being constructed using conventional
earthmoving equipment. However, because of the high water table on the island special
arrangement are being made to dewater areas being excavated.


International marine consultants have desgined the banks of the canals. The sloping
sides in the inter-tidal area are to be retained by natural packed stone, held together in
the form of Reno mats, with a geofrabric material on the inside to prevent fine sand
filtering through the gaps between the stones. The top edge above the inter-tidal zone
will be stone orf ine sand coverered in large areas with indigenous groundcovers. The
bottom of the waterway will be fine sand. Beaches will be constructed using the smooth
fine sand of the bottom of the waterway, extending all the way up to the land’s edge.
When all the construction is completed each section of the waterway will be opened to
the lagoon on a carefully controlled basis.


Tidal Flow
The tidal flow around the islands will be natural. The CSIR used a state of the art
modeling system developed by the Danish Hydraulic Institute to assist with the design
and layout of the waterways. The model was used to measure water flows, levels,
velocities and quality.


The waterways around the islands are to be deep enough for normal lagoon boats, even
at low srping tide. The average water depth will be 1.6m. The ground level of the islands
will be raised during development by an average of 1m to between 2.8m and 3m above
mean sea level (MSL). The calculation of the safe ground floor level of buildings has
been made by the CSIR taking into account all factors – the highest astronomical spring
tide with the extreme effect of river floods, bad sea conditions, atmosphere pressure and
strong winds all combined together at one time, plus an allowance for global warming
and an extra safety factor added. This minimum ground level as been set at 3m above
MSL.
Housing
Talking about some of the unusual features, Dr Mulder said that in one area of the
development a number of boat apartments would be constructed. “Here you can take
your boat underneath your home,” he said. The minimum height of the floor level of al
the buildings has to be 3m above sea level for wind surge, for high tides, storm tides,
plus a safety factor built into that. Underneath these homes will be a floating jetty and
from there an owner willb e able to walk up into his apartment.


“The front part of these homes will be on piles and they will cantilever over the water.”
He explained. “There will be other categories of housing. There will be tidewater units,
where the tide moves in under the dwellings. These homes facing north towards Knysna
will look over a salt marsh that has considerable ecological sensitivity and bird life.
These dwellings will be on stilts and the tide will come in and out over the salt marsh,” he
said. Talking about some other features of the marina, Dr Mulder said that all homes on
the canals would have jetties, while in other areas homes will be served by commucal
jetties. ON the eastern side of the development, an area to be known as Long Beach,
residents will have their own private beaches, while beach units will also be scattered
elsewhere in the development. On the centre island, to be known as The Cove, there will
be a communcal beach for owners. “We have six individual islands, each with a bridge
access and its own private jetty and own beach. These are selling at approximately
R2m,” Dr Mulder said, explaining that the prices of stands in the development started at
about R300 000. Phase one is on the eastern sode of the islands and is almost sold out.
The first part of Phase 1B has been released and out of 20 stands there are two left, Dr
Mulder explained , adding that about ten percent of sales were to overseas investors.


“We have divided the development into five phases to develop roughly one phase per year. We
will have about five years of construction and work will roll over from one phase into another.
We intend giving transfer to owners in Phase 1 by June next year.
November 2000


The Boardwalk Casino: a Sibakhulu and Power Construction
Success Story


Power Construction and Sibakhulu Construction have successfully and timeously
completed a joint venture at the Boardwalk Casino and Conference Centre in
Port Elizabeth for Sun International and its operating subsidiary, Emfuleni
Resorts Developers.


The construction of the R535 million Boardwalk Casino project is said to be the
fastest casino building project seen in South Africa. The first platform for
construction of the casino was handed over within the first three weeks of the
contract period. This is considered a record time in which 20 000 cubic metres of
earth was moved and 10 000 cubic metres was blasted, over and above the
initial setting-out work and the removal of trees.


Sibakhulu/Power commenced with the R23 million site works subcontract in
October 1999 and employed 180 workers on site. The project comprised of
clearing the site and demolition of old buildings; 150 000 cubic metres of bulk
earthwork platforms; sewer-, storm water-, water main- and ducting services; as
well as service roads and parking areas and civils work for the creation of a lake
that forms an attractive feature of the development.


Other tasks included a R10 million road construction contract to divert traffic for
the Boardwalk Casino away from Marine Drive and into Second Avenue. This
involved 500 metres of new road construction and the improvement of an
intersection, as well as the widening of Marine Drive for traffic to enter the new
route.
The greatest challenge that faced Sibakhulu and Power was the tight
construction programme and many major changes that were made on a daily
basis, which required a flexible and innovative approach on the part of the
contractors. Other priorities included the protection of the environment in the area
and environmental protection consultants were brought in to monitor work.


More about the Power Group:
The Cape-based Power Group of Companies is a dynamic conglomerate that
provides a comprehensive range of civil engineering, blacktop paving,
manufacturing and township development services. Through its unique synergy
of complementary in-house services and a commitment of the Reconstruction
and Development Programme (RDP), the Group has achieved unequally cost
efficiency in supplying South Africa’s most vital needs – potable water, paved
roads and affordable housing in fully-serviced townships.


Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman of the Group, Graham Power, the
Power Group now employs more than 1400 people and spans the Western,
Southern and Eastern Cape. Sibakhulu Construction is a newly established
subsidiary of the Power Group of Companies.
March 1994

R18-million contract – a first under Framework
Agreement
One of the first four township construction projects so far accredited as
labour intensive under the Framework Agreement between COSATU, SANCO
and the civil engineering industry, has been awarded to Power Construction,
in consortium with Haw and Inglis.

The project will create employment for between 450 and 500 workers drawn
from local community – four times the number of workers normally used on a
project of similar size, according to Vaughn Forrester-Jones, Power
Construction’s director in charge of the project.

This R18-million contract is for the provision of 2 000 fully services sites at
Chris Hani branch (formerly the Bloekombos settler camp near Kraaifontein)
and every possible aspect (about 70%) of the contract, including road
leveling and construction, trenching and pipelaying, kerbing, site clearance
and leveling, block making and toilet construction, and so on, will be done by
hand.

The project has been split into two separate contracts; the east section,
designed by consulting engineers Ninham Shand and awarded to Power
Construction, will take nine months to complete and the west section,
designed by Wouter Engelbrecht and awarded to Haw & Inglis, 12 months.
The two contracts will run concurrently and the client is the Cape Provincial
Administration.

Construction was scheduled to begin early in January, but the workforce was
assembled for a month of intensive training which started on November 15.
The client has allocated R200 000 to the training programme. “This training
will include a course on basic business skills, followed by supervisory and
skills training,” Forrester-Jones said.

“The skills programme will be divided into five modules covering underground
services (sewers, storm water systems, water mains, water connections,
backfilling water mains and cable ducts), kerbs, roadworks, toilet
construction and manhole construction. Each successful trainee will receive a
recognized and accredited certificate of competence and it is our belief that
when we complete the contract and leave the site, trained local supervisors
who have passed all tests will be able to start a small business, join the
maintenance staff or their local authority or offer their skills on the open
market.

“This is one of the first projects of its kind in South Africa and will be a
challenge to us and to the community in which we will be working.” He
added. “We all need to go through the learning curve and I anticipate some
teething problems, but if we all work together only good can come from this
and future labout intensive projects.”

Community liaison officers appointed from the Chris Hani branch community
will be on site at all times to assist with employment and community liaison.
In preparation for this innovative project, Power Construction, consulting
engineers Ninham Shand and SABITA (the SA Bitumen and Tar Association)
are collaborating in an experiment to determine the most efficient method of
surfacing roads by hand. The experiment is being conducted at Power
Construction’s Philippi township project, which was due for completion in
January.

Mike Judd, a consulting engineer with Ninham Shand and member of the
Accreditation Board, said that while heavily trafficked primary roads
determined that structural premix be laid;
By conventional mechanized methods, land-laid bituminous surfacing coulf be
used very effectively on secondary roads and across courts (light traffic cu-
de-sacs providing across to four or more silos.
“Four different bituminous working surfaces – sand asphalt, continuously
graded lino sidewalk mix, chip-and-spray and Cape Seal (a prepared base
covered with bituminous slurry) will be hand-laid to determine relative levels
of difficulty, production quality of finish and cost effectiveness,” Judd said.

“We accept that mechanical paving techniques can be more efficient, but the
road surfacing proposed for the Chris Hani branch township is just one aspect
of a large contract which as a whole equates favourably with conventional
contracting methods in terms of cost.
“And the socio-economic benefits of labour intensive methods are a distinct
bonus. The Chris Hani branch contract will not only create employment for
hundreds of people now without work, but will leave them with the skills for
continued economic activity. We foresee that those workers trained to lay
asphalt surfaces will be able to set up small subcontracting groups to lay
asphalt, driveways or maintain the roads in small municipalities.”

Judd added that Nunham Shand would prepare a workers’ training course on
hand-laid bituminous surfacing on conclusion of the Philippi experiment, with
the intention that this course be incorporated into formalized training
schemes by the Western Cape Training Centre and the Department of
Manpower.
May 1994

Labour award for MD
The managing director of Cape Town based Power Construction has been
presented with the South African Institution of Civil Engineers Presidents’
Award for Meritorious Service.

The award was given to Mr Graham Power for his constribution in creating
the recently-sopted labout intensive construction system for public works
projects.

According to the citation, efforts by Mr Power and others led directly to the
Framework Agreement for Labour Intensive Construction on Public Works
Projects signed in Johannesburg.
May 1994

Service award for Power
The SA Institution of Civil Engineers (SAICE) Presidents Award for Meritorious
Service for 1993 has been presented to Graham Power, MD of Power
Construction.

The award was made in recognition of Power’s efforts to establish a system
whereby labour enhanced construction can take its place in the array of tools
available for the development of infrastructure.

The efforts of Power and others led directly to the historic Framework
Agreement for Labour Intensive Construction on Public Works Projects signed
in June last year between the civil engineering industry, Cosatu and Sanco.

The initiative committed the industry to maximize the use of manual
construction methods on appropriate projects. It also achieved consultation
with communities and a human resource enrichment orogramme based on
skills and management training.
1994

Nuwe skool open in Wallacedene
Kraaifeontein – Die laerskool Eflakeni, die eerste skool in die Wallacedene-
gemeenskap hier, het gister amptelik sy deure geopen.

Honderde geesdriftige kinders en ouers van die eens omstrede plakkerskamp
was by die opening teenwoordig. Die skool is in minder as vier maande
voltooi en die feit dat die skool gister sy deure kon oopmaak word bestempel
as ‘n voorbeeld van uitstekende samwerking tussen die plaaslike
gemeenskap, die Kaapse Provinsiale Administrasie (KPA) se tak:
gemeenskapsdienste, die Departement van Onderwys en Opleiding (DOO) en
provate organisasies.

Die Laerskool Eflakeni is ‘n tydelike skool weens die begrotings probeleme
van die DOO. Die department sou eers oor vier jaar ‘n skool in die gebied kon
bekostig. Vanwee die dringende opvoedingsbehoefte in die gemeenskap is
daar besluit om ‘n skuur in die middle van die plakkerskamp in ‘n skool te
omskep. Met die hulp van die KPA is die nodige hulpbronne na die
gemeenskap gebring.

Befondsing vir die projek is deur die firma Power Konstruksie in Kraaifontein
en die gemeenskap onderneem. Die firma Wouter Engelbrecht en Vennote
het die tegniese hulp verleen. Volgens mej. Salome Meyer skakelbeampte
van die KPA se tak: gemeenskapsdienste, sou die skooltjie nooit gerealiseet
het indien die betrokke private maatskappyr nie ingespring en hul hulp
aangebied het nie.

Die KPA en die DOO het net as fasiliteerders opgetree, het sy gese. Die
Laerskool Eflakeni is egter nie groot genoeg om in al die behoeftes van die
gemeenskap te voorsien nie. Op die oomblik maak die skool slegs
voorsiening vir sub A tot st. 2.

Die onafhanklike Ontwikkelingstrust (OOT) is deur die gemeenskap genader
vir addisionele fondse. Die skool moet nog van elektrisiteit, addisionele
toilette en ‘n omheining voorsien word.

“As gewone mense mekaar se hande vat en begin saamwerk om iets te
verrig dan is die gevolge iets soos die oprigting van die skool,” het mnr Fanie
Naude, streekdirekteur van die KPA se tak gemeenskapsdienste ten tyde van
die opening gese.

Die skool is opgerig met die volle samewerking van die Wallecedene-
gemeenskap. “Die aksie is deel van ‘n geintegreerde prose swat bekend
staan as gemeenskapsontwikkeling, waarin gemeenskappe leer om hulleself
te help.”
1994

School for children of shack dwellers opens
A school for shack dwellers’ children, one of several being provided for
squatter communities in the Peninsula this year, has opened in Kraaifontein.
Eflakeni Primary, in Wallacedene, home to about 5 000 people on 1 100
services sites, will have classes from sub A to standard 5.

Dignitaries at the opening ceremony, attended by about 300 residents,
included Mr Fanie Naude of the Cape Provincial Administration, Mr Wallace
Mgoqi, of the Legal Resources Centre and Mr Archibald Ndamase of the
Department of Education and Training.

Mr Naude said Eflakeni was a temporary school because the DET could not
afford a permanent one for three or four years. The school for more than 500
pupils is a renovated farm shed divided into four rooms and the DET is to
provide two pre-fabricated classrooms.

Mr Naude said the project is being funded by Power Construction and the
community with the CPA and the DET acting as facilitators. Eflakeni is still
not large enough to cope with the number of chikdren requiring education.
“The Independent Development Trust has been approached by the
community for additional funding to upgrade the school with electricity,
fencing and additional toilets,” Mr Naude said.

Mr Bram Mhlom, a former teacher at Simon Hebe High School, in Mbekweni,
has been appointed principal. Mr Mhlom, a regional ANC executive member
said that although initial arrangements with the DET had been for classes
from sub A to standard 2, with six teachers and 300 pupils, residents had
asked for the school to be extended to standard 5 because of a great
demand for education.

“The community has employed an additional eight teachers who will be paid
from community contributions. Negotiations are continuing to have this
responsibility transferred to the DET,” he said.

Registration at township schools got off to a slow start, with principles saying
a “clear picture” would emerge by Monday. But Mr Joel Magwaca of Langa
High, said scores of pupils from rural areas wanting to register without school
reports were being turned away. A teacher at ID Mkhize High, in Gugulethu
said the school was dealing with standard 6 pupils only snf 220 new pupils
had been registered.
June 1994

Labour intensive construction has proved valuable
The historic Framework Agreement for Public Works Projects for Labour
Intensive Construction Methods was signed exactly one year ago. In that
short year, the complex organizational and administrative procedures needed
to ensure that the system can operate effectively have been established and
the first few projects have been accredited and are already under
construction. One of the largest such projects is the Chris Hani Branch
township development at Kraaifontein, awarded jointly to Power Construction
and Haw Inglis.

“For me the most powerful affirmation of labour intensive construction
methods is that we are slightly ahead of our programme schedule, that the
quality of our work is meeting specifications in every sector, that out
consultation with the worker community has been productive and helpful and
that our site agents, most of whom were initially resistant to the concept of
the Framework Agreement, have all done a 180˚ about face and are now its
most vocal and positive advocates,” Forrester-Jones said. He acknowledges,
however that he and his staff have had to reach the above conclusions are a
sometimes frustrating, always eye-opening learning curve.

“Much has been written about the need for skills training for workers involved
in labour intensive projects – now called the Labour Pool Worker system. Yet
nobody thought to set up a training course for middle and senior
management!” he said wryly. And it is in the area of training and budget
allocation for training where he feels more thought, refinement and
experience are needed.

“The training is actually taking far longer than first envisaged by as much as
50-60% and the way it was initially instituted will have to be revised. For
example, the original intention was that workers would have to complete all
modules of the Labour Pool Worker programme to qualify for a diploma. We
found that his system locked a worker into an unacceptable long period of
non-earning activity (eg. We’ve found that more than 160 hours of traiing is
required for the kerbing course), made for impractical lead times between
training and experience building activity and held up project productivity.

Modules
“It is my belief that the system we’ve instituted now – whereby a worker
receives training in a single module, moves immediately into income-earning
acativity and receives a certificate for that module – will find far wider
acceptance. Having received certificates for all modules over the course of
one large or several smaller projects, the worker can then hand these in and
receive his overall diploma in the same way a student gets credit for courses
at university or at technikon,” Forrester-Jones said. (The Labour Pool Worker
training programme, following a basic introduction to business principles,
includes modules on supervision, kerb manufacture and laying, underground
services (pipework), block-making and toilet construction, roadworks,
manhole construction.)

He estimates that to install an effective training scheme, contractors should
budget the cost of traiing at between a low of 3% and a high of 7.5% of total
contract value. Forrester-Jones said it was also very easy to under-estimate
the degree of supervision requires in labour intensive projects. “We’ve found
that if our work teams are to reach or exceed their work targets, these
targets must be set out for them by 09h00 at the latest every day. And the
targets must be clearly and tangibly understandable – eg trench areas must
be clearly indicated with pegs, flags, chalk lines or cones the number of
moulds for a day’s kerb manufacturing task must be laid out and visible. This
requires that our site agents, supervisors, foremen and surveyors have to be
on their toes. . . with the side benefit that our own productivity has risen!”

Prductivity
While overall productivity has been easily maintained and sometimes
exceeded (proof that the original task loading per man or per team was, in
most cases, very accurately assessed) it has been necessary to adopt some
new (and some not so new) working methods.

“Although we lais the same amount of pipe in the same time as we would
have done by conventional means, the demands of labour intensive
construction reduced the cost effectiveness of lasers (at R25 000 each) to
unacceptable levels, so we’ve had to revert to the older ‘boning board
methods’ which is nevertheless effective and has maintained quality
standards.”

Manageable
He said the control of labour had proved to be manageable that enthusiasm
and motivation levels were high. And that the cost effectiveness of the
overall project compared very favourably with conventional methods. “Many
teams or gangs are exceeding their work targests – although some choose to
work to a ‘time and finish’ system and go home in the early afternoon after
completing their task and we are very satisfied, occasionally even surprised,
byt the productivity we’ve achieved. Our bush clearing team, for example,
staggered me with a work rate more than double our expectations and we
were able to hold his team up to others as an example of what can be
achieved and how much money can be made.” Forrester-Jones said that
occasionally it has been becessary to yield on task targets or to amend them.
With the Cape’s high water table trenches often became untenable for
manual excavation. After consultation with the community and the
consultants, it was agreed to excavate by machine and allow the work team
to make up the lost income by laying additional pipe in the prepared trench.
“Work teams are self-disciplined or subject to the discipline of their
communities and we’ve found that dispute resolution, elbeit at the cost of
many meetings has been highly effective.

Productivity
“For maximum productivity, however, it is vital to select and groom a good,
strong team leader, who is the only communication conduit between site
management and workers. With strong team leadership, productivity targets
are attainable, manageable and economicallt viable. In fact we are so
pleased with the methods and systems we’ve evolved that I am applying
some of the principles on contracts in George and Mossel Bay, although these
are not essentially labour-intensive projects.”

Loabour employment by the two contractors on the site stoof at about 430
workers in May and with pipework now complete, the contractors were about
to begin the roadworks – also by labour intensive methods. Here too, Power
Construction and Haw and Inglis will be at the sharp end of the learning
curve as they apply the labour intensive training and surfacing methods
devised by consultants Ninham Shand in conjunction with the Southern
African Bitumen and Tar Association (Sabita) and the two contractors.

“Despite the frustration of the learning process, I believe labour intensive
construction under the principles of the Framework Agreement has proved an
effective and valuable mechanism for both job creation and community
enrichment,” Forrester-Jones said.

“We have learned a great deal and will undoubtedly learn more as we go
through the roadworks phase of the project.”
May 1994

Graham Power receives award for meritorious service
to civil engineering

The SAICE President’s Awared for Meritorious Service to Civil
Engineering for 1993 has been made to Graham Power. The award
was made at the annual general meeting of SAICE held in
Bloemfontein recently.

The citation reads as follows:
Over an extended period of time Graham Power has been energetically
leading a concerted effort to establish a system, whereby labour
enhanced construction can take its place in the array of tools available
for the development of infrastructure.

He has toiled through many meetings with a wide spectrum of persons
and a variety of interest groups, over many hours, with remarkable
patience and success. In these efforts he was assisted by many able
and dedicated members of the Institution. These efforts were
rewarded with the signing of The Framework Agreement for Public
Works Projects using Labour Intensive Construction Systems, on June
22, 1993.

This has now grown into a well organized system, recognized by the
National Economic Forum and geared to create jobs, train people and
ensure community participation. With his efforts Graham Power has
demonstrated a keen interest in the well being of fellow citizens of this
country, who are desperately in need of jobs.

At the same time he assisted the engineering profession in re-
affirming its willingness to play a major role in this daunting task. In
fact, members of the Institution are currently involved in a number of
demonstration projects that are being constructed.

With this award, the Institution acknowledges the unselfish efforts by
an individual who is closely associated with its members. His
contribution has indeed enhanced the status of civil engineering and
the profession.
1993

Business Personality of the Week
Exactly 10 years ago Graham Power drove from his Sir Lowry’s Pass
smallholding in a second-hand bakkie, with two casual labourers, to start
Power Construction’s first civil engineering contract.
The months of agonising, which had culminated in his decision to “go do it
alone”, lay behind. Immediately ahead lay the Herculean task of persuading
clients and consultants – all wary of the “new boy on the block” who had no
machinery and no infrastructure – to give him work. To this day Graham
Power remembers his bitter disappointment when. After being the lowest
tenderer, a consultant nevertheless awarded a valuable R26 000 contract to
a competitor.
Disappointed, yes. Daunted, not at all. Power secured proof that whatever
machines he needed would be available to him, and only six months later
that same consultant handed him a R260 000 contract – a breakthrough
which allowed him, less that a year later to buy his first second-hand grader,
the first of hundreds of vehicles and earthmoving machines which today
make up the Power Construction fleet.

The company’s turnover in that difficult first year was R300 000, but with his
personal reputation now endorsed by a track record of successfully
completed contracts, Power was able to secure more and more work. The
scale of contracts multiplied as did Power Construction’s turnover.

Today the company employs more than 600 people working from its head
office in Blackheath and branches in Vredenburg on the West Coast and in
George. Activities have diversified into paving with the launch of its
subsidiary Blitz Asphalt in 1988; Power Properties, a property development
company, has several successful township developments to its credit; the
popular Firlands Equestrian Centre and Farmstall in Gordon’s Bay is already a
thriving commercial venture.

From that inconspicuous start with just a single bakkie, Power Construction
this year celebrates its 10th anniversary with an annual turnover for the
Power Group of Companies approaching R70-miilion!
Power started his career immediately after his year of national service,
joining Savage and Lovemore as a learner surveyor, often riding 75km to
and from work on the back of a bakkie during his first year. Within months
his thrusting, decisive style-wryly recalled by colleagues as “cheek” – earned
him a reputation as a man able to cut through to the heart of a problem,
eliminate fuss and delays, get the job done.

At the age of just 19, Power was appointed site agent (one of the youngest
such appointments on record) and by his 21st birthday was given charge of
supervision construction of the Steenbras hydro-electric lower dam, near
Gordon'’ Bay. This level of responsibility however, did not prevent him
indulging his other great love, rugby. As a hooker he captained the Gordon’s
Bay club team and later as chairman of the club, was instrumental in the
club’s promotion to the first division. He is still the club’s honorary chairman.
Power remained with S&L for nine years, gathering experience, a reputation
for straight direct dealing and the momentum which led to his decision to go
out on his own.
“Among the lessons I learned very quickly was that without good men, you
cannot do good work; that an ambition to be the “biggest” look ridiculous
beside an ambition to be the best; and that if you take out, without putting
back, you are signing your own death warrant.”

Power Construction specialises in township development, pipelines and
roadwork, activities in great demand with the recent upsurge in the
formalisation of settler communities. The company has completed contracts,
among others in Khayelitsha, Wallacedene and Kayamandi in the Western
Cape and Thembalethu, Kwanankwaba in Hillview in the Southern Cape. It
was in the development of these townships that Power’s belief in
“reinvestment”- which in the company itself takes the form of an elaborate
programme of staff training and self-realisation – found fertile ground for
innovation.

The company broke new ground in the civil engineering industry by
undertaking in consortium, the financing, conveyancing, construction and
even re-location of residents to the 4 100 site Village 5, town 3 township in
Khayelitsha. Graham Power has also been a prime mover in the civil
engineering industry’s initiative to give settler communities a stake in the
development of their townships. Through the use of labour intensive
construction methods, hundreds of men from these communities have been
given jobs ore-casting kerbing and construction blocks on site, trenching and
backfilling for pipelines and building toilets.
This movement to implement labour intensive construction methods in every
possible civil engineering contract now has national backing. The National
Committee for Labour Intensive Construction (NCLIC), representing the
industry, with Graham Power as its chairman has already secured the vital
backing of COSATU and the Government.

IN 1990 Graham Power was awarded the “Junior Sakeman van die Jaar” title
by the Johannesburg Afrikaanse Sakekamer, an award he typically claims
belongs to his team, rather than to himself.

“I have personally done virtually every job now done by me staff. I know the
difficulties they experience and see it as my job to make it easier for them to
get the job done, quickly and efficiently. That way everyone benefits. I
believe in employing above average people, expect above average
performance and I provide above average reward. With this kind of
philosophy, how can I take sole credit for the achievements of Power
Construction?”
These are more than just words. Graham Power mixes freely with his men,
wherever their job or status in the company. No “stern, distant manager” he
is often seen on site, giving solid advice without being patronising, guiding
without dictating. And he refuses to wear a tie, unless absolutely necessary.

“Management too often pays lip service tot he need for close communication.
By talking to my men, trying to understand them, mixing with them, I get to
know their problems and can feed their strengths. We have set up training
programmes designed not only to help our staff do their jobs better, but also
give them an understanding of how every part of the company works. Our
elected Employees Liaison Committee makes it possible for any man,
whatever his position in the company, to communicate his difficulties to
management. Every problem raised by this committee is dealt with and
solved.”

Power has strong confidence in South Africa’s future and in the role of the
civil engineering industry in that future.

“Already we are seeing a resurgence of infrastructural development. Political
changes have already made it possible for large-scale township
developments to be planned and executed, but what we are now seeing is
only the spearhead of the massive development which will undoubtedly take
place in the next decade. The civil engineering industry can, I believe, play a
key role not only in realising that potential, but also in helping to generate
the employment which will promote development in other directions and in
other sectors.”
1993

Dual carriageway planned
Voortrekkerweg, the main road through Malmesbury is being converted to a
dual carriageway to cope with increased traffic to the N7 highway and the
northern Cape.

Mr Robbie Zamudio site agent for civil engineering contractors Power
Construction, said the R1.65 million project also called for the diversion of
the town’s main underground stormwater culvert and the relacation of all
underground services beneath Voortrkkerweg.

The seven-month contract for the municipality of Malmesbury is due to
completion in October. Consulting engineers are Vorster van der Westhuizen.
January 1993

Contractors share in risk
The unique R30.75-million Village 5 township development at Khayelitsha,
providing 4 100 fully services plots on the 144 ha site, is reported to be the
first such development in South Africa, in which the contractors themselves
have undertaken a major portion of the capital risk. The project was
completed in December.

An unprecendented constraint on the development was that the civil
engineering consortium received payment only on completion of the services
and registration of the properties to individual owners. Payment at the rate of
R7 500 per erf, was funded by the Independent Development Trust (IDT). To
facilitate transfers and therefore cash flow, the contracting consortium, CDC
(Community Development Consortium), consisting of Power Construction,
Clifford Harris and EU Civils, in association with WCUSA (Western Cape
United Squatters’ Association) had to set up a management, information and
conveyancing facility to identify, register, screen and apply for subsidies for
eligible buyers. At times the contractors were even required to apply for and
arrange ID documents for buyers and to organize their relocation.

The CDC was also required to provide finance to the value of R 12 million at
any stage. “To our knowledge this is the first time contractors have been
prepared to undertake a capital risk of this magnitude in the interests of job
creation and the local communities.” Said Graham Power, managing director
if Power Construction.

All project costs, including land costs, town planning, land survey,
engineering fees, legal and transfer fees, information services, facilitating
costs, escalation costs and bridging finance had to be allwed for within the
subsidy and the project team also had to assume all responsibility for the
development from inception in January until the development agreement
with the IDT was finalized in May last year.

Planning and design by consulting eingineers Hill Kaplan Scott Inc (HKS)
began in September 1991, and work on the project started in January 1992.
“This project is elevated above the norm by several factors,” Andre du
Preez, operations director for Power Construction said recently. “It reflects a
new development procedure between government, local authorities, the
private sector and, more important, the recipient communities and their
representatives; through close liaison we were able to ensure orderly
relocation to areas which had been upgraded to normal services standards at
a very low cost; and the project is indicative of the short timespan in which
such developments can be completed.”

The total development, with provision for 12 schools, crèches and churches,
business and service trades, community facilities and public open space, in
addition to the 4 100 residential sites, includes: surfaced roads – 26km;
water mains – 27km; sewer mains – 24km; stormwater mains – 5km; cable
ducts (electrical and telephone) – 2.5km; high voltage reticulation – 6km;
low voltage reticulation – 5km; and precast concrete toilet units – 4 100 (all
with flushing toilet).

Bus route roads were provided with mountagle kerbs on both sides, 2m
surfaced footways on both sides and bus bays at 200m intervals. Minor roads
incorporated a mountable kerb on the lower side of the roadway and road
edging on the high side.

Design parameters called for minor stormwater to be conventionally piped,
while major stormwater runoff will be along the surfaced roads through a
series of retention ponds to a main stormwater culvert previously provided
for the development. The ponds are located in public open spaces or are
part of specially designed sportsfields.

Sanitation is through a conventional waterborne sewerage system with
separate connections to individual erven. Each erf is provided with a toilet
unit with conventional earthenware closet and flushing system.

Although no electricity is provided for residential erven, adequate ducting
under roads was installed for future electrification. Du Preez added that in
spite of one of the worst winters in 20 years, and the need for waterborne
sewerage demanded by the Cape’s high water table, the project had been
completed to a high standard with low costs in a very short time and had
also made some use of labour-based construction methods to create jobs for
the beneficiary community.
June 1993

Agreement could pave way for job creation
An agreement was signed in Johannesburg last night, paving the way for
possible job creation in the construction industry. The signatories are the
Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU), the South African
National Civics Organisation (SANCO) and the civil engineering sector’s
National Committee for Labour Intensive Construction.

Discussion between the three groups for the last two years have led to the
Framework Agreement for Public Works Projects for Using Labour Intensive
Construction Systems. Now, the recession-hit construction industry can begin
to offer jobs up to 10 times the 55 000 people it currently employs.

Eight years ago it offered 135 000 jobs. For the industry, the agreement
means maximizing the use of labout intensive methods within public works
programmes, in spite of its enormous investments in machinery.

COSATU and SANCO on the other hand, have compromised by agreeing to
payment through the productivity lnked task based payment systems. Other
features of the framework include:
    Agreed consultation procedures for communities and other interested
      parties on the implementation of projects.
    Project designed changes to absorb more labour.
    Training procedures that ensure that public works projects will have a
      lasting effect in communities.

“The framework agreement formalizes the desire and intention of both the
civil engineering industry and organized labour to raise employment levels in
the construction industry,” a joint statement reads.
1993

R2.5m contract awarded
Power Construction has been awarded the R2.5 million contract for civil
works at the N1 Value Centre shoping complex next to N1 City in Goodwood.

The 17-week contract is for earthworks, stormwater, sewage and water main
services, and for the provision of 700 parking bays and the consulting
engineers are De Vos Paxton. The clinet is Syfin Holdings.

Power Construction site agent Mr Andre Zandberg said more than 6 000
squar emetres of brick paving would be laid for the parking areas and paths.
The high water table in the area has demanded 24-hour draining for the past
six weeks so as not to delay completion of the project.
August 1993

The Framework Agreement: a shot in the arm or the
foot?
The Framework Agreement has been billed as an historic co-operative
between the oftentimes contrary concerns of Cosatu and its affiliates and the
civil engineering industry. While its precedental overtones are not in doubt,
it could spell trouble for plant hire agencies who place a premium on
advanced technology and yet may see demand for it wane. True or false?
David McKay reports . . .

The Framework Agreement was concluded after a year of talks between
representatives of the civil engineering industry and Cosatu. Its raison d’etre
was a commitment to labour intensive projects in return for task-based
payment system to be overseen by a boardacronymously referred to as
NCLIC. Cosatu’s Jay Naidoo says the agreement amounts to a re-structuring
of the civil engineering industry akin to larger economic changes that have to
be made to parallel political transition.

“The agreement is a recognition on both sides of how South Africa’s
economic problems can be addressed in the broadest sense,” says Naidoo.
He also gave the assurance that he agreement did not necessarily mean the
impending redundance of technology. “Cosatu is not against technology,” he
said shortly after signing the agreement with representatives from the
industry and Sanco. “But the agreement must be in the interests of the
community.” He added. NCLIC describes its policy as the employment of as
many people as can be economically and technically afforded. Importantly, it
ends its definition with the words – “thus the effective substitution of labour
for equipment.”

Are the assurances of NCLIC merely a palliative and how is the council able
to guarantee the continued development of the capital equipment industry in
South Africa in the face of forces that want to see less of it? NCLIC
chairperson graham Power says the changes facing the construction industry
in the wake of last month’s Framework Agreement will undoubtedly impact
on the plant hire industry. But these will be neither as wide spread or as
immediate as is feared, he adds. The changes could also generate a positive
spinoff for the plant hire industry. Power says the primary objective of the
Framework Agreement was to reverse the downward trend of employment in
the construction industry. Employment now stands at 55 000 compared with
135 000 in 1980.

But the broader objective was to stimulate the construction industry as a
whole and to promote the flow of new capital into the industry, he says. “It is
simplistic to assume that with the introduction of LI contracting on all
earthmoving plant will be immediately mothballed.
“This is neither practical or possible and, for a number of reasons, nobody
involved in the LI initiative sees any significant short-term negative effect on
the plant hire business,” he explains. “Firstly we foresee that the majority of
LI projects will emerge from government and local authority sources rather
than from the private sector.
“But while we would like all future contracts to be labour intensive to some
degree, it will never be possible for a project to be 100% LI. The most we
can expect is about 50%.

“We also anticipate that upcoming LI projects will be funded from new
sources such as the National Economic Forum (NEF), additional government
funding and from external sources. The government and local authorities will
be lobbied to promote and fund LI contracts. The injection of this new money
is likely to have a domino effect on construction in general and the plant hire
industry.”

Power made it clear the construction industry was facing inevitable changes
towards LI contracting. He warned the plant hire industry to gear itself up for
long-term strategic planning which will allow it to take advantage of the new
opportunities presented by these changes. “The construction activities which
are particularly adaptable to LI work are the manufacture of precast
elements, shallow trenching and rural road maintenance,” says Power.

“It is immediately clear that while these operations have some impact on the
plant hire business, they will also open many opportunities for that industry,
particularly in the field of compaction,” Power says. “He adds that a marked
overall improvement in the construction and plant hire industries should
become apparent within the next two years. Fears that projects will fragment
into disjointed “mini-contracts” were also unfounded.

Power stresses that “the main contractor route” would be followed in which
local entrepreneurs and subcontractors would be trained. This will help them
to gain the experience which later may enable them to become contractors in
their own right,” he concludes. Consulting eingineer Mike Judd represented
the South African Road Federation in negotiations leading up to the signing of
the agreement. He says fast-track projects are unlikely to become LI.
Projects which rely on state-of-the-art technology or machines for their
viability are also likely to stay out of the LI paradigm.

These are high-tech finish projects such as major roads, airports or freeways,
major bridges and high-rise buildings. He also rejects fears that major
commercial undertakings would be pressurized to make use of LI methods. “I
believe we cannot prevent the move towards LI construction since there is an
existing plant hire industry that needs all the work it can get to keep going.”
He says.

“Construction work will not suddenly switch to LI overnight anyway. This will
take time. Early and careful consideration of the LI trend will reduce any
marked negative effects on the plant hire industry. “Plant will have to be
looked at carefully and owners will need to take the movement into account
as with all changes in life and technology.” Judd adds that any increase in
funding brought about by LI construction would have a ripple effect which
would translate into an overall stimulus to the economy.

This would encourage further construction, not all of which would be LI, and
benefit the plant hire industry. I believe the private sector will accept LI
construction as a viable alternative only if there is a commercial advantage.
While there may be incentives to adopt LI methods, there will be no pressure
on anyone to go the LI route (or to seek accreditation) if the project is
unsuited to it,” says Judd.

“There will always be a larger sector of the construction industry which will
steer clear of LI construction.” Ivor Korck of Rohr Roads comments that “the
backlog in respect of LI civil contracts versus those that require conventional
construction methods is enormous. “If the level of funding from both external
and internal sources is adequate, it is probably safe to predict that the total
construction cake will increase to such an extent that conventional or plant
intensive work will not reduce from its preent level – and will probably
increase,” says Korck.

Andre Lanbrechts who represented the South African Association of
Consulting Engineers (SAACE) on the NCLIC negotiating team says the board
has often stated that LI construction is a process of symbiosis where first-
world technology meets third-world preferances.

“In this context, the management contractor’s approach corresponds best to
meet demands from both sides,” he says. The definition of LI construction
calls for an economically justifiable process that must be within the time
contraints. “IT is therefore inevitable that conventional contracting methods
will still be employed to foster production, economy and the execution of
those processes which cannot economically be performed by hand labour
means. “I can foresee that a big demand for conventional plant will still exist
if a massive amount of money is to be spent by government to catch up with
the housing backlog,” he says.

The amount of money available for construction and housing will be larger to
sustain both LI methods conventional construction,” he says. In terms of the
Framework Agreement employment in the industry could be increased
tenfold on current levels. The proportion spent on labout in urban
development projects would be raised from about 10% of the contract value
to at least 40%. In rural development this could be increased to 25%.
Priority has to be given to the employment of single heads of households and
the long-term unemployed in a community while women and youths also had
to constitute a “specified proportion” of people employed.
January 1992

Khayelitsha Village 5 near completion
The R30.75 million Village 5 township development at Khayelithsa, providing
4 100 fully serviced plots on the 144 hectare site, is scheduled for completion
in December.

An unprecedented constraint on the development was that the civil
engineering consortium received payment only on completion of the services
and registration of the properties to individual owners.

Payment at the rate of R7 500 per erf, was funded by the Independent
Development Trust (IDT). To facilitate transfers and therefore cash flow, the
contracting consortium, CMD (Community Development Consortium),
consisting of Power Construction, Clifford Harris and EU Civils in association
with WCUSA (Western Cape United Squatter’s Association) had to set up a
management information and conveyancing facility to identify, register,
screen and apply for subsidies for eligible buyers.

At times the contractors were even required to apply for an arrange ID
documents for buyers and to organize their relocation. The CDC was also
required to provide finance to the value of R12 million at any stage.
All project costs, including land costs, town planning, land survey,
engineering fees, legal and transfer fees, information services, facilitating
costs, escalation costs and bridging finance had to be allowed for within the
subsidy and the project team also had to assume all responsibility for the
development until the development agreement with the IDT was finalized in
May this year.

Planning and design by consulting engineers Hill Kaplan Scott Incorporated
(HKS) began in September last year and work on the project started in
January 1992.

The total development with provision for 12 schools, crèches and churches,
business and service trades, community facilities and public open space, in
addition to the 4 100 residential sites, includes: surfaced roads 26km; water
mains 27km; sewer mains 24km, stormwater mains 5km; cable ducts
(electricity and telephone) 2.5km; high voltage reticulation 6km; low voltage
reticulation 5km; recast concrete toilet units 4 100 (all with flushing toilets).
1992

Civil engineers look at labour intensification
The first steps towards a nationawide intensification of labour utilization in
the civil engineering industry will be taken soon when a delegation
representing the four major controlling bodies of the industry meets with
government ministers.

Arising from a recent seminar at the University of Cape Town aimed at
establishing guidelines for “the appropriate use of labour intensive-methods
in construction”, the proposed meeting between government and industry
leaders will seek official sanction for a drive to raise employment levels in the
civil engineering industry.

Employment has dropped from 135 000 in 1982 to 55 000 today, but
industry spokesmen believe this trend could be reversed through
restructured planning and tendering procedures to minimize mechanization
and through a job-creation programme designed around labour intensive
construction methods.

Organised by the SA Road Federation (SARF), the SA Association of
Consulting Engineers (SAACE), the SA Federation of Civil Engineering
Construction (SAFCEC) and the SA Institute of Civil Engineers of Civil
Engineers (SAICE), the UCT seminar concluded that labour intensive projects
should ideally “Be co-ordinated by a National Employment Creation
Programme and should be prompted by the public sector, with private
enterprise to follow.”

A meeting between officials of the four assosiations and the Ministers of
Finance, Community Development and Transport is now being organized to
promote the establishment of sich a National Employment Creation
Programme, and to negotiate details (including minimum wage levels) of a
private sector initiate to steer construction towards more intensive labour
utilization. It is expected that a representative of the Institution of Municipal
Engineers of South Africa will also attend.

Joint chairman of the four bodies Graham Power said there was consensus
that the labour intensification programme envisaged by the civil engineering
industry could not solve South Africa’s unemployment problem, but could
make a major contribution towards job creation and revitalization of
infrastructural development.

“We envisage that manual labour could effectively by used on a number of
operations which are currently mechanized. These include (amongst others):
    Excavation and back-filling of shallow trenches
    Laying of small diameter and’or light-weight pipes;
    Construction of man-holes/catchpits;
   Building of toilets using blocks manufactured on site;
   Manufacture on site of precast concrete products;
   Laying of on-site precise concrete kerbs and channels;
   Secondary road repairs and upgrading;
   Using labour enhanced surfacing techniques recently proposed by
    SABITA.
October 1992

Labour-led methods could boost employment
Labour intensive construction methods could absorb 50 percent of all State
construction expenditure within three years, says Mr Graham Power, joint
chairman of the four civil engineering bodies spear-heading a drive to raise
employment levels in the industry.

Construction industry spokesperson believe the current employment level –
down to 55 000 from 135 000 in 1985 – could be doubled through structural
changes to project design documentation methods.

A 5-hectare 160-site pilot project designed around labout-based construction
methods is being planned for the CPA under the auspices of the National
Housing Commission Work is scheduled to start in January.

“An essential element of labour-based projects is that they be thouroughly
workshopped with the community which will provide the labout,: said Dr
Andre Lambrechts, spokesperson for project managers BKS Consulting
Engineers.

“The pilot project at Section 1 of Phase 4 Crossroads has the full approval of
the Western Cape United Squatters Association,” he said.
October 1992

Engineers, government to meet on bumper jobs plan
Representatives of the civil engineering industry are to meet government
officials next Monday to seek official sanction for a drive to boost
employment levels in the industry which have plunged from around 135 000
to 55 000 in the past eight years.

The meeting between representatives of the SA Road Federation, the SA
Association of Consulting Engineers, the SA Federation of Civil Engineering
Contractors and the SA Institute of Civil Eingineers will meet Theo Alant,
Deputy Minister of Finance, GME Carelse, Deputy Minister of Manpower and a
senior representative of the Department of Transport in Cape Town on
October 19.

The initiative follows a recent seminar at the University of Cape Town aimed
at establishing guidelines for the appropriate use of labour-based methods in
construction. The seminar concluded that labour-based projects should
ideally be co-ordinated by a national employment creation programme and
should be promoted by the public sector with follow-up by private enterprise.

Industry spokesman believe the trend of dropping employment levels can be
reversed through restructured planning and tendering procedures to
minimize mechanization and through a job creation programme designed
around labour intensive construction methods.

Graham Power, joint chairman of the four civil engineering bodies
spearheading the drive, said they believed current employment levels could
be doubled through structura; changes to project design, documentation and
construction methods focused on job creation, resulting in a nationwide
revitalization of infrastructural development.

He said labour-based construction methods could absorb 50% of all State
construction expenditure within three years.
November 1992

Intricate design to conquer floods

A R6-million contract for the civil engineering work on the 27-hectare
Western Province Park industrial development will be completed this
month – two-and-a-half months ahead of schedule – according to Mr
Vaughn Forrester-Jones, operations manager for Power Construction.

“In spite of some tricky engineering design and difficulties with high
water table in the area, we have been able to meet our client’s request
that the project be treated as a ‘fast track’ contract for completion in
three and a half months, instead of the six months tendered for,” he
said.

The increased work rate has been achieved through tight planning and
a seven-day work week from the 10 engineers, supervisors and
surveyors and the 90 labourers. Work on the 43-site industrial park for
clients Syfin Holdings on the sote of the former Goodwood Drive-In
Cinema began in mid July, and the civil engineering contrct includes all
the bulk earthworks, provision of 1.8km of paved access and internal
roads, stormwater drains, water mains and a sewer system which
includes a 1.3km rising-main connection to the sewer main near
Voortrekker Road, and a 7m deep pumping station.

“The subsurface work on this project demanded some innovative
design work because of the high water table and the prolonged
winter/spring rainfall,” said site agent Mr Percy Knight.
“Another problem is the undersized storm water mains throughout the
area. We solved this problem by building two retention ponds on the
site with a combined capacity of 5.1 million litres. These will
accumulate storm water until the mains can drain it off.”
December 1992

Plans to create jobs on way
Johannesburg – Plays for an extensive continual public works programme to
alleviate unemployment are to be drawn up by the key working group of the
national economic forum.

It will also examine the extent and causes of retrenchments and current
retrenchment procedures and packages, sources say. The investigation,
decided on at a working group meeting this week, aims to establish whether
the current spate of large-scale retrenchments can be stemmed and how to
lessen the impact of unavoidable retrenchments.

At least 100 000 formal sector jobs were lost this year. Government working
group representatives will also investigate tendering requirements with a
view to future public works programmes. Labour absorption in parastatals, as
well as discussions between Cosatu and the civil engineering industry on job
creation, will come under scrutiny.

The effects of trade, tariffs and exchange rate policies on job creation and
the current statis of Gatt talks and the South African Customs Union, will also
be examined. The short-term working group aims to report back on all these
issues by the end of January. Other issues to be looked at include
restructuring the public sector and retirement and provident funds.

Mr Jabu Mabuza, co-ordinator of the business delegation to the group, said
the spirit prevailing at this week’s meeting was “very heartening.” The public
works programme should make extensive use of labour-intensive methods of
construction and should devote a high proportion of project costs to labour
without jeopardizing quality, according to an aconomic task force document
submitted to the working group.

The documents will be a basis for developing further proposals on public
works. It argues that success depends on:
    Providing employment and income to those trapped in the poverty
      circle.
    Disseminating productive skills and useful education and training
      through the programme.
    Generating physical infrastructure for economic growth and
      development such as houses, roads, schools, clinics, erosion
      prevention and conservation.

The document proposes a four-phased approach from community
involvement and education to research analysis and design. Pilot projects
should lay a basis for developing a national programme. It has been
estimated that in the past decade 3.3 million people have come on the job
market in South Africa, but that only 186 000 jobs have been created.
December 1992

Cape contractors in township development first
The unique R30.75-million Village 5 township development at Khayelitsha,
providing 4100 fully serviced plots on the 144ha site, is the first such
development in South Africa in which the contractors themselves have
undertaken a major portion of the capital risk.

The project was scheduled for completion last December. An unprecedented
constraint on the development was that the civil engineering consortium
received payment only on completion of the services and registration of the
properties to individual owners. Payment, at the rate of R7500 per erf, was
funded by the Independent Development Trust (IDT).

To facilitate transfers and therefore cash flow, the contracting consortium,
CDC (Community Development Consortium), consisting of Power
Construction, Clifford Harris and EU Civls, in association with WCUSA
(Western Cape United Squatters Association) had to set up a management,
information and conveyancing facility to identify, register, screen and apply
for subsidies for eligible buyers. At times the contractors were even required
to apply for and arrange ID documents for buyers and to organize their
relocation. The CDC was also required to provide finance to the value of R12-
million at any stage.

“To our knowledge this is the first time contractors have been prepared to
undertake a capital risk of this magnitude in the interests of job creation and
the local communities,” said Graham Power, managing director of Power
Construction. All project costs, including land costs, town planning, land
survey, engineering fees, legal and transfer fees, information services,
facilitating costs, escalation costs and bridging finance had to be allowed for
within the subsidy and the project team also had to assume all responsibility
for the development from inception in January until the development
agreenebt with the IDT was finalized in May last year.

Planning and design by consulting engineers Hill Kaplan Scott Inc (HKS)
began in September 1991 and work on the project started in January 1992.
The total development with provision for 12 schools, crèches and churches,
business and service trades, community facilities and public open space, in
addition to the 4100 residential sites, included:
Surfaced roads                           26km
Water mains                              27km
Sewer mains                              24km
Stormwater mains                         5km
Cable ducts (elec and tel)               2.5km
High voltage reticulation                6km
Low Voltage reticulation                 5km
Precast concrete flushing toilet units 4100
December 1992
Labour-based construction to the fore

Labour-based construction methods could absorb 50 percent of all State
construction expenditure within three years, according to Graham Power,
joint chairman of the labour civil engineering bodies spearheading a drive to
raise employment levels in the industry.

Construction industry spokesman believe the current employment level –
down to 55 000 from 135 000 in 1985 – could be doubled through structural
changes to project design, documentation and construction methods focused
on job creation, resulting in a nationwide revitalization of infrastructure
development.

A 5-hectare, 160 site pilot project designed exclusively around labour based
construction methods is already being planned for the Cape Provincial
Administration under the auspices of the natonal Housing Commission and is
scheduled to get under way in January. “An essential element of labour-
based projects is that they be thoroughly workshopped with the community
which will provide the labour,” says Andre Lambrechts, spokesman for
project managers BKS Consulting Engineers. “The pilot project at Section 1
of hase 4 of Crossroads has the full approval of WCUSA (Western Cape
United Squatters Association) and of the Cross roads Town Council.”

Innovative design features have been used to minimize mechanized
construction methods and these include land profiling to maximize water run-
off during the prolonged, wet Cape winters and relocation of subsidiary sewer
and stormwater drains so that they can be buried by hand.

Main pipelines would still be laid beneath the roadbed by mechanical means
because of the depth required and because the high water table on the Cape
Flats demanded a “fast-in, fast-out” approach.
Labour based activities will include hand trenching, pipelaying, backfilling and
compaction. Kerbs, building blocks and other precast components will all be
manufactured on site and toilets will be built using hand-made blocks.

Lambrechts stresses that great emphasis is being placed on training
throughout the project. “A major objective is to create trained labour
contractors with sustained job opportunities. The entire Crossroads Phase 4
development will comprise 569 fully services stires and we intend to draw on
both the lessons we learn and the trained labour pool generated during this
pilot project for the further development of Crossroads.”

Workers will be issued with certificates, quoting level of training and
experience and these will be updated after each project worked on.
Lambrechts say conventional “management” contractors will be used during
the pilot project to provide training materials management, supervision of
production and quality and central labour payment.

“There is no reason why many of these functions cannot eventually be about
the conomic and skill empowerment of the communities in which these
developments take place.” He says. “The labout component of a project such
as this is usually in the region of 25 percent of total cost. We want to at least
double that ratio and to leave trained people behind us when we leave.”

While economy of design is a major principle in labour-based work,
productivity is also of prime importance and these principles are now being
discussed with financiers of present and future projects as well as with labour
unions to obtain support and understanding.
October 1991

Plan to boost jobs in construction


The Department of Manpower has committed itself to “positive action” on the
implementation of labour-based construction methods aimed at boosting
employment levels in the civil engineering industry.

This follows urgent representation to senior government officials, including
Theo Alant, deputy Minister of Finance and GME Carelse, deputy miniter of
Manpower last week. Graham Power, chairman of a joint committee
representing four controlling bodies of the civil engineering industry said
proposals for a formal reduction in mechanized construction methods and an
increased use of manual labour aimed at job, wealth and skill creation had
been well received.

A spokesperson for the Department of Manpower said the department had
agreed at the meeting to examine private sector submissions on labour
intensification in the construction industry and to present proposals to the
cabinet.

“The data provided to us by the industry must now be evaluated and
formulated into a set of concrete proposals which can be submitted to the
vabinet. What is certain at this stage, however is that this department is
committed to act positively on the implementation of labour-base
programmes which will create jobs and generate wealth.”

Power said the industry represented by the SA Federation of Civil Engineering
Contractors, the SA Road Federation, the SA Institute of Civil Engineers and
the SA Association of Conulting Engineers would give every assistance to the
Department of Manpower in drawing up a working plan for the cabinet to
consider.

According to Power both delegations had recognized that civil engineering,
was a major employer and was the industry best suited to form the
foundation of a nationwide Employment Creation Programme.

The concept of labour-based construction had the blessing of Cosatu.
1990

Padbou ‘n Leefwyse
Graham power (34), tweede jongste van vyf kinders het as kind soms harde
bene gekou. Sy ouers het geglo dat hul kinders die bes moontlike
skoolopleiding moes kry. Daarom dat hy dan ook gedurende sy
hoerskoolloopbaan elke dag 15km per fiets moes afle. Na matriek is hy
weermag toe en sy pa is in hierdie tyd oorlede. Na sy weermagopleiding was
dit nie vir hom beskore om verder aan ‘n universiteit te gaan studier nie en
he thy gevolglik by Savage and Lovemore aangesluit as leerlingopmeter. “In
my eerste jaar moes ek soggens 75km agter op ‘n bakkie sit om by die
terrein te kom. Saans was dit maar weer so en dan moes die nodige
bestekopneming tuis aangepak word. Hierdie lang ure het my behoorlik
geskoei en dit het ‘n leefwyse vir my geword.” Ten spyte van die lang ure he
thy nogtans ingeruim vir die weeklikse rugbyoefeninge en he thy selfs tot die
WP se finale O/20 proewe gevorder.

Binne die eerste jaar by Savage and Lovemore, is ‘n klein kontrakkie aan
hom toegeken vir waarneming. Hy het hierdie geleentheid met albei hande
aangegryp en met ‘n vinnige tempo voortgebou op vroee sukses. Net voor sy
21ste verjaardag is hy san ook aangestel as Terreinagent op die Steenbras
Hydro Elektriese Skema. Daar word beweer dat hy die jongste persoon in die
geskiedenis van die maatskappy was om so ‘n pos te kon beklee.

Op 24 jarige ouderdom is hy bevorder tot Kontrakbestuurder en handhaaf hy
‘n maandelikse omset van meer as R2.5m tussen die jare 1980 en 1983.
“Gedurende hierdie tydperk het ek op ‘n deeltydse basis verskeie
bestuurskursusse voltooi om die praktyk en die teorie bymekaar te bring.”

Op sy 28ste verjaardag in April 1983 en na 9.5 jaar diens by Savage and
Lovemore, het hy besluit om sy eie onderneming, vandag bekend as Power
Construction in dieselfde bedryf na die siviele ingenieurs bedryf op die been
te bring. “Ek het ‘n tweedehandse bakkie aangeskaf en me eerste kontrak
was vir ‘n kerk.” Hierna het lang ure en harde werk gevolg met sy vrou wat
hom begestaan het met die nodige administratiewe pligte. Met volgehoue
durf, dinamiese persoonlikheid, mensekennis en doeltreffende
bestuursvermoens, het hy hierdie onderneming binne 3 jaar uitgebou tot ‘n
selfstandige en gerespekteerde instansie. Tot op hierdie stadium is die werk
van sy klein hoewe naby Somerset Wes gedoen maar die onderneming moes
noodgedwonge verskuif word na Blackheath waar die Hoofkantoor vandag
gelee is. Noun a amper 7 jaar beskik die maatskappy tans oor ‘n gesonde en
dinamiese infrastruktuur en bied werksgeleenthede aan meer as 600 mense.
“Ek beskou my werknemers as die grootste bate in die onderneming en
benut elke moontlike geleentheid om aspekte soos bv. Werksatisfaksie,
opleiding en menseverhoudings te bevorder.” Met Graham as Besturende
Direkteur het die maatskappy sedert die ontstaan elke jaar daarna
uitmuntende resultate getoon, nieteenstaande sekere jare van resessie.
Vandag is die maatskappy beslis een van die grootste siviele ingenieurs
kontrakteurs in die Wes Kaap. Die maatskappy het so pas uitgebrei na die
Suid Kaap met ‘n volledige Takkantoor op George. Daar word spesialiseer in
dorpsontwikkeling, massa grondwerke, pypleidings, betomwerke, algemene
siviele ingenieursdienste asook teer van paaie met sy eie teer aanleg.

“Een van my geheime resepte is die feit dat ek baie tyd spandeer op die
terreine waar ek in my kortbroek enige situasie of aktiwiteit kan bereik en in
gevoel bly met die praktiese implikasies.”

Die aktiwiteite van die maatskappy het intussen uitgebrei en die groep is ook
betrokke by ander ontwikkelinge bv, Landbou, Eiendomme en vakansieoorde.

Graham is aktief betrokke by ‘n gymnasium waar hy 3 maal per week oefen
en is life vir waterski (kaalvoet) veral wanneer hy by sy vakansiewoning gaan
ontspan. Ook is hy baie betrokke by rugby en is onder andere voorsitter van
Gordon’d Baai/Helderberg Rugby KLub wat hierdie jaar in die WP se senior
liga sal deelneem. Hy is ook voorsitter van die WP Sakemanne Klub en uit die
aard van die saak ‘n baie groot WP ondersteuner.
Maart 1990

Power ‘n man met ‘n kragopwekker in hom
As jy grondboontjies betaal, kry jy net ape om vir jou te werk, lui die ou
waarheid in die sakewereld. Graham Power, 34-jarige wenner van vanjaar se
Johannesburgse Junior Afrkiaanse Sakekamer se wedstryd vir die Junior
Sakeman van die Jaar, het met die waarheid in gedagte besluit: Betaal
bogemiddelde salarisse vir bogemiddelde werk. Dis Power se leuse en dit
werk. Daarom is hy die wedstryd-wenner. Hy het sy siviele ingenieursaak,
Power Construction, in die Kaap op die filosofie gebou - letterlik van die
grond af tot ‘n onderneming met ‘n omset tussen R2.5 miljoen en R3.2
miljoen per maans, ‘n markaandeel wat tussen 15% en 20% wissel en totale
bates van sowat R13 miljoen.

Power sit agteroor in sy kantoor in Blackheath, Kaapstad, en terwyl hy gesels
besef jy die van pas by die man. Daar is ‘n kragopwekker in die korte kerel
wat wegraak after sy lessenaar wanneer hy agteroor leun. Soos ‘n woelige
haker le hy dan vorentoe dan agtertoe terwyl hy veldwerk doen met jou
vrae.

Van balle haak wee thy baie. Op sy dag he thy in die finale o.20-proewe vir
die Westelike Provinsie uitgedraf. Hy was tot 1986 nog kaptein van
Gordonsbaai se eerste span en sedertien klub-voorsitter. Die klub het
onlangs nog tot die senior liga deurgedring nada thy verlede en voorverlede
jaar die Presidentsliga gewen het. Power gaan nou ook sy kragte inspan om
te keer dat WP-spelers uit die provinsie gerokkel word. Hy is aangestel as
voorsitter van die WP sakemanne-Klub wat aanbiedinge buite die provinsie
die hoof bide.

As kind, se Power moes hy soms maar harde bene kou. Hy het op Vryzee
gewoon en moes elke dag 15km per fiets ry om by die skool in Bellville te
kom. Hy was op een na die jongste van vyf kinders en sy ouers het geglo
elkeen moet ‘n goeie skoolopleiding ontvang. Terwyl hy na matriek sy
diensplig gedoen het, is sy pa oorlede. Universiteitstudie was hom nie
beskore nie en hy het hom as leerling-opmeter by savage & Lovemore
aangesluit.

“In my eeste jaar moes ek soggens 75km ry agter op ‘n bakkie om by die
terrain te kom. Saans was dit weer so om tius te kom waar ek nog die
bestekopneming moes voltooi,” vertel Power. Daardie lang ure in die
vuurdoop het in ‘n leefwyse ontwikkel. Binne sy eerste jaar by Savage &
Lovemore het Power ‘n klein kontrak gekry wat hy moes bestuur. Kort voor
sy 21ste verjaardag was hy terreinagent vir die Steenbras-hidro-elektriese
projek – blykbaar die jongste man aan wie so ‘n pos in die maatskappy
toevertrou is.
Na so nege jaar by Savage & Lovemore het die kragopwekker bine-in Power
se omwentelinge begin toeneem. Hy het kraperig geraak. Die rompslomp –
met ‘n hoofkantoor ver van jou in Johannesburg het hom gavang. Daardie
gevoel van ‘n nek wat skeeftrek oor ‘n plafon teen die kop was te veel. Daar
was geen ander keuse nie. Sy huis in Gordonsbaai is verruil vir ‘n kleinhoewe
in Sir Lowry’s Pass en ‘n skoonpa wat borg staan vir ‘n nuwe onderneming.
Power Construction het die lig gesien, baie beskeie. Al bates was die
kleinhoewe, ‘n gebruikte bakkie en sy vrou – nie noodwendig in daardie
volgorde nie. En dit nogal in ‘n bedryf wat as hoogs kapitaal-intensief beskou
word.

Mev. Power, ‘n nooi Lauren Baumker, moes moue oprol en help met die
administratiewe werk. Skoonpa, mnr Heinz Baumker, ‘n Duitser wat lank in
die hotel bedryf in SA betrokke was voordat hy op Hermanus afgetree het,
het borg gestaan vir finansiele verpligtinge. Met ‘n paar tydelike handlangers
was die eerste werk sypaadjies en opritte vir huise. Daarna het die eerste
kontrak – in 1983 – van R10 000 gekom om siviele werk vir die
dorpontwikkeling van Abbotsdale naby Malmesbury vir die Metodiste Kerk te
doen. Dit was moeilike tye. Sy persoonlike record by Savage & Lovemore het
hom teleurstellend min gehelp. Kontrakteurs was bekommerd omdat hy nie
sy eie masjiene gehad het nie en moes huur.

Die teleurstelling sal Power byvoorbeeld nooit vergeet toe ‘n kontrak van R26
000 van ‘n Stellenbosse consortium oor die rede nie aan hom toegeken is nie
– terwyl hy geweet het sy tender is 10% laer as die van sy naaste
mededinger.

Die kragopwekker het weer versnel. Hy het die betrokkenes tromp-op geloop
en na ses maande kry hy toe van dieselfde consortium R160 000 se werk. Al
wat dit gekos het was ‘n persoonlike waarborg van die verhuurder dat
masjienerie vir hom beskikbaar sou wees. Nie lank nie, in 1984, het Power sy
eerste stootskraper gekoop – vir R172 000. Vandag kos so ‘n dins ver oor die
R300 000. Toe volg die eerste roller (65 000) en die eerste gebruikte
watertrok (R65 000).

Van toe af was die gort gaar. Die eerste jaar se omset was R300 000 . .
.daarna het dit jaarliks so te se verdubbel tot verlede jaar toe dit met sowat
30% teenoor die vorige jaar gegroei het omdat daar besluit is om te
konsolideer. “’n Mens kan nie omset eet nie. Jy kan net wins eet,”
verduidelike Power die stap. Sy winste het oor al die jare heen in persentasie
meer toegeneem as omset.

Power Construction bide nou werk aan 600 mense – net meer as hondered
salaries werkers en die res loon werkers. Van die beskeie gebruikte bakkie is
daar gevorder tot meer as 500 stukke toerusting van verskillende groottes.
Power is ‘n man vir spanwerk. Elke Woensdag eet hy saam met een van sy
terreinspanne. Probleme word bespreek en oplossings word bevorder.
Terwyl hy gegroei het, het van s you maats van Savage & Lovemore hulle by
hom aangesluit. Hulle het in ‘n hegte span ontwikkel.

Power het vir sy gebrek aan universiteisopleiding verged met deeltydse
studie in sakekursusse. Hy doen dieselfde vir sy personeel. Hy glo in groei
van binne af. Mense word bevorder en geleentheid gebied vir groei, eerder as
om mense van buite af aan te stel. Elke nuweling wat hom by Power
Construction aansluit, ondergaan ‘n doopseremonie. Hy moet ‘n dop witblits
in ‘n afgesaagde springbok horing wegslaan, asemhaal en fluit. Daarna kry
hy ‘n erdekruik vol Power Blitz. ‘n witblits wat spesiaal in Namakwaland vir
Power gestook word.

Op die kruik staan:
“This Power Blitz with its powerful kick, complements our Civil Engineering
skills.” Hierdie verslaggewer het daarvan getoets. En . . . hyg-hyg . . . fluit-
fluit . . . dit lyk of daar nog kwaai skop in Power Construction sit.
1990

Die moeilikste is net om te begin


Die artikel is die vierde in F&T se reeks oor die streekwenners in die
Johannesburgse Junior Afrikaanse Sakakamer se jaarlikse wedstryd vir die
Junior sakeman of – Vrou van die Jaar. F&T is een van die borge van die
wedstryd.

Vir mnr Graham Power (34), Wes-Kaapse streekwenner van die
Johannesburgse Junior Afrikaanse Sakekamer (JJAS) se wedstryd vir die
Junior Sakeman van die Jaar, was die moeilikste stap in sy strewe na sukses
die eerste besluit im wel ‘n kans met ‘n eie onderneming te waag.

“Dit voel of jy behoorlik alles waag, wat dit baie moeilik maak om die belsuit
te neem. Maar as jy die moed bymekaar kan skraap om wel voort te gaan, is
die grootste deel van die stryd al gewonne. Die ergste is wanneer jy
personeel begin aanstel en weet dat hulle afhanklik is van hoe goed jy sake
bestuur,” se hy oor sy besluit om in 1983 ‘n eie onderneming te vestig.

En in sy geval het die baie waagmoed geverg om in die konstruksiebedryf ‘n
onderneming te probeer vestig teen mededinging van maatskappye soos
Murray & Roberts, Basil Starke en sy vorige wergewer, Savage &
Lovemore.”Dit is ‘n strawwe bedryf, wat baie eise stel en waar baie risiko’s
betrokke is. Maar dit is waar die opwinding le – om die risiko’s in geleenthede
om te skep,” se hy.

Toe Power Construction in 1983 in Kaapstad gestif is, was Graham en sy vrou
die enigste personeellede. “Ek het die kontrakte behartig en sy die
administrasie. Ons het begin met ‘n grbruikte bakkie en ‘n kontrak vir die
bou van ‘n kerk,” vertel hy.

Vandag het die maarskappy 600 mense in diens en ‘n omset van tussen R2.5
miljoen en R3 miljoen per maand. Daarby het sy bates in die sewe jaar tot ‘n
totale waarde van R13 miljoen gegroe.

Na sy skooldae en militere diensplig het hy hom by savage & Lovemoew as
leerling-opmeter aangesluit. Hy het gou gevoel dat hy die regte sort werk
gekies het. Skaars twee jaar later he thy terreinagent by Steenbrad se hidro-
elektriese projek, waarvoor die maarskappy die kontrak gehad het, geword.
Hy was een van die jongste mense in die maatskappy se geskiedenis wat die
verantwoordelikheid gehad het. Nog ‘n paar jaar later is hy as
kontrakbestuurder aangestel en he thy kontrakte van etlike miljoene rand
beheer.
“Dit is ‘n opwindende bedryf wat jy nie sommer verlaat as dit eers in jou
bloed is nie,” se hy. Tussen die groot kontrakte deur he thy etlike
bestuurskursusse voltooi om hom vir die risiko’s van ‘n eie onderneming voor
te berei. Hoewel sy pligte as uitvoerende hoof van die maatskappy baie eise
stel, sorg hy dat hy genoeg tyd saam met sy vrou en drie kinders deurbring.
Hy is ook aktief by die Gordonsbaaise rugbyklub betrokke. Hy is ‘n
bestuurslid van die Westelike Provinsie se Sakemanneklub en behoort ook
aan die Hottentots Holland – sakekamer.
March 1990

Power to Power


According to Mr Graham Power (34), winner of the 1990 “Junior Sakeman
van die Jaar” competition and Managing Director of his Civil Engineering
concern, Power Construction, his success is attributed to the spirit of
teamwork which prevails in his company, a Philosophy which he generates in
his organization and which carried him through to the finals and eventually
allowed him to win this prestigious award. Graham was nominated by
Hottentots Holland Sakekamer for the Western Cape area and became one of
the 9 finalists, each one representing a South African region. Needless to
say, Mr Power walked away with the trophy!

A love for the civil field drove him to join Savaage and Lovemore, as a
Learner Surveyor. Just short of his 21st birthday he was assigned the position
of Site Agent for the Steenbras-hydro electric scheme and became the
youngest member in Savage and Lovemore’s history to be given such a post.
While working hard, he also “played” hard, and was elected for the WP U20
finals. At the age of 23 he was appointed Contracts Manager.

After spending 9.5 years with Savage and Lovemore, he decided to start his
own company in 1983. Using the knowledge and experience he had gained
and combining it with a drive for success, he started up Power Construction.
Graham and Lauren (his wife) were the only employees and the company’s
fixed assets totaled one second hand bakkie. Today Power Construction’s
assetss totaling R13m, employs 600 people and produces a turnover of R3m
per month.

Power Construction is certainly one of the leading Civil Engineering
Contractors in the Western Cape. This year the company expanded
extensively in the Southern Cape and established a branch office in George.

Graham is a keen sportsman and ardent supporter of rugby. In 1986 he
captained the Gordon’s Bay first XV and at present he chairs the Gordon’s
Bay Helderberg Rugby Club. He is also the Chairman of the WP
Businessman’s Committee which has been established to monitor the
activities of the WP rugby players.
April 1990

Award for Cape contractor

Graham Power (34), the managing director of one of the Cape’s newer
civil engineering companies, has been named as the winner of the
1990 “Junior sakeman van die Jaar” competition.

Power, who runs fast-growing Power Construction, was nominated by
the Hottentots Holland Sakekamer for the Western Cape area and was
one of nine finalists, each representing a South African region.

He attributes his success in the competition to the spirit of teamwork
which prevails in his company. Power’s first job in the civil engineering
field was as a learner surveyor with Savage & Lovemore. Just short of
his 21st birthday, he was appointed site agent for the massive
Steenbras pump storage scheme. He was, he recalls, the youngest
employee in Savage & Lovemore’s history to be given such a post.

He was later – at the age of 23 – appointed contracts manager by the
company. After nine-and-a-half years’ with Savage & Lovemore, he
decided to go into business on his own account. Power Construction
was duly founded in 1983, its only employees being Power and his wife
Lauren and its only fixed asset a second-hand bakkie.

The company has since thrived and today ranks as one of the bigger
civil engineering contractors in the Cape, It has assets of R13-million,
a turnover of R3 million a month and employs 600 people. It recently
established a branch in George.

Power is a keen sportsman and an ardent rugby supporter. He was
once selected for the Western Province under-20 finals and in 1986 he
captained the Gordon’s Bay First Fifteen. At present he chairs the
Gordon’s Bay Helderberg Club. He is also the chairman of the Western
Province Businessman’s Committee, which has been established to
monitor the activities of Western Province rugby players.

My congratulations to Graham Power on his award. I don’t know him
personally but he is clearly the type of entrepreneur that our industry
and for that matter our country needs. I have a feeling I’ll be hearing
a lot more of him in the future.
October 1990

N1 City

On the 9th of January 1990, the civil services and roads contracts for
N1 City was awarded to Power Cosntruction to the value of R4.2m to
be completed in 6 months.

There were a few problems encountered which made the project more
difficult to complete on time. Firstly the existing underground services
presented a problem as they were generally not in position as shown
on the plans.

Secondly, the in situ material to be used for the roadworks was found
to be unsuitable as a result of high day contents and had to be
replaced with suitable material.

Thirdly, the problem which made the project most difficult to plan
efficiently, was the fact that at peak perions there were up to 40
different contractors on site, each requiring access to their works at
different points on the site.

This was, however, well co-ordinated by the project managers and the
site staff. The other major problem encountered was that we
experienced one of the wetterst winters in the Cape in years, during
which most of our roadworks had to be done.

The first section of work to be handed oever, was the Hyperama roads
and parking area. This was done on time as a result of many hours
spent working over weekends and late nights.

The value of the civil works increased to R5.7m due to the many
additional works requested by the client and project managers.
Despite the above constraints the project was completed successfully
on time due to full hearted co-operation by everyone participating with
the co-ordination and planning to make such an outstanding
achievement possible.
April 1988

Power Construction – vyf jaar van prestasie

Graham Power Contractors (Edms) Bpk handeldrywende as Power
Construction ontleen die naam “Power” van die besturende direkteur
en stigter van Power Construction. Mnr Graham Power.

The maatskappy se hoofkantoor is gelee in winbledon weg,
Blackheath. Graham Power het voor die stigting van Power
Construction tien jaar ondervinding gehad van die konstruksiebedryf
en op die jeugdige ouderdom van 28 jaar Power Construction begin.
Die maatskappy spesialiseer in dorpsontiwkkeling, grondwerke,
pypleidings en algemene siviele Ingenieursdienste.

Daarna het mnre. Andre du Preez en Vaughn Forrester-Jones met
gesamentlik 20 jaar ondervinding in die bedryf by die maatskappy
aangesluit en is ook sedertien bevorder tot direkteure.

Gedurende die afgelope vyf jaar het Power Construction ‘n groep
kundiges, ‘n arbeidsame arbeidsmag en dinamiese bestuurslui
bymekaar gemaak. Die bestuurslui word aangevul deur mnre. Cobus
Burger – Finansiele Bestuurder, Leon Meyer en Dieter Vietze –
Kontrakbestuurders en Ernst Himmelstutzer – Aanlegbestuurder, met
gesamentlik 60 jaar ondervinding in die bedryf en wat bygestaan word
deur ‘n puik middelbestuurspan met baie jare onderving.

Wat interessant is van hierdie onderneming is dat die meeste van die
persone van wie reeds melding gemaak is plus die seksieleiers,
ambagsmanne, operateurs, drywers en baie van die arbeiders reeds
abie jare voor die stigting saamgewerk het. Nieteenstaande die baie
jare ondervinding is die gemiddelde ouderdom maar net 34.

Sedert die ontstaan van Power Construction in 1983 het die groep elke
jaar daarna uitmuntende resultate getoon, nieteenstaande sekere jare
van resessie. Die resultate toon dat Power Construction elke jaar
sedert 1983 hul omset van die vorige jaar so te se verdubble het.
Hierdie prestasie is hoofsaaklik toe te skryf aan doelgerigte
bestuurspraktyke; effektiewe benutting van alle hulpbronne en
toegewyde werknemers in ‘n gesonde werkmelieu.

Power Construction het nou so ‘n stadium van ontwikkeling bereik dat
die groep gunstig vergelyk kan word met enige van die groot
konstruksiemaatkappye wat al jare lank in die Wes-Kaap is.
Power Construction vier aan die einde van Maart hul vyfjarige
verjaarsdag en wil hiermee aan hul kliente, raadgewende ingenieurs
en almal wat met die groep skakel hul dank oordra vir die goeie
ondersteuning.
Januarie 1988

Die kontrak vir R6.6 miljoen, die grootste in die Paarl se geskiedenis,
vir die aanle van dienste in die nuwe woonbuurt in Daljosafat, is
verlede week in die kantoor van die burgemeester onderteken. Die
kontrak is vir die eerste fase van die woonbuurt tussen Paarl-Oos en
Newtown, waar 720 selfbou-wooneenhede opgerig sal word. By die
ondertekening was mnre Hennie Liebenberg (stadsklerk), raadslid Jan
de Necker ( burgemeester), Siebrits Laker (besturende direkteur van
ASLA-konstruksie), Ben Heunis (stadsingenieur) en Graham Power
(besturende direkteur van Power Konstruksie)

Asla en Power het ‘n consortium gevorm en sal elk die helfte van die
ontwikkeling waarneem, wat insluit die aanle van paaie, riolering,
water en stormwater. Volgens die ontwikkelaars sal die ontwikkeling
so vinnig moontlik geskied.
New township development

A new R8.78 million township development at Village 4a, Philippi west,
will provide another 853 fully serviced plots.

Mr Percy Knight, site agent for cotractors Power Construction, said the
38-week contract for the installation of all services, including roads,
stormwater drainage, sewerage system, water supply to each plot and
electric cable ducting for high-mast lighting, would be completed by
the end of October.

“Every plot will have a flushing toilet and water supply and wherever
possible local labour will be utilized.”
Waterfront development a challenging civil job

Power Construction’s R5.5 million contract for the civil engineering
works on the new Victoria and Alfred Waterfront development was
“one of the most challenging we’ve undertaken,” operations director
Andre du Preez said this week.

Speaking during final cleaning-up operations (the contract was
completed and handed over in time for the official opening in October
31), Mr du Preez said more than 50 percent of all work had to be done
in the last two months of the 28-week contract.

“Power Construction’s contract was for the installation of all
underground services (sewer, stormwater and water mains), buried
ducts for electrical and communication lines, concrete works including
retaining walls and steps at the Amphitheatre, paved parking areas for
980 cards, and more than 11 000 sq m of paving.

“A major team effort, which included Hawkins, Hawkins and Osborne
and Hill Kaplan Scott who did the civils design and supervision, was
required to complete the project on time,” he added.

“The project demanded some very detailed planning as we had to
interact with several other major contractors, making sure our
excavations did not cut off or impede access to their working areas.
We also had to allow for movement of the public through the
Waterfront and much of the excavation had to be done by hand since
this is one of the oldest areas of Cape Town, with dew records of
existing buried cables or pipes. We also encountered one of the worst
winters in 20 years, political stayaways and the Easter break.” He said.

The huge public response to the Waterfront development also
demanded increased paved parking areas and 700 extra parking bays
in addition to the 280 originally contracted for.
Picks and shovels may build jobs for many

Armies of workers with picks and shovels will preplace bull dozers and
other construction machines when a new job creation programme goes
ahead.

The first labour-based project, a site and service housing development
on the Cape Flats, could get off the ground in January if current
negotiations between labour unions and other groups are finalized in
time. The pilot project was initiated by the Cape Provincial
Administration and a spokesman for the project managers said today
he believed the intention to “put wealth back into the townships” could
be achieved.

The jobs programme is devised by the country’s civil engineering
industry, whose labour force was slashed from 135 000 in 1982 to 55
000 today. It hopes to minimize mechanization and industry
spokesmen believe employment levels could be increased if planning
and tendering procedures are restructured.

Mr Graham Power, chairman of four organizations in the industry said
a meeting was being organized with cabinet ministers to promote a
national employment creation programme and to negotiate details
including wage levels.

“Labour-intensive projects have proved highly successful in other
countries.”
R5.3 m kontrak vir Plattekloof 3

Parow – ‘n Kontrak van R5.36 miljoen, doe grootste siviele
ingenieurskontrak wat nog deur die munisipaliteit aanvaar is, is gister
hier onderteken vir die aanbring van alle siviele dienste in die nuwe
dorpsontiwkkeling Plattekloof Uitbreiding 3.

Mnr Giel Basson, burgemeester en mnr Graham Power, besturende
direkteur van Power Konstruksie het die kontrak hier in die
burgemeesterskantoor onderteken.

Mnr Jean Simonis, stadsingenieur, het gese strenge voorwaardes vir
die aanbring van dienste word geste om te verseker dat die
dorpsgebeid een van die mooiste woonbuurte in die Noordelike
Stadsgebiede sal word.

In die dorpsgebied is 322 enkelwoonerwe wat almal groter as 1 000m2
is. Die straatlengte in die gebied is in total sowat 10km, waarvan
2.5km van blokplaveisel voorsien sal word, met sowat 2km se fiets en
wandelroetes.

Afgesien van die enkelwoning-ontwikkeling sal daar onder meer ook
vyf persele van tussen 1ha en 0,6ha vir die oprigting van
groepsbehuising met ‘n klein sakekompleks wees, asook ‘n
kantoorperseel van 8,4ha, ‘n hotel perseel can 3,2ha en ‘n perseel van
8.8ha waar die SAUK se toekomstige radio en televisiesentrum vir
Wes-Kaapland opgerig sal word.

Volgens mnr. Simonis sal landskapbeplanners aangestel word om toe
te sien dat die bestaande natuurskoon so min moontlik versteur word.
Nuwe groepbehuising vorder fluks

Bouwerk vorder fluks aan Onverwacht, ‘n nuwe groepsbehuisings-
ontwikkeling in Gordonsbaai. Die eerste inwoners sal reeds aan die
einde van die maands hul intrek seem.

Alle siviele dienste is nou voltooi en is hierdie week deur Power
Construction aan die ontwikkelaar, Deon Smit oorhandig. Dierdie
kothuis dorpie is binne loopafstand van die nuwe hawe-ontwikkeling en
bide aan die voornemende koper ‘n gerieflike vloerplan, hope
ingeboude kaste in alle kamers en die kombuis asook volledige
badkamers. Die erwe is heeltemal omhein en selfs aanrol gras word
voorsien om die tuine te verfraai.

Al 73 huise het ‘n enkel motorhuis en bykomende parkeergeriewe.
Klem Word gele op sekuriteit, ‘n veiligheids aspek wat slegs ‘n
groepsbehuising projek jou kan bied. Die uitsig op die berge skep ‘n
unieke atmosfeer.

Die siviele kontrakteurs is Power Construction, die elektriese dienste is
voorsien deur Racec en die raadgewende siviele ingenieurs is Louw &
Nortje. Die argitek is Mnr Koos Louw van Geldenhuys en Louw.

Die vertoonhuis is elke dag Maandag tot Sondag oop.
Kaapse bou-saak open op George

George – ‘n Bekende bou-onderneming in Wes-Kaapland het pas ‘n
kantoor en werkwinkel hier geopen. Die onderneming het in net meer
as ses jaar tot een van die grootste bou-ondernemings in Wes-
Kaapland gegroei danksy doelgerigte bestuurspraktyke, doeltreffende
aanwending van alle hulpbroone en ‘n toegewyde span werknemers.
Volgens die besturende direkteur van Power Construction, .mnr.
Graham Power, het die maatskappy se bestuurspan na ‘n besoek aan
Suid-Kaapland verlede jaar besluit dat die streek baie goeie
uitbreidingspotensiaal vir die Wes-Kaaplandse onderneming bide.

Daar is besluit om hier gevestig te raak eerder as om van die
hoofkantoor in Blackheath vir kontrakte in Suid-Kaapland te tender en
dan na voltooing van ‘n projek wee rte vertrek.

Mnr Paul Thiart het hom as kontrakbestuurder vir Suid-Kaapland hier
te vestig en volgens hom werp die maatkappy se besluit reeds vrugte
af. Power Construction is tans besig met twee stewige kontrakte in die
omgewing en nog ‘n kontrak is onlangs aan hom toegeken.

Die maatskappy spesialiseer in fir ontwikkeling van woongebiede,
grondverskuiwingswerk, die le van pypleidings, betonwerk,
voorafvermenging en algemene siviele ingenieurswerk.

Samewerking
Volgens mnr. Power, wat die maatskappy in 1983 gestig het, is die
mikpunt om diens van ‘n hoe gehalte so gou moontlik te verskaf en te
installer en om te alle tye ‘n goeie gees van samewerking met die
kliente, consultant, plaaslike owerheid en die verskaffers te handhaaf.

“Dit het nou tyd geword dat die verskillende ontwikkelingsektore in die
streek bymekaar kom om saam werk te skep. Ons kan nie langer wag
dat werk na ons toe kom nie,” het mnr. Power gese.

Hy het ook die versekering gegee dat die dirkteure en personeellede
hul volle ondersteuning sal gee vir projekte en kontrakte wat hier
aangepak word.

Mnr Thiart het bygevoeg sat die maatskappy die goeie naam wat hy
sedert sy ontstaan in die Kaapstad-omgewing opgebou het, gestand
sal doen deur werk van hoe gehalte tel ewer en goeie verhousings met
die klante en raadgewende ingenieurs te handhaaf.
Contractors beat the odds at The Boardwalk Casino.
South African contractors are often very modest about their achievements and
today they are required to be more resourceful than ever. “Fast Track” contracts
are the order of the day and now the construction of The Boardwalk Casino in
Port Elizabeth has been described as a “crash track” project. Indeed,
construction of the R533-m development is said to be the fastest casino building
project seen in South Africa.

Errol Symons reports from Port Elizabeth: “If one considers the odds in the R533-
m Boardwalk Casino development odds Marine Drive on the Port Elizabeth
waterfront, then the contractors must have held a royal flush for them to come
out tops in a “game” which held so many of challenges.”
Perhaps the greatest challenge was the tight construction programme and the
many major changes made on a daily basis, requiring a flexible and innovative
approach on the part of the contractors. To add to this some 30% of the value of
works was constructed by affirmative business enterprises, which required
patience and skill hitherto not seen on any South African project given the tight
time constraint of the project.

Sibakhulu/Power Consortium had the subcontract for the site works at R23-m.
This comprised clearing of the site and demolition of old buildings, 150 000m3 of
bulk earthwork platforms, sewer, storm water, water main and ducting services,
service roads and parking areas, as well as the civils work for the creation of a
lake that forms an attractive feature of the development.

This joint venture was also involved in a R10-m road construction contract to
divert traffic for the Boardwalk Casino away from Marine Drive and into Second
Avenue, so as to avoid traffic congestion on the beachfront. This involves 500m
of new road construction and the improvement of an intersection as well as the
widening of Marine Drive for traffic to enter the new route.
Work for the client, Sun International and its operating subsidiary, Emfuleni
Resorts Developers, started in October 1999. Murray & Roberts/Inkamva/Metro
JV (MIM) was the principle building contractor and some 50 subcontractors
representing a variety of trades were engaged in the project.
Project managers were S.I.P. and Ninham Shand Inc, Boonzaaier Dotwana and
Associates were the consulting Engineers.

Victorian
The Boardwalk Casino and conference centre is an elegant white building with a
red roof, designed in a classical Victorian style. The casino resembles the Hotel
del Coronado on San Diego.
The design of the casino and the adjacent 350 person conference centre, is
similar to that of the many fine examples of Victorian buildings and homes still
found in Port Elizabeth – a city established after the arrival of British settlers in
the Eastern Cape in 1820.
Located at the focal point of The Boardwalk Gardens at the end of a lake, the
casino links the architectural language of the entire site.
Inspiration for The Boardwalk’s gardens is the world-famous Tinoli Gardens in
Copenhagen, a multi-coloured collection of flowers, trees and meandering
pathways around a lake. Fitting in with the architecture and the surrounds is a
retail mall. A brightly coloured decorated passage halfway along the retail mall
leads to the Red Shed, the Port Elizabeth cousin of the famous original at the
V&A Waterfront in Cape Town. The Red Shed will be a high-profile venue for
talented artists and crafts persons from the province wanting to display their
wares.

Challenge:
Richard Cook, the site agent for the Sibakhulu/Power Consortium, said the initial
challenge was to hand over the first platform for construction of the casino within
the first three weeks of the contract.
“We had three weeks to move 20 000m3 of earth and to do about 10 000m3 of
blasting, including for example, the initial setting out work and the removal of
trees.”

Another aspect of the work was that Sibakhulu/Power Consortium had to place a
1050mm of stormwater pipe under Marine Drive. An open excavation 3m deep
had to be done by hand in half-widths in the busy road to accommodate the
traffic. In the region of 25 services were located en route and here too a tight
programme had to be kept. The contractor had six weeks to complete the work.
Glenville Cullum, director of Power Construction East Cape and also a director of
Sibakhulu Construction, said the protection of the environment in the area was
given utmost priority by the client, and environmental protection consultants were
brought in to monitor work.
The client employed Sadia Chand to do an environmental impact study prior to
the start of the work, and Prof. Guy Bate of the University of Port Elizabeth was
appointed the environmental control officer. Contractors had to conform to the
requirements of the environmental management plan.
Glenville Cullum said “from the beginning we managed to control the dust by
putting up sprinkler systems all over the site. The bush that we cleared we put
around the perimeter of the site to control the dust. That was quite a major
challenge.”

Highlights:
“One of the highlights here is that this thought to be the fastest built casino in
South Africa to date,” said Mr. Cook. “We need to consider the duration of the
contract and what was achieved in that time”.
“Another interesting aspect, more especially in the past few months, is that we as
the subcontractor of the earthworks and services we have had to liaise and work
with about 50 other subcontractors on site. For example, we had to work with
them with regard to access.”
“Another challenge is that this has almost been like a design and construct
project. At the start of the contract we only had about 30% of the drawings for
construction and as the contract developed so more drawings were brought out.
Those drawings also changed dramatically the course of the contract.”

On Time:
“We are on time and the reason for this is probably because we tried to be
proactive in attempting to foresee possible changes. At the same time there has
been very close co-operation between the project managers, the consultants, the
architects and the contractors on site. Much of the work was changed verbally on
site and then drawings were processed and made available, sometimes after the
work had been completed. In my experience this is quite different. We have had
to be extremely flexible and it has really been about service to the client.”

Resources:
“We started on this project with all the resources we required, so it was really a
question of adapting to meet the client’s needs” Glenville said. He said the
Sibakhulu/Power Consortium employed up to 180 workers on site, all of who
were local apart from some plant operators from the Western cape.

Employment:
“A requirement of the contract was that 30% of the value of the contract had to
go to the previously disadvantaged and the consultant, Barox, was engaged to
ensure that this goal was achieved. Barox screened prospective local employees
and the Sibakhulu/Power Consortium also employed another contractor Siyaka
Civils to make up the 30% requirement. Siyaka Civils was employed to construct
the main parking area for 1200 vehicles, which was a contract worth about R3m.
They also employed locals and a local contractor to assist them.

Tight Programme:
Mr. Dave Collins, project director for the Murray & Roberts/Inkamva/Metro JV,
said selected sub-contractors did the bulk of the work so it was largely a
managing contract for the JV.
“The value of our work was probably about 15% to 20% of the contract value” he
said. “There has been a lot of team work, a lot of co-operation. We have worked
with many new sub-contractors that we have not worked with before. There has
been a learning curve in terms of how we work and how they work, and how we
want them to work. There have been a lot of late changes and late decisions, that
affected all the trades. This has made it all the more difficult to get it finished on
time”.
Mr. Collins who has been with M&R for more than 23 years, is a professional in
building construction management.

Little bit about Sibakhulu Construction:
Sibakhulu Construction,a newly established company and a subsidiary of the
Western Cape-based Power Group of Companies, is committed to making a
difference in the Eastern Cape as an emerging contractor.
Mr. Dumisa Mcetywa, who is a B.Sc civil engineering graduate from UCT, is the
managing director.
Canal Walk, Century City
Power Construction has just completed its last six projects on the Century City
site.The Shopping Centre contracts had been on the go since 1997, when the
first earthworks and plant forms for the project was done. The roads, parking,
services and paving contracts have all been done as a subcontractor to Murray &
Roberts.
The CD Road, a four lane dual carriage access to the centre, off the N1, was
done together with Murray & Roberts in consortium.
The canal link, a waterway link between the shopping centre and Ratanga
Junction, was also in consortium with Murray & Roberts.

For Power Construction, participation in a “dream project” such as Century City,
has been an exciting challenge and one to which the company committed a huge
portion of its human and material resources. However, it was the very special
relationship between client, consultant and contractor, not the scale of
operations, which charaterised this multi-faceted project.

Andre du Preez (MD of the Construction companies in the Group), who has been
involved with Century City since Power’s first contract in November 1996,
believes the key to the success of the development was the excellent relationship
between the major role players.
“A large proportion of our work followed a pattern which demanded enormous
flexibility and the capacity to take on ad hoc additional works and design changes
without sacrificing delivery dates or quality of finish. It also demanded the ability
to plan, programme and schedule for fast track delivery and the willingness to
work seven days a week if necessary.”

The cape-based Power Group of Companies is a dynamic conglomerate that
provides a comprehensive range of civil engineering, blacktop and asphalt
paving, manufacturing and township development services. Through its unique
synergy of complementary in-house services and a commitment of the
Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP), the Group has achieved
unequalled cost efficiency in supplying South Africa’s most vital needs – potable
water, paved roads and affordable housing in fully-serviced townships.

Launched in 1983 by Executive Chairman of the Group, Graham Power, the
Power Group now employs more than 1400 people and spans the Western,
Southern and Eastern Cape with Power Developments headed by MD Stefan
Bothma and Andre du Preez as MD of the construction companies in the group.

Civil Engineering arms include Power Construction (West) and Blitz Asphalt,
based in Cape Town, Power Construction (East), operating from Port Elizabeth
and Power Construction (South), with offices in Knysna. Other divisions within
the Power Group include Power Developments, AV Mouldings and Derby
Material (suppliers of quarry products and ready-mix materials). The Group has
also equal partnerships with emerging companies such as Hughmic Construction
and Sibakhulu Construction.

The Power Group’s achievements have been acknowledged in several
prestigious national and international awards, such as the recent Professional
Marketing Review Golden Arrow Award to Power West Cape as the highest rated
construction company in the Western Cape. Other accolades include the
Johannesburg Afrikaanse Sakekamer Junior Businessman of the Year Award to
Graham Power in 1989; the 1997 Internal Africa Award which was presented to
Power Construction in Tunis; and the Institute of Housing for South Africa (IHSA)
award to Power Developments as South Africa’s Developer of the Year in 1998.
In 1993 Graham Power was also awarded the SA Institution of Civil Engineers
Award for Meritous Service for assistance rendered to small and emerging
contractors in their efforts to build financial and management independence.
R30 million Century City access contract at Halfway Mark

Construction of the R30 million road and bridge system to provide improved
access to the new super-regional Century City shopping centre in Cape Town, is
at the halfway mark.

The project, a joint venture awarded to Power Construction West and Murray and
Roberts Consortium, commenced on 12 January 2000 and is due for completion
in September.

When complete, a new 4,5 km road will run parallel to the North of the N1 and
extend from the Sable Road bridge on-ramp to the Wingfield interchange at the
N7 and include an intersection with on and off ramps providing direct access tot
he new shopping centre via a striking steel viaduct over the Century City ring
road and canal.

Apart from being visually very impressive, the overall project has presented a
couple of interesting challenges. One involved the strictly quality-controlled and
therefore time-consuming static compaction of a portion of road passing close to
the Summergreens housing development. The other was the careful
emplacement of a management plan to safeguard a core flora conservation area
on the site.

The contract has to date caused almost no disruption to normally heavy daily
traffic flow on the N1.
Hughmic Construction – the Power of Collaboration

A one-of-a-kind partnering of nimble, entrepreneurial contractor skills and solid,
big company backing has set a valuable example to the construction industry:
success can indeed become reality when opportunities are created for those who
have the drive and vision to get ahead.


Hughmic Construction was formed in 1997 as an Empowerment Joint Venture, one of
the pioneering enterprises of its kind in the industry. Armed with their years of
construction experience and now newly equipped with the support of an established
industry player, Channo Hughes and Abel Michel became 51% partners, with Power
Construction West Cape holding the balance of shares.


As an independent, autonomous contractor, the new company was able to enjoy
operational free rein, while availing itself of finance, plant, buying power, project
management guidance and construction expertise from the Power Group.


This seamless access to the resources and encouragement provided by Power has
fostered a confident, determined group of people who seem to be going places in no
uncertain terms. Contracts and projects are tackled with youthful enthusiasm and seen
through with the deliberate exertion and undertaking of seasoned industry experts.


And, while customer satisfaction and individual pride in a job well done may be the day-
to-day drivers of their success, the ideal of empowerment and community upliftment
takes pride of place in the broader sense of service. Through team spirit and sheer hard
work, the company has secured contracts for the construction of various prestigious and
exciting projects. These have resulted in long-term job opportunities and the acquisition
of new and relevant proficiencies, with obvious sustainable benefits to the communities
in which Hughmic is active.


Mentoring is a further important part of the process of social upliftment; skills filter back
into the communities and stimulate the thirst for knowledge. This culminates in a more
confident, better-equipped workforce.
Hughmic Construction operates according to the following values with the Power Group:


   Absolute reliability – every task completed on time, to budget and to benchmark
    standards.
   Quality – we take pride in producing durable, aesthetically pleasing work that is an
    asset to the community and the environment.
   Teamwork – by allowing every member a meaningful part in the process, we develop
    the full potential of our personnel fostering competency, confidence and self-worth,
    qualities that find their way back into the communities from where we draw our
    people.
   Professionalism – in our appearance and quality work, in our swift and timeous
    service, in our integrity and in our long-term customer relationships that we value so
    highly.
   Commitment to business ethics – we continuously focus on ethical issues and
    believe that ethical behaviour will give us an inner peace and a better quality of life
    and will contribute towards our long term survival and growth.
EIENDOM IN LANGEBAAN-AFTREEOORD OPGERAAP


Langebaan-Aftreeoord oortref alle verwagtinge, met opgewondenheid onder
kopers sowel as die breë gemeenskap.             Sedert die verkoopskantoor in
Desember verlede jaar geopen het, is die helfte van die wooneenhede reeds
verkoop. Belangstelling is baie groot in hierdie tradisionele Weskus-oord met sy
63 huise, 28 woonstelle en ‘n volledig toegeruste mediese sentrum vir
verswaktes.

In die eerste week van Februarie 2004 sal daar met die bou van die skouhuis begin
word.


‘n Segsman vir Power Developments sê dat meeste van die kopers tot dusver uit die
omgewing kom, van plekke soos Langebaan, Vredenburg, Paternoster en Hopefield.
Meeste van die kopers is in die ouderdomsgroep middel 50’s tot laat 60’s.            Die
demografiese profiel van die kopers is ‘n duidelike indikasie dat spekulante nie deel
uitmaak van die kopersmark nie.


Langebaan-Aftreeoord is ‘n trekpleister vir mense wat ‘n veilige leefwyse soek in ‘n
ontspanne seekus-omgewing, vir die goue jare.


Henrie Jonck, direkteur van Langebaan-Aftreeoord, stel dit so: “Mense erken die projek
as die eerste allesomvattende aftreeoord aan die Weskus. Die versorgingseenheid vir
verswaktes het groot belangstelling uitgelok van sover as Hermanus, Strand en selfs
Vishoek.


Mitchell & Botha Argitekte het getrou gebly aan die tipiese, historiese Weskus-
argitektuur.   Huise word aangebied vanaf R579 000 in ses ontwerpsopsies, wat
kwaliteitafwerking en gemak bied. Die eenhede bestaan uit een- en tweeslaapkamer
huise. Opsionele ekstras sluit in braaiplekke, kaggels, ‘n derde slaapkamer, dubbele
toesluitmotorhuise of motorafdakke.


Hierdie ontwikkeling is aantreklik as ‘n belegging sowel as ‘n woonplek vir afgetredenes.
Huise word aangebied op ‘n plot en plan basis. Heffings is vasgepen tot 2006. Met
verkoping van eietitel huise, gaan alle profyt na die verkoper. Die lewensregwoonstelle
gee inwoners die reg om hulle oorspronklike kapitaal met herverkoop te behou, plus ‘n
deel van die wins wat op ‘n glyskaal bepaal word, afhangend van die okkupasie-tydperk.


Die fasiliteit vir verswaktes sal deur professionele, ervare personeel beman word en dit,
saam met die lewensregwoonstelle, sal bestuur word deur Gerimed wat ook die baie
suksesvolle Kogelpark-Aftreeoord te Kleinmond bestuur.


Irene Fouché van Gerimed wat die nuwe sentrum saam met haar eggenoot Flip sal
bestuur, sê dat die sentrum vir verswaktes tydelike, asook volgehoue sorg bied in 25
private kamers, almal en-suite, met hulp t.o.v. persoonlike higiëne, mobiele aktiwiteite,
administrasie van medikasie en algemene gesondheidsorg, terapeute en haarkappery.


Die oord wat 24 uur sekuriteit geniet met ‘n geëlektrifiseerde heining, beheerde toegang,
twee eetkamers, ‘n sitkamer en kroeg, ‘n biblioteek, ontwerpte tuine en ‘n interne
alarmstelsel gekoppel aan ‘n sentrale kontrolekamer, geleë langs Langebaan se
munisipale kantore en net ‘n klipgooi vanaf elke denkbare fasiliteit.


Francois du Toit van Creative Profile, self ‘n liefhebber van die Weskus, is tans
verkoopsagent en sê: “Hierdie oord bied ‘n unieke geleentheid om die ryk Weskuskultuur
te geniet.   Langebaan is die middelpunt van ‘n area wat natuurlewe, blommeprag,
wonderlike kuslyn en watersport bied, tesame met gholf en ‘n casino. Kopers kan in
weelde hul eie lewenstyl geniet en terselfdertyd deel in ‘n plaaslike omgewing met ryk
Suid-Afrikaanse tradisie.”


‘n Afspraak om persele te besigtig en die verkoopskantoor te besoek, kan gemaak word
met Michelle du Toit by die bemarkingsagente se kantoor te 021 913 7728.
LANGEBAAN RETIREMENT VILLAGE PROPERTY SNAPPED UP

There’s a hype of expectancy as roll out for the Langebaan Retirement Village
gathers momentum. Almost half of the residential units have been sold since
the sales office opened in December last year. Interest in this traditional
West Coast village comprising of 63 cottages, 28 apartments and a 24-hour
fully-equipped medical frail care centre remains high.

Construction on the show house is scheduled to start the first week of
February 2004.

A spokesperson from Power Developments says most of the sales have been
to people in the area and surrounds, such as Langebaan, Vredenburg,
Paternoster and Hopefield. Most of the buyers are in the mid-50s to late 60s
bracket.

The Langebaan Retirement Village is attracting people in search of a secure
lifestyle in a relaxed seaside environment for their golden years. In some
cases children have also invested in units for their parents.

Says Henrie Jonck, operations director of Langebaan Retirement Village:
“People recognise the project as the first West Coast all-embracing
retirement village. Major interest has been shown in the frail care facility
from people as far afield as Hermanus, Strand and even Fish Hoek.

Architects Mitchell & Botha have faithfully followed design guidelines
retaining elements of typical historic West Coast architecture. Offering
cottages from R579 900 in six design options, each emphasises comfort and
quality finishes. Accommodation includes one and two-bedroom homes.
Optional extras include braais, fireplaces, a third bedroom, double lock-up
garages, or carports.

The development is attractive as both an investment and a home for retirees.
Cottages are on a plot and plan basis. Levies are fixed, escalating only in
2006. On resale of the single title cottages, all profit goes to the seller. The
life-title apartments allow for occupants to regain original capital invested,
plus a portion of the profit, which is determined on a sliding scale, depending
on the period of occupancy.


The frail care facility, staffed by professional, experienced personnel, as well
as the life title apartments are to be managed by Gerimed, who also manage
the very successful Kogelpark Retirement Village in Kleinmond.

“The frail care centre features temporary or permanent care in 25 private
rooms, all en-suite and provides assistance with personal hygiene, mobile
activities, administration of medicine and general health care, therapists and
hairdressers,” said Gerimed’s Irene Fouché, who will manage the centre with
husband Flip.

The village, which enjoys around the clock security, an electrified boundary
fence and wall, a single access-controlled entrance, two dining rooms, a
lounge with a pub, a library, a landscaped gardens and an internal
emergency alarm system linked to a central control room, is adjacent to the
Langebaan municipal offices, a sunny stroll from every facility.

Says Francois du Toit of Creative Profiles, an expert on West Coast lifestyles
and retained as sales agent: “The village offers a unique opportunity to enjoy
the rich West Coast ambiance. Langebaan is the hub of an area teeming with
wildlife, flowers, antiquity, wonderful coastline and water sport, golf and a
casino. Buyers can enjoy their own lifestyle in luxury, yet blend with amazing
locals and area rich in South African tradition.”
Cape Business News


POWER CONSTRUCTION FOCUS ON ROADS


In their continuing efforts to provide clients and consulting engineers with
the best possible service, a decision was recently made by the Power Group
to combine the Roadwork units in Power Construction West Cape (Pty) Ltd
with the Paving, Milling and Surfacing operations currently known as Blitz
Asphalt (Pty) Ltd. The new company called Power Construction Roads (Pty)
Ltd, will trade under the name “Power Roads”.


Being aware of the external environment with regard to the deterioration of
our National and Urban roads network and the need for specialised roadwork
skills in the industry, this change was considered necessary.


Power Construction Roads (Pty) Ltd specialises in major and minor road
construction, rehabilitation of roads, premix/asphalting, general surfacing
(seals), airport taxiways, runways and apron slabs and parking areas and has
established enviable track records for high quality performance, often well
ahead of schedule, whatever the time constraints. This is in line with the
company    philosophy   of   commitment      to   “Power   Ways”,   a   disciplined
adherence to control, planning, measurement and management, which sets
and ensures the achievement of exceptional standards of operational
excellence, that has become the company’s competitive edge.


The new company consists of 2 operational units namely:


   National & Trunk Roads:           Construction & Rehabilitation under the
    leadership of Louwtjie Louw
   Urban Engineering & Infrastructure: Rehabilitation & Maintenance under
    the leadership of Dieter Vietze
The Rural Roads Division has successfully completed Gouritz Mouth to
Mosselbay on the N2 in March 2002 for the South African National Roads
Agency (SANRAL), and is currently in the process of completing the
Zoutfontein and Bontebok contracts on either side of Hanover on the N1.


This Division has recently been awarded a R60 million contract from
Bultfontein to Vogelstruisfontein (Richmond) on the N1 for SANRAL.         The
contract involves 23.5km of cold in-situ recycling, together with a G1
basecourse and a 19mm Cape Seal, over a period of 20 months.


They have also been awarded a rehabilitation contract on the N2 in the
Eastern Cape between Toleni and Ibika to the value of R59 million over a
length of 28.4km. The Employer on this 18 month contract is also SANRAL
(South).


The Urban Power Roads teams have just completed Ou Kaapse Weg as well
as the rehabilitation of the N7 between Goodwood and the Melkbosstrand
turn-off, a R40 million Joint Venture contract with Martin and East. The
rehabilitation consisted of in-situ recycling with foam bitumen of the existing
road layers (250mm thick), and a 35mm Asphalt overlay together with a
18mm ultra-thin asphalt surfacing. (“Novachip”).


They are currently engaged in Kraaifontein : Maroela Road for the City of
Cape Town; routine road maintenance (patch repair works and crack sealing)
on the N1, N2 and R300 in the vicinity of Cape Town and the resealing of the
Du Toits Kloof Pass between the Huguenot Tunnel and Florence for SANRAL.


Some of the recent and current major projects of the Asphalt and Urban
Division include Rehabilitation of taxiways at Cape Town International
Airport, Ou Kaapse Weg, and Kromboom Parkway Phases 1 & 2. In addition,
this Division has continued to service the City of Cape Town in respect of
urban road rehabilitation and maintenance work.      A large number of small
projects have been completed successfully and cost efficiently.        A good
example of the initiative and commitment of the Power Roads teams is the
rehabilitation of Vissershok Road during October to December 2001, when
this road, which was falling apart, was rehabilitated and resurfaced within six
(6) weeks – a job that would normally take 6 months!


Power Construction Roads has good working relationships with all the SMME
companies in the Western Cape, and has done Consortium and Joint Venture
projects with most of them in the past.


The Blitz Asphalt brand has, since its inception in 1990, become a major
force in the specialised surfacing market, but with the same teams involved,
they are confident that the “Power Roads” brand will signify greater capability
of both entities.


Power Construction Roads is a division of the Cape-based Power Group of
Companies, a dynamic conglomerate providing a comprehensive range of
civil engineering, blacktop paving, manufacturing and township development
services.
Sparrebosch Clifftop Estate & Country Club


“Environmental Friendly” Construction

Power Construction South Cape started work on the Sparrebosch contract with a
R2,2million access road project, and then secured a R12-million contract for the
roads and bulk services. This was increased to R15-million with additional
pipelines and other works that were completed in June 1999 under
circumstances described by director Paul Thiart as "definitely the tightest
environmental controls we've ever encountered."

While this made life very difficult at times, it was both a challenge and a valuable
learning experience that will stand the company in good stead for similar projects
in this environmentally conscious area - and especially with projects like Thesen
Islands Development.

"With the good track record we've established at Sparrebosch for both
conservation and high quality construction, and the support system we've built up
with local officials, I believe our credibility in Knysna is rock solid - a vital asset in
this area, which is becoming more competitive in the construction industry every
day," Paul said.

“We must be aware of the consequences if environmental protection is not
properly costed and properly implemented during construction.”

Paul's views were endorsed by Knysna Council member Vicky Smit, who
remarked after the ribbon-cutting ceremony: "It is amazing how this place has
changed, and yet retained its unspoiled, natural look, without damage to the
environment."

Sparrebosch - Knysna

Power Construction South Cape is proud of the successful completion of Civil
Services at Sparrebosch, a blue chip golf and country club development high
above the Knysna Lagoon.

The project included a R2,2 million access road and a R15 million contract for
roads and bulk services, as well as additional pipelines and other works that
were completed in June 1999.

A demanding contract, Power Construction South Cape adhered to very strict
environmental controls to ensure minimal impact on the area’s ecologically
sensitive natural environment. This included control measures to limit the impact
of the construction site on Woodbourne Pan, and avoiding the breeding areas of
a rare butterfly species indigenous to Knysna.
Power Construction enhances its excavator and dozer fleets
with new Komatsu units

Leading Cape Town based civil engineering contractors Power Construction
recently acquired two Komatsu excavators and a bulldozer as replacements
for older Komatsu machines.


The latest purchases comprise a 30,8 t PC300-6 excavator, a 22,2 t PC220-6
excavator and a 20,6 t D65EX-12 bulldozer. The new purchases also partly
represent upgrades as the PC300-6 replaces an old PC220-6 and the new
dozer, which incorporates hydrostatic steering, is a substantial enhancement
on the older model D65E-8G.


Power Construction has been using Komatsu equipment for the past 16
years, its first purchase being a D65E-8G dozer in 1986. Today Komatsu
equipment is a strong brand in the company’s excavator, bulldozer and wheel
loader fleets.


Plant director Fanie van der Westhuizen says the main factors in favour of
Komatsu equipment is its consistent reliability, low running costs and high
residual value of the equipment. Furthermore, while they use the most up-
to-date operating technology to ensure that the equipment works at
maximum efficiency, the control systems are relatively simple to keep
maintenance and repair costs down to a minimum, he added.


Projects on which the company is currently engaged include a road
rehabilitation project at Hanover in the Karoo, rehabilitation of the
N7 in Cape Town, the Thesen Islands development in Knysna and the
Brackenridge upmarket housing development at Plettenburg Bay.
R1.5-billion Cape golf estate tees off


Construction of the first nine holes at the R1.5-billion Pearl Valley signature golf
estate and spa in the Western Cape is on track for completion by October.


The layout and grassing of the first six holes of the Jack Nicklaus-designed golf
course has been completed. Pearl valley project director Zuraimi Mustapha says
the cool season grass, used especially for its quick-growing properties, good
drainage and lo water requirements, has taken well and the fairways of six of the
holes are fully grassed.


The R44.5-million golf course construction contract is being undertaken by Golf
Data. Following completion of phase one and two earthworks at a cost of R10-
million, a further two contracts with a combined value of R40.8-million, covering
phase three earthworks and phase one infrastructure and services, have been
awarded to Power Construction.


“By the end of phase three earthworks a total of 1,2-million cubic metres of earth
wil have been moved to shape the 18 fairways of the golf course, the housing
platforms and the 17ha of man-made lakes,” says Power Construction contracts
manager Francois Voigt.


“Phase one civil work includes the construction of the main entrance and water,
sewerage and road networks for the residential developments,” he says. Thirty
percent of the phase one contract is being undertaken by an empowerment
company as part of Pearl Valley’s commitment to involving black-empowerment
companies in the development of the estate.


The R7-million bulk water supply and reservoir contract has also been awarded
to Power Construction. Runoff water and water from subsoil drains will all be
directed into an irrigation lake at the 13th hole from where it will be dispersed by a
network of 70km if pipes to irrigate the glf course and road reserve and to top uo
the other dams.


Buks Zeeman, resident engineer of Africon, the consulting engineer for the
project says that the design of the R7-million serwer-pump station, rising main
and sewerage-treatment works on the farm Kliprug has begun. Phase three
earthworks and phase one infrastructure and services are due to be completed
by the end of August this year.


Pearl Valley, which is located between Franchhoek and Paarl, is being
developed by Malaysian company, Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad.
The first phase of the project comprises Nicklaus’s world-class 18-hole golf
course, a clubhouse, community, security and other services and 193 plots.
“About 30 of the residential plots in phase one have been sold, with another 30
plots reserved,” says Mustapha.


“Sales are expected to escalate further on completion of the first nine holes,” he
says. When sales reach 70%, construction is expected to begin on the nest of six
phases of the project. In total Pearl Vallet covers an area of 212 ha, which will be
made up of 170ha of golf estate and residential area and 41 ha of farmlands.


 There are to be 320 residential homes, 180 lodges, a proposed 90-room hotel
 and health and fitness centre and several recreational facilities, an aquestrian
                    centre and citrus orchards and vineyards.

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