Mensa Questions and Answers about the Organization What is by wuzhenguang

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									                         Mensa


        Questions and Answers about the Organization



        What is Mensa?

        Mensa is an international organization with only one requirement
        for membership - a score on a standardized I.Q. test higher than
        98% of the general population.

        How many people belong to Mensa?

        American Mensa now has nearly 50,000 members; another 20,000
        members belong to national Mensas in Australia, Austria, Belgium,
        British Isles, Canada, Channel Islands, Finland, France, Germany,
        Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden,
        and Switzerland. There are Mensans in 98 countries throughout
the
        world.

        What is Mensa's purpose?

        Mensa has three major purposes: to identify and foster human
        intelligence for the benefit of humanity; to encourage research
        in the nature, characteristics, and uses of intelligence; and to
        provide a stimulating intellectual and social environment for
its'
        members.

        What are Mensa members like?

         Mensa members represent:
         1. All ages from 4 to 94...
         2. Every educational level from preschoolers to high school
            dropouts to Ph.D.s...
         3. All economic levels, from people on welfare to
millionaires...
         4. A broad range of occupations, including executives, factory
            workers, scientists, farmers, authors, engineers,
lawyers,
            doctors, truck drivers, homemakers, teachers, computer
            programmers, secretaries, politicians, the military,
actors,
            musicians, and hundreds more.

        What does "Mensa" mean?

        Mensa is Latin for "table".    We are a round-table society that
makes
          no distinctions as to race,    color,    creed,   national origin,
age,
          or economic,   educational,   or social status.    Only intelligence
          matters.

          What can Mensa offer me?

        You can be assured of meeting others at your own intellectual
        level. In a world that is becoming more and more stratified and
        classified, and in which social and intellectual contacts are
        frequently limited to people with whom you work, to your
neighbors,
        and to the usual civic organizations, Mensa has a lot to offer.
        Most of all, it offers a challange: Mensa dares you to use,
exercise,
        and, ultimately, expand your intellectual potential. The
entire
        organization is structured for that purpose.


                                          Page 1




          How is Mensa organized?

          American Mensa has about 140 Local Groups, located in all 50
          States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Chances are
there's
          a local group near you.

          What do these groups do?

          Most local groups hold regular meetings, at least one a month,
          as well as various other activities. (Many groups have meetings
          and activities more frequently, sometimes several times a week.)
          These activities allow members to become acquainted with each
other;
         many friendships have developed as a result of Mensa. In
addition,
         the groups publish newsletters distributed monthly to their
members,
         containing an activities calendar, and other items of information
         and interest. The activities of each group are determined by its
         own members.

          What are the meetings like?

          Meetings vary,   from a board-of-directors planning session to
get-
          togethers that feature speakers and/or fre-for-all discussions.
A
          speaker may be a noted authority on a subject of may be a member
          with knowledge to share.

          What other activities are available?

        Activities cover a wide range of interests, from games night
        (Scrabble, Chess, Boggle, and Dungeons and Dragons are
especially
        popular) to theme parties; from singles get-togethers to family
        outings; from luncheons or dinners to a night at the local pub;
        from theater and film parties and concerts to a night of playing
        records and dancing at a member's house. When Mensans get
together,
        they usually have a good time.

          What's so special about Mensans meeting?

        There is an atmosphere of congeniality, intellectual
stimulation,
        good humor, and, perhaps most important, lively conversation.
        There is freedom to think and to express those thoughts. There's
        always someone who will listen to, enhance, and even challenge
        your ideas.

          What do members talk about?

          Unless there's a specified theme at a particular meeting, pretty
          much the same things people everywhere talk about -- current
events,
          sports,   sex,   the future,   music,   politics,   art,   computers,
the
          economy, kids, cars, values. It isn't so much a question of
          "what" -- it's more a matter of "how".

          How do I know whether anyone shares my interests?

          Mensa has over 180 SIGS -- Special Interest Groups -- composed
          of members with personal or professional interests in common.
          SIGs are started and maintained by members, and cover a vast
          range of topics including astronomy, body language, law,
          photography, history, and allergies -- to name just a few.
          Almost all SIGs have newsletters of their own. If your special
          interest doesn't have a SIG, it's easy to start your own.

                                           Page 2




          How is Mensa organized nationally?

          Mensa is governed by the American Mensa Committee (AMC), composed
          of elected and appointed volunteers. There is also a small paid
          administrative staff whose members -- along with the officers --
          are always ready to assist the entire membership.
         Are there national activities?

         A national convention, or Annual Gathering,   is held every June
or
        July -- in a different city each year -- where over 1,000 members
        attend workshops, participate in seminars, attend social
functions,
        renew old friendships and start new ones. The Annual Gathering
is
        a special, never-to-be-forgotten experience.
           Regional Gathers (some 40 of them) are held annually in various
        parts of the country, with most of the excitement and activities
        (both intellectual and social) of the Annual Gathering, on a
        somewhat smaller scale.
           The Mensa Annual Colloquium is a new activity sponsored by the
        Mensa Education and Research Foundation. It is designed to
provide
        a stimulating intellectual forum where members may meet with
experts
        to spend a few days discussing a chosen topic.

         What about special programs?

         The Mensa Education and Research Foundation (MERF) sponsors the
         Mensa Scholarship Program (in which students nationwide compete
         for varying sums of money for their education), Awards for
         Excellence for short papers in the field of giftedness, the
Mensa
         Meritorious Publication Award (with Wright State University,
Dayton
         Ohio) for a major work in the field of giftedness, Memorial
         Awards, and donor programs.
           The Gifted Children Program compiles and provides information
         that includes activities, both national and local, centered
         around gifted children.

         Does Mensa have its own publications?

        The "Mensa Bulletin", published ten times per year, is sent
        to members as a part of their membership. It incorporates the
        "International Journal", and these publications contain views
        and information about Mensa, as well as contributions by Mensans
        on a wide variety of subjects.
          Local newsletters are published by almost every local group,
        informing members of local activities and events, and other
        items of interest.
          "Interloc" (also published ten times yearly) is free to
officers,
        and to other active members on request. It contains news and
        information about various society, administrative, and internal
        matters.
          The "Mensa Research Journal", published periodically by MERF,
        reports on Mensa-supported research. It also publishes original
       articles in diverse fields of interest, and is available for a
       subscription fee.
         "Isolated-M" is a popular and informative newsletter published
       by the Isolated-M SIG. It is sent to those members who are
       geographically isolated from a local group, and is available to
       others by subscription.



                                     Page 3



         The "Mensa Register", or other membership directory, published
       periodically, list all of the members and may include such
       information as geographic location, areas of expertise and/or
       interest, and other professional and personal data.

       Are there any special benefits for members?

       Although hardly the primary reason for joining Mensa, membership
       does afford some special benefits, such as S.I.G.H.T., which
       assists traveling Mensans, and insurance.

       How can I become a member?

         We suggest you begin with a valid, at-home, I.Q. test. Complete
         the application form (at the end of this text) and return it to
         us with your check or money order for $9.00. We'll send you an
         I.Q. test you can take at home. Upon receipt of your completed
         test, we will score it and notify you of the results. If the
         results indicate an I.Q. at or above the 95th percentile, you
         will be invited to take our supervised tests, which cost $20.00
         and are administered by one of our proctors at a convenient
location.
         Should your score on one of the proctored tests indicate your
I.Q.
         to be in the top 2%, you will be offered membership in the
Society.
         Our tests, however, are not valid for persons under the age of
         14; they can qualify for membership via alternative procedures
         for admission (see the end of this text).

       What about I.Q. test taken in the past?

        A score in the 98th percentile or higher on one of many
standardized
        I.Q. tests -- if approved by our Supervisory Psychologist --
        previously administered in school, the Armed Forces, or by any
        licensed psychologist, is satisfactory evidence of qualification
        for membership (see the end of this text).

       What's the next step?
        You will be notified that your score is acceptable, and, soon
        after payment of the membership dues, you will begin receiving
        the national "Mensa Bulletin", a local newsletter, and your
        membership card entitling you to participate in all Mensa
        activities and special benefits.

        What are the membership dues?

        Current annual dues are $33.00 -- less than ten cents a day.
        (Information about student dues, additional family member
        dues, and life dues is provided at the time membership is
offered).
        Part of your dues is returned to the local groups to provide
        a greater range of activities and benefits for the members on
        a local level. Mensa is a not-for-profit organization.

        Is Mensa for me?

        Only you can answer that. If what you're looking for is
intelligent
        conversation, stimulating people, interesting activities, and
an
        opportunity to expand your world, the answer is yes. Why not
        fill out the application blank and find out if you qualify?




                                        Page 4


        Remember, one out of every fifty people qualifies for Mensa.
        YOU could be that one.

        Join us.   We might be just what you're looking for.




        ---------------------------------------------------------------

                   Alternate Procedure for Admission

        Admission to Mensa may also be granted on the basis of
        evidence of a previous intelligence test. A list of the
        qualifying scores* for several of the major intelligence
        tests is given here.

        * It should be noted that the term "I.Q. score" is used as a
        convenient, easily understood reference, but that candidates
        for membership in Mensa must achieve a score at or above the 98th
        percentile on a standard test of intelligence. The "I.Q. score"
        varies from test to test, as indicated by the list below.
Candidates MUST supply the evidence or make the necessary
arrangements to have it sent. Such documentation is returned
only if request is made at the onset. If the test was given by
a psychologist, psychometrist, or agency, the score must be
reported on professional letterhead and signed by the test
administrator. If the evidence is in the form of a transcript,
the transcript must be certified. Notarized photostatic copies
of original documents are usually acceptable.

------------   Qualifying Test Scores   -------------------

California Test of Mental Maturity ............   IQ   132
California Test of Cognitive Skills ...........        132
CEEB or SAT (Verbal and Math combined)
  prior to 9/77 ...............................        1300
CEEB or SAT (Verbal and Math combined)
  as of 9/77 ..................................      1250
GRE (Verbal and Math combined) ................      1250
LSAT (prior to 1982) or 662 (as of 1982) ......        39
ACT Composite .................................        29
Miller Analogies Test - raw score .............        66
Stanford Binet, Form L-M ......................   IQ 132
Wechsler Adult and Children Scales
  (WAIS and WAIS-R, WISC and WISC-R) ..........   IQ    130
Otis Tests:
        Alpha .................................   IQ   138
        Beta ..................................   IQ   128
        Gamma .................................   IQ   131
        Lennon ................................   IQ   132

Many other intelligence tests may also be accepted subject
to individual appraisal of the documentation by Mensa's
Supervisory Psychologists, e.g:

Henmon-Nelson
Medical College Admission Test
National Teachers Exam



                              Page 5


Wechsler Bellvue 1
Cattell Cultural Fair
Graduate Management Admission Exam
ACE
SRA Primary Mental Abilities
Army General Classification Test (AGCT or GT prior to 10/80)
NY State Regents Scholarship Test (aptitude section only)
Navy GCT (Standard Score) prior to 10/80

Mensa reserves the right to alter or modify these norms as
the tests indicated are renormed or restandardized. All prior
          evidence submitted to Mensa will be appraised individually,
          and Mensa reserves the right to make the final determination
          as to the acceptability of any test.




          ------------------------------------------------------------


          Mail to:    American Mensa, Ltd.
                      2626 East 14th Street
                      Brooklyn, N.Y. 11235-3992
                      718-934-3700

          Name: .....................................................

          Age:   .......

          Address: ..................................................

          City: .............................. State: ... Zip: ......

          Phone: (h)................... Phone: (b)...................

          ... [A] Please send me the preliminary test to do at home without
                  supervision. Enclosed find U. S. $9.00; please inform me
                  of my score.

          ... [B] I wish to go directly to the supervised test.     Please
send
                     me the name and address of the nearest Proctor. I
understand
                     the $20.00 fee is to be paid to the Proctor.

          ... [C] I claim exemption from testing and enclose evidence that
my
                     I.Q. is in the top 2% or the general population.    I
enclose
                     $15.00 nonrefundable evaluation fee. (If the evidence is
to
                     be sent to us by a psychologist or testing institute,
please
                     give name and address of same.


....................................................................


....................................................................

        I learned about Mensa through:
.....................................
Amount enclosed: $ ...................... (U.S. funds only)




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