Realizing our Graduate Potential - University of Winnipeg

					Realizing our Graduate Potential                              Kirby, February 2008




                          Realizing our Graduate Potential:
Creating an Institutional Environment for Graduate Programs and Graduate Students
                            at the University of Winnipeg

              The Interim Draft Report of the Task Force on Graduate Studies




Task Force on Graduate Studies
University of Winnipeg
Chair: Dr. Sandra Kirby

February 15, 2008
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                        Kirby, February 2008



Task Force on Graduate Studies Members:
Chair: Dr. Sandra Kirby (Acting Associate VP Research & Graduate Studies)

New Graduate Programs Representatives: Dr. Ed Byard, Dr. Fung-Yee Chan, Dr. Scott Forbes, ,
Dr. John Hofley, Wendy McNab, Dr. Sheela Ramanna, Dr. Mavis Reimer, Jacqueline Romanow,
Dr. Alden Turner

Joint Masters Degree Programs Representatives: Dr. Joan Grace (with Dr. Jim Silver), Dr. James
Hanley (with Dr. Nolan Reilly), Dr. Albert Welter

Marriage and Family Therapy Program Representative: Marilyn Boyd

Faculty of Theology Representative: Dr. James Christie (Dean, Faculty of Theology), (with Dr.
John Lenshyn)

Communications Representatives: Dan Hurley (later replaced by Shawn Coates/Naniece
Ibrahim)

Senior Administration Representatives: Dr. Neil Besner (Associate VP International), Doug
Prophet (Associate VP Finance), Dr. Brian Stevenson (VP Academic)

Faculty and Administration Representatives: Michael Benarroch (Dean, Faculty of Business and
Economics), Kelly Brown (Executive Director of Student Relations), Craig Cooper (Associate
Dean, Faculty of Arts), Dr. David Fitzpatrick (Dean, Faculty of Arts), Dr. Gabor Kunstatter
(Dean, Faculty of Science), Nancy Latocki (Director of Student Records), Gerry Munt (Director,
Strategic & Budgetary Priorities), Colin Russell (University Registrar)




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                      Kirby, February 2008


Summary of Recommendations:

Short Term
General
    Develop a public education and marketing campaign which showcases and
        celebrates graduate student research and graduate studies of both existing and new
        graduate programs. This campaign should be targeted to the university community,
        the general public and the provincial government (recommendation #10).
    Start a process and timeline for establishing a Faculty of Graduate Studies that is
        consistent with the quality and accessibility articulated in the UW Mission
        Statement (recommendation #11).
    Create a pre-Masters category within the undergraduate program for students who
        need to complete specific work before applying for admission to graduate studies.
        The pre-Masters program of studies is to be designed specifically for the pre-
        Masters student by the appropriate department graduate studies committee and
        approved as a course of study by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Pre-Master’s study
        may be undertaken concurrently with English as an Additional Language training
        that has been recommended by Admissions or the department. The nature and
        structure of possible language training should be determined by the English
        Language Development sub-committee of the Senate Student Services Committee
        (recommendation #18).
    Guide centrally any COPSE funding and COPSE requests for funding to help offset
        longer-term requirements and protect against post-grant jumps in expenditures
        (recommendation #22).
Specific
    Establish a Graduate Scholarship Endowment Fund that is designed to meet our
        long-term enrolment objectives (recommendation #2).
    Establish immediately the position of Acting Dean of Graduate Studies in an Office
        of Graduate Studies, who shall report to the Associate VP-R&GS (recommendation
        #5).
    Establish an operating and capital budget line for FGS revenues and expenditures
        for administrative support, program implementation and academic staffing without
        impacting the high quality, accessibility and resources of the UW undergraduate
        programs and departments in Arts Science and Education. Ensure that a 1.0 FTE is
        available immediately for administrative support (recommendation #12).
    Prepare an agreement on workload issues (teaching and supervision of graduate
        students) (recommendation #14).
    Adopt the admission process of the new programs for all graduate programs
        (recommendation #16).
    Identify the student categories as full-time, part-time and continuing. The goal is to
        provide sufficient support to enable students to study full time (recommendation
        #17).
    Require all international applicants to successfully complete one of the following
        English Language Assessment tests: a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a
        Foreign Language) score of 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based) or a total



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                         Kirby, February 2008


       score of 88 (internet-based) with a score of at least 20 on each of the individual skill
       areas; a minimum score of 85% on the MELAB (Michigan English Language
       Assessment Battery); an overall minimum band score of 6.5 on the IELTS
       (International English Language Testing System) with at least 5 on each test band;
       an overall minimum result of 60 on the CAEL (Canadian Academic English
       Language Assessment) with at least 60 on each sub-test. Scores more than two years
       old will not be accepted. Note: Individual departments may require higher scores
       than those listed above, or scores more recent than two years.
           - Applicants should arrange for their English language test score(s) to be sent
              directly to the Graduate Studies Office. No student will be admitted until
              this requirement has been satisfied.
           - A waiver may be granted if evidence can be provided of four or more years of
              education in a recognized secondary and/or post-secondary institution in
              which the language of instruction is English. Requests for a waiver must be
              submitted at the time of application and will be considered on an individual,
              case by case basis
           - NOTE: Appropriate services to assist students in improving their English
              language capabilities should be determined by the English Language
              Development sub-committee of the Senate Student Services Committee
              (recommendation #19).
      Consider the residence requirement for the graduate Masters programs be a
       minimum of 8 months and that occasional students be required to do a minimum of
       60% of their course work at the UW (recommendation #20).
      Add a 0.5 FTE position to the Awards and Financial Services Office to maintain the
       centralized list of awards and add a 0.5 FTE position to the Admissions Office to
       manage the graduate student admissions (recommendation #21).

Long Term
General
    Make the case, in partnership with Manitoba’s other universities, to our provincial
      government for increased funding for graduate studies in the province
      (recommendation # 1).
    Build a growth strategy for graduate programming at the University of Winnipeg
      that is sustainable and clearly identifies and recovers both the direct and indirect
      costs of programming to the university. The strategy should be sufficiently flexible
      to take maximal advantage of new resources if and when they arise (recommendation
      #3).
    Link the development of graduate programming at the University of Winnipeg to
      the objective of enhancing research capacity. We need to identify the areas where
      graduate programming can best assist research and develop new programming in
      these areas. Developing research capacity is best achieved if our faculty have broad
      access to graduate programs (recommendation #4).
    Set a target of 3% of enrolment (full time student equivalents) for our graduate
      programs in the medium term (3 to 5 years) and 10% in the long-term (10-12 years)
      (recommendation #7).



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                      Kirby, February 2008


      Structure the new graduate programs horizontally around themes of wide interest
       to our students, faculty and the public. They should be designed to span disciplines
       and undergraduate programs allowing broad potential access of our faculty to
       graduate programming (recommendation #8).
    Engender a graduate student culture through the promotion of graduate research,
       allocation of sufficient student lounge/study space, graduate housing, and other
       services (recommendation #9).
    Seek multi-year, incremental funding from COPSE for operating costs of a New
       Faculty (recommendation #13).
Specific
    Establish a Faculty of Graduate Studies, directed by a Dean of Graduate Studies, to
       replace the Office of Graduate Studies. The Dean of Graduate Studies shall report
       to the VP (Academic) (recommendation #6).
    Create a Graduate Studies Advisory Committee to the Dean of Graduate Studies to
       review proposals for new programs and facilitate growth of implemented programs
       (recommendation #15).




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                                               Kirby, February 2008




Table of Contents

Task Force on Graduate Studies members: ............................................................................... 2
Summary of Recommendations: ................................................................................................. 3
I. Preamble .................................................................................................................................. 7
II. Introduction: ........................................................................................................................... 8
III. Sub-Committee Reports: ..................................................................................................... 11
       A. Integrated Planning and Budgets …………… ............................................................ 11
       B. Administrative Structure and Program Articulation .................................................... 33
       C. Admissions and Records .............................................................................................. 35
       D. Graduate Student Issues ............................................................................................... 38
       E. Budgets and Accounting............................................................................................... 41
       F. Administrative Structure and Program ......................................................................... 45




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                          Kirby, February 2008


Realizing our Graduate Potential: Creating an Institutional Environment for
 Graduate Programs and Graduate Students at the University of Winnipeg

          The Interim Draft Report of the Task Force on Graduate Studies

                                   University of Winnipeg
                                     February 15, 2008


I. Preamble
The University of Winnipeg is a public institution with a long and lustrous history which is now
facing many exciting challenges, including those of educating both domestic and international
graduate students and of supporting research excellence. The Task Force on Graduate Studies
(TFGS) sees these two challenges as intertwined. That is, we cannot achieve one in isolation
from the other. These are wholly in line with CAUT’s statement that “to realize our country’s
full potential, Canadians must overcome three major challenges:
     We must increase the supply of highly educated labour. The production of advanced
        degree holders needs to increase by more than 35% over the next decade …
     We need to maintain and enhance our international competitiveness. The Canadian
        economy is increasingly dependent on international trade – a highly competitive,
        innovative and knowledge-driven enterprise …
     Our third challenge is demographic. Over the next decade, the percentage of the total
        population who are aged 25 to 59 will begin shrinking. To remain competitive, both
        labour market participation and productivity need to increase…by providing
        opportunities for individuals from underrepresented groups to pursue a university
        education.” (Universities: Addressing Canada’s Challenges, CAUT/AUCC
        www.aucc.ca/publications/media/2007/budget _submission_12_12_e.html accessed
        1/25/2008)

We already offer graduate programs. The Faculty of Theology offers a MA in Theology
(MTheology), a Master of Divinity (MDiv), a MA in Spiritual Disciplines and Ministry
Practices, and a Master of Sacred Theology. Marriage and Family Therapy offers a Masters of
Marriage and Family Therapy (MMFT). We also deliver three Joint Masters Degree Programs
with the University of Manitoba, a MA in History, a Master of Public Administration (MPA),
and an MA in Religion.

In our move towards offering a fuller range of graduate studies programs, we received Senate
and COPSE permission to launch 4 new graduate programs. These are still in the planning
process:

      MA in Aboriginal Governance. This program has three options: course work and thesis,
       course work plus comprehensive examination, course work and cooperative work
       placement, and will be registering 3-5 students in September 2008.



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      MA in Applied Computer Science and Society. This program consists of course work
       and a thesis. Approximately 10 -12 students are expected for September 2008.

      MSc in Bioscience, Technology and Public Policy. This program has course work and a
       thesis, though a course work only option is being pursued. This program is registering
       approximately 8 students for September 2008.

      MA in English. This program will eventually offer five streams of study: Cultural
       Theory, Cultures of Childhood; Gender, Sexualities and Culture; Local, National and
       Global Cultures; and Manuscript, Print and Digital Cultures. This program will be
       recruiting its first students, particularly for the Cultures of Childhood stream, for studies
       beginning in September 2009.

To date, we have established two committees, the New Graduate Programs Committee and the
Task Force on Graduate Studies. The first committee is tasked with working together, sharing
tasks and engaging in problem-solving, to launch their new programs. The TFGS is tasked with
recommending a strategic plan for the growth and development of graduate studies. With the
support of the Acting Associate Vice-President – Research and Graduate Studies, and the R&GS
office, we have also held a press conference (September 7, 2007 – Dr. Axworthy, Minister
McGifford, photo opportunities), and participated in the special launch of the M.A. in Aboriginal
Governance on Feb. 1, 2008 (details of program curriculum and plans at UW). The new
programs are all interdisciplinary in nature and will integrate well with the overall direction of
the UW on excellence in education at the undergraduate, and now graduate, level. Also, they
will help to retain top students and attract new students. In addition, the programs will attract
competitive faculty which will enhance our capacity to do research, and develop and enrich our
students’ learning experiences.

In this report, we address the myriad of challenges related to linking existing graduate programs
with each other and with the new, free-standing graduate programs. We ask questions about
what administrative structures are needed, how we shall pay for these programs, who teaches in
them and what consideration teachers receive in terms of work-load, how much money is enough
to support a student, and what the process should be to admit prospective students to graduate
studies. It has been an exciting ride for us all – getting to fashion what we think is a measured
response to the challenge of creating a small number of the very best graduate programs at the
University of Winnipeg.

II. Introduction:
The Task Force on Graduate Studies (TFGS) was created in the fall of 2007 to create a strategic
plan for the growth and development of graduate studies at the University of Winnipeg. In this
TFGS draft report, recommendations are made for the administrative location, policies and
procedures for the graduate programs, including the four new graduate programs approved by
COPSE in June 2007.

The TFGS has also been responsible for identifying key those issues/challenges and solutions
“across programs” that would benefit from an institutional response. These include but are not


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


limited to advertising, admissions, housing, website development, student orientation, graduate
committees, admission of faculty and students to graduate studies, fee structures, graduate
advising, graduate student roles in governance, course and program evaluations, comprehensive
examinations, standardization of thesis and defense procedures, office/study space, financial and
risk management issues, funding for graduate students, administration of programs,
communications, workload/tenure/promotions, research funding, publications, and domestic and
international student recruitment.

The TFGS assisted where possible with providing timely direction as we launch new graduate
programs in 2008 and 2009. Finally, the TFGS has addressed other items arising in the
discussions about Graduate Programs at the University of Winnipeg.

To accomplish our tasks, the TFGS identified five sub-committees and their mandates as
follows:
     Integrated Planning and Budgets: Dr. Scott Forbes (Chair), Marilyn Boyd, Dr. Joan
       Grace, Gerald Munt, Dr. Albert Welter
     Graduate Student Issues: Kelly Brown (Chair), Dr. Neil Besner, Judith Dyck, Naniece
       Ibrahim
     Admissions and Records: Colin Russell (Chair), Nancy Latocki, Judith Dyck, Dr. Sandi
       Kirby (and Dr. Craig Cooper)
     Administrative Structure and Program Articulation: Dr. Gabor Kunstetter, Dr. Sheela
       Ramanna (with Dr. James Hanley) (Co-Chairs), Dr. Alden Turner, Dr. Craig Cooper, Dr.
       James Christie, Dr. David Fitzpatrick, Dr. Joan Grace, Jacqueline Romanow
     Budgets and Accounting: Doug Prophet (Chair), Dr. Sandi Kirby, Gerald Munt, Dr.
       Michael Benarroch
    ● Administrative Support - Research and Graduate Studies Office: Bea Spearing, Emina
       Cingel, Alicia Dueck, Anna Henry

This draft report, presented to the UW community at large, is the result of considerable work.
The overall report is based on approximately 3 months of bi-weekly, “heavily agenda’d”
meetings of the TFGS, numerous meetings of the five sub-committees, equally numerous one-
on-one consultations between the Acting AVP-R&GS, Dr. Kirby and the graduate programs, and
countless hours of individual work in preparing for meetings, recording minutes and preparing
the sub-committee reports.

The TFGS is enthusiastic about accounting for the unique structural and program elements at the
University of Winnipeg; the Task Force has undergone, and will continue to do extensive
consultations with chairs, directors of existing graduate programs, and the university community
at large. As part of this exercise, we invite your feedback on this draft report, including its 28
recommendations, through a process that consists of 2 public consultations (March 13 and March
14) and a series of meetings with, for example, UWSA/Aboriginal Students Association, GFC,
and UWFA. In addition, written feedback received by Alicia Dueck (a.dueck@uwinnipeg.ca ) on
or before March 14, 2008 will be considered. After the March 14th deadline, the TFGS will
prepare the final report and recommendations for submission to Academic Planning Committee
and Senate, the Vice-President (Academic) Dr. Brian Stevenson, and the University President



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                          Kirby, February 2008


and Vice Chancellor, Dr. Axworthy. It will also be presented to others who may be affected by
the implementation of the TFGS Report.

The TFGS also wishes it to be known that we have responded to the task of addressing the nature
and scope of graduate studies at the UW with prudent deliberation, keeping before us two main
points. First, the expansion of graduate studies at the UW must build on, but not erode, the
excellent undergraduate programs. Second, the goal is to establish and maintain a small number
of top quality, niche programs fitting within the academic and research goals of the UW -
programs that will be attended by students who receive support to engage in graduate studies.

NOTE: The consultations will use, as their starting point, the current graduate studies programs
at the UW and the 4 new programs approved by UW’s Senate and then by COPSE (June, 2007).
Of the 4 new programs, 3 will be accepting their first students in September 2008 and 1 program
will do the same in September 2009.

The TFGS worked within the following limitations.
    Existing regulations and agreements
         Faculty of Theology (Joint Enterprise between UW and the General Council of the
         United Church of Canada)
         MMFT (and the Aurora Centre)
         Joint Senate Committee regulations (UW and UM) – for the Joint Masters Programs

      Financial Limitations
          Funding – budgets for the Faculty of Theology, MMFT, JMPs, COPSE funding (MA
          in Aboriginal Governance - $856,400 over 4 years)
          Funding submissions for new programs
          Funding submissions for new joint programs

      Proposals for new graduate programs that are already in process

      The general situation/context of the UW in 2008 with the existing provincial
       government’s position re: student fees, annual funding and government priorities.

The TFGS worked within a positive context, a context bounded by the following:
    Considerable experience with graduate programs and graduate students at UW

      The ‘Coming of Age” as an institution that has both undergraduate and a range of
       graduate programs

      A willingness by students, staff and faculty to engage in the process of bringing new
       programs and existing programs into a functional administrative structure.

      A President who takes the development of graduate programs to be one of his top three
       issues for UW.
           The UW is committed to graduate program development in niche areas in a way as to
           enhance graduate programs and not to diminish the existing undergraduate programs.


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008



      Consultations with the UW community will be undertaken and a final report prepared for
       Academic Planning, Senate, VP Academic and President.

General: The University is committed to graduate program development in niche areas in a way
as to enhance graduate programs and not to diminish the existing graduate or undergraduate
programs. Financial incentives (e.g., scholarships, teaching assistantships), program/promotional
funding, faculty, and administrative staff should be made available equally, when possible and
suitable, between new and existing graduate programs. It is the priority of the TFGS that new
and existing graduate programs maintain viability and sustainability while having room for
program/curriculum expansion.

Enrolment and program expansion will be considered in light of academic requirements and
available funds. As a general principle, graduate programs will not enroll more funding-eligible
students than there is funding to provide. Shortly, the TFGS will develop a set of criteria for
determining student support. It is the intention of the TFGS that unexpended student support
funds available in each department will be available to that department in future years.

Final cost and environmental impacts are still being developed through the TFGS reporting
process and, hence, this is more of a progress report than a final draft. Nevertheless, it is clear
that the university is moving forward with graduate programming based on the approval of the 4
new programs by UW’s Senate and then by COPSE (June, 2007). Of the 4 new programs, 3 will
be accepting their first students in September 2008 and 1 program will do the same in September
2009.

III. Sub-Committee Reports:

   A. Integrated Planning and Budgets

               1. The Case for Increasing Graduate Finding in the Province of
                  Manitoba
It is important to consider from the outset that any substantial expansion of our current graduate
programming rests upon provincial government funding. Given the historical challenges – a
provincial government whose primary current policy for universities centers on access via a
tuition freeze, and whose main focus for growth in the post-secondary sector has been the
expansion of the college system – the task before us is formidable. If we cannot persuade the
provincial stewards of post-secondary education of the wisdom of a policy shift toward greater
emphasis on graduate studies, any future growth will be slow and incremental, the rate of
expansion set by COPSE’s appetite for new programming. We need to make the case, in
partnership with Manitoba’s other universities, to our provincial government for increased
funding for graduate studies in the province.




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                                       Kirby, February 2008


          MANITOBA RANKS 9th of 10 PROVINCES IN GRADUATE EDUCATION

The Province of Manitoba faces a massive shortfall in graduate education. According to
Statistics Canada data, Manitoba trains about 2/3 of our per capita share of Master’s students,
and half our share of doctoral students. Overall, Manitoba awards fewer graduate degrees per
capita than every province in Canada with the exception of Prince Edward Island. Our rate of
0.49 graduate degrees per 1000 stands at just over half the national average (FIG 1).

FIGURE 1. Graduate degrees awarded per 1,000 population in Canadian provinces in 2001.
Source: Statistics Canada.
                               Graduate Degrees Awarded Per 1,000 Population (2001)


          Nova Scotia                                                                           1.26

              Quebec                                                                     1.18

              Ontario                                                            0.94

             CANADA                                                              0.92

               Alberta                                                    0.81

     British Columbia                                             0.71

        Newfoundland                                             0.69

        Saskatchewan                                           0.65

        New Brunswick                                     0.59

           MANITOBA                               0.49

 Prince Edward Island             0.11

                         0.0         0.2    0.4          0.6            0.8        1.0   1.2           1.4



          MANITOBA TRAINS TOO FEW GRADUATE STUDENTS

The problem is not our overall capacity in Post-secondary education. We educate our per capita
share of undergraduate students. Our shortfall lies only at the graduate student level. We train
too few graduate students relative to the number of undergraduate students. The national average
is 6.6 undergraduates per graduate student: the four provinces most engaged in graduate student
education – BC, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec - have the lowest ratios. Manitoba, at 11.7
undergraduate students per graduate student stands at almost twice the national average (FIG 2).
BC, Alberta and Ontario are currently engaged in a rapid expansion of graduate student capacity.
BC, for example, has set the goal of having the highest per capita share of graduate students in
the country. Ontario is increasing graduate student capacity by 65% between 2005 and 2010 and
by 2010 will be providing annual funding of $220 million per year to do so.




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FIGURE 2. The ratio of full time equivalent undergraduate students to full time equivalent
graduate students in Canada. Source: Statistics Canada.

                   Ratio of undergraduate to graduate students, 2005/06

                 0.0     2.5         5.0       7.5         10.0    12.5   15.0    17.5

        Quebec                 3.6


            BC                         5.2


       CANADA                                6.6


        Alberta                              6.7


        Ontario                                      8.7


  Newfoundland                                         9.1


    Nova Scotia                                            9.6


  Saskatchewan                                               9.8


       Manitoba                                                    11.7


 New Brunswick                                                             14.8


           PEI                                                                      36.8




      GRADUATE STUDIES UNDERPINS RESEARCH PERFORMANCE

The presence of well-focused graduate programs is linked to above average research
performance among Canada’s undergraduate universities. The University of Winnipeg belongs
to a group of 8 mid-sized undergraduate universities with roughly 150-225 full-time equivalent
faculty. The group also includes Lakehead University, Trent University, UPEI, UNBC, St.
Francis Xavier University, Acadia University and St. Mary’s University.

In 2005, our total research income ranked last among this group (FIG 3). It is no coincidence
that we are also the only university in the group without a significant presence in graduate
studies. Lakehead University which has almost exactly the same faculty complement as
ourselves, secured four times the research funding.

      MANITOBA UNDERPERFORMS NATIONALLY IN SECURING TRICOUNCIL
       FUNDING

Manitoba underperforms in securing Tricouncil funding. Our Tricouncil agencies dispense
nearly $2 billion in research funding per annum. At 3.6% of Canada’s population, our per capita
share in 2004/05 should have been $64 million: we received just $46 million, or 2/3 our per
capita share (TABLE 1).

This funding deficit, that costs the province more than $17 million per annum, can be traced
directly to our shortfall in graduate student training. Tricouncil funding is strongly linked to the
training of graduate students, and Manitoba trains fewer graduate students than it should.


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                                                                     Kirby, February 2008


FIGURE 3. Relationship between total research income and faculty complement at Canada’s
undergraduate universities in 2005.


                           $20,000,000
                                                                                               Total Research income vs. Full
                                                                                               Time Faculty at Undergraduate
                                                           Lakehead                                      Universities in 2005
                           $17,500,000

                                                                                    Laurentian

                           $15,000,000
 Research income in 2005




                                                                                                Lethbridge
                                                                                                                    Brock
                           $12,500,000

                                                                                                                         Ryerson
                                                                        Trent
                                                                PEI                                            Wilfred Laurier
                           $10,000,000
                                                             UNBC

                                                                                              Moncton
                                                                                St FX
                            $7,500,000


                                                                        Acadia

                            $5,000,000       St. Thomas                  St. Mary's

                                                          Cape Breton           WINNIPEG
                                                           Mount Allison                                      Graduate School
                            $2,500,000                       Brandon                                          No or limited
                                                                                                              graduate school
                                             Nipissing       Mount St. Vincent
                                                            Bishops
                                   $0
                                         0           100            200                 300             400            500         600

                                                            Full time equivalent faculty


TABLE 1. Shortfall in Tri-Council funding (Canada Institutes for Health Research, CIHR; Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council, SSHRC; Natural Sciences and Engineering
Research Council, NSERC) to Manitoba in 2004/05. Source: CIHR, SSHRC and NSERC online
databases.

                                                                    CIHR                  SSHRC                  NSERC              Total Tricouncil Funding
                                Total funding                       $746,879,915              $290,393,161         $720,393,312          $1,757,666,388
Manitoba’s per capita share of total
                                                                      $27,261,117             $10,599,350           $26,294,356            $64,154,823
             funding

                    Actual funding to Manitoba                        $20,979,330              $7,239,027           $18,736,900            $46,955,257


                             Funding shortfall                        $6,281,787               $3,360,323            $7,557,456            $17,199,566




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                                         Kirby, February 2008



                                     UNDERPERFORMANCE IN TRICOUNCIL FUNDING PENALIZES OUR
                                      STUDENTS

Graduate scholarship funding to a universities’ students is based in large part upon Tricouncil
funding performance to its research scholars: more grant funding leads directly to more graduate
scholarships for our students. FIG 4 shows the data for NSERC; exactly the same pattern holds
for SSHRC funding.

FIGURE 4. NSERC grants vs. scholarship funding at Canada’s undergraduate universities in
2006/07. Source: NSERC online database.

                                            NSERC Grant vs Scholarship Funding
                                                 at Undergraduate Universities

                                      $800,000
                                                                      NSERC Scholarships =
  NSERC Scholarship Funding 2006/07




                                                                  0.11 x NSERC Grants $) +
                                                                                  $61,176
                                                                  R2 = 0.58 P = Trent
                                                                                 0.000006
                                      $600,000



                                                                                  Lethbridge
                                                                                    Brock
                                      $400,000


                                                                  St. Mary's          Laurentian
                                                         PEI                       Lakehead    Ryerson

                                      $200,000



                                                       Winnipeg
                                                     Brandon
                                           $0
                                                $0      $1,000,000   $2,000,000    $3,000,000    $4,000,000

                                                       NSERC Research Grant Funding




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                                                  Kirby, February 2008


                                        GRADUATE TRAINING IS LINKED DIRECTLY TO A PROVINCE’S RETENTION
                                         OF SKILLED WORKERS IN RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Graduate training is linked to the training and retention of personnel involved in Research &
Development in Canada. Not surprisingly provinces such as Quebec and Ontario that train more
graduate students have higher numbers of workers in Research and Development per capita (FIG
5). Graduate research and training not only enlarges the pool of R & D workers, it also creates
the R & D enterprise that attracts these highly trained workers. Graduate research provides
direct economic benefits to the province training these workers.

FIGURE 5. Graduate degrees per capita awarded by Canadian province in 2001 plotted against
the number of people involved in R & D per capita in 2005. Source: Statistics Canada.

                                         9
                                                Provinces who train more
  R & D Personnel Per 1,000 Population




                                                graduate students have                          QC
                                         8
                                                more personnel involved
                                                in R & D
                                         7                                               ON


                                         6


                                         5
                                                                       BC

                                         4                                         AB                 NS

                                                           MB               SK
                                         3                                   NL
                                                   PEI                 NB
                                         2


                                         1
                                         0.00       0.25        0.50        0.75        1.00   1.25        1.50

                                                 Graduate Degrees Awarded Per 1,000
                                                             Population

                                        THE PROVINCE OF MANITOBA HAS RECOGNIZED THE NEED FOR
                                         GRADUATE STUDENT SUPPORT

The Province of Manitoba introduced the Manitoba Graduate Scholarship program in 2004. This
program was initially targeted to the University of Manitoba. Funding has increased from
$350,000 to $2,000,0000 in scholarship funding (TABLE 2).




                                                                                                                                   16
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


This modest funding provides scholarship support for both Masters and Doctoral students. The
University     of     Winnipeg       current      receives     6     Manitoba       Graduate
Scholarships.

TABLE 2. Growth in funding for Manitoba Graduate Scholarships. Source: Manitoba Provincial
Budget.

                                     Year         Level of
                                                  Funding
                                   2004/05        $350,000
                                   2005/06        $700,000
                                   2006/07       $1,357,500
                                   2007/08       $2,000,000

      OTHER PROVINCES PROVIDE MUCH MORE SUPPORT: BRITISH COLUMBIA

The British Columbia provincial government has announced an increase of more than $70
million in annual funding for the expansion of graduate studies in the province. The centerpiece
is a $50 million annual commitment to the universities to support graduate students. Universities
will receive $20,000 per graduate student per year for program operation. Separate funds are
being created for graduate student scholarships such as the Pacific Leaders Graduate
Scholarship, announced in March 2007, which will provide 20, $20,000 awards to graduate
students; recipients must work 1 year in the BC Public Service for each year funded. Another
example is the Pacific Century Graduate Scholarship program which offers 1,000 graduate
scholarships valued at $10,000 for students studying in British Columbia. In addition, the unique
ACCELERATE BC Program will make available a total of $10 million in subsidies for graduate
internships. The population of British Columbia stands at 4.3 million, 3.7x that of Manitoba.
The equivalent funding in Manitoba would be $19,000,000 per annum.

Under the goals of the CAMPUS 2020 Plan, BC will consistently be one of the three highest
spending provinces in terms of provincial support for basic and applied research by 2010 and
will enroll more graduate students per capita than any other province.

      OTHER PROVINCES PROVIDE MUCH MORE SUPPORT: THE CASE OF
       ALBERTA

The Province of Alberta and its three research-intensive universities have identified expansion of
graduate studies as a major priority. The Universities of Alberta, Calgary and Lethbridge are all
focused on increasing the proportion of graduate students to allow them to compete with the
world’s best public universities.

The province is assisting in this effort by providing what can only be described as massive
increases in funding for post-secondary education in general (an 18% increase in the last year
alone), and substantial funding for graduate studies in particular. In June 2007, the government
announced $227 million in new funding to the Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund which
provides a substantial number of graduate scholarships. In addition, there is a concentrated effort


                                                                                                17
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


to enhance the research capacity of graduate students in the fields of nanotechnology, energy,
environment, health, medical technologies, agriculture, forestry, as well as information and
communications technology. The Ingenuity Accelerator program provides $100 million over 10
years for Ingenuity Accelerator Research Institutes housed at Alberta’s research universities. As
well, the government provides over $6 million annually in graduate scholarships to students in
the field of information & communications technology and nanotechnology.

In many cases, Alberta is designing strategies to lever federal funds with provincial incentives.
For example, in the Alberta Ingenuity Postdoctoral prize program, they automatically offer a
$20K top-up to anyone bringing an NSERC post-doctoral fellowship to an Alberta university
turning a $40K fellowship into a $60K fellowship. They are adopting similar incentive programs
to attract students holding NSERC and SSHRC graduate scholarships.

      OTHER PROVINCES PROVIDE MUCH MORE SUPPORT: THE CASE OF
       ONTARIO

The Province of Ontario historically has had one of the best graduate scholarship programs in the
country. The Ontario Graduate Scholarship (OGS) program is designed to encourage excellence
in graduate studies at the master’s and doctoral levels, and currently 2000 scholarships are
awarded each year, with a value of $10,000 for two terms or $15,000 for three terms.

In the 2005, the Ontario provincial government announced a major expansion of graduate studies
in the province. It was announced that by 2009/10, funding for universities would increase more
than 10%, the government providing universities with an additional $220 million per annum for
the support of graduate students (per capita this would represent about $20 million per annum in
Manitoba). It is estimated that the addition $550 million for capital support, will allow expansion
for 14,000 new graduate student spaces by 2010.

 RECOMMENDATION #1. Make the case, in partnership with Manitoba’s other universities,
 to our provincial government for increased funding for graduate studies in the province



               2. The Development of Integrated Graduate Programming
                      a. The Development of Graduate Studies at the University of Winnipeg:
                         How Far and How Fast?

We need to map out a plan for the development of graduate studies at the University of
Winnipeg that includes a sustainable budget model. Unlike nearly all of Canada’s other
universities with more mature graduate programs, we have a nearly blank page to write upon.
This gives us the opportunity to learn from the mistakes and success of others. But it also means
that we are entering an arena of competition where others have invested more resources than we
currently have available. We shall need to assess the local and national environment for growth:
we need to invest prudently and what works (or fails) elsewhere may not work here. Our
challenge grows because the landscape of graduate studies in Canada is changing rapidly. As we




                                                                                                18
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                             Kirby, February 2008


move forward, we also need to answer the question of how graduate programming fits in with
our overall enrolment strategy.

      FUNDING FOR GRADUATE STUDIES: THE PACHYDERM IN THE ROOM

Growth cannot occur in the absence of resources. Planning for the development of graduate
studies requires planning for the acquisition of the budgetary resources to sustain the programs.
We have been given the mandate not to parasitize the existing funding for our undergraduate
programs: thus we need to secure the new funding for both the direct and indirect costs of
program development. We must identify not only the obvious costs of instructing and housing
our new (and existing) graduate students, but all the incidental impacts on the entire university
infrastructure as well including the development of the necessary administrative superstructure.

We must explore all possible sources of revenue – existing and new – to sustain our programs.
Graduate programming is expensive, and with perhaps rare exceptions, does not pay for itself.
Graduate students require greater levels of direct support than an average undergraduate student,
and building scholarship / fellowship funding is an obvious and substantial challenge. In
general, roughly $20 must be placed in a scholarship endowment fund to every dollar drawn out
each year. Using a round number of $10,000 / student per year means that every 100 graduate
students will require $20 million in endowment funding in the absence of any other funding.
This exceeds our current endowment funding for the entire university by a wide margin. And
while we must work vigorously to marshal funding from all sources, it is clear from the outset
that any substantial expansion of our current graduate programming rests upon provincial
government funding.

 Recommendation #2. Establish a Graduate Scholarship Endowment Fund that is designed to
 meet our long term enrolment objectives.

We need to build a baseline slow-growth strategy that provides a comprehensive overview of all
budgetary items. The strategy should take into account indirect and directs costs of
programming to the university. It should specify enrolment targets for graduate programming
over the short, medium and long-term and the corresponding funding resources necessary to
sustain these targets; this would include, but is not restricted to, building student support funds,
for our long-term enrolment target.


 Recommendation #3. Build a growth strategy for graduate programming at the University of
 Winnipeg that is sustainable and clearly identifies and recovers both the direct and indirect
 costs of programming to the university. The strategy should be sufficiently flexible to take
 maximal advantage of new resources if and when they arise.

      MODELS AMONG OTHER ‘UNDERGRADUATE’ UNIVERSITIES

We have a wide variety of models to follow, and most in the University of Winnipeg community
are probably unaware of the breadth and depth of graduate programming at Canada’s so-called
‘undergraduate’ universities – e.g., our Maclean’s cohort. Some have been aggressively building


                                                                                                 19
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                         Kirby, February 2008


graduate programming capacity with large numbers of Masters and Doctoral programs. Indeed,
Brock University, Laurentian University, Wilfred Laurier University, UNBC, Lakehead
University and Ryerson University are probably better described as small to mid-sized
comprehensive universities than undergraduate universities1.

Eleven of Canada’s 21 Maclean’s undergraduate universities currently offer doctoral
programming including several the same size or smaller than us (Trent, UNBC, Lakehead, St.
Mary’s).

At the opposite extreme, a handful of undergraduate universities – including the University of
Winnipeg – have developed limited or no graduate programming. Some of these – Bishops
University, St. Thomas University, Brandon University, and Cape Breton Univeristy – are not
likely to add any significant graduate programming in the near future. Nipissing University is
expanding graduate studies at present.

We might also look at Canada’s newest universities – UOIT, UBC Okanagan, and Thompson
Rivers University plan to examine their plans for growth: all are building a substantial graduate
programming capacity, with both UOIT and UBC Okanagan including doctoral programming.

Another potentially useful comparison is with the smaller comprehensive universities, University
of Regina and University of Windsor. The University of Regina has a student population only a
third larger than our own, but mounts diverse graduate offerings, with a graduate student
population making up 15% of overall enrolment. These universities illustrate the payoff to
developing research capacity from graduate studies. In 2005, Regina’s overall research income in
2005 was $23.9 million compared to our own $4.4 million, a five-fold difference; Windsor
brought in more than $24 million that same year.

Though we are a smaller institution, we are far from the smallest offering graduate studies –
indeed most of the Maclean’s undergraduate cohort offer varying degrees of graduate
programming already. Our size alone does not prevent us from offering a diverse array of
graduate programs. Universities smaller than us in Canada, and in the case of UNBC, much
smaller, offer diverse graduate offerings.

       GRADUATE STUDIES ENHANCES RESEARCH CAPACITY

Graduate studies underpin the research enterprise of Canada’s post-secondary institutions. This
homily is repeated in the academic and strategic planning documents of most of Canada’s
universities. Graduate studies planned well, with a clear focus on research themes that reflect
institutional strengths and the local environment in which a university is situated, can develop
research capacity strongly. We need look no further than Trent University, Lakehead University,
and UNBC for examples of undergraduate institutions roughly our own size that attract two to
four times our current research funding.



1
 These institutions often describe in their documents of self-governance the individual graduate programs as niche
or narrowly targeted, but when totaled together, the graduate offerings are comprehensive.


                                                                                                                 20
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                          Kirby, February 2008


TABLE 3. Total research funding to Canadian undergraduate universities in 2005. Data for the
Universities of Manitoba, Regina and Windsor are shown for comparison. UBC Okanagan is omitted from the
rankings as data were not available on faculty size. Source: 2007 CAUT Almanac.

    University         Total Research Full-time
                       Income in 2005 equivalent
                          (rank among   faculty
                         undergraduate
                                              (rank among
                           universities)
                                             undergraduate
                                              universities)
  MANITOBA              $146,699,000             1050
     Windsor             $24,118,000              468
      Regina             $23,943,000              399
     Lakehead          $18,431,000 (1)         222 (9)
    Laurentian         $16,475,000 (2)         369 (5)
      Brock            $13,431,000 (3)         441 (2)
    Lethbridge         $12,679,000 (4)         372 (4)
     Ryerson           $10,771,000 (5)         522 (1)
 Wilfred Laurier       $10,264,000 (6)         411 (3)
       Trent            $9,958,000 (7)         219 (10)
        PEI             $9,746,000 (8)         177 (13)
      UNBC              $8,365,000 (9)         159 (14)
     Moncton           $8,165,000 (10)         306 (6)
St. Francis Xavier     $7,870,000 (11)         228 (7)
      Acadia           $5,990,000 (12)         192 (12)
    St. Mary’s         $4,619,000 (13)         207 (11)
   WINNIPEG            $4,399,000 (14)         225 (8)
   Cape Breton         $3,989,000 (15)          90 (19)
 UBC Okanagan             $3,315,000          (no data)
    Mt. Allison        $2,801,000 (16)         111 (18)
   BRANDON             $1,960,000 (17)         123 (16)
Mt. Saint Vincent      $1,612,000 (18)         126 (15)
     Nipissing         $1,400,000 (19)          99 (20)
      Bishops          $829,000 (20)          117 (17)

From the data tabulated in Table 3 we can obtain a coarse measure of success in securing
research funds. Successful universities are those that rank above their faculty size in research
funding. These would include Lakehead University (1st in research funding; 9th in faculty size);
Laurentian University (2nd in funding and 5th in faculty size); Trent University (7th in research
funding and 10th in faculty size); UPEI (8th in funding and 13th in faculty size); UNBC (9th in
research funding and 14th in faculty size).2 Among the underperformers are Ryerson University
(1st in faculty size and 5th in funding); Wilfred Laurier University (3rd in faculty size and 6th in
2
  Lakehead and PEI have both secured substantial research funding on the backs of professional schools (forestry,
engineering, public health at Lakehead University; veterinary medicine at PEI). As such, their success is not easily
translated to the University of Winnipeg where the development of similar programs in unlikely.



                                                                                                                 21
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


funding); University of Moncton (6th in faculty size and 10th in funding); St. Francis Xavier
University (11th in funding and 7th in size); and University of Winnipeg (8th in faculty size and
14th in funding; this sadly is the greatest negative performance in the group).

Institutions such as Trent University have developed research capacity by ensuring that graduate
programs are broadly accessible to their faculty. Not all faculty members participate in graduate
research and teaching, but those that do derive substantial benefits. Allowing faculty broad
access to graduate programming allows for more individuals to reach their research potential.
This objective can be reached by having transdisciplinary programs built around research themes
that allow faculty situated in different undergraduate programs access to graduate research and
training.

 Recommendation #4. Link the development of graduate programming at the University of
 Winnipeg to the objective of enhancing research capacity. We need to identify the areas where
 graduate programming can best assist research and develop new programming in these areas.
 Developing research capacity is best achieved if our faculty have broad access to graduate
 programs.


      A CASE STUDY: TRENT UNIVERSITY

PROFILE: Trent University was founded in 1964 and is located in Peterborough with a satellite
campus in Oshawa. It describes itself as a research-intensive small university. In 2004/05, Trent
had 219 full-time faculty compared to 228 at the University of Winnipeg.

In 2006/07 Trent had 8050 undergraduates (738 at the Oshawa campus); 83% were full-time and
17% part time. With 277 masters and doctoral students, graduate students comprise about 3.3%
of the current total enrolment. Trent’s FTE student enrolment of 6710.6 in 2006 was just slightly
greater than that of the University of Winnipeg at 6508.3.

Trent’s stated policy is to maintain an undergraduate enrolment of 8000 until 2014; within this it
plans to increase the enrolment of aboriginal students to 600, out of province students to 350, and
international students to 700. At the graduate level Trent plans to increase graduate enrolment
from 277 Masters and Doctoral Students in 2006/07 to 600 by 2014 (=7% of total enrolment).

UNIVERSITY BUDGET: Trent University’s most recent financial statement for 2006 contained
overall expenditures of $115.2 million, and revenue of $115.8 million. Its primary sources of
revenue were a government grant of $55.8 million, tuition revenue of $35.4 million, and
ancillary revenue of $17.8 million. By comparison, the University of Winnipeg’s most recent
financial statement for the year ending March 31, 2007 contained overall expenditures of $87.6
million. Trent’s primary expenditures were $71 million on salaries and benefits, $20.9 million
on supplies and expenses, and $7.7 million on scholarships and bursaries. The university had an
endowment fund in 2006 of $26.8 million, of which $15.0 million was targeted to student
assistance. Endowment fund expenditures are (at a maximum) 4% of the average four-year
rolling unit value as of December 31.




                                                                                                22
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


GRADUATE STUDIES ADMINISTRATION: Graduate studies at Trent is administered from
an Office of Graduate Studies headed by a Dean of Graduate Studies (Douglas Evans) supported
by five administrative staff: an Administrative Assistant, a Graduate Studies Officer, a
Scholarships and Bursaries Officer, and Office Assistant and a Liaison Officer. The Dean of
Graduate Studies reports to the VP Academic and Provost (Susan Apostle-Clark). Trent also has
an Associate VP Research (Jim Parker) who also reports to the VP Academic and Provost. The
Research Office is supported by three administrative staff: a Coordinator in the Office of
Research, a Research Project Officer, and an Administrative Assistant. The positions of
Associate VP Research and the Dean of Graduate Studies were created in 2004 when the
decision was taken to split the Office of Graduate Studies and Research into two positions.

GRADUATE STUDENT SUPPORT: The University provides guaranteed funding to both
Masters and Doctoral students ($12,698 to MA students; $12,698 to $17,000 to MSc students;
$12,698 to $19,000 for PhD students). This funding ranks among the most generous for graduate
students at Canada’s undergraduate universities.

GRADUATE PROGRAMS AND RESEARCH: Trent’s graduate programs are fundamentally
interdisciplinary in nature, and organized around the universities’ major research themes. It
offers degrees (MA, MSc and PhD degrees) in 11 programs, as well various degrees offered in
joint programs with other Ontario universities. According to Trent’s Graduate Studies website,
“Professors who supervise graduate students are often members of an undergraduate department
and a separate graduate program. This type of organization encourages interdisciplinarity in our
graduate programs and facilitates interactions between faculty and graduate students from
different disciplines.”

Trent’s graduate programs have expanded the institution’s research capacity substantially. In
2005, Trent secured just under $10 million in total research funding, ranking it among the top tier
(7th of 21) of Canada’s undergraduate universities. The University of Winnipeg in 2005 secured
$4.4 million in research funding ranking it 14th of the 21 undergraduate universities.

LESSONS FROM THE TRENT EXPERIENCE: Trent University has built graduate
programming that emphasizes horizontally-structured programs that identify major themes (e.g.,
Cultural Studies, Canadian Studies, Indigenous Studies, Modelling) alongside a smaller number
of vertically aligned programs (Anthropology, English, History). Part of their success stems
from strong administrative leadership in the program. They identified early on that the
development of graduate studies was beyond the capacity of a single VP Research and Graduate
Studies and split the position in two, to create an AVP of Research and also a Dean of Graduate
Studies. According to their current Dean of Graduate Studies, Douglas Evans (personal
communication): “It had become apparent that the position was just too large for one person. In
reality our graduate programs were being supervised by an administrative person in the Office of
Research and Grad Studies. Consequently many things that should have been happening were
not.” He further notes that the two positions have grown apart in their focus as they work on
different portfolios and that this has not been administratively inefficient: “Staff-wise, at the
moment, I do not think we have any more staff between the two operations than we would have
if they were still combined.”




                                                                                                23
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                           Kirby, February 2008


Dr. Evans notes that in the early years, there was no perceived need for a formal Faculty of
Graduate Studies. But with growth in graduate programming on the horizon, he remarks that it
may be time revisit the issue of establishing a Faculty of Graduate Studies given the logistic
difficulties of coordinating across undergraduate programs.

Given the strong parallels between Trent and the University of Winnipeg in size, age and
institutional outlook their experience is informative.

TABLE 4. Graduate programs at Trent, January 2008.

                         Program                              Degree
                       Anthropology                             MA
Applications of Modelling in the Natural & Social Sciences  MA / MSc
         Canadian Studies and Indigenous Studies                MA
                     Canadian Studies                           PhD
                      Cultural Studies                          PhD
                          English                               MA
                          History                               MA
                    Indigenous Studies                          PhD
                     Materials Science                          MSc
               Theory, Culture and Politics                     MA
                  Watershed Ecosystems                      MSc / PhD
           Trent / Queen's (various disciplines)           MA / MSc /PhD


Recommendation #5 (short term). Establish immediately the position of Acting Dean of
Graduate Studies in an Office of Graduate Studies, who shall report to the Associate VP-R&GS.


Recommendation #6 (long term). Establish a Faculty of Graduate Studies, directed by a Dean of
Graduate Studies, to replace the Office of Graduate Studies. The Dean of Graduate Studies shall
report to the VP (Academic)

      HOW DOES GRADUATE PROGRAMMING FIT INTO THE OVERALL
       ENROLMENT STRATEGY?

Among the strategic decisions to be taken is consideration of where graduate studies fits in with
overall enrolment strategy. The academic plans of nearly every other Canadian university our
size or larger has spoken to this. The chief enrolment growth will occur in the expansion of
graduate studies. Larger universities such as the University of Toronto, University of Western
Ontario, Queens University, and UBC are either holding undergraduate enrolment constant or
lowering slightly, while increasing graduate enrolment, especially at the doctoral level. Other
medium to large universities such as York University, University of Saskatchewan, University of
Victoria, University of Waterloo, University of Calgary, and University of Alberta are looking
for the growth of graduate enrolment to outpace the growth of undergraduate enrolment, again


                                                                                              24
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


with growth targeted mainly at the doctoral level. The University of Windsor projects a steady-
state enrolment of 12,500 undergraduates with an increasing graduate component to 15% of a
total of 14,000 students by 2009. The University of Regina’s academic plan included the
objective of increasing graduate enrolment to 15% of total enrolment, which it reached ahead of
schedule. Ryerson University forecasts a 10% graduate enrolment by 2010, from 0 in 2000.

Canada’s Big Seven research universities look primarily to the elite public institutions in the
United States, where the ratio of undergraduates to graduate students ranges from 4:1 to 2:1.
UBC, University of Toronto, University of Western Ontario, Queens University, University of
Alberta, McMaster University, & McGill University have set enrolment targets for graduate
studies in the range of 20 to 25% of total student enrolment. Canada’s comprehensive
universities have set enrolment targets for graduate studies in the 15 to 25% range, and
undergraduate universities set their targets (when specified) between 0 and 15%. A target of
10% (roughly 600 graduate student FTE’s) signifies a significant commitment to graduate
programming and would represent a reasonable and achievable long-term goal (10-12 years). In
the medium term (3 to 5 years), a 3% target represents a reasonable goal for the University of
Winnipeg.

 Recommendation #7. Set a target of 3% of enrolment (full time student equivalents) for our
 graduate programs in the medium term (3 to 5 years) and 10% in the long term (10-12 years).


      PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT: VERTICAL OR HORIZONTAL?

The current proposals for graduate studies are pioneers in a new field that will cultivate
opportunities for others. There are certainly other departments/ programs that have the size and
resources to mount their own graduate programming (e.g., Chemistry, Psychology), but there are
others that at present do not (e.g., Anthropology, Environmental Studies). If we follow a vertical
department-by-department model for the development of additional graduate programming, we
will create inequities among programs that inevitably lead to quarrels about how resources are
allocated. There is the potential for the perception of ‘have’ and ‘have-not’ departments. But this
problem is easily resolved by creating programs horizontally so that they span multiple
disciplines bringing departments large and small into the fold.

One of our institutional strengths is a culture of collaboration. We are sufficiently small that
individuals and groups in different areas are familiar with each other’s work, and we share many
common interests viewed from different perspectives. There is for example, growing interest in
the themes of health and the environment, subjects that can draw people together from across the
academic spectrum.

We can build to our strengths, and avoid division by constructing broadly-based graduate
programs that span a wide range. The ‘umbrella degrees’ do not preclude the development of
specialized themes, but instead create opportunities for all of our faculty to participate in
graduate programming without the need for individual departments to mount autonomous
programs which in same case may present insuperable difficulties. Thematic programs could
allow individual faculty in each undergraduate program multiple contact points with graduate



                                                                                                25
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


level research and education. It also allows for the efficient sharing of resources – e.g., courses
taught in summer institutes could be shared across programs.

The new program in BioScience and Policy was designed to be interdisciplinary: it serves not
just the Department of Biology, but all areas touched by the life sciences. There has already
there has been growing interest from students and faculty ranging from anthropology to
environmental studies to physics. And the broad theme of the inter-relationships between
science and policy extends well beyond the boundaries of science into the arts and humanities.
The role of science in modern society is pervasive, and there is no reason why a parallel MA in
Science & Policy could not be developed, allowing the participation of faculty in history,
sociology, economics, conflict resolution, philosophy, and politics among others, to participate in
graduate studies; this is just one of many possible themes for graduate programming at the
University of Winnipeg.

Going forward, our job will be to identify the broad themes that simultaneously allow us to
develop our research capacity and capture student, faculty and public interest. This will likely
require revision of our current academic and strategic planning that were designed in the pre-
graduate studies era. .

 Recommendation #8. Structure the new graduate programs horizontally around themes of wide
 interest to our students, faculty and the public. They should be designed to span disciplines and
 undergraduate programs allowing broad potential access of our faculty to graduate
 programming.

                      b. Developing a Graduate Student Culture at the University of Winnipeg

To successfully implement graduate education at the University of Winnipeg, it will be necessary
to create a graduate student culture. In spite of the existence of graduate students at UW for
decades, their presence has largely been hidden from view. This situation will have to change.
No institution of higher learning that assumes the responsibilities of graduate education can do so
without creating the “space,” both mental and physical, for such education to proceed. The
purpose of this section is to outline the measures necessary for UW to successfully implement a
graduate student culture.

      CREATING A WELCOMING ENVIRONMENT

We need to create a welcoming environment for graduate students at this university. This must
begin prior to students’ actual arrival on campus, from the time of initial inquiry, through the
application and acceptance process, through shepherding the students through their initial arrival
on campus, through their registration and enrollment in courses, through graduate student life,
and through successful completion of their programs. We face unique challenges in this regard,
given that our undergraduate student culture is inhibited by the large number of commuters, with
relatively few students living in close proximity to the university. This makes it even more
incumbent that efforts be made to create a graduate student atmosphere at UW.




                                                                                                26
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                             Kirby, February 2008


How can this be accomplished? In the first place, efforts must be made to insure that the inquiry
and application process is conducted in a smooth, timely, and professional manner. Whoever is
charged with these responsibilities needs to treat each inquiry personally. One advantage UW
should have over larger institutions is our ability to provide a personal touch in our interactions,
even to inquiries received via email. We need to prepare an information packet (both paper and
electronic versions) that includes information not just about the formal application process, but
also about the UW and the city of Winnipeg. To outsiders, Winnipeg may have many advantages
(e.g. symphony, WAG, Manitoba Museum, theatre, etc.) of which they will not be immediately
aware. Likewise, it will be important to introduce them to the advantages of UW, especially the
welcoming culture for graduate students that this report hopes to help initiate.

As successful applicants arrive at UW, there needs to be a liaison office to handle their initial
needs. Students from out of town will not know the “lay of the land,” either at the university or
in the Winnipeg community. Those arriving by air should be met at the airport, whenever
possible. Clear directions should be provided by the liaison office for those arriving by car. If
prior housing arrangements have not been made, the UW should be prepared to provide
temporary housing until suitable accommodation is found. The liaison office should assist in this
regard, to the extent that is necessary. The UW should also strongly consider establishing special
residences for graduate students, and make this option available to all who are interested. The
liaison office should also insure that students know how to make contact with their academic
supervisor or other representative from the student’s department, to help initiate the registration
process and begin the transition to academic life at UW.

      INTELLECTUAL ENVIRONMENT: GRADUATE STUDENT COMMON AREA,
       OFFICE SPACE, ETC.

After this initial transition period, the UW needs to insure that the campus provides a welcome
and stimulating environment for graduate students during their tenure of study here. While much
of the intellectual stimulus will naturally come from the department of a student’s chosen
program, the UW must strive to complement these in a comprehensive and uniform manner. The
university must insure, for example, that graduate students have adequate study space at the
university, preferably by providing office space dedicated to graduate students. Graduate
students should also be issued special ID cards that will give them, for example, increased time
for checking out books from the library. In addition, the university needs to provide a common
area – e.g., a graduate student lounge – where graduate students can intermingle. Also important
to the development of an intellectually stimulating culture is the creation of a regular roster of
speakers on relevant and topical issues of interest to graduate students. While much of this will
be managed through individual departments, funds need to be made available so that departments
can adequately meet this need and invite in guest speakers, hold symposiums, etc., as is
necessary. Because of our relatively isolated locale, expenses for such undertakings will not be
insignificant, but should be factored in as a necessary cost of providing graduate education at
UW. Graduate students will also feel welcome and valued to the extent that they are given
opportunity to present their work in forums beyond their individual departments, in conferences
and symposiums. There should be a concerted effort to showcase collaborative research projects
that involve both faculty members and graduate students. In short, the growth of graduate studies
programs at UW will necessitate the encouragement of enhanced intellectual activity on campus.



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


This will improve the intellectual quality of the university as a whole and have positive effects
on the educational environment throughout the campus community, including undergraduates
and faculty.

      GRADUATE STUDENT HOUSING AND SERVICES

In order to create a welcoming and stimulating environment for graduate students, houses
dedicated exclusively to graduate students should be made available. It will be especially
important that such housing be made available to out of town graduate students, unfamiliar with
housing options in Winnipeg. Special accommodation should also be reserved for married
students, some of whom will be coming with children. In addition to housing, provisions must be
made to assist graduate students with child care, where necessary. Space must be made available
in UW campus daycare, as needed (without requiring for space to become available). While this
may seem peripheral to a graduate student’s program, the ability to provide child care for those
who need it will help insure a smooth transition to UW and establish a basis for academic
success.

With regard to a common area for graduate students to congregate, the UW should consider
providing such space in close proximity to the liaison office and the newly established office of
graduate studies. This will help to carve out a space on campus specifically devoted to graduate
students and their concerns. In the event that advice is needed, help will be close at hand. This
office/area should help create an atmosphere of a “home away from home,” a place with
comfortable chairs, suitable for both relaxed conversation and casual study. Copy and vending
machines should be easily accessible. In addition to this common area, it will be important that
graduate students have access to “after hours” facilities as well, and to this end the UW should
consider allowing graduate students admission to the faculty club, without membership charge.

 Recommendation #9. Engender a graduate student culture through the promotion of graduate
 research, allocation of sufficient student lounge/study space, graduate housing, and other
 services.


      RAISING THE PROFILE OF GRADUATE STUDENTS AT UW

If implemented, these measures should result in a raised profile of graduate students on campus
and within the university community, especially as numbers of graduate students grow. Yet, this
is only part of the picture. We must also work to raise the profile of graduate studies at UW with
other academic institutions, the government and the public, and with funding agencies. The truest
mark of the quality of graduate studies at UW will be with the graduates we produce. As
programs come on board, UW should work hard to increase significantly the quotient of NSERC,
SSHRC, and MGS scholarships to which UW graduate students have access. Regarding MGS
scholarships, the UW should consider petitioning the government for a ratio of
scholarships/students to insure that UW students receive at least this minimum number of
awards. And it goes without saying that effort must be made to encourage the provincial
government to significantly increase the amounts of money dedicated to graduate education at
UW and within the province generally. NSERC and SSHRC should be notified, if they haven’t
already, of the UW’s new status as a university with independent graduate studies, to insure that


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


our students applications to these funding agencies receive the consideration they deserve. In
addition, efforts must be made to communicate with the public regarding UW’s graduate
programs, especially as these programs fill needs that the public can identify with as priorities.
Whenever appropriate, the activities of individual graduate programs should be communicated to
the public through forums, etc., that invite public participation.

As indicated, if we are going to get serious about this, we will need to spend some money, and
the budget committees need to note specifically areas where costs will be incurred and estimate
the amounts necessary to cover the items mentioned.


 Recommendation #10. Develop a public education and marketing campaign which showcases
 and celebrates graduate student research and graduate studies of both existing and new graduate
 programs. This campaign should be targeted to the university community, the general public
 and the provincial government.

                      c. Integration and/or relationship between existing and new graduate
                          programs

There are eight existing graduate programs at the University of Winnipeg. Four of these
graduate programs are in the Faculty of Theology at the University of Winnipeg:

Master of Arts in Theology;
Master of Divinity;
Master of Arts in Spiritual Disciplines and Ministry Practices; and
Master of Sacred Theology.

A fifth graduate program –Master of Marriage and Family Theory (MMFT) – originated in the
Faculty of Theology but moved from that faculty almost five years ago. The MMFT is now the
only the only Masters program totally owned by the mainstream University of Winnipeg.

The remaining three are joint master programs (JMPs) with the University of Manitoba in the
following areas:

History;
Public Administration; and
Religious Studies.

In discussions as to how to best plan, develop and successfully implement new graduate
programs at the University of Winnipeg, this report discusses factors that should be recognized
and attended to with respect to building dynamic and diverse graduate education for both
existing and new graduate programs. Two broad areas are considered here, raising the graduate
studies profile and creating an integrated administrative approach

Firstly, raising the profile of graduate studies is integral. Existing programs can significantly
contribute to and further enhance the overall synergy of graduate education at the University of
Winnipeg. To date, this has been a challenge for existing graduate programs for a few reasons.


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                             Kirby, February 2008


One reason is the current low profile of existing graduate programs. The University of Winnipeg
is primarily an undergraduate institution, yet there have been many highly successful and
thriving graduate programs in place for many years. Another reason for the diminished profile of
current graduate programs is that program and administrative structures in place for the Joint MA
programs situate many of the elements of graduate programming within the University of
Manitoba (e.g., application process, registration, academic regulations).

Secondly, creating a integrated administrative approach. It is important to work towards building
graduate education and a programming structure that respects the unique elements of the existing
programs while also ensuring that a two-tier graduate education and administrative/regulatory
structure is not developed.

Building a dynamic and diverse graduate education program presents resource challenges, such
as faculty complement, graduate student support and services as well as administrative support.
The overall task is to enhance the visibility and future viability of graduate programs.

      ENHANCING GRADUATE PROGRAM VISIBILITY

Two of the current graduate programs have been in operation for decades. The joint History and
Religion MA’s and the joint MPA have been in existence for over 30 years. The MMFT has
been in existence for 14 years, and the MA in Divinity for 19 years.

There are approximately 118 students registered in joint master programs (63 in public
administration, 48 in history and 7 in religious studies). As well, there are 79 students enrolled
in the MMFT. In total, there are over 200 graduate students who are part of existing UW or joint
graduate programs at the University of Winnipeg.

Yet given these realities, it is not clear to what extent the wider university community is aware of
the current graduate programs, nor what these programs and graduate students bring to the
University of Winnipeg. We recommend, therefore, that the visibility of current graduate
programs, along with new programs, be enhanced and encouraged. One sure method to promote
visibility is to engender a graduate student culture, as discussed in Section Two of this report.

As well, we recommend that that the university develop a campaign that celebrates the
achievements of the existing graduate programs. Graduate students who have won prestigious
scholarships (e.g., the Manitoba Graduate Scholarship, MA SSHRC) can be showcased, as can
graduate research projects culminating in profiling of some of the graduates of the existing
programs.

Moreover, it is crucial that this campaign (and any promotion of graduate education) also
increase recognition of how existing graduate programs and graduate students contribute to the
excellence in undergraduate education. Graduate students at the University of Winnipeg, are not
only students, they are teaching assistants, and research assistants.




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


      UNIQUE AND EQUITABLE- EXISTING AND NEW PROGRAMS

Unique elements of the existing programs are varied. For the joint programs with the University
of Manitoba, processes in place are likely to remain in place unless there is substantive program
overhaul agreed to by both departments at each university. All joint programs are chaired by a
full time faculty member (of the respective department – history, politics, religious studies)
which rotates between the two universities (2 to 5 year terms). The accountability structure for
the fair and effective governance of joint programs includes a Joint Discipline Committee (JDC)
comprised of faculty and students of the respective department/program. The JDC is responsible
for upholding regulations passed by the Joint Senate Committee (for joint programs) which also
have been passed by the Senate of each university.

Students who are interested in being admitted to a joint program apply through the University of
Manitoba’s application procedure. The application fee is paid to UM. Joint masters students
also register through the UM Aurora system, are eligible for awards and scholarships
administered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies (FGS) and are obligated to adhere to academic
regulations as set out by the FGS at UM (as well as UW). Students in joint programs, however,
are by all accounts students of both universities. Although a UM student card is provided to joint
master students, they have full access to UW library and computer services, and of course, take
courses at both universities. UW course numbers have corresponding UM course numbers to
allow for registration through the UM system.

For the graduate program in Marriage and Family Therapy and the three graduate programs
situated within the Faculty of Theology at the University of Winnipeg, external accountability
extends to accrediting bodies (MMFT to the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and
Family Therapy Education and the Theology degrees to the Association of Theological Schools
in the United States and Canada). As well, the Master of Divinity program is a member of the
Winnipeg Theological Cooperative along with the Canadian Nazarene College, the Canadian
Mennonite Bible College and Concord College.

Questions and issues for consideration and discussion include: How do we integrate registration
and/or record keeping of current programs with new graduate programs? To what extent should
academic graduate regulations be harmonized between current and new programs (e.g., grade
point averages)? Should a UW graduate student card also be issued to joint program students?
Given the high number of part time students in existing programs (MMFT and MPA Program)
how do we ensure access to university and student services? How to we ensure that scholarships,
funding for teaching assistantships, etc., are equitably distributed among students in current and
new programs?

      RESOURCES-PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND VIABILITY

It is recommended that financial initiatives developed to support students in new graduate
programs apply equally to existing programs, albeit adapted to fit the unique elements of current
programs. The status of students, for example, should be considered particularly with respect to
the number of part time students in some of the existing programs and the reality that many of




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                              Kirby, February 2008


the existing graduate students have full time employment (which structures their ineligibility for
many scholarships).

Various other areas have also been identified as priority for the continued success and viability
of current programs. Since existing programs have been in operation for several years, some are
at a juncture of considering program expansion or curriculum changes to meet current and
emerging realities in the discipline of study, as well as to respond to shifting demographics.
Resources such as new faculty hires, office space, and administrative support would promote
effective program development and ensure that programs are able to implement desired
objectives. For example, the MPA program has been considering substantial course
revitalization to meet emergent public sector practices, while a PhD in religion and globalization
is in development by the Faculty of Theology.

Proper academic/teaching complement is crucial to successful graduate education. Not only does
faculty have to be experts in the discipline or field to teach graduate level seminars, they are also
often asked to take on thesis students and assume administrative responsibilities in the
administration of the graduate program. And existing programs are in situations of competing
with other well-established programs throughout Canada and North America. Resources for
faculty renewal and program development, therefore, must also be forthcoming in conjunction
with funds to promote existing graduate programs.

Of course, the ability to revitalize program and faculty is largely dependent on the overall
funding available to graduate programs. It is recommended, in conjunction with Section One of
this report, that government funding for graduate education be substantially increased, and that
funds are made available to existing graduate programs.

                           d. University-Wide Financial Implications

Strong commitments have been made to all academic units that the further development of the
Graduate Studies program will not be at the expense of the undergraduate academic program.
The meetings with the departments involved have resulted in a strategy in which the programs
will develop slowly, based on the number of students for which we can provide funding support.
In essence, the overall impact for the University consists of the following items:

      PRIMARY REQUIREMENTS

STUDENT SUPPORT: It is apparent that in order to provide student support, substantial new
funds are required. For every dollar provided by the government in annual operating support, the
university must raise $20 in endowment funds. This makes graduate programming a major
customer for the University of Winnipeg Foundation and places a significant reliance on the Duff
Roblin Scholarship Fund.

FACULTY OFFICES, EQUIPMENT, ETC: Current projections, based on all four programs
being operational, are for 12 new faculty members. This means that new offices, office
furniture, equipment, computers, and various other operational necessities must be acquired.




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                             Kirby, February 2008


OFFICE/FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES: The establishment of an Office of Graduate
Studies in the short term and a Faculty of Graduate Studies in the long term will necessitate the
hiring of a Dean as well as an administrative assistant. This will require the acquisition of office
space, monies for assorted operational costs, and access to a meeting room.

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT: The requirement for administrative assistants has been
identified by the Registrar (assuming specialized manual registration), graduate program
departments, and the Office of the Associate Vice-President (Research & Graduate Studies).

STUDENT STUDY SPACE: Each graduate student will need access to a personal study space. It
is estimated that a total of 80 new graduate students over the next four years will require access
to such a space.

LIBRARY: Specialized Masters programs will require an expansion of resource material
including books, journals, and online resources. The English Department has budgeted for this
need.

EQUIPMENT: Some programs will require specialized equipment. In addition, technology
upgrades are needed to ensure that the current administrative software is capable of providing
management information on the graduate programs.

      SECONDARY REQUIREMENTS

STUDENT SOCIAL SPACE: The notion of a special place for graduate students is a critical
component of creating a graduate student culture. Constructing such a space will require capital
for equipment and renovations.

COMMUNICATIONS: There will be costs for assorted communications material.

   B. Administrative Structure and Program Articulation
We recommend that we start a process with a timeline for establishing a Faculty of Graduate
Studies (FGS) as the administrative entity responsible for all existing, newly-established,
proposed, and future graduate programs at the University of Winnipeg. A statement of the new
Faculty’s mandate, values and goals should be developed in terms consistent with the principles
of quality and accessibility articulated in the UW Mission Statement. The FGS will need a Dean
of Graduate Studies who would report to the Associate Vice-President (Research and Graduate
Studies). The Dean should be given centralized oversight of these programs and coordinate their
academic, budgetary and student services resources (including timetabling and office/teaching
space) across participating academic departments, programs, and administrative units.

 Recommendation #11. Start a process and timeline for establishing a Faculty of Graduate
 Studies that is consistent with the quality and accessibility articulated in the University of
 Winnipeg Mission Statement.




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                            Kirby, February 2008


We further recommend that the University of Winnipeg establish an operating and capital budget
line for FGS revenues and expenditures required for administrative support, program
implementation, and academic staffing, without impacting the high quality, accessibility and
resources of the University’s current undergraduate programs and departments in Arts, Science
and Education. Over time, its costs will contribute value-added resources to the University’s
academic community, such as the library, laboratory facilities, teaching capacity, and specialized
research activities for students and faculty. To this end, the University should immediately seek
a multi-year, incremental funding commitment from COPSE for operating costs of this new
Faculty inclusive of the actual costs and revenue for existing (‘joint’) graduate programs as well
as projected costs and revenue for all four newly-approved programs (presently, 1 funded; 3
unfunded). In addition, funding should be sought for anticipated program expansion, capital
costs, and scholarship / bursary programs. Consistent with longstanding principles of University
autonomy and governance practices, it is crucial that this funding be allocated to UW-FGS rather
than on a targeted program-by-program basis (see COPSE Act).

 Recommendation #12. Establish an operating and capital budget line for FGS revenues and
 expenditures for administrative support, program implementation and academic staffing
 without impacting the high quality, accessibility and resources of the UW undergraduate
 programs and departments in Arts, Science, and Education. Ensure that a 1.0 FTE is available
 immediately for administrative support.


 Recommendation #13. Seek multi-year, incremental funding from COPSE for operating costs
 of a new Faculty.

In terms of infrastructure, a new FGS should articulate with or mirror current personnel and
decision-making processes across existing departments and faculties, including the provisions for
faculty appointments, review, tenure, promotion, and workload contained in Collective
Agreements. On DCC and DRC matters, departmental Graduate Program Committees should
develop program and course proposals for approval through a new Graduate Faculty Council’s
Curriculum (cf. Honours Committee) and Appeals Committees, respectively, for consideration
by Academic Planning and Senate (with provisions for FGS representatives). Upon completion
of the Task Force Report, a Graduate Studies Advisory Committee to the Dean of Graduate
Studies should review proposals for new programs and facilitate growth of implemented
programs.

 Recommendation #14. Prepare an agreement on workload issues (teaching and supervision of
 graduate students).


 Recommendation #15. Create a Graduate Studies Advisory Committee to the Dean of
 Graduate Studies to review proposals for new programs and facilitate growth of implemented
 programs.




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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                          Kirby, February 2008


   C. Admissions and Records

           1. Admission Process

The following admissions process is recommended:

1. The applications will be received by the Graduate Assistant in the Awards Office, and he/she
will check for completeness of the documentation.
2. The Director of Admissions will check the appropriateness and authenticity of the
documentation, and will ensure that minimum academic and English Language requirements
admission have been met.
3. The Graduate Assistant in the Awards Office will retain all original documents, and send the
departments copies of everything, as their working file. With the small number of applicants for
2008-09, we were able to send the working files to the departments by February 5.
4. The department will send the file back to the Graduate Assistant in the Awards Office with a
recommendation to admit, and a recommendation for funding. The response from the
department should be received by the Graduate Assistant by March 1.
5. The Graduate Assistant in the Awards Office will prepare a letter of acceptance and
notification of funding level, which will be signed by both the AVP Research and Graduate
Studies and the Director of Admissions, and sent to the student.
6. Departments may communicate with the students directly if they choose, and may choose to
develop their own system of communication and tracking for purposes of recruitment and
retention of the students.

 Recommendation #16. Adopt the admission process of the new programs for all graduate
 programs.


       2. Student Categories

The issue of student categories was discussed, and there was general consensus about a full-time
status and a Continuing status for extra time necessary to complete. The Task Force needs to
clarify further what the definition of part-time status might be.

                  1 Year program       2 Year program          Possible Funding
                  time limit           time limit              Level
Full-time         1 year               2 years                 Full funding
Part-time         2 years              3 years                 Half funding
Continuing        3 year max           5 year max              No funding


 Recommendation #17. Identify the student categories as full-time, part-time and continuing.
 The goal is to provide sufficient support to enable students to study full time.

Students holding a first degree who are recommended to do a Pre-Master’s year should be
admitted to the University as Pre-Master’s students, but the clear desire of members of the


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                           Kirby, February 2008


TFGS was that these students should be admitted to the undergraduate program, not to Graduate
Studies. Upon successful completion of the Pre-Master’s program, their application to Graduate
Studies would be considered, but not with an up-front guarantee of admission.

 Recommendation #18. Create a pre-Masters category within the undergraduate program for
 students who need to complete specific work before applying for admission to graduate
 studies. The pre-Masters program of studies is to be designed specifically for the pre-Masters
 student by the appropriate department graduate studies committee and approved as a course of
 study by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Pre-Master’s study may be undertaken concurrently
 with English as an Additional Language training that has been recommended by Admissions
 or the department. The nature and structure of possible language training should be
 determined by the English Language Development sub-committee of the Senate Student
 Services Committee.


       3. English Language Assessment

 Recommendation # 19. Require all international applicants to successfully complete one of
 the following English Language Assessment tests: a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a
 Foreign Language) score of 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based) or a total score of 88
 (internet-based) with a score of at least 20 on each of the individual skill areas; a minimum
 score of 85% on the MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery); an overall
 minimum band score of 6.5 on the IELTS (International English Language Testing System)
 with at least 5 on each test band; an overall minimum result of 60 on the CAEL (Canadian
 Academic English Language Assessment) with at least 60 on each sub-test. Scores more than
 two years old will not be accepted. Note: Individual departments may require higher scores
 than those listed above, or scores more recent than two years.
              Applicants should arrange for their English language test score(s) to be sent
                 directly to the Graduate Studies Office. No student will be admitted until this
                 requirement has been satisfied.
              A waiver may be granted if evidence can be provided of four or more years of
                 education in a recognized secondary and/or post-secondary institution in which
                 the language of instruction is English. Requests for a waiver must be
                 submitted at the time of application and will be considered on an individual,
                 case by case basis
             NOTE: Appropriate services to assist students in improving their English language
             capabilities should be determined by the English Language Development sub-
             committee of the Senate Student Services Committee.

       4. Award Application and Disbursement

We would recommend, following the model of McGill and other places, that the Awards and
Financial Aid Office maintain a centralized list of the internal Graduate Awards administered by
The University of Winnipeg that are available for students, but that the process of application
and selection be decentralized.



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                          Kirby, February 2008


   1. Students will make application for these awards to the appropriate area, e.g. the academic
      department, the Awards & Financial Aid Office, Research & Graduate Studies.
   2. Areas undertake their selection process and notify Awards of their decisions.
   3. Awards will then notify the student and disburse the money.

The process for awarding Manitoba Graduate Scholarships is currently centralized in the AVP
Research and Graduate Studies Office along with the process for NSERC, CIHR, and SSHRC
graduate applications.

       5. Residence Requirement

 Recommendation #20. Consider the residence requirement for the graduate Masters programs
 be a minimum of 8 months and that occasional students be required to do a minimum of 60%
 of their course work at the UW.


       6. Grading
We recommended that the Graduate Programs follow the same grading scheme as the
undergraduate programs. We recommended that any Graduate student who receives a grade of
C+ or lower be put on probation in their program, and a second occurrence of a grade of C+ or
lower would result in removal from the program. In both cases, Task Force members seemed to
favour a separate grading scheme for Graduate Studies, and the establishment of a C grade as the
marker for unacceptable performance, but with the requirement of redoing the course, rather than
a probationary status in the program.

       7. Student Services Grad Studies Staffing

 Recommendation #21. Add a 0.5 FTE position to the Awards and Financial Services Office to
 maintain the centralized list of awards and add a 0.5 FTE position to the Admissions Office to
 manage the graduate student admissions.


       8. General Comments
It is clear that much more work needs to be done in the development of policies and procedures
for the Graduate Studies program. Participants in the existing Joint Master’s programs seem to
favour University of Manitoba regulations and procedures, and that well-established
environment may offer more of a good standing model than we had originally envisaged. The
programs can be unique, but the administrative handling of them might do well to follow the
tried and true from our experience in the Joint programs.

The establishment of thesis regulations and appeals procedures are two important areas we have
not yet discussed. The development of a graduate studies environment in the Student



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                           Kirby, February 2008


Information System is being included in planning for Phase II of the SIS project, followed by
conversion of the manual records which we will have been maintaining in the interim.

   D. Graduate Student Issues

       1. Funding and Fundraising
Funding for Graduate Programs will be sought from COPSE. In addition, fundraising initiatives
within and external to the University of Winnipeg can be used to further support particular
initiatives, scholarships, and bursaries in the programs. The Office of the Associate Vice-
President (Research and Graduate Studies) is currently developing a strategy for fundraising and
securing the funds to support our current and future students. The fee structure is set at $5250
(domestic/fulltime year) and $10,500 (international/fulltime year) and $500 from those student
fees is being placed in a graduate students’ scholarship fund which will be administered by
graduate students with the assistance of the AVP-RGS office for the express support of graduate
students.

       2. Recruitment Management
The committee recommends a centrally controlled recruitment management system as
enrolments build. A centralized approach insures that applications are transitioned smoothly
from the initial stages until the final acceptance into the graduation programs. Special attention
will be needed for the admission of and support for our international students and we are
working with the AVP-International on these initiatives.

In conversations with the University of Alberta, we learned that one person typically handles
1,000 applications, with 80 percent of these applying for fall term. While our graduate student
population is building, a full time person assigned to such a role could pick up other
responsibilities as they relate to graduate students. Once we reach an application pool of 500 to
750, this coordinator’s role can be re-evaluated to determine whether the current staffing level
meets the needs of the graduate program.

       3. Grad Studies Promotional Plan

      THE SHORT TERM PLAN: CREATE AWARENESS

It will be important to promote graduate programming though materials such as posters,
brochures, and fact sheets for national as well as international audiences. Building links with
industry, business, government, allied professionals, non-profit organizations, academic research
library communities, and various other community stakeholders will also be integral. A number
of events would lend themselves to further promotion of graduate events such as the University
of Winnipeg Open House. Perhaps an information booth and new events such as an Open House
for Industry or a Graduate Studies Open House would be a desirable way to decimate
information. Alumni, faculty, and enrolment services can also play a role in promoting graduate
programming.



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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                              Kirby, February 2008


      THE LONG TERM PLAN: COMPARE & STRATEGIZE

In the long term, it will be necessary to create a five year goal which may include a
comprehensive enrolment strategy for attracting ideal students for our graduate programs. In
addition, it will be important to examine what other schools are doing and learn from their
mistakes and successes. In the long term plan, the university should focus on attracting a larger
number of international students

       4. Awards and Financial Aid
The policies and details still need to be addressed. In principle, there will be support for graduate
students, and the goal is to provide sufficient funding to allow students to study full time. We
anticipate that some students will have, in hand, external funding that is greater than our base
level. Other students will require our base funding for their studies. In the next two months, we
will be specifically addressing the creation of student awards such as graduate teaching
assistantships and graduate research assistantships and how they can be managed within each of
the graduate programs.

       5. Governance
The UWSA has contacts with most Canadian Graduate student associations/unions through the
Canadian Federation of Student (CFS).

It is common for student unions and associations to create a Graduate Student Association (GSA)
within the student association by-laws and auspices. After time, when the GSA gains more
membership through program expansion and enrollment, the GSA and the students' association
would determine whether or not autonomy is an option.

According to UWSA’s President David Jacks, the University of Manitoba Students’ Union
(UMSU) and the University of Manitoba’s Association (UM GSA) followed those procedures
and were quite successful.

       6. Governance Participation
Graduate Student representation in terms of Senate and the various related Committees would be
determined through the UWSA through appointments. The UWSA current appointees are either
students at large within respective faculties, or students interested in University affairs. As such,
there may not be an established Association for at least 2-3 years while the graduate studies
program population is growing; the UWSA would insure Graduate Student representation.

       7. International Student Issues
In addition to the supports needed by international students in general, there may be specific
needs for international cohorts or individual students. Dr. Besner is investigating what would be
needed. One example is a two-day orientation currently being planned for international students
arriving in May 08 is being organized (the Saudi contingent, going into the English Language


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Realizing our Graduate Potential                                           Kirby, February 2008


Program (ELP) first).     There needs to be particular attention paid to cultural issues for
international students.

       8. International/Domestic Student Interaction/Mix
To achieve the heterogeneous mix we think is desirable, it is vital that there be a space created
where international and domestic graduate students can meet and socialize.

       9. Housing and Childcare
As part of the Science complex, the new student housing will offer townhouses in addition to
traditional student dorm housing. These townhouses would have great appeal to a graduate
student population, which typically includes more mature students who may have dependents of
their own. These three bedroom units will be ideal to meet the housing requirements of student-
parents.

It is the goal of the University’s Housing Office to create a variety of options to address the
housing needs of our diverse student population. The anticipated growth of the Graduate Student
population, along with their unique housing needs, will be considered in future student housing
strategies and designs. A dedicated Graduate Student housing space to create a sense of
community will be taken under consideration with the Community Renewal Corporation (CRC);
however, it is unlikely such a project will be undertaken until after completion of the Science
Centre in 2009/2010.

In the meantime, while the graduate student numbers are building, the Housing Office will
examine how we can integrate this new community into our existing space of dorm style rooms,
bachelor apartments, and one-bedroom apartments.

       10. Graduate Student Space
Our committee recommends duplicating the Aboriginal Student Service Centre model which
includes separate student lounge and study space and co-located offices for counselors. The
study space provides private carousels and desktop computers.         To co-locate offices for
counselors would be ideal in building rapport with the students. It also creates the opportunity
for informal meetings in the social spaces. Dedicated space is essential in building a sense of
community for these students, which in turn improves retention rates.

The current Aboriginal student population has grown to approximately 800 – 900 students.
Usage rates are not known to us as such records are not kept; however, the centre is most often
full to capacity and is perhaps more satisfactory to meet the space needs of 400 – 500 students.
It was built at an estimated cost of $500,000.

If our 4 year plan includes a graduate student population of 500 students, we would recommend
duplicating the current square footage and foot print of the Aboriginal Student Service Centre.
Estimate cost including rising construction costs: $750,000.



                                                                                              40
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                       Kirby, February 2008


In the interim, temporary space may be obtained in Graham Hall as Student Services will be
relocating to the Army Surplus store site in a newly created Student Services Hub prior to Fall
2009.

    E. Budgets and Accounting
This report is actually more of a progress report than a definitive report. The decision to proceed
with Masters programs for Aboriginal Governance (funded by COPSE) and the Bioscience and
Applied Computer Studies programs (both unfunded by COPSE) in 2008-9 has already been
made. Recruiting is underway in the departments and students are now being accepted. By way
of background, COPSE approved the establishment of the four new programs and provided
funding for one but they also provided verbal support to the notion of funding one other program
in the next fiscal year. To that end, the Bioscience program has been submitted for
consideration.

Graduate studies approval in 2007 was a major milestone. This is a continuation of the UW’s
general trend towards longer studies. The development of a graduate studies focus supports the
long-term growth of the UW. From an academic perspective, the primary concern is that the
general quality of the graduate programs will have a much more important impact on our
academic reputation than would specific undergraduate programs.

Budget predictions, based on limited COPSE support and student recruiting to date, suggest that
the financial challenges are steep. The 3-5 year requirements projections are based on two key
factors – the enrolment projections and the tuition. For projected enrolments:

Current Enrollment Projections

Projected Enrollment by Program 08-09    09-10 3     0-11        11-12
Aboriginal Governance           5          12         14          13
BioScience                      8          17         25          29
Applied Computer Science        8          16         19          22
English                         0          10         13          23
________________________________________________________________________
Total                           21         55         71          88




3
  The Saudi Arabian government previously approached us about sending students to study at the University of
Winnipeg. On January 30, 5 faculty/ administrators flew to Ottawa to speak with them again. It was concluded that
there were ~20 students that we would consider accepting into the ACS and Bioscience Masters Programs upon the
condition that they would fulfill the necessary English requirements. This meant that we had to think about the
2009-10 year differently. MSC in Bioscience faculty went back to the drawing board to formulate a course based
program instead of the previous course + thesis program. This allows the program to handle more students. The
promise of Saudi Arabian students also relieves some financial pressure as these students will come fully funded.
However, the influx of these foreign students raises some issues. The University wants a healthy mix of different
students; having such a large influx of students from one area will give the program a certain flavor.



                                                                                                              41
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                             Kirby, February 2008


Tuition

Tuition Structure                                    Tuition
International Students                               $10,500
Domestic Students (all-in, no additional fees)       $ 5,250
Continuance                                          $ 2,125

Although this is a new program and therefore is unlikely to be subject to freeze guidelines, this
will have to be confirmed by COPSE. Tuition for students in graduate studies has two impacts.
First, support per student will be greater than tuition so new entrants are likely to cost more in
student support than we gain in tuition. Second, for the purpose of COPSE requests, tuition will
likely offset operating costs. Therefore, higher enrolment and higher tuition could mean both a
greater demand for student support and a lower level of COPSE funding.

Since the support level is at least partly based on tuition fees, there is some argument for
discussions with COPSE re: Grant criteria, and the relationship between tuition and support prior
to finalizing.

          1. Student Support

In general, the UW must provide support for graduate students. This is both necessary to attract
students and essential to allow the students to make graduate studies a full-time occupation. In
addition to direct university support, graduate students may receive funding from sponsors,
external scholarships, stipendiary teaching duties or research grants. The TFGS considers that a
minimum requirement from all sources needs to be determined, and then UW can provide
additional funds to ensure that all students enrolled meet the minimum financial requirements.
There are 4 major unknowns that make predicting the requirements difficult at this time. These
are:
      What is the minimum requirement?
      How many students will arrive with external funding?
      Will there be some sort of pro-rata adjustment for such extra funding as stipendiary duties
       or research grants – or will they be deducted dollar for dollar?
      Will we be competing for exceptional students by increasing the offer in some cases?

At the moment, the TFGS is considering minimum requirements of $15,000, 1/3 of students are
externally funded, and we can partially offset support through decreases in the stipendiary
budgets, shows that overall support requirements increase from $275,000 in 2008-09 to $931,000
in 2011-12.

The base revenue sources for the reminded are Manitoba Government Scholarships, The Duff
Roblin Scholarships, UW Entrance Scholarship funds, stipendiary budgets used to hire students,
unrestricted funds transferred from the University of Winnipeg Foundation, and funds from the
International Office. Overall, these are currently projected to rise from $172,000 in 2008-09 to
$370,000 in 2011-12. It is anticipated that transfers from unrestricted funds will cover the deficit
in 2008-09 but it won’t come close by 2011-12 when the total deficit will exceed $500,000.



                                                                                                 42
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                              Kirby, February 2008


Student fee structure: Sandra Kirby proposed taking $500/student and putting it into a graduate
scholarship fund. International students would pay an additional $500 in tuition to cover this
cost. The $500 for Canadian students would be taken from current tuition amount.

       2. Faculty-Staff Requirements
Faculty requirements for teaching courses are relatively small. The proposal assumes that faculty
will be given credit for thesis supervision in order to estimate the faculty requirements. If this
were, in fact, to become a policy rather than simply a costing assumption, it would affect the
faculty time for any or all of Theology, MMFT, and the Joint Masters programs. It could also
influence issues like faculty time for tutorials and the required overall workload.

It is anticipated, as well, that this program will increase expectations for a faculty of graduate
studies and for departmental administrative support. Both costs are included in the proposal.

       3. Operating Revenue
The major unknown in Operating Revenue is COPSE. This raises three problems. First, COPSE
funding for special projects in generally 2-3 years, after which the funding rolls into general
revenue. A slow roll-out means that the programs won’t be mature, but rather, still expanding
when funding is completed and the programs later costs will add pressure to our operating
budget without revenue. Second, there are significant secondary costs associated with the
expansion of graduate studies that need to be included in the overall cost but may or may not be
eligible for COPSE funding, (registration, faculty offices, study space, application of new
initiatives to current graduate programs, overall administration structure for graduate programs,
student lounge, etc.). Third, the question of student tuition vs. student support dramatically alters
the cost equation fro purposes of the COPSE submission. Therefore, it is critically important that
the submission to COPSE be based on an overall approach rather than a series of individual
department submissions.

 Recommendation #22. Guide centrally any COPSE funding and COPSE requests for funding
 to help offset longer-term requirements and protect against post-grant jumps in expenditures.

       4. Sustainability
The current projections are for 12 new faculty, with offices and equipment, and study space for
88 graduate students at the end of year 4. There are environmental impacts to this (Mike Burch
will be working on these), and an assessment will be required and ready in time for the final
TFGS report.

       5. Recommendations

Gerry Munt, in consultations with the sub-committee and the R&GS office, is preparing a 3-5
year plan and together we are recommending that it be based upon:
    Slow build-up of enrollment consistent with academic requirements


                                                                                                  43
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                           Kirby, February 2008


      The decision to proceed with the programs for Aboriginal Governance, Applied
       Computer Science and Bioscience has already been made
      Finding for student support must be in place and student eligibility for support must be
       based on the amount available (i.e. not enroll more funding-eligible students than there is
       funding to provide)
      Criteria for student support is to be developed following the tabling of the TFGS report
       (end March). Several models are being considered. NOTE: One element that must be
       included is carry-over. Unexpended student support funds available in each department
       will be available to that department in future years… no penalty for not expending funds.
      COPSE funding and COPSE requests for funding must be guided centrally to help offset
       longer-term requirements and protect against post-grant jumps in expenditures.

The Committee also:
    established the financial reporting infrastructure in the general ledger accounts system as
      well as the financial reports for budgets etc;
    provided assistance in the preparation of the 2008-2009 budgets in consultation with the
      Department Heads of each graduate program;
    assisted in the preparation of a high-level 5 year financial plan for each program;
    Joint Masters Programs – financial implications
    Theology and MMFT - financial considerations
    Assessed and assisted in the development of an action plan related to the following
      issues:
             i.   Tuition Fees and Enrolment projections for each program
            ii. Funding strategies for students – scholarships funded by the Foundation and
                  other sources
           iii. Capital requirements for faculty and students
           iv.    Funding for research grants
            v.    Additional Government support
           vi.    Funding strategies for the University with COPSE




                                                                                               44
Realizing our Graduate Potential                                                 Kirby, February 2008


    F. Administrative Structure and Program
    Item                            Discussion Points                   Action/Responsibility
Teaching &       --Graduate teaching is qualitatively different from      -Since there are
Supervision of   undergraduate teaching.                                  workload issues that
Graduate         --Graduate teaching must be part of load.                are of concern to
Students         --Graduate supervision must be recognized as part        Senior Administration
                 of workload.                                             and UWFA, this
                 --Any extra administrative load will hopefully be        requires a JCC (or
                 taken up by new faculty added to deal with extra         equivalent) which
                 teaching load.                                           should be struck by the
                                                                          VP(Academic).
Administrative   --Graduate studies needs visibility and recognition.     - Appointment of an
Entity for       --Graduate Studies needs commitment of resources         Acting Dean of
Graduate Studies from province, and not just reallocation of funds        Graduate Studies.
                 within University; a separate faculty would make it      -Start process for
                 easier to clearly identify direct costs. The University establishing Faculty of
                 of Winnipeg needs to be on an equal playing field        Graduate Studies.
                 with other graduate schools (i.e. University of
                 Manitoba).
                 --Graduate studies requires a full time advocate to
                 provide leadership, vision, and fund-raising.
                 --Growth of graduate studies must be accompanied
                 by corresponding growth in research funding which
                 will put additional stress on already overburdened
                 Research Office.
Job Search       --We need to establish clear general criteria and        --No action required.
Committees       process for admission of faculty to Faculty Graduate
                 Studies.
                 --The specific criteria in each discipline will be
                 determined by departments.
                 --Onus should be left on the department to ensure
                 DPC has sufficient expertise to evaluate potential
                 faculty where graduate supervision is expected.
                 --The Dean of Graduate Studies could be part of the
                 interview process, at the request of the department.
                 --Where appropriate, contract offer and admission to
                 the Faculty of Graduate Studies should occur
                 simultaneously.
Program          --The Graduate Faculty Curriculum committee
Integrity        should be established to deal with courses, (parallel
                 to GFC Curriculum Committee);
                 --The FGS determines general theses process to
                 ensure quality (e.g. provides Chair for thesis
                 defense, rules regarding external examiners, etc.)




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