Graduate Brochure - University of Regina by zhouwenjuan

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									Department of Psychology
Information for Prospective Graduate Students
                                                  Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 1




Letter from the Head, Department of Psychology (2012-2013)


Dear Graduate School Applicant:

Thank you for your interest in our graduate programs in psychology at the University of Regina.
We offer a fully accredited program leading to the Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, as well as an
M.A. and a Ph.D. program in Experimental and Applied Psychology. Our graduate programs are
described in the following pages.

We look forward to receiving your application.




Richard MacLennan Ph.D.
Head, Department of Psychology




                              Graduate Program Co-ordinators


Office Administrators                       Brenda Yung
                                            Brenda.Yung@uregina.ca

                                            psychology.dept@uregina.ca


Director, Clinical Training                 Heather Hadjistavropoulos, Ph.D., R. D. Psych
                                            Heather.Hadjistavropoulos@uregina.ca

Director, Experimental and Applied          Chris Oriet, Ph.D.
Psychology                                  Chris.Oriet@uregina.ca
2   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina




Living in Saskatchewan

Residents of Saskatchewan enjoy a high standard of living coupled with a relatively low cost of
living. Saskatchewan is rich with cultural heritage, has an excellent network of national and
provincial parks, and has clean air that is smog free. The landscape varies tremendously from the
vast wheat fields in the South to the dense trees and thousands of lakes that make up the Northern
Forest.

Saskatchewan has been a leader in health care for over 50 years. Saskatchewan pioneered
universal hospital care insurance in the 1940’s and comprehensive coverage in the 1960’s. The
province is now concentrating on a wellness model that promotes preventive care and innovative
service delivery with a system of health regions across the province. Regina is home to three
major healthcare facilities: The Regina General Hospital, Pasqua Hospital and the Wascana
Rehabilitation Centre.

The climate is relatively diverse across four distinct seasons and residents enjoy more hours of
sunlight than most other places in North America. The temperature shows considerable
fluctuation over the course of the year. The average temperature is -11 degrees Celsius for the
winter and +23 degrees Celsius for the summer.

The City of Regina

Regina, the capital of Saskatchewan, is located in south central Saskatchewan, midway between
Calgary, Alberta and Winnipeg, Manitoba. The Regina metropolitan area is well known as one of
the sunniest places in Canada with a population of approximately 210,000 (2011 statistic).

Regina is home to the beautiful Legislative Building, and residents benefit from an abundance of
parks, pathways, cultural events, organised sports, and excellent sporting facilities. Regina’s park
system features over 100 parks and is crowned by the Wascana Centre, a 930-hectare park that
includes a lake, a picnic island, a marina, and waterfowl park and display ponds. Wascana Centre
is one of the largest urban parks in North America and has no counterpart in Canada. Major
annual events include the Regina Dragon Boat Festival, the Regina Folk Music Festival and the
intercultural celebration Mosaic. Winter sports are also popular including, for example, curling,
hockey, and skiing. Regina is also home to several theatre groups, the longest continually
running symphony in Canada and many fine restaurants.

The cost of living in Regina is very reasonable compared to other major Canadian cities.
Affordable arrangements for student accommodations include a variety of student housing
options that are available on campus. The 2010-2011 cost of on campus accommodations ranges
between $2,200 and $3,960 per semester depending on the nature of the accommodation and the
options selected. Off-campus unfurnished one bedroom apartments near the University typically
rent for approximately $900 per month. Less expensive rental accommodations are available
throughout Regina. For additional information about on-campus housing, go to:
http://www.uregina.ca/residences. For more information about Saskatchewan or the city of
Regina you can check out gov.sk.ca or cityregina.com.
                                                     Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 3




The University of Regina is a young and dynamic institution. Although we achieved
independence only in 1974, we have grown to ten faculties and many departments, which have
established reputations for excellence and innovative programs leading to bachelor, master, and
doctoral degrees. As well, 18 research centres and institutes on campus enhance teaching and
research opportunities.
Our main campus is located in the heart of Wascana Centre, a unique 930-hectare development
dedicated to education, recreation, culture, and the seat of government. The new Campus and our
historic 'old' campus provide an attractive work and study environment for our students, faculty,
and staff.
The University of Regina has grown rapidly over the past few years. The annual operating budget
is over $177 million. Enrollment has reached approximately 12,000 full and part-time students
with over 1,400 faculty and staff. Over the last decade, the University has achieved dramatic
increases in its research revenues from external sources. Research efforts cover an impressive
array of topics including health, social justice, informatics, culture & heritage, and energy &
environment.
In recent years, the University has enjoyed renewed physical growth. This consisted of the
addition of several new buildings including the multi-million dollar Dr. William Riddell Centre (a
unique partnership bringing together the Students’ Union, the Faculty of Fine Arts, Student
Services, a food court and commercial enterprises), a two-storey addition and renovation to the
Education Building, an impressive home for the First Nations University of Canada, two new
residences, a state of the art Kinesiology and Health Studies complex, a major laboratory building
addition and new Regina Research Park buildings that have led to synergies and research
partnerships with industry and government.
Much of this information is derived from the University of Regina’s official web-site at
www.uregina.ca.




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                                                                 Psychology Department


The Department of Psychology offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Clinical Psychology as well as
Experimental and Applied Psychology (EAP). The Master’s degree programs offered in the
Department are considered as preparatory for further work at the doctoral level. In all cases, the
graduate programs offered in the Department of Psychology are subject to the general regulations
of the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research.

For a relatively small Department, a rather broad range of interests is reflected in the scholarly
activities of psychology faculty members (see section on faculty interests); and an even broader
range of research activities is reflected in the products of our graduate students (see list of recent
faculty publications and student theses). The size of the program allows students to receive a
great deal of individual attention from faculty. At the undergraduate level, the Department of
Psychology has the largest number of majors in the university. Our current complement of
graduate students stands at 44 clinical and 16 EAP students.

Admission Requirements

Fully qualified acceptance into the M.A. program requires an Honours degree or its equivalent in
psychology. Applicants with an Honours degree (or its equivalent) in related disciplines may also
be considered for admission into the M.A. program. Admission to the Ph.D. program is
traditionally contingent upon a Master’s degree in Psychology. Fully qualified acceptance into
either stream of doctoral studies requires previous academic preparation equivalent to that
comprising the Master’s degree programs offered in the Department.

Financial Support

The department strives to ensure that all of its graduate students have access to a satisfactory level
of funding support. This is typically achieved through a combination of sources of support
described in this section. During 2010-2011 the average levels of funding (over 12 months)
obtained by students in the Clinical program were $27,187 at the Master's level and $32,215.88 at
the doctoral level prior to pre-doctoral residency. These levels of average funding have been
stable in recent years. Students in the EAP program are also funded through a combination of
sources with most students receiving funding from supervisors’ grants. A high proportion of our
graduate students are funded through national scholarships.

A number of scholarships ($6,000 [MA] - $7,000 [PhD] per semester), teaching assistantships for
2012 - $2,356 [MA]; for 2012 - $2,469 [PhD] per semester including vacation pay), research
awards ($5,500 [MA] - $6,000 [PhD] per semester), and teaching fellowships (2012 - $6,351 per
semester including vacation pay) are available through the Faculty of Graduate Studies and
Research.      The Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research approves awards on the
recommendation of the Department. To be eligible for financial assistance, a student must be
registered as a full-time student.

Conditionally qualified students (see Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research Calendar) are not
eligible for University scholarships, assistantships, or fellowships. Some additional teaching
assistantships are available from the Faculty of Arts, and individual faculty members often also
support their own graduate students with research assistantships from their grants.
                                                     Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 5




Students are strongly encouraged to seek additional funding from external sources. There are
several national granting agencies that support graduate research through scholarships such as the
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Natural Sciences and
Engineering Research Council (NSERC), and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research
(CIHR), among others. Students who are successful in these competitions will automatically
receive a $5,000 enhancement award in the first semester in which the award is held, and then a
FGSR scholarship ($6,000 MA and $7,000 PhD) in the semester following completion of the
award. Both EAP and Clinical students have achieved a great deal of success earning national
scholarships. These awards have ranged in value from approximately $17,000 to $50,000 per
year. Our students have also been highly successful in winning institutional scholarships and
other awards such as the Governor General’s Medal for best graduate thesis at the University of
Regina.

Application Procedures

If what we have to offer appears to mesh with your goals, you can obtain the application or apply
online (http://www.uregina.ca/gradstudies/apply/ ). There is a non-refundable application fee
of $100.00 for all applicants; please note that if your file is not complete by January 15th you
cannot be considered for the fall of that year.

A complete file consists of:
a)    a completed application form
b)    your transcripts
c)    your GRE scores (verbal, quantitative, analytical and Psychology)
d)    two letters of reference
e)    a letter of intent detailing your background, goals, and research interests including
      faculty members who you would be interested in having as research supervisors.

Over the past several years, most students admitted into our clinical programs on average have
had combined GRE scores (verbal, quantitative, analytical) above the 68th percentile and an
average grade of ~ 85%. It is unusual for students to be accepted into the program with GRE
scores (verbal, quantitative, analytical, and psychology) below the 40th percentile or with an
academic average lower than 80%.

With respect to the letter of intent, you must provide a short written statement detailing
your background, your interests and why you think that our program is suited to your
goals. A form letter designed to provide general information to a number of graduate schools
may well be inadequate for our purposes. After you have reviewed faculty members’ interests
you should contact a faculty member who shares your interest and discuss potential supervision.

Applications must be complete and received in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research
office, North Tower Residence Room 110.2, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S
0A2. Tel: (306) 585-4161 by January 15th.

The department values diversity and encourages applications from all qualified women and men,
including aboriginal peoples, persons with disabilities, and members of visible minorities.

We hope that the information we have provided in this package will help you to make an
informed decision and we thank you for your initial interest in our Department.


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6   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina




Other Student Services

The University of Regina, Department of Counselling Services, under the direction of Dr. Brian
Sveinson, offers confidential counselling services to any University of Regina student. For more
information contact Counselling Services at:

Riddell Centre Room 251
University of Regina
Regina, Saskatchewan
S4S 0A2
Telephone: (306) 585-4491
Fax: (306) 585-5172

Instructional areas used by the Department of Psychology are wheel chair accessible. Assistance
can be arranged with parking, special arrangements with instructors and technologies to assist
students. Other services are also available. For more information please contact the University's
Co-ordinator of Special Needs (306 585-4631) or Room 251, Dr. William Riddell Centre.
                                                        Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 7




                                                              Graduate Programs




Clinical Psychology Program


Accreditation

The Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology has been fully accredited by the Canadian
Psychological Association (CPA) since the 2003-2004 academic year. Our next accreditation site
visit will take place in the 2014-2015 academic year. Information regarding CPA accreditation
can be obtained by contacting the CPA Accreditation Office at:
                         Accreditation Office
                         Canadian Psychological Association
                         141 Laurier Avenue West, Suite 702
                         Ottawa, ON K1P 5J3

                         CPA website: www.cpa.ca

Mission

The mission of the Clinical Psychology Program at the University of Regina it to train our
students in the scientist-practitioner tradition so that they will be prepared to work as either a
researcher, teacher or practitioner or all of these within a variety of settings (academic, clinical, or
research setting).

Philosophy/Principles

In keeping with the motto of the University of Regina as “One Who Serves” the philosophy of the
clinical program in the Department of Psychology is characterized by a commitment to our
responsibility to society and to our responsibility to the profession. In fulfilling these
responsibilities, we endeavour to ensure that our students are not only knowledgeable and
competent in both delivery of services and in the conduct of creative research, but that they also
endorse an ethic of care. Underlying these skills and attitude acquisitions is the principle of
integrity in relationships, which, in turn, is characterized, by respect for the dignity, and welfare
of others.



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8   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina




Values

The following values are inherent in the clinical program’s achievement of our mission:
             • Excellence
             • Scholarship
             • Leadership
             • Innovation & Creativity
             • Integration of Science and Practice
             • Broad-based Generalist Training
             • High Ethical Standards
             • Responsiveness to Society
             • Adherence to National Standards and Policies Concerning Training
             • Compassion
             • Diversity
             • Respect & Integrity
             • Professional Satisfaction
             • Collegiality
             • Collaboration
             • Productivity and Effort
             • Accountability

Theoretical Orientations

Students have opportunities through work with faculty or community supervisors to pursue
various interests in clinical psychology including clinical health psychology. Opportunities exist
to work with children, adults or seniors in a variety of settings such as mental health, psychiatric,
acute care, rehabilitation, counselling or forensic settings. Exposure to a variety of theoretical
orientations is possible, including cognitive-behavioural, experiential, humanistic and
interpersonal. Exposure to neuropsychology is also available.

Professional and Research Interests

A rather broad range of interests is reflected in the professional and scholarly activities of the
Clinical Psychology Faculty members (see section on faculty interests). Research expertise of
faculty fall both within the quantitative as well as qualitative domain.

Goals/Objectives

      Research Goals: The program strives to prepare students to have an understanding and
      respect for both basic and applied research. The faculty of the clinical program subscribe to
      the views that: (a) the clinical scientist, who is competently-trained in practice makes the
      most significant contributions to clinical research; and (b) the practitioner who is familiar
      with the body of basic and applied research, and who can critically evaluate research findings
      makes the soundest contributions to society and the profession.

      Research Objectives: To meet the above goals, students take courses in research methods
      and statistics. They also obtain experience in program evaluation (e.g., though course work,
      completion of a program-sanctioned program evaluation, participation in the Canadian
                                                  Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 9



Evaluation Society Annual Case Competition or completion of a program evaluation proposal
as part of comprehensive exams). Research is incorporated into clinical courses and is a
component of reading required for clinical training. Furthermore, students complete both an
M.A. and Ph.D. thesis and have the opportunity to participate in faculty research projects.

Clinical Practice Goals: Students will be competent in: (a) assessment, (b) diagnosis, (c)
evaluation; (d) consultation; and (e) intervention. In each area, students will gain competency
in the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships, including competency in
working with diverse groups. It is recognized, however, that the field of clinical psychology
is diverse and no single practitioner can master all areas. Students will be taught to recognize
their skills and when appropriate refer to colleagues who have the requisite skills.

Clinical Practice Objectives: Students complete course work in ethics, psychopathology,
assessment and interventions exposing students to more than one theoretical orientation and
skills for working with both adults and children and diverse populations. Students carry out at
least 2,700 hours of clinical training under supervision, including a four month internship,
two PhD clinical placements and a predoctoral residency. Students also complete an oral case
presentation, a review paper on a clinical topic, and an ethics oral exam.

Knowledge Goals: Students will gain a working understanding of biological, social,
cognitive and affective bases of behaviour as well as individual differences, statistics and
research methods. A more thorough knowledge of personality, psychopathology, assessment,
diagnostics, intervention, ethics and professional behaviours will be obtained. Several
theoretical orientations are covered.

Knowledge Objectives: To gain the above knowledge students complete course work at the
graduate level in all of the above areas. Further knowledge is gained through clinical
experiences and comprehensive exams.

Ethics and Professional Conduct Goals: The program strives to prepare students to be
ethical and professional in their research, clinical, and teaching activities. Moreover, the
program strives to prepare students to be sensitive to issues of racial and cultural diversity
and individual differences.

Ethical Objectives: To meet the above goals of our program, students take a course in
professional ethics that not only thoroughly covers the CPA code of ethics and ethical
decision making process, but also legislation, standards of practice, and cultural issues. They
are also trained in becoming competent and effective in their interpersonal relationships.
Students are exposed to diverse clients (over 2700 hours of clinical training), and diverse
faculty mentors. Students also complete an oral ethics exam as part of the comprehensive
examination process.

Leadership Goals: We encourage our graduates to: (a) disseminate their work through
conference presentations and publishing papers; (b) expand their knowledge by attending
conferences or workshops and reading journals; (c) train others in psychology and other
mental health fields; (d) educate the public; and (e) contribute to psychology as a discipline
by holding leadership roles.

Leadership Objectives: To meet the leadership goals, students are encouraged to present
and publish their work, to obtain experience as teaching assistants, to be involved in training
junior students and to play an active role in the development of the discipline of psychology

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10   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



     by being an active member of the Psychology Graduate Students Association and the
     Canadian Psychological Association. To encourage professional development, students
     complete a seminar series devoted to professional issues at the PhD level. A major
     component of this seminar series is focused on development of skills in supervision and
     interprofessional relationships. Additional training in supervision is also provided.

Evaluation of Outcomes

The program evaluates its outcomes on an annual basis. Our annual program evaluation is
available on the departmental website and is included as an Appendix of this brochure.

Academic and Practical Functions for which the Students will be Prepared

Students from our program will be prepared to pursue a variety of careers, including primarily
research, clinical, or teaching positions, or a combination of these activities. We recognize and
value that students have varying career aspirations. The program strives to prepare students to be
well grounded in research, the provision of clinical services, and teaching.

Recent Practica and Four Month Internship Settings

Beyond course work, clinical psychology students have a variety of training opportunities in
Regina, other areas of Saskatchewan and elsewhere. Examples of four month internship and
practica training sites include:
        Counselling Services, University of Regina
        Psychology Training Clinic (Child and Family Clinic & Adult Clinic), University of
        Regina
        Child and Youth Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
        Mental Health Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
        Wascana Rehabilitation Centre (Adult Rehabilitation Program; Functional Rehabilitation
        Program; Children’s Program; Extended Care/Veterans program ), Regina Qu’Appelle
        Health Region
        Prairie Psychological Services, Regina, SK
        Royal Canadian Mounted Police Academy, Regina, SK
        Battlefords Mental Health Centre, North Battleford, SK
        Saskatchewan Hospital (Inpatient Unit; Forensic Unit), North Battleford, SK
        Prince Albert Mental Health Centre, Prince Albert, SK
        Yorkton Mental Health Centre, Yorkton, SK
        Cypress Health Region, Swift Current, SK
        Regional Psychiatric Hospital, Saskatoon, SK
        Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto
        St. Joseph’s Hospital, Anxiety Treatment and Research Center, and Mood Disorder
        Program, Hamilton, ON
        Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB
        Cross Cancer Institute & Department of Psychology, University of Alberta Hospital,
        Edmonton, AB
        Mandel and Associates, Calgary, AB
        Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin

These placements offer graduate students clinical experience in assessment, individual therapy,
and or group therapy. Ph.D. level psychologists supervise from a variety of theoretical
perspectives. Individuals who have an interest in seeking placements in other provinces can
                                                    Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 11



explore this option with the Clinical Placement Coordinator. This has been feasible in several
instances in the past. Students who are accepted into our program should be prepared to seek
some of their clinical training outside of Regina.

University of Regina Psychology Training Clinic

Many students receive training in the University of Regina Psychology Training Clinic with
supervision provided by registered doctoral clinical psychologists. Clients or community
providers can refer to the clinic. Students are involved in the assessment and treatment of clients
under supervision. Clients present with variable problems, such as anxiety and mood disorders or
disorders of childhood. Individual, group and family therapy is used. Students working in the
clinic can book a clinic computer and desk to complete reports, and book a group room,
individual therapy room or family room to see clients. All therapy rooms can be viewed by a
one-way mirror and are set up for both audio and video recording.

Predoctoral Residency

As part of training, doctoral students must complete a 1-year predoctoral residency at a CPA
accredited site or equivalent. Our students have had a high degree of success in obtaining
residences to their liking. Predoctoral residences are normally completed outside Regina. Sites
since 2001 include:

        Annapolis Valley Health - Valley Regional Hospital, Kentville, NS Calgary Consortium
        in Clinical Psychology
        British Columbia Mental Health and Addiction Services, Vancouver
        Calgary Consortium in Clinical Psychology (3 students)
        Central California Psychology Internship Consortium (CCPIC), (2 students)
        Centre of Addictions and Mental Health, Toronto, ON (2 students)
        Clinical Health Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg (3 students)
        Edmonton Consortium Clinical Psychology Residency
        Millard Health Centre, Edmonton
        Ongwanada: Kingston Internship Consortium
        Ottawa General Hospital
        Queen Elizabeth II Health Science Centre, Halifax, N.S. (4 students)
        Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region (6 students)
        River Valley Health, Fredericton, N.B.
        Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, Ottawa, ON (3 students)
        Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, SK (5 students)
        St. Joseph’s Hospital, Hamilton, ON
        University of British Columbia, Counselling Services

Clinical Program Facts

        In recent years, the average size of our applicant pool has been 41.
        Each year we extend approximately seven to eight offers to applicants and enrol five to
        six new students.
        Students who were admitted in the last three years had an average grade of approximately
        87%. Average graduate record examination (GRE) percentile scores were as follows:
        Verbal 78%, Quantitative 61%, Analytical 67%; and Psychology Subject score of 712.



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           Attrition rates (i.e., leaving the department before the completion of a degree) are
           approximately 3% for the M.A. program and 3% for the PhD program in the last 11
           years.
           The student body currently is comprised of 74% female and 26% male students.
           Approximately 39% of these students are from Saskatchewan, another 36% are from
           other western provinces and 23% are from eastern Canada. We also have one
           international student in our program.
           The average age of our graduate students is 30 and ranges from 22-52.
           There are three students who represent visible minorities and one student who is of
           Aboriginal ancestry. We currently have one international student enrolled in the program.
           At present, we have no students with special needs enrolled in our graduate programs;
           however, we encourage applications from qualified persons with special needs. All
           university buildings are wheel chair accessible and specific assistance and equipment for
           students can be arranged through the disability resource office (306-585-4631).

Our Graduates

Graduates from our program have been highly successful in obtaining employment in clinical
settings (e.g., hospitals, mental health clinics) and research settings (e.g., universities). All of our
doctoral clinical program graduates have been successful in becoming registered, licensed or
certified (or, in the case of very recent graduates, are in the process of becoming registered,
licensed or certified) as psychologists in the jurisdiction of their choice.

Clinical Degree Programs

The degree programs in Clinical Psychology offered in the Department are based on a scientist-
practitioner model of training and emphasise clinical, research, and professional skill
development.

The M.A. program in Clinical Psychology is intended to provide students with a solid grasp of
basic academic and practical skills. The Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology builds upon the
M.A. program and provides an opportunity for advanced research, study, and clinical skills
acquisition. In line with the current emphasis of many programs and jurisdictions in North
America with respect to academic training and credentialing in Psychology, students pursuing
graduate education and training in Clinical Psychology are strongly encouraged to do so at the
doctoral level. As such, all students completing the M.A. are expected to apply to the Ph.D.
program. Students who are enrolled in our clinical programs are expected to maintain full-time
student status.

M.A.
Psyc 801 Research Design and Methodology in Psychology                       (3 credit hours)
Psyc 802 Applied Multivariate Statistics                                     (3 credit hours)
Psyc 806 Ethics and Standards of Professional Practice                       (3 credit hours)
Psyc 832 Advanced Psychopathology                                            (3 credit hours)
Psyc 850 Psychological Assessment I                                          (3 credit hours)
Psyc 860 Psychological Interventions I                                       (3 credit hours)
Psyc 876 Internship in Clinical Psychology                                   (1 credit hour)
Psyc 900 Graduate Seminar                                                    (2 credit hours)
Psyc 901 Thesis Research                                                     (16 credit hours)

Total Credit Hours: 37 credit hours
                                                      Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 13




All course work is taken in the first academic year. The second academic year is used to
complete research and usually the four month internship. Students in this program will normally
apply for admission to the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology in January of their second year
in the program. At this time of application to the PhD, all required course work and the clinical
internship should be complete and data collection for the MA well underway. The likelihood of
being accepted into the PhD program decreases if students do not meet these timelines.

Ph.D.
Psyc 800 History, Theory and System in Psychology
(or equivalent, e.g., Psyc 824, 826)                                               (3 credit hours)
Psyc 803 Psychometrics                                                             (3 credit hours)
Psyc 851 Psychological Assessment II                                               (3 credit hours)
Psyc 861 Psychological Interventions II                                            (3 credit hours)
One elective Psychology course                                                     (3 credit hours)
Psyc 865 Comprehensive Exams                                                       (1 credit hour)
Psyc 870 Practica in Clinical Psychology                                           (1 credit hour)
Psyc 871 Practica in Clinical Psychology                                           (1 credit hour)
Psyc 880AB Residency in Clinical Psychology                                        (3 credit hours)
Psyc 900 Doctoral Seminar                                                          (1 credit hour)
Psyc 901 Thesis Research                                                           (44 credit hours)

Total Credit Hours: 66 credit hours

Ph.D. courses are typically offered every 2nd year. In addition to the above, students must
demonstrate competence in: (a) biological bases of behaviour (e.g., physiological, comparative,
neuropsychology, psychopharmacology); (b) cognitive and affective bases of behaviour (e.g.,
learning, sensation, perception, cognition, motivation, emotion); and (c) social bases of behaviour
(e.g., social, cultural, ethnic, and group processes, sex roles, theories relating to organisations and
systems). This can be accomplished either by taking a graduate course in each of these areas (one
of which could be used to fulfil the Ph.D. elective course requirement), or by completing all-
inclusive qualifying examinations (for students who demonstrate significant prior experience in
an area, qualified faculty will co-ordinate the relevant reading lists and exam). A combination of
graduate courses and examinations may also be used to fulfil the requirements. Moreover,
students can demonstrate competence (subject to approval by the clinical committee) in a
maximum of one cognate area (i.e., biological, cognitive or social) if they have completed a
minimum of two advanced undergraduate courses in any one of the three cognate areas. Courses
in these cognate areas may be taken at any point during the student’s graduate training with
departmental approval. In addition, students are encouraged to take courses in other areas such as
program development/evaluation.

Clinical Training

Students in the graduate program in Clinical Psychology complete a minimum of 900 hours of
supervised practical experience consisting of a 600 hour four month internship in Clinical
Psychology (Psyc 876) and a minimum of two additional 150 hour Practica in Clinical
Psychology (Psyc 870-875) prior to the full-year Pre-doctoral Residency in Clinical Psychology
(Psyc 880AB). No more than 600 hours of the required supervised clinical experience can be
undertaken for academic credit by students enrolled in the M.A. program in Clinical Psychology.
For the full-year pre-doctoral residency, students are expected to apply to CPA accredited sites or

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14   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



equivalent and to go through the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers
(APPIC) matching process (www.appic.org).Students will receive at least 300 hours of direct
contact with clients prior to the pre-doctoral residency and at least 150 hours of supervision.

Comprehensive Examination

The Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination (Psyc 865-CL) covers broad aspects of clinical
psychology, and consists of four parts:
    1) A case presentation (~2 hours in length for presentation and questions) in which students
       are required to summarize a case that they have assessed and treated during a previously
       completed practicum or internship. In the presentation, the student must cover and
       integrate theory, research, assessment, and intervention in relation to the clinical case.
    2) A review paper (written in format for submission to a psychological journal) covering
       recent research on a subject of broad relevance in clinical psychology. The purpose of
       this paper is to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate an ability to
       integrate of theory, research, and practice while highlighting important developments.
       We note that this component is currently under review and may be replaced with a
       different examination approach/methodology.
    3) An ethics oral examination (~1 hour in length) during which students are asked questions
       that are designed to assess their understanding of ethical and professional issues and their
       ability to resolve ethical dilemmas.
    4) A program evaluation proposal. The following students are exempt from this component:
       a) Students who successfully completed a graduate course in program evaluation; b)
       students who participated in the Canadian Evaluation Society Annual Case Competition;
       and c) students who completed substantial supervised work (as determined by the clinical
       committee) in the area of program evaluation including a written program evaluation
       report.

The comprehensive examination process is typically completed over a three-month time span and
is used as a means of judging whether or not the student has a mature and substantial grasp of the
discipline and the ability to integrate theory, research, and practice in the areas of
psychopathology, assessment, treatment, and ethics.

This examination is scheduled after the student has completed all degree requirements, with the
exception of the doctoral dissertation and pre-doctoral residency. It must be taken prior to
applying for the pre-doctoral residency.

All parts must be passed in order to meet the comprehensive examination requirement.
Unsuccessful candidates for the Comprehensive Examination may repeat each component of the
examination once. A second failure will result in the student being discontinued from the Clinical
Program.

Program Manual

More details on the Clinical Psychology Program can be obtained by downloading the Clinical
Psychology Program Manual (http://www.uregina.ca/arts/psychology).
                                                     Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 15




Experimental and Applied Psychology (EAP) Degree Program


Overview

The Experimental and Applied Psychology (EAP) program is designed to train psychologists who
will work in either academic settings or as researchers in industry or the public sector. Students
in the EAP program have the opportunity to specialize in Cognitive, Developmental, Forensic,
Social, or Theoretical Psychology, or in Neuroscience.

Orientation

The EAP program focuses on training students to become independent researchers who are
capable of carrying out high quality, high impact research. Faculty in the EAP program have
research interests that address both basic questions of global importance and applied problems
that impact our community, our province, and our country. To this end, student training takes
place in traditional laboratory settings as well as in non-academic community settings, such as in
hospitals, schools, and law enforcement agencies. A key component of the EAP program is
strong mentorship, with students working closely with their supervisors at every stage of the
development and implementation of research projects. Students also have opportunities to work
with researchers in areas outside of their immediate area of specialization, and collaboration is
encouraged. As part of their training, students are encouraged to present their findings at research
conferences both at the University of Regina and around the globe. To this end, the Faculty of
Graduate Studies provides travel awards on a competitive basis, in three competitions each year.

Areas of Specialization

Cognitive Psychology

Students choosing to specialize in cognitive psychology learn to design research studies to
address questions of interest in both basic areas (including attention and perception, memory,
learning, mathematical cognition, and decision making) and applied areas (such as metacognition,
with application to education; face recognition, with application to the law; and the effects of
aging and mental health on cognition, with application to health).

Developmental Psychology

Students working in this area conduct research on (a) how children learn and become skilled in
academic domains such as arithmetic, (b) issues relating to the impact of family dynamics on
mental development, and (c) the role that siblings, parents, and peers play in children’s
development.

Forensic Psychology

Forensic psychology addresses research questions that intersect with theoretical and practical
application of the law. Faculty research interests include the psychology of policing, reliability of
eyewitness testimony, perceptions of victims and perpetrators of crime, investigative
interviewing, child witnesses, and police decision-making processes.



                                                - 15 -
16   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Neuroscience

Neuroscientists explore how the structure of the brain gives rise to its function. Faculty research
in this area examines: the impact of acquired brain injury; the neural correlates of the expression
and interpretation of emotion; sex differences in cognitive and visuomotor skills, and the effects
of differential prenatal exposure to hormones on behaviour later in life.

Social Psychology

Students specializing in this area carry out research that examines interpersonal dynamics, such as
prejudice and racial attitudes, mentoring relationships, women in positions of leadership and
power, and issues in intimate relationships and dating, such as partner violence. Faculty research
also analyzes individual differences and popular culture from a critical perspective.

Theoretical Psychology

This specialization, one of very few of its kind in Canadian psychology programs, addresses
foundational issues in psychology, such as the history of the discipline; the history of ideas on
psychological topics such as mind, emotion, thought, and action; how psychology relates to other
sciences; and critical and theoretical considerations of topics frequently explored in other areas of
psychology, such as interpretation, perception, the concept of the self and the meaning of
consciousness.

Program Structure

Students in the EAP program complete courses in research methods, statistics, ethics, and courses
in their chosen area of specialization, as well as courses in other areas of interest to the student.
Both M.A. and Ph.D. candidates complete thesis research, developed in consultation with the
student’s supervisor and a thesis committee. Following acceptance of a thesis by the student’s
thesis committee, an oral examination (defense) will be held. Doctoral candidates are also
required to complete a comprehensive examination. The format of the comprehensive
examination is flexible, with students able to choose from among several options including
writing a mock research grant proposal, completing a research practicum with a community
partner, or developing a new course, as best meets the career objectives of the student. M.A.
students typically complete their programme of study in two years; Ph.D. students typically
complete their programme of study in three years.

The courses required for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are as follows.

M.A.
PSYC 801 Research Design and Methodology in Psychology                         (3 credit hours)
PSYC 807 Research and Applied Ethics                                           (3 credit hours)

PSYC 802 Applied Multivariate Statistics
   or PSYC 805 Experimental Design and Analysis of Variance                    (3 credit hours)
One additional PSYC course                                                     (3 credit hours)
PSYC 900 Graduate Seminar in Psychology                                        (2 credit hours)
PSYC 901 Thesis Research                                                      (16 credit hours)

                                                                           Total: 30 credit hours
                                                  Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 17




Ph.D.
PSYC 800 History, Theory and System in Psychology                              (3 credit hours)
Three additional PSYC courses                                                  (9 credit hours)
PSYC 901 Thesis Research                                                       (48 credit hours)
PSYC 865-EA Comprehensive Examination                                          (1 credit hour)

                                                                               Total: 61 credit hours

Please visit: http://www.uregina.ca/gradstudies/calendar/programs/psychology.shtml for current
degree requirements and course descriptions.




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18   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Faculty Research Interests and Selected Publications



Dennis P. Alfano, Ph.D. (Toronto) Professor

Clinical neuroscience. Current research interests focus principally on clinical neuropsychological
aspects of mild traumatic brain injury, concussion in high-risk athletes, and the clinical utility and
validity of neurobehavioural measures. Representative projects include: a) prospective
neuropsychological study of concussion in high-risk athletes, b) neurobehavioural aspects of mild
traumatic brain injury, and c) ecological validity of neuropsychological assessment following
traumatic brain injury.
Email: Dennis.Alfano@uregina.ca

Alfano, D.P., & Nicholls, M.J. (2009). Comparative discriminative ability of neurocognitive
    assessment versus symptom report in the detection of sport-related concussion. Canadian
    Psychology, 50(2a), 65.

Alfano, D.P., & Nicholls, M.J. (2008). Comparative discriminative ability of neurocognitive
    measures with and without baseline assessment in the detection of sport-related concussion.
    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 23, 735.

Hodsman, S.E., & Alfano, D.P. (2008). Construct validity of a neurocorrective index for the
   MMPI in traumatic brain injury. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 23, 690.


Gordon J. Asmundson, PhD, RD Psych, FRSC (Manitoba) Professor

Research and clinical interests involve understanding the basic mechanisms of the anxiety
disorders, health anxiety, acute and chronic pain, and the association of these with disability and
behavior change as well as related assessment and treatment issues.
Email: Gordon.Asmundson@uregina.ca

McMillan, K. A., Asmundson, G. J. G., Zvolensky, M. J., & Carleton, R. N. (in press). Startle
  response and anxiety sensitivity: Sub-cortical indices of physiologic arousal and fear
  responding. Emotion, 00, 000-000.

Asmundson, G. J. G., Taylor, S., Carleton, R. N., Weeks, J. W., & Hadjistavropoulos, H. D.
   (2012). Should health anxiety be carved at the joint? A look at the health anxiety construct
   using factor mixture modelling in a non-clinical sample. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26,
   246-251.

Fetzner, M. G., McMillan, K. A., Sareen, J., & Asmundson, G. J. G. (2011). What is the
    association between traumatic life events and alcohol abuse/dependence in people with and
    without PTSD? Findings from a nationally representative sample. Depression and Anxiety,
    28, 632-838.
                                                   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 19



R. Nicholas Carleton, Ph.D. (Regina) Assistant Professor

Research interests include the biopsychosocial measurement, assessment, and treatments of
anxiety, chronic pain, traumatic stress, mood, and somatic disorders, focusing on
transdiagnostics, fundamental cognitions (i.e., lower-order factors such as intolerance of
uncertainty), and shared emergent properties (i.e., higher-order factors such as extraversion).
Attentional biases and psychometrics and statistics. Representative Projects include: Modifying
cognitive biases in social anxiety: Exploring new avenues for treatment; Trauma, pain, and fear:
Using the startle paradigm to explore the relationship between PTSD and chronic pain.
Email: Nick.Carleton@uregina.ca

Carleton, R. N. (in press). The intolerance of uncertainty construct in the context of anxiety
    disorders: Theoretical and practical perspectives. Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics.

Carleton, R. N., Richter, A. A., & Asmundson, G. J. G. (2011). Attention modification in persons
    with fibromyalgia: A double blind, randomized clinical trial. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy,
    40, 279-290.

Carleton, R. N., Sikorski, J., & Asmundson, G. J. G. (2010). Terrifying movie stimuli: A new
    design for investigating precursors for posttraumatic stress. Psychological Trauma: Theory,
    Research, Practice, and Policy, 2, 206-217.


Heather Hadjistavropoulos, Ph.D. (British Columbia) Professor; Director of Clinical Training

Current research interests include examining: 1) how psychological variables (e.g., health
anxiety, coping) impact health; 2) strategies for improving training in clinical psychology (e.g.,
supervision) and 3) strategies for improving health care, such as studying the impact of internet
cognitive behaviour therapy on mental health problems. Clinical interests focus on the
assessment and treatment of adults with anxiety and depression, especially among those with
health related conditions.
Email: Heather.Hadjistavropoulos@uregina.ca

Hadjistavropoulos, H. D., Janzen, J.A., Kehler, M. D., Leclerc, J. A., Sharpe, D., & Bourgault-
   Fagnou, M. D. (2012). Core cognitions related to health anxiety in self-reported medical and
   non-medical samples. Journal of Behavioural Medicine, 32, 167-178. DOI 10.1007/s10865-
   011-9339-3

Hadjistavropoulos, H. D., Thompson, T., Ivanov, M, Drost, C., Butz, C., Klein, B., & Austin, D.
   (2011). Considerations in the development of a therapist-assisted internet cognitive behavior
   therapy service. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 42, 463-471. Doi:
   10.1037/a0026176

Hadjistavropoulos, H. D., Kehler, M. D., Peluso, D., Loutzenhiser, L., & Hadjistavropoulos, T.
   (2010). Case presentations: A key method for evaluating core competencies in Clinical
   Psychology? Canadian Psychology, 51, 269-275.




                                              - 19 -
20   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Thomas Hadjistavropoulos, Ph.D., ABPP, FCAHS (Saskatchewan) Professor, Research Chair
in Aging and Health and Director of Centre on Aging and Health

Current research interests include the following: a) Clinical health psychology (e.g., pain
assessment); b) pain; c) aging; d) fear and anxiety in older persons; and d) ethics and professional
issues in clinical psychology. Clinical interests fall within the areas of adult Cognitive Behaviour
Therapy and adult clinical assessment.
Email: Thomas.Hadjistavropoulos@uregina.ca

Hadjistavropoulos, T. et al. (2012). The relationship of fear of falling and balance confidence
   with balance and dual tasking performance. Psychology and Aging, 27, 1-13.

Hadjistavropoulos, T., et   al. (2011).    A     biopsychosocial           formulation      of    pain
   communication. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 910-939.

Hadjistavropoulos, T., Breau, L. & Craig, K.D. (2011). Pain assessment in adults and children
   with limited ability to communicate. In D.C. Turk & R. Melzack (Eds.) Handbook of pain
   assessment (3rd Edition) (pp. 260-280). New York: Guilford Press.


Bridget Klest, Ph.D. (Oregon) Assistant Professor

Research interests focus on interrelations among trauma exposure, relational context of trauma,
gender and ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, employing a broad definition of posttraumatic
symptoms including both physical and mental health indicators. Additional interests include
exploring options for expanding access to mental health care, for example through telehealth
treatment modalities.
Email: klest20b@uregina.ca

Klest, B. (2012). Childhood trauma, poverty, and adult victimization. Psychological Trauma:
   Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 4, 245-251.

Klest, B., Freyd, J.J., & Foynes, M.M. (in press). Trauma exposure and posttraumatic symptoms
   in Hawaii: Gender, ethnicity, and social context. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research,
   Practice, and Policy.

Klest, B., Freyd, J.J., Hampson, S.E., & Dubanoski, J.P. (in press). Trauma, socioeconomic
   resources, and self-rated health in an ethnically diverse adult cohort. Ethnicity and Health.


Jeff Loucks, Ph.D. (Oregon) Assistant Professor

Broad research interests include the development of social cognition. More specific current
interests include infant, child, and adult action perception, infant social cognition, and the relation
between motor experience and action understanding.
Email: loucks5j@uregina.ca

Loucks, J., & Sommerville, J. A. (2012). The role of motor experience in understanding action
   function: The case of the precision grasp. Child Development, 83, 801-809.

Loucks, J., & Sommerville, J. A. (2012). Developmental changes in the discrimination of
   dynamic human actions in infancy. Developmental Science, 15, 123-130.
                                                    Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 21



Loucks, J., & Baldwin, D. (2009). Sources of information for discriminating dynamic human
   actions. Cognition, 111, 84-97.


Lynn Loutzenhiser, Ph.D. (Saskatchewan) Associate Professor

Research interests include the transition to parenthood, infant sleep, and father involvement in
families. Clinical interests include the assessment and treatment of childhood disorders, early
childhood and family therapy.
Email: Lynn.Loutzenhiser@uregina.ca

Geissler, S., Loutzenhiser, L., Praud, J., Streifler, L. (2010). Mothering Canada;
    Interdisciplinary Voices: La maternité au Canada: Voix interdisciplinaires. Toronto, Ontario;
    Demeter Press.

Swami, V., Frederick, D.A., et al. (2010). The attractive female body weight and female body
   dissatisfaction in 26 countries across 10 world regions: Results of the International Body
   Project I. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin,. 36 (3), 309-325.

Sevigny, P. R. & Loutzenhiser, L. (2009). Predictors of parental self-efficacy in
   mothers and fathers of toddlers. Child: Care, Health and Development, 36(2), 179-189.


Richard N. MacLennan, Ph.D. (Western) Professor, Department Head

Psychological measurement and statistics. Trait approaches to the study of: personality, creativity,
and intelligence. Also interested in the application of psychological testing to practical problems
in industrial-organizational, vocational, police, and military psychology.
Email: Richard.Maclennan@uregina.ca

MacLennan, R. N. & Partyka, J. C. (2009). Exclusive Training on a Computerized Firearms
   Simulator Does Transfer to Live-Fire Performance. RCMP Technical Report 02-2009.

Partyka, J. C., MacLennan, R. N., & Brand, J. (2009). Simulator Adaptation Syndrome in a
    Computerized Driving Simulator. RCMP Technical Report 01-2009.

Remo, N. & MacLennan, R. (2007). Honesty and integrity of university security personnel.
   Canadian Journal of Police and Security Services, 5(1), 49-58.


Chris Oriet, Ph.D. (Waterloo) Associate Professor

Interests focus primarily on the effects of attention and experience on perception, as well as
limitations in the allocation of attention across time and space. Current research interests
include: 1) statistical summary representations of sets, 2) the relationship between attention and
awareness, and 3) attentional biases.
Email: Chris.Oriet@uregina.ca

Corbett, J. E. & Oriet, C. (2011). The whole is indeed more than the sum of its parts: Perceptual
   averaging in the absence of individual item representation. Acta Psychologica, 138, 289 -
   301.


                                               - 21 -
22   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Fitzgerald, R., Oriet, C., & Price, H. L. (2011). Change detection inflates confidence on a
    subsequent recognition task. Memory, 9, 879 - 890.

Whiting, B. F. & Oriet, C. (2011). Rapid averaging? Not so fast! Psychonomic Bulletin and
   Review, 18, 484 - 489.


Heather Price, Ph.D (Simon Fraser) Associate Professor

Current research interests include: Children as witnesses; autobiographical and event memory;
alibi witnesses; effects of stress/emotional arousal on memory; forensic interviewing.
Email: Heather.Price@uregina.ca

Schneider, L., Price, H. L., Roberts, K. P., & Hedrick, A. H. (2011). Children’s episodic and
   generic reports of alleged abuse. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25, 862-870.

Price, H. L. & Roberts, K. P. (2011). The effects of an intensive training and feedback program
   on police and social workers’ investigative interviews of children. Canadian Journal of
   Behavioural Science, 43, 235-244.

Price, H. L., & Connolly, D. A. (2007). Anxious and non-anxious children’s reports of a repeated
    or unique event. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 98, 94-112.


Donald A. Sharpe, Ph.D. (Manitoba) Associate Professor

Current research interests include applications of quantitative approaches (e.g. meta-analysis;
structural equation modeling), research methodology and ethics.
Email: sharped@uregina.ca

Sharpe, D., & Faye, C. (2009). A second look at debriefing practices: Madness in our method?
   Ethics and Behavior, 19, 432-447.

Faye, C., & Sharpe, D. (2008). Academic motivation in university: The role of basic
   psychological needs  and identity formation. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science,
   40, 189-199.

Sharpe, D., & Faye, C. (2006). Non-epileptic seizures and child sexual abuse: A critical review of
   the literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 26 1020-1040.


William E. Smythe, Ph.D. (Toronto) Professor

Foundational issues in theoretical psychology; narrative and discursive psychology; metaphor in
psychology; personal mythology; psychology of fiction; foundations and ethics of qualitative
research.
Email: William.Smythe@uregina.ca

Smythe, W. E., & MacKenzie, S. A. (2010). A vision of dialogical pluralism in psychology. New
   Ideas in Psychology, 28, 227–234.
                                                   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 23



Smythe, W. E., & Chan, G. (2009). Jungian archetypes and evolutionary psychology. In Teo, T.,
   Stenner, P., Rutherford, A., Park, E., & Baerveldt, C., Varieties of theoretical psychology:
   International philosophical and practical concerns (pp. 289-298). Concord, ON: Captus
   University Publications.

Smythe, W. E. (2007). The shamanic motif in psychological healing. In J. D. Pappas, W. E.
   Smythe, & A. Baydala, (Eds.), Cultural healing and belief systems (pp. 55-72). Calgary, AB:
   Detselig.


Laurie Sykes Tottenham, Ph.D. , (Saskatchewan) Associate Professor

My research examines individual differences in emotional and spatial abilities from a
neuropsychological perspective. Areas of focus include: laterality, influences of task
characteristics, and steroid hormones. Research techniques include salivary enzyme
immunoassays (conducted on-site, to assess circulating hormone concentrations) and behavioural
testing.
Email: Laurie.SykesTottenham@uregina.ca

Hatin, B.D.M., Sykes Tottenham, L., & Oriet, C. (in press). The relationship between collisions
    and pseudoneglect: Is it right? Cortex.

Sykes Tottenham, L., Saucier, D., Elias, L., & Gutwin, C. (2005). Men are more accurate than
   women in aiming at targets in both near and extrapersonal space. Perceptual and Motor
   Skills, 101, 3-12.

Sykes Tottenham, L., Saucier, D., Elias, L., & Gutwin, C. (2003). Female advantage for spatial
   location memory in both static and dynamic environments. Brain and Cognition, 53(2), 381-
   383.


Kristi Wright, Ph.D. (Dalhousie) Associate Professor

Current research interests include: childhood psychopathology; health anxiety, preoperative
anxiety; early onset psychosis
Email: kristi.wright@uregina.ca

Wright, K. D., Asmundson, G. J. G., McCreary, D. R., Stewart, S. H., McLaughlin, E., Comeau,
   M. N., & Walsh, T. M. (2010). Confirmatory factor analysis of the Childhood Anxiety
   Sensitivity Index: A gender comparison. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 39, 225–235.

Wright, K. D., Stewart, S. H., & Finley, G. A. (2010). Preoperative anxiety in children: When is
   parental presence helpful? Canadian Journal of Anesthesia, 57, 751–758.

Wright K. D., Eisner, A., Stewart, S. H., & Finley, G. A. (2009). Measurement of preoperative
   anxiety in young children: Self-report versus observer-rated. Journal of Psychopathology
   and Behavioral Assessment, 32, 416–427.




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24   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Campion College
University of Regina

Katherine D. Arbuthnott, Ph.D. (Saskatchewan) Professor

Cognitive psychology: Current research focuses on processes that facilitate goal-pursuit and self-
control with particular application to pro-environmental behaviour.
Email: Katherine.Arbuthnott@uregina.ca

Arbuthnott, K.D., Arbuthnott, D.W., & Thompson, V.A. (2006). The Mind in Therapy: Cognitive
   Science for Practice. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Arbuthnott, K.D. (2010). Taking the long view: Environmental sustainability and delay of
   gratification. Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy, 10, 4-22.

Arbuthnott, K.D. (2009). Education for sustainable development: Beyond attitude change.
   International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 10, 152-163.



Tom Phenix, Ph.D. (Saskatchewan) Assistant Professor

Mathematical cognition; retrieval-induced forgetting; math anxiety
Email: Tom.Phenix@uregina.ca

Phenix, T. & Price, H. (in press). Applying Retrieval-Induced Forgetting to Children's Testimony.
   Applied Cognitive Psychology.

Phenix, T.L. & Marchi, Ashley (2011, April). Math ability: Belief and performance. Paper
   presented at the Discourse, Power and Resistance Conference, Plymouth, UK.

Phenix, T. & Campbell, J.I.D. (2004). Effects of multiplication practice on product verification:
   Integrated structures model or retrieval-induced forgetting? Memory & Cognition, 32, 324-
   335.


Katherine Robinson, Ph.D. (Alberta) Associate Professor

Mathematical Cognition Lab Research with both adults and children on procedural, factual, and
conceptual knowledge of arithmetic. Supported by NSERC discovery grants and internal grants.
Child Health and Learning (CHLD) Lab (with Drs. Kristi Wright & Heather Price) CFI-funded
research facility designed specifically for data collection with children. Interactive Media,
Poetics, Aesthetics, Cognition, and Technology (IMPACT) Lab (with Drs. Christian Riegel &
Sheila Petty) CFI-funded interdisciplinary research facility designed to conduct studies on how
poetics and aesthetics affect cognitive processing and how both of these are mediated by the
multimedia platform on which they are presented. Equipment includes eye tracker and several
multimedia devices (e.g., virtual reality goggles and iPhones).
Email: Katherine.robinson@uregina.ca

Robinson, K. M., & LeFevre, J. (2011). The inverse relation between multiplication and division:
   Concepts, procedures, and a cognitive framework. Educational Studies in Mathematics. doi:
   10.1007/s10649-011-9330-5.
                                                   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 25




Dubé, A. K., & Robinson, K. M. (2010). The relationship between adults’ conceptual
   understanding of inversion and associativity. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology,
   64, 60-66.

Robinson, K. M., & Dubé, A. K. (2009). Children’s understanding of addition and subtraction
   concepts. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 103, 532-545.


Luther College
University of Regina

Mary Hampton, Ed.D. (Harvard) Professor

Counselling & consulting Psychology. Special interests in women's studies, community
Psychology, cross-cultural counselling, women's health, and Aboriginal peoples’ health.
Email: Mary.Hampton@uregina.ca

Hampton, M.R. & Gerrard, N. (Eds.) (2006). Intimate partner violence: Experience, theory                  and
   policy. Cormorant Books & RESOLVE.

Hampton, M., Baydala, A., Bourassa, C. McKenna, B., Saul, G. McKay-McNabb, K. , Goodwill,
   K., Clark, V., Christiansen, J. (2011). Seven Years Completing the Circle: End-of-Life Care
   With Aboriginal Families. Canadian Journal of Nursing Research.

Hampton, M., Baydala, A., Bourassa, C., McKay-McNabb, K., Placsko, C., Goodwill, K.,
   McKenna, B., McNabb, P. & Boekelder, R. (2010). Completing the circle: Elders speak about
   end of life care with Aboriginal families in Canada. Journal of Palliative Care (26),5-13.


Regan Shercliffe, Ph.D. (Simon Fraser University)
Borderline personality disorder; post traumatic stress disorder; cross cultural issues related to
psychopathology and health
Email: Regan.Shercliffe@uregina.ca

Shercliffe, R.J., Stahl, W. & Tuttle, M.P. (2009). Meta-analysis as used by psychology: A casting
   of old wine in new bottles or a superior vintage? Theory and Psychology, 19(3), 413-430.

Shercliffe, R.J. & Colotla, V. (2009). MMPI - 2 profiles in civilian PTSD: An examination of
   differential responses between victims of crime and industrial accidents. Journal of
   Interpersonal Violence, 24, (2), 349-358.

Shercliffe, R.J., Hampton, M., McKay-McNabb, K., Jeffery, B., Beattie, P. & McWatters, B.
   (2007). Cognitive and demographic factors that predict self-efficacy to use condoms in
   vulnerable and marginalized Aboriginal youth. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality,
   16(1-2), 45-56.




                                              - 25 -
26   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Adjunct Faculty and Professional Associate Selected Publications

Angelina Baydala, Ph.D. (Private Practice)

My research uses grounded theory and narrative inquiry to understand cultural and historical
aspects of clinical psychology, psychopathology, psychotherapy, and health care.

E-mail: Angelina.Baydala@uregina.ca
Hampton, M., Baydala, A., Bourassa, C., McKay-McNabb, K., Placsko, C., Goodwill, K.,
   McKenna, B., McNabb, P., & Boekelder, R. (2010). Completing the circle: Elders speak
   about end-of-life care with Aboriginal families in Canada. Journal of Palliative Care, 26(1),
   6-14.

Mckenna, B., Hampton, M., Bourassa, C., McKay-McNabb, K., & Baydala, A. (2010). Voices
   from the moon lodge. In L. Loutzenhiser (Ed.), Mothering Canada. Toronto, ON: York
   University.

Baydala, A. & Gorchynski, A. (2007). Healing from Addiction with Yoga Therapy and AA. In J.
   Pappas, W. Smythe, & A. Baydala (Eds.), Cultural healing and belief systems. Calgary, AB:
   Detselig.


Derrick D. Larsen, Ph.D. (Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)

Alfano, D. P., Asmundson, G. J. G., Larsen, D. K., & Allerdings, M. D. (2000) Post-traumatic
    stress disorder and mild traumatic brain injury. Brain and Cognition, 44, 90-94.

Enns, M. W., Cox, B. J., & Larsen, D. K., (2000) Perceptions of parental bonding and symptom
   severity in adults with depression: Mediation by personality dimensions. Canadian Journal
   of Psychiatry, 45, 263-268.

Enns, M. W., Larsen, D. K. & Cox, B. J. (2000) Discrepancies between self and observer rating
   of depression: The relationship with demographic, clinical and personality variable. Journal
   of Affective Disorders, 60, 33-41.

Michelle C. E. McCarron, Ph.D. (Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)

Current research interests include: qualitative research methodology, with a focus on conceptual
development as a method of data analysis; qualitative health research; research ethics; and
professional mentoring.
Email: Michelle.McCarron@uregina.ca or Michelle.McCarron@rqhealth.ca

McCarron, M. C. E., & Stewart, D. W. (2011). A Canadian perspective on using vignettes to
  teach ethics in psychology. Canadian Psychology, 52, 185-191.

Pettifor, J., McCarron, M. C. E., Schoepp, G., Stark, C., & Stewart, D. W. (2011). Ethical
    supervision in teaching, research, practice, and administration. Canadian Psychology, 52,
    198-205.

Stewart, D. W., & McCarron, M. C. E. (2011, June). Ethical considerations in using ethical
   dilemmas. In J. L. Pettifor (Chair), Ethics update 2011. Symposium conducted at the 72nd
   annual convention of the Canadian Psychological Association, Toronto, ON.
                                                   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 27




Katherine Owens, Ph.D. (Mental Health, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)

Current interests include: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, assessment, anxiety disorders, mood
disorders, neuropsychological assessment, clinical supervision, clinical training, Recovery Model,
psychological first aide/post-disaster/conflict zone volunteering, and tertiary-level
multidisciplinary rehabilitation

Owens, K.M.B., & Antony, M.M. (2011). Overcoming health anxiety: Letting go of your fear of
  illness. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

Owens, K.M.B., Asmundson, G.J.G., Hadjistavropoulos, T. & Owens, T.J. (2003). Attentional
  Bias Toward Threat Cues in Individuals with Health Anxiety. Cognitive Therapy and
  Research, 28, 57-66.

Owens, K.M.B. & Pfeifer, J. (2003). Police leadership and ethics: Training and policy
  recommendations. The Canadian Journal of Police and Security Services, 1, 124-135.

Associate Member

Kim Dorsch, Ph.D. (Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina)


Adjunct Professors

Angelina Baydala, Ph.D. (Private Practice, Regina, SK)
Regan Hart-Mitchell, Ph.D. (Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Derrick Larsen, Ph.D. (Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Michelle McCarron, Ph.D. (Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Katherine Owens, Ph.D. (Mental Health, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region) Tom Robinson
Ph.D. (Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)


Professional Associates

Brian Sveinson, Ph.D. (Counselling Services, University of Regina)

Bruce Bordon, Ph.D. (Child &Youth Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Della Hunter, Ph.D. (Child &Youth Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Elizabeth Ivanochko, Ph.D. (Child &Youth Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Tania Safnuk, Ph.D. (Child &Youth Services, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)

John Brown, Ph.D. (Mental Health, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Pamela Clarke, Ph.D. (Mental Health, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)
Katherine Owens, Ph.D. (Mental Health, Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region)

Shannon Fuchs-Lacelle, Ph.D. (Children’s Programme, Wascana Rehabilitation Centre)
Heather Switzer, Ph.D. (Children’s Programme, Wascana Rehabilitation Centre)
David West-Johnson, Ph.D. (Functional Rehab Programme, Wascana Rehabilitation Centre)


                                              - 27 -
28   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Kristy Kowalyk, Ph.D. (Functional Rehab Programme and Extended Care/Veterans Program,
Wascana Rehabilitation Centre)

Jason Peeble, Ph.D. (RCMP Mental Health)

Sam Morgan, Ph.D. (Cypress Health Region)

Bob Brown, Ph.D. (Praire North Health Region, North Battleford, SK)
Wayne Schlapkohl, Ph.D. (Praire North Health Region, North Battleford, SK)
Dallas Savoie, Ph.D. (Praire North Health Region, North Battleford, SK)

Lisa Berg-Kolody, Ph.D. (Mental Health Centre, Prince Albert Parkland Health Region)
Doug Jurgens, Ph.D. (Mental Health Centre, Prince Albert Parkland Health Region)
Margaret Ralston, Ph.D (Mental Health Centre, Prince Albert Parkland Health Region)




Professors Emeritus

Paul Antrobus, Ph.D.
Siu Chow, Ph.D.
Lorne Elkin, Ph.D.
Robert Moore, Ph.D.
William Muir, Ph.D.
Joan Roy, Ph.D.
William Wynn, Ph.D.
                                                 Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 29



Recent Graduate Theses and Dissertations


Ph.D.

Bovell, C. (2012). Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial of a Self-Help Book for Health
Anxiety

Dube, A. (2012). Conceptually-Based Strategy Use: Investigating Underlying Mechanisms and
Development Across Adolescence and into Early Adulthood

Collimore, K. (2011). Responses to Interoceptive Exposure in Social Anxiety Disorder: Further
Exploration of the Relationship Between Anxiety Sensitivity and Social Anxiety

Janzen Claude, J. (2011). An Application of Health Behaviour Models to Diabetic Treatment
Adherence: A Comparison of Protection Motivation Theory and the Theory of Planned Behaviour

Tuttle, M. (2011). A Modified Dialectical Behaviour Therapy Skills Group for Multidiagnostic
Suicidal Adolescents with Symptoms of BPD

Bourgault-Fagnou, M. (2010). Health Anxiety Among Older Adults: Assessing the Efficacy of
Cognitive Behavioural Treatment.

Brass, E. (2010). Restoring Balance: Determinants of Health and Depressive Symptoms in
Aboriginal People.

Carleton, N. R. (2010). Trauma, Pain, and Fear: Using the Startle Paradigm to Explore the
Relationship Between PTSD and Chronic Pain.

Lints-Martindale, A. (2010). An Examination of Observational Pain Assessment Tools for
Dementia Patients and the Role of Delirium.

McCarron, M. (2010). Empirical and Theoretical Support for a Preconceptual Approach to
Qualitative Data Analysis.

Stadnyk, B. (2010). Psychiatric Nurses in Saskatchewan: The Effects of Exposure to Trauma and
Workplace Agression on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Cognitions.

Stapleton, J. (2010). Distinguishing Between Advoidance and Numbing Symptoms in Post-
Traumatic Stress Disorder: An Evaluation of New Symptom Clusters Using a Revised Version of
the PTSD Checklist – Civilian Version (PCL-C).

Taylor, L. (2010). The Relationship Between Religion, Spirituality and Intimate Partner
Violence: A Qualitative Exploration.

Todd, K. (2010). A Neuropsychological Study of Traumatic Brain Injury Among A Canadian
Sample of Male Federal Offenders.

Buchanan, K. (2009). Risk Assessment and Spousal Violence: Predictive Validity and Cultural
Applicability.


                                            - 29 -
30   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Moore Hutchings, V. (2009). Where Did I Hear That?: The Influence of Source Monitoring
Ability on Prospective Memory in Younger and Older Adults.

Quine, A. (2009). Intercultural Anxiety and Cultural Self-Efficacy Among Saskatchewan Nursing
Students: Examination of Experience.

Clarke, P. (2008). Saskatchewan Aboriginal Women’s Postpartum Depressive Experiences: A
Qualitative Exploration.

Hart, R. (2008). Evaluation of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy Psychosocial Skills Training Group
for Women with Borderline Personality Disorder.

Owens, K.M.B. (2008). The Modified Stroop Task as a Clinical Took for the Assessment of
Health Anxiety

Rossiter, L. (2008). The Development of a Midwife-Mother Relationship Questionnaire (MMRQ)

Williams, J. (2008). Fear of Falling, Fear of Pain and Activity Restriction Among Informal
Caregivers of Seniors with Dementia.

Fuchs-Lacelle, S.K. (2007). Pain and Dementia:                    The Effects of Systematic Assessment on
Clinical Practices and Caregiver Stress.

Carrington, J. (2006). Elements of and Strategies for Maintaining a Police Marriage: The Lived
Perspectives of Royal Canadian Mounted Police Officers and Their Spouses.

Green, S. (2006). Psychosocial Pain Management Interventions for Seniors: Theoretically and
Empirically Derived Predictors of Change.

Kowalyk, K. (2006). Health Anxiety During Pregnancy: Assessing the Efficacy of a Self-Help
Booklet.

Woods, M. (2006). Evaluating The Efficacy of Graded In Vivo Exposure For The Treatment of
Fear In Patients With Chronic Back Pain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

Boisvert, J. (2005). The Relationship between Hope, Coping, Spirituality, and Eating Disorder
Symptomatology in Women.

Hunter, D. (2005). Problem-Stealing Behaviour in Pre-Adolescent Males: The Efficacy of Social
Cognition Variables in Contrasting Non-Stealing and Problem-Stealing Groups.

Pike, H. (2005). The Influence of Temperament and Attachment on Children’s Memory for a
Significant Medical Event.

LaChapelle, D. L. (2003). An Investigation of Pain and Its Psychosocial Consequences:
Examining the Impact of Age and Coping Style.

Peebles, J. (2002). Pain, Anxiety, and Coping Self-efficacy in the Context of Dental Care.
                                                    Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 31




M.A.

Alberts, N. (2011). The Role of Parental Medical Illness in Health Anxiety: A Test of the
Interpersonal and Cognitive-Behavioural Models

Barefoot, C. (2011). Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Older Adults with Chronic
Pain

Chan, K. (2011). Maternal Perceptions of Infant Sleep Problems

Delparte, C. (2011). Exploring Borderline Personality Disorder Features Dimensionally Among
Emerging Adults With A History of Offending

Dhillon, J. (2011). The Role of Socioeconomic Status in Jurors’ Perceptions of Child Witness
Credibility

Fetzner, M. (2011). Does Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Severity and Presentations Impact
Specific Physical Health Disorders in Deployed Canadian Forces Personnel?

Fitzgerald, R. (2011). Is There a Benefit to Intentionally Forgetting Faces?

Ghandehari, O. (2011). Improving Pain Management in Long-Term Care Facilities Through
Health Provider Education

Sabir, S. (2011). Advanced Music Training and Executive Function: A Neurocognitive Study

Thibodeau, M. (2011). Anxiety Sensitivity and Autonomic Arousal:                     Implications for the
Maintenance of Social Anxiety

Ahlquist, A. (2010), Normal Infant Sleep Patterns and Parental Perceptions of Problematic
Infant Sleep

Brand, J. (2010). The Rapid Extraction of Statistical Properties in Visual Search

Gooding, N. (2010). Borderline Personality Disorder and Chronic Pain: Prevalence in a
Rehabilitation Setting

Hatin, B. (2010). Alexithymia: Right Hemisphere Dysfunction or Interhemispheric Transfer
Deficit

Langille, J. (2010).   Police Response and Psychopathology in Victims of Intimate Partner
Violence

Lawrie, T. (2010). The Effects of Description on Own- And Other-Race Face Recognition and
Response Bias

McMillan, K. (2010). The Role of Anxiety Sensitivity in Acoustic Startle Responsivity

Mustafaeva, S. (2010). Measuring Depression in a Karen Population: The Development of a
Culturally Sensitive Screening Tool

                                               - 31 -
32   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Pugh, N. (2010). Elucidating the Relationship Between Health Anxiety and Behaviour

Rumpel, E. (2010). Conformity to the Societal Beauty Ideal: The Perspectives of Female
Makeover “Reality” Television Viewers.

Thompson, M. (2010). The Work-Family Interface across The Transition To Fatherhood

Welch, P. (2010). The Relationship between Traumatic Stress and Pain Perception

Chan, S. (2009). Pain Self-Efficacy, Socially Prescribed Perfectionism and Coping Strategies in
Older Adults with Chronic Pain.

Eritz, H. (2009). Depression and Informal Caregivers’ Ability to Evaluate Pain in Older Adults
Residing in Long-Term Care Facilities.

Jensen, G. (2009). Public Opposition To Social Policies For Aboriginal Peoples In Canada

Jones, S. (2009). Health Anxiety in Women with Breast Cancer: Does Social Support Make a
Difference?

LeClerc, J. (2009). The Relationship Between Obesity, Binge Eating and Health Anxiety.

Peluso, D. (2009). Exploring Novice Therapists’ Development of Identity.

Sockett, A. (2009). Organization and Memory for Mental Health Information.

Abrams, M. (2008). Human Tonic Immobility: Measurement and Correlates.

Chan, G. (2008). Plot Permutation as Deconstructive Reading: An Empirical Study.

Drost, C. (2008). “I Love this body, what it can do for me”: Exploring pathways to a more
positive relationship with the body through yoga.

Dubé, A. (2008). Skills Underlying Inversion Shortcut use: The Role of Analogical Reasoning
and Working Memory.

Pandey, M. (2008). Capacity Limited Resources and Task Switching: A Study of the Human
Ability to Carry out Multiple Processes Concurrently.

Placsko, C. (2008). Stories of Care: Experiences of Late-Life Caregiving.

Woods, M. (2008). The Nature of Sleep in Victims of Intimate Partner Violence: A Feminst
Analysis

Barnes, C. (2007). Citizens and the Police: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Race.

Collimore, K. (2007). Social Anxiety Following Assaultive and Nonassaultive Trauma: An
Examination of Genetic and Environmental Influences.

Dever Fitzgerald, T.G. (2007). The Role of Activity Restriction in the Prediction of Seniors’
Falls, Pain and Functional Ability.
                                                   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 33




Jackiw, L. (2007). Social Influences of the Cross-Race Effect.

Janzen, J.A. (2007). Coping with Anxiety While Waiting for Surgery.

Kirichenko, T. (2007). From princess to sex-object: A content analysis of femininity in popular
media.

Sveigny, P. (2007). Parenting Self-efficacy in Mothers and Fathers of Toddlers

Hunter, P. (2006). A Clinical Trial Evaluation of a Pain Management Program for Seniors with
Dementia.

Kehler, M. (2006). What role does health anxiety play in coping with MS? An exploratory
internet-based study.

Krätzig, G. (2006). Does Experience Influence Metacognitive Calibration? An Investigation of
Three Types of Experience.

Lints, A. (2006). The Relation of Pain Responses and Brain Function in a Sample of Patients
with Alzheimer’s Disease

McCarron, M. (2006). The Experiences of Mentoring and Being Mentored in Academia:
Perspectives of Mentors and Protégées

Shujah, A. (2006). Examining psychotherapists’ perspectives toward their work with Canadian
Muslim clients: Listening to the listeners.




                                              - 33 -
34   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina




                                                      APPENDIX

                                   CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM
                                    DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
                                        UNIVERSITY OF REGINA

                                       FALL 2012 PROGRAM REVIEW

                   HEATHER HADJISTAVROPOULOS, PH.D., R. D. PSYCH
                            Director of Clinical Training
                                                                                        Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 35




                                                               Overview of Review


CPA encourages us to evaluate our program on a regular basis. The purpose of this report is to review the goals, objectives and outcomes
of the Clinical Psychology Program. Please send comments and feedback to hadjista@uregina.ca.


                                                                    Research

Research Goals: We strive to prepare students to have an understanding and respect for both basic and applied research. We subscribe to
the views that the clinical scientist, who is competently trained in practice, makes the most significant contributions to clinical research; and
the practitioner, who is familiar with the body of basic and applied research, and, who can critically evaluate research findings makes the
soundest contributions to society and the profession.

Research Objectives: To meet the above goals, students: 1) take courses in research methods and statistics and gain experience in
program evaluation; 2) take clinical courses that incorporate research literature; 3) complete an M.A. thesis and Ph.D. dissertation; and 4)
participate in faculty research projects.

Outcomes: The following are some indicators that represent how we are doing in this area:

                                  2004-      2005-       2006-        2007-          2008-      2009-         2010-         2011-       CPA Stats
                                  2005       2006        2007         2008           2009       2010          2011          2012         2006-
                                                                                                                                          2007
  Research Methods course        90%        92%        90%          90%     88%                  91%          91%           91%             -
  average
  Statistics course average      83%        88%        90%          95%     85%                  86%          91%           88%             -
  Students with at least one   66.6%        72%        89%          77%     92%                  97%          95%           92%            59%
  conference presentation
  Students with at least one   48.5%        53%        56%          66%     64%                  69%          71%           69%            40%
  refereed publication
  Students holding RA            50%        70%        71%          77%     76%                  61%          67%           73%            33%
  positions*
  Students with major            31%        56%        64%          65%     45%                  55%          50%           63%            37%
  external funding*, **
  Students with Faculty of       45%        70%        61%          73%     45%                  61%          70%           69%            33%
  Graduate Studies &
  Research(FGSR)
  funding*, **
     * excludes students who are on or have completed the predoctoral internship
     ** includes both tri-council funding and other major external funding


                                                                 Clinical Practice

Clinical Practice Goals: Students will be trained to be competent in assessment, diagnosis, and intervention. In each area, students will gain
competency in the development and maintenance of interpersonal relationships, including competency in working with diverse groups. It is
recognized, however, that the field of clinical psychology is diverse and no single practitioner can master all areas. Students will be taught to
recognize their skills and when appropriate refer to colleagues who have the requisite skills.

Clinical Practice Objectives: Students will meet the clinical goals by: 1) completing course work in psychopathology, assessment and
interventions exposing students to more than one theoretical orientation and skills for working with both adults and children and diverse
populations; 2) carrying out at least 2700 hours of clinical training under supervision; and 3) completing comprehensive exams that require an
oral case presentation, a review paper on a clinical topic, and an ethics oral exam.




                                                                      - 35 -
36   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina




Outcomes: Some indicators of our success in this area are:

                                  2004-2005         2005-          2006-     2007-      2008-2009      2009-2010      2010-2011     2011-2012
                                                     2006          2007      2008
     Psychopathology                86.5%           88.2%          87%       86%          85%             89%            87%           87%
     Assessment I                   87.5%           87.5%          88%       78%          84%             88%            89%           87%
     Assessment II                     -            87.8%             -      86%            -             88%              -           88%
     Interventions I                84.5%           83.4%          85%       84%          84%             84%            85%           86%
     Interventions II               91.0%               -          86%          -         85%               -            87%
     Percentage Students            100%            100%           100%      100%      75% (86%        100% (75%         100%       80% (73%
     Matched (includes                               (81%          (77%      (79%       Canadian        Canadian       (one non         of
     those matched through                         matched        matched   matched     students        students      accredited    Canadian
     clearing house)                                   by            by        by      matched by      matched by       match)       Students
                                                   AAPIC)         AAPIC)    AAPIC)       AAPIC)          AAPIC)       compared       matched
                                                                                                                        to 83%      by APPIC)
                                                                                                                         match




     Predoctoral Residencies
     2012-2013                           Calgary Health Region
                                         Royal Ottawa Health Care Group
                                         Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region (primary rotation: Functional Rehab Program)
                                         Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region (primary rotation: WRC Children’s Program)
     2011-2012                           University of Manitoba, Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Winnipeg, MB
                                         UBC Counselling Services
                                         BC Mental Health and Addiction Services, Clinical Child and Adolescent Track, BC Children's Hospital
     2010-2011                           Centre for Addiction & Mental Health - Clarke Division – Toronto, ON
                                         Millard Health Centre, Edmonton Alberta
                                         Ongwanada: Kingston Internship Consortium
                                         Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center, Halifax, NS
                                         Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region (2)
                                         Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, SK(2)
     2009-2010                           Calgary Health Region (2)
                                         University of Manitoba, Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Winnipeg, MB
     2008-2009                           Ottawa Hospital
                                         Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre
                                         Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
     2007-2008                           Edmonton Consortium Clinical Psychology Residency
                                         Regina Qu’Appelle Health Region
     2006-2007                           Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center, Halifax, NS (2)
                                         Saskatoon Health Region
                                         University of Manitoba, Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Winnipeg, MB
     2005-2006                           University of Manitoba, Department of Clinical Health Psychology, Winnipeg, MB
                                         Centre for Addiction & Mental Health - Clarke Division – Toronto, ON
                                         Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center, Halifax, NS
                                         River Valley Health Internship, Fredericton, NB
     2004-2005                           Central California Psychology Internship Consortium Association, Fresno, CA
                                         Department of Corrections, Mental Health Services Division, Salinas Valley State Prison, Soledad, CA
                                         Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, SK
                                         St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, ON
                                         Annapolis Valley Health - Valley Regional Hospital, Kentville, NS
                                                                  Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 37




                                                         Knowledge

Knowledge Goals: Students will gain a working understanding of biological, social, cognitive and affective bases of
behaviour as well as individual differences, statistics and research methods. A more thorough knowledge of
personality, psychopathology, assessment, diagnostics, intervention, ethics and professional behaviour will be
obtained.

Knowledge Objectives: To meet the knowledge goals students: 1) complete course work at the graduate level in all of
the above areas, 2) gain knowledge through clinical experiences, and 3) complete comprehensive exams.

Outcomes: Indicators of success are reflected in course work completion noted above but also in marks for the
following courses:

                                   2004-      2005-      2006-       2007-      2008-       2009-       2010-        2011-
                                    2005       2006      2007        2008       2009        2010        2011         2012
803 (Psychometrics)                92.3%      89.6%        -         91%          -         91%           -          91%

845 (Neuropsychology)                 -       86.8%         -        88%         89%         85%           -         90%
881 (Information Processing)       80.0%      88.5%       87%        86%         86%         85%         86%         88%
820 (Social)                       91.7%         -        89%          -         86%           -         91%           -


                                             Ethics and Professional Conduct

Ethics and Professional Conduct Goals: Students will be prepared to be ethical and professional in their research,
clinical, and teaching activities, and sensitive to issues of racial and cultural diversity and individual differences.

Ethics and Professional Conduct Objective: To meet the ethical goals of our program, students: 1) take a course in
professional ethics, 2) are exposed to diverse clients at clinical training sites (over 2700 hours of clinical training), 3)
complete an oral ethics exam as part of the comprehensive examination process, and 4) apply for ethics approval for
M.A. and Ph.D. research.

Outcomes: This is measured through the following:

                      2004-      2005-       2006-        2007-        2008-       2009-       2010-        2011-      CPA
                      2005       2006        2007         2008         2009        2010        2011         2012       2006-
                                                                                                                       2007
  806 Ethics          95%        85%         85%          86%          88%         85%         89%          86%        -
  Average
  Supervised          1439       1547        1604         1456         1334        1389        1739         1595       1552
  clinical hours
  when applied
  to internship
  Direct Hours                                                                     411         527          648
  Supervision                                                                      217         250          204
  Hours


                                                            - 37 -
38   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Also note that all PhD. graduates have registered or are going through the registration process.


                                                           Leadership

Leadership Goals: Students will gain experiences that prepare them to take leadership roles and contribute to
psychology as a profession.

Leadership Objectives: Students complete a seminar in professional issues at the PhD level and are encouraged to: 1)
present and publish their work, 2) attend professional seminars and conferences when possible; 3) gain experience in
supervision of junior students; 4) obtain experience as teaching assistants or sessional instructors; 5) be active in the
department and the PGSA and the community, and 6) be members of the Canadian Psychological Association or other
professional organizations.




Outcomes: Indicators of outcome in this area are seen through examination of students enrolled each year:

                           2004-       2005-       2006-          2007-   2008-      2009-       2010-      2011-      CPA
                           2005        2006        2007           2008    2009       2010        2011       2012       2006-
                                                                                                                       2007
                                                                                                                       Stats
  Conference                72%         89%         77%           83%      92%        97%         95%       92%        60%
  Presentations
  Publications              53%         56%         66%           56%      64%        69%         71%       69%        40%
  TA/Sessional              69%         57%         58%           43%      34%        51%                   50%         40%
  Positions
  Professional Org          94%        100%        100%           86%      94%       100%         97%       92%        74%
  Membership
  Additional                 NA         75%         94%           81%      56%        76%         97%       90%          -
  Workshops


                                                           Graduates

Year                Name                                      Position After Graduation
2003-2004           Diane LaChapelle, R. Psych                Assistant Professor, UNB, Fredericton
2004-2005           Heather Switzer, R. D. Psych              Child Psychologist, Children’s Program, Wascana Rehab
                                                              Center, Regina
                    Jennifer Boisvert, R. Psych               Research Consultant, Population Research Laboratory,
                                                              University of Alberta
2005-2006           Jody Carrington, R. Psych                 Psychologist, Inpatient and Day Unit of the Alberta Children's
                                                              Hospital, Calgary.
                    Kristy Kowalyk, R. D. Psych               Psychologist, Functional Rehab Program, Regina, SK
                    Marc Woods, R. D. Psych                   Psychologist, Chronic Pain Center, Saskatoon, SK
2006-2007           Sheryl Green, C. Psych                    Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and
                                                              Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University
                                                              Acute Mental Health & Consultation Liaison
                                                              St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton
                                                                Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 39



                  Shannon Fuchs-Lacelle (in             Child Psychologist, Children’s Program, Wascana Rehab
                  process of registering in SK)         Center, Regina, SK
2007-2008         Lucille Rossiter (in process of       Psychologist, River Valley Hospital, Fredericton, NB
                  registering in NB)
                  Katherine Owens, R. D. Psych          Senior Psychologist, Mental Health, Regina, SK, Adjunct
                                                        Professor & Professional Associate, U of R,
                  Jaime Williams                        Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of
                                                        Saskatchewan
                  Regan Hart-Mitchell, R. D. Psych      Psychologist, Mental Health, Regina, SK
2008-2009         Pam Clarke. R. D. Psych               Psychologist, Mental Health, Regina, SK
                  Veronica Hutchings, R. Psych          Psychologist, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Center,
                                                        Halifax, NS
                  Allisson Quine, R. D. Psych           Psychologist, Child & Youth Services, Regina, SK
                  Kim Buchanan, R. Psych                Psychologist, Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Edmonton, AB
                                                        (60%)
                                                        Instructor, Grant MacEwan University (40%)
2009-2010         Liz Brass, R. D. Psych                Psychologist, Child and Youth Services, Regina, SK
                  Nicholas Carleton                     Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of
                                                        Regina
                  Jennifer Stapleton                    Psychologist, Acute Care, Waterford Hospital, St. John's, NL
2010-2011         Michelle Bourgault-Fagnou             Psychologist, Functional Rehab Progam, Regina, SK
                  Amanda Lints-Martindale               Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Health Psychology,
                                                        University of Manitoba, and Staff Psychologist, Community
                                                        Mental Health Program, Steinbach, MB
                  Megan Tuttle                          Psychologist, Child and Youth, Regina, SK
2011-2012         Kelsey Collimore                      Postdoctoral Fellow, Dr. Neil Rector, Sunnybrook, Toronto, ON
                  Amy Janzen                            Psychologist, Adult Mental Health, Regina, SK
                  Candice Bovell                        In process of registering in ON
                  Paulette Hunter                       Assistant Professor, St. Thomas More College, Saskatoon, SK
                  Kim McKay-McNabb                      Assistant Professor, First Nations University




                                               Graduate Survey
The past ten graduates of our PhD program completed a survey about our program. Below is a summary of feedback
from this survey.

                              2007-2008             2008-2009           2009-2010           2010-2011          2011-2012
To what extent did the        Completely –          Completely –        Completely –        Completely –       Completely
program achieve its goal to   40%                   30%                 40%                 40%                – 60%
train you as a scientist      Mostly – 60%          Mostly – 70%        Mostly – 60%        Mostly – 60%       Mostly –
practitioner?                                                                                                  40%

How would you rate the        Excellent – 50%       Excellent – 60%     Excellent –         Excellent –        Excellent –
overall quality of the        Good – 50%            Good – 40%          60%                 50%                40%
training you received?                                                  Good – 40%          Good – 50%         Good – 60%

How prepared did you feel
for:
Conducting clinical           Great- 40%            Great- 60%          Great- 70%          Great- 60%         Great- 6%
assessments                   Good – 50%            Good – 40%          Good – 30%          Good – 40%         Good – 40%

Conducting clinical           Great-60%             Great-60%           Great- 60%          Great- 60%         Great- 40%
interventions                 Good- 40%             Good- 40%           Good- 40%           Good- 40%          Good- 60%

Consulting with other         Great-30%             Great-30%            Great- 50%         Great- 50%         Great- 50%

                                                         - 39 -
40   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



professionals                    Good-40%               Good-40%            Good-50%            Good-50%          Good-40%
                                 Fair- 30%              Fair- 30%                                                 Fair- 10%

Conducting research              Great-90%              Great-90%           Great- 80%          Great- 70%        Great- 40%
                                 Good-10%               Good-10%            Good-10%            Good-20%          Good-50%
                                                                            Fair – 10%          Fair – 10%        Fair – 10%

Consuming research               Great-90%              Great-90%           Great-100%          Great-90%         Great-90%
                                 Good- 10%              Good- 10%                               Good-10%          Good-10%

Teaching                         Great – 40%            Great –30%          Great –30%          Great –30%        Great –40%
                                 Good – 40%             Good – 30%          Good – 20%          Good – 20%        Good – 20%
                                 Fair – 20%             Fair – 40%          Fair – 40%          Fair – 50%        Fair – 30%
                                                                            Poor –10%           Poor –10%         Poor –10%
Supervising clinical work        Great – 20%            Great –10%          Great –10%          Great –10%        Great –20%
                                 Good-30%               Good-30%            Good-30%            Good-40%          Good-40%
                                 Fair- 40%              Fair- 50%           Fair- 30%           Fair- 20%         Fair- 20%
                                 Poor -10%              Poor -10%           Poor -30%           Poor -30%         Poor -20%
Dealing with ethical issues      Great – 40%            Great – 30%         Great –40%          Great –40%        Great –40%
                                 Good- 50%              Good- 60%           Good- 60%           Good- 60%         Good- 60%
                                 Fair - 10%             Fair - 10%

Working with diverse             Great – 40%            Great – 40%         Great -60%          Great -60%        Great -50%
clients                          Good – 40%             Good – 40%          Good -40%           Good -40%         Good -50%
                                 Fair- 20%              Fair- 20%

In an overall sense, how         very satisfied -       very satisfied -    very satisfied      very satisfied    very
satisfied are you with the       40%                    40%                 - 40%               - 30%             satisfied -
training you received?           mostly satisfied -     mostly satisfied    mostly satisfied    mostly            30%
                                 60%                    - 60%               - 60%               satisfied -       mostly
                                                                                                70%               satisfied -
                                                                                                                  70%

If a friend of yours was         Yes, definitely –      Yes, definitely –   Yes, definitely     Yes, definitely   Yes,
interested in attending          70%                    60%                 – 80%               – 70%             definitely –
graduate school, would           Yes, I think so -      Yes, I think so -   Yes, I think so -   Yes, I think so   80%
you recommend our                30%                    40%                 20%                 - 30%             Yes, I think
program?                                                                                                          so - 20%



Notable Strengths – reported by many students
Accredited program

Research:
•   Quality of research education and training; requiring both MA and PhD
•   Availability of multiple research opportunities beyond MA and PhD – highly productive research labs
•   Quality of research supervisors and committee members
•   Flexibility of students to focus on key areas of interest
•   Collaborative research labs
•   Quality of research space

Clinical:
•     Clinical seminar series involving students from MA to PhD
•     Quality of clinical experiences in multiple community settings
                                                                  Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 41



•    Development of strong assessment skills
•    Applied components to assessment courses
•    Strong emphasis on empirically supported assessment and intervention
•    Emphasis on scientist practitioner model
•    Psychology Training Clinic

Teaching:
•   Excellent opportunities for teaching
•   High quality courses

Support:
•   Mentorship of DCT
•   Availability of financial support
•   Supportive peers in program
•   Availability of scientist practitioner role models
•   Supportive clinical supervisors
•   Collaborative program


Suggested Areas for Development:                  Clinical Committee Response

•    Increase difficulty of Neuropsychology       •      Unfortunately, the size of the program does not allow for
     (e.g., presentations and measures)                  specialized training in neuropsychology at this time; students
                                                         come into this course with variable knowledge from the
                                                         undergraduate level and therefore the course provides
                                                         foundational knowledge.
•    Add further training in consultation         •      This is now covered in the PhD seminar
•    Add courses in health psychology             •      We have offered a directed reading before in health psychology;
                                                         offering of this course on a more consistent basis is something
                                                         we’d like to work towards, but must be balanced with demands for
                                                         other courses
•    Add courses in child psychopathology,        •      We would like to offer more courses in child psychopathology,
     assessment and treatment of children,               assessment and interventions, but interest in taking these courses
     family therapy                                      has not been sufficient to offer the courses. Many students also
                                                         feel very strongly about not adding another course
•    Include more of an applied component         •      There is a certain amount of knowledge that needs to be shared
     to intervention courses (e.g.,                      during courses and the applied experience is best offered in
     developing therapeutic relationships,               clinical placements. That said, in both treatment courses we have
     dealing with therapeutic process                    applied components.
     issues).
•    Eliminate MA                                 •      We have given serious consideration to elimination of the MA, but
                                                         continue to feel the benefits of completing the MA out way the
                                                         negatives (e.g., MA thesis is positive, allow students to terminate
                                                         after the MA if necessary; Tri-council funding available for the MA,
                                                         in Saskatchewan those with MA can register)
•    Have five year minimum for MA and            •      At this time, we do not see ways that it is possible to meet the
     PhD                                                 requirements for CPA accreditation and for the MA and PhD to
                                                         take five years.
•    Provide course work in clinical              •      We offer extensive course work now in clinical supervision
     supervision*
•    Use U of R psychology clinic in              •      The U of R Psychology Clinic is used extensively in clinical
     coursework*                                         courses.
•    Add additional course options in             •      We would like to add more courses, but there are barriers
     therapy                                             including: 1) low enrolment; and 2) time to completion. For the
                                                         time being, we will encourage students to explore directed reading
                                                         options.

                                                             - 41 -
42   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



•     Additional opportunities for diverse          •     We continue to look for additional practica for students. Over the
      client contact spanning different                   past several years, we have been able to secure several new
      therapies and populations                           placements. In 2010, we were able to place students in Swift
                                                          Current and are also able to offer a new practicum in the
                                                          Psychology Training Clinic focused on trauma symptoms. In
                                                          2011, several new placements were added as well (e.g., RCMP,
                                                          Prairie Psychological Services, Bariatric Surgery Clinic).
•     Additional support for students to            •     The MA and PhD are set up so that students can complete out of
      complete out of province practica                   province practica at several points during their program. The
                                                          Clinical Placement Coordinator will assist the student in exploring
                                                          out of province practica that are of interest to the student. We
                                                          currently have agreements with CAMH in Toronto, St. Jo’s in
                                                          Hamilton, Royal Ottawa Health Care Group, and several settings
                                                          in Calgary and Edmonton allowing our students to train in these
                                                          sites.
•     Add additional practica with more             •     The clinical hours that students obtain in our program follow the
      clients in each placement                           recommendations set out by CPA. Students obtain experience in
                                                          at least four settings (one 4-month internship and three practica).
                                                          The Clinical Placement Coordinator closely monitors hours to
                                                          ensure that students meet the national standards.
•     More workshops                                •     Over the past three years, we have offered at least one additional
                                                          workshop to students each year (e.g., interprofessional pain
                                                          workshop)
•     Examine case studies                          •     In the clinical seminar series, we have at least four students
                                                          present a case each year.

                                                         Financial Support

M.A. Funding
                       2004-          2005-        2006-             2007-       2008-        2009-         2010-        2011-
                       2005           2006          2007             2008        2009         2010          2011         2012
                      (n=13)         (n=12)*       (n=9)*           (n=11)*     (n=14)*      (n=13)*       (n=13)       (n=12)
    Average         $18,438        $19,946       $28,187          $17,019     $18,640      $22,432       $25,105      $27,187
    level of
    income:
      # of              4             2              0              2           1              0        1 (lowest    1 (student
      students                                                                                           $8300)        did not
      reporting                                                                                                       apply for
      income                                                                                                             any
      below                                                                                                           support)
      $10,000
      # of              5             5              2              6           8          6 (lowest        2            0
      students                                                                              income
      reporting                                                                            $14,600)
      income
      between
      $10,000-
      19,999
      # of              1             3              3              3           4              6            7            8
      students
      reporting
      income
      between
      $20,000-
      $29,999
                                                           Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 43



    # of            3            2           4            0             1              1             3             3
    students
    reporting
    income
    above
    $30,000
  % with           31%        58.3%         78%         45%            29%           54%           62%           50%
  external
  funding
  % with           77%         58.3%       100%          73%           50%            92%          100%           83%
  FGSR
  funding
  % who            38%         50%          11%          27%           29%            54%           92%           67%
  obtained TA
  funding
  % who            77%         83.3%        78%          64%           86%            83%           77%           92%
  obtained
  RA funding
  % who held       38%         16.6%          0            0             1             0             8%           17%
  outside
  employment
  % who            38%         33.3%        33%          27%             0             0              0            0
  obtained a
  Sask Health
  Bursary

* excludes 2 students because data unavailable because student on leave or ABD

Ph.D. Funding
                     2004-      2005-        2006-        2007-         2008-          2009-          2010-          2011-
                     2005        2006        2007         2008          2009           2010           2011           2012
                    (n=19)      (n=13       (n=15)*      (n=17)*       (n=14)*        (n=18)*        (n=15)*        (n=18)
                                  )*
  Average         $38,342     $37,858     $33,379      $28,903       $27,598        $26,584        $26,866      #32,215.88
  level of
  income:
    # of             2          1            4             3             2         5 (lowest      4 (lowest      5 (lowest
    students                                                                       $14,300)       $16,000)        $6944)
    reporting
    income
    between
    $0-19,999
    # of             7          3            2             7             8             7              4                3
    students
    reporting
    income
    between
    $20,000-
    $29,999
    # of             2          5            4             4             4             3              6                4
    students
    reporting
    income
    between
    $30,000-
    $39,999

                                                      - 43 -
44   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



    # of                 8            4             5                3           0              3              1             6
    students
    reporting
    income
    above
    $40,000
  % with major         58%         76.9%           53%              59%        57%            56%             47%           67%
  external
  funding
  % with               53%          61.5%          87%              53%         50%           44%             47%           55%
  FGSR
  funding
  % who                58%          46.1%          53%              41%         36%           56%             47%           40%
  obtained
  TA/sessional
  funding
  % who                37%          46.1%          47%              47%         71%           56%             67%           72%
  obtained RA
  funding
  % who held           21%          38.5%          53%              35%         14%           28%             20%           22%
  outside
  employment
  % who                21%          7.6%            6%                0          0            11%             NA            NA
  obtained a
  Sask Health
  bursary

* excludes those who are on or have completed the pre-doctoral internship


                                                        Program Statistics

                         2002       2003-2004       2004          2005-2006    2006   2007-         2008-     2009-   2010-       2011-
                           -                          -                          -    2008          2009      2010    2011        2012
                         2003                       2005                       2007
  Number of M.A.          6/6           7/6          4/3            6/5(1       4/4    6/6           6/5       6/6    6/NA        6/NA
  Students                          (1 student                     student
  Admitted/Number                    withdrew                     withdrew
  of MA.                             after 1st                     after 1st
  Graduates from                    semester)                     semester)
  Class To Date
  MA Time to              29        35 months         26          27 months     25      28            28       23      NA          NA
  Completion             mths                        mths                      mths    mths          mths     mths
  Number of Ph.D.          2              5           5               4         6       2             7        3        6           8
  Students
  Admitted
  Number of Ph.D.            0            1             2             3         2       4             3        2        3           3
  Graduates
  PhD Time to                -         67 m         46 &      54,58, 60 m      57 &   57, 60,       47, 51,    50*,   48, 50,     51, 59,
  Completion                                        72 m                        62*   72, 77,       55, 78     70,    64, 70      79, 80
                                                                                 m      m                     96* m     m           m

* student transferred to clinical from an experimental program
                                                            Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 45




                                           Other Student Statistics

                                    As of 2011                         As of 2012                 CPA 2006-2007
Average time to            28.7 months (last 43 graduates          28.3 months (last 49                NA
completion MA                        2003-2011)                   graduates 2003-2012)
Average time to            7.62 years (20 graduates 2003-             7.38 years (23                 7.28 years
completion for total                    2011)                     graduates 2003-2012)
program (MA & PhD) for
all students
Withdrew from MA            2 of 62 admissions 2001-2011            2 of 67 admissions                    NA
program before                                                          2001-2012
completion
Withdrew from PhD           2 of 55 admissions 2001-2011            2 of 60 admissions                    NA
program before                                                          2001-2012
completion
Current percentage male            26.3% (out of 38)                 26% (out of 46)                    16.5%


                                               Faculty Statistics

                          U of R 2007-      U of R 2008-        U of R 2009-       U of R        U of R         CPA
                              2008              2009                2010           2010-         2011-          2006-
                                                                                   2011          2012           2007
Authors/co-authors of        100%              100%                100%            100%          100%           93%
papers at professional
or scientific meetings
Authors/co-authors of        100%              100%                100%            100%          100%           84%
articles in refereed
journals
Member of Journal            30%                30%                 40%             40%           30%           43%
editorial board
Thesis supervisor            80%                80%                 90%             90%           80%           89%
Thesis supervisor            40%                20%                 11%             22%           20%           67%
(complementary
faculty)
Recipients of grants or      100%              100%                100%            100%           90%           77%
contracts
Members in                   100%              100%                100%            100%          100%           93%
professional
associations
Engaged in                   90%                90%                 90%            100%          100%           73%
professional practice
Engaged in                   100%               94%                100%            100%          100%           86%
professional practice
(adjunct)
Registered in program        90%                90%                 90%            100%          100%           84%
jurisdiction
Registered in program        100%               94%                100%            100%          100%           89%
jurisdiction (adjunct)
Male tenured                 40%                40%                 40%             40%           40%           39%
Male non-tenured              0%                 0%                  0              10%           10%           10%
Female tenured               40%                40%                 50%             40%           40%           39%
Female non-tenured           20%                20%                 10%             10%           10%           12%
                                                       - 45 -
46   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina



Total number of core                 10                  10                10           10              10       10.5
faculty
Total number of                      10                  10                9                9           10       10.2
complementary faculty
Total number of adjunct              13                  16                16           19              22       24.9
faculty & professional
associates


                                                       Course Offerings

                              U OF R 2007-        U of R 2008-    U of R          U of R          U of R      CPA 2006-
                                 2008                2009         2009-         2010-2011       2011-2012    2007 STATS
                                                                  2010
Total number of core                 3                  5           4              4               3            5.1
courses (neuro,
cognitive, social,
psychopathology,
history)
Total number of                      5                  4           3              4               5            5.4
foundational courses
(ethics, research
design, statistics,
psychometrics, MA
seminar)
Total number of                      3                  4           4              4               3            8.1
professional courses
(assessment I and II,
interventions I and II,
doctoral seminar)
# core faculty teaching            20%                 10%         20%            10%             20%          42.6%
core courses
# core faculty teaching            20%                 20%         10%            20%             20%          38.5%
foundational courses
# core faculty teaching            30%                 40%         40%            40%             50%          67.4%
professional courses
# of complementary                 10%                 30%         22%            33%             40%          51.1%
faculty teaching core
courses
# of complementary                 30%                 30%         11%            11%             20%          45.5%
faculty teaching
foundational courses
# of complementary                   0                  0           0              0               0           10.4%
faculty teaching
professional courses
# of adjunct teaching                0                  0           0              0               0            6.2%
core courses
# of adjunct teaching                0                  0           0              0               0            8.9%
foundational courses
# of adjunct faculty and             0                  0           0              0               0           16.2%
professional
associates teaching
professional courses
                                                   Graduate Studies in Psychology at the University of Regina 47




                                       Feedback Wanted

What are our strengths?               What are our weaknesses?                  What could we improve?


                                   Please Send Feedback to:
                          Heather Hadjistavropoulos, Ph.D., R. D. Psych
                             Professor & Director of Clinical Training
                                   Department of Psychology
                                      University of Regina
                                     Regina, SK S4S 0A2
                                      hadjista@uregina.ca
                                         (306) 585-5133




                                              - 47 -

								
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