Using the strategies to Figure Out Unknown Words by pptfiles

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									Using the Strategies to Figure
    Out Unknown Words
          Ashley Bragg
      There are six main strategies that help
     children find out words they do not know.
1.    Look at the picture.
2.    Get your mouth ready for the first sound.
3.    Find a word or part you know.
4.    Cover the ending.
5.    Skip the word and come back.
6.    Always think, “Does the word make
      sense, look right, and sound right?”
          Look at the Picture
The first strategy a child should use when he
 comes to a word he doesn’t know is look
 at the picture.

Ex) The lion on the
hill is looking over
the lion in the grass.
        Get your mouth ready.
This means the student should get their mouth
   ready for the first letter or sound of the word. As
   they are doing this they should be thinking what
   would make sense.
Example: The dog barked when the children
   passed by the yard.
If they do not know the word, barked, they should
   get their mouth ready for the b sound and think
   what would make sense right there in the
   sentence.
Find a word or parts of a word that
            you know.
In many words, children can find parts or
  smaller words that they recognize inside
  the word that they do not know.
**Prompt the child to use their fingers to find
  parts or words within the word that they
  know.

Examples: became, delightful, independent
                Cover the Ending
Often, a word looks much larger and much more
  confusing when an ending is added to the word.
Endings that are added to words are:
                                   -ed
                                   -ing
                                    -s
                                    -ly
If a child comes to a word they do not know, and the word has an
    ending, have the students cover the ending to help them figure out
    the word.
Example: The boy walked to the other side of the building.
 Skip the word and come back.
It is alright for the students to skip the word they do
    not know and come back, but it is very
  important for them to go back to the word.

Once they go back, they should think, “What would
 make sense there?” After they come up with a
 word, they should ask themselves, “Does that
 word look right or do the letters match how it
 sounds and does it sound right?”
     Example of “Skip the Word and
             Come Back”
The boy’s family came to visit the day before
  Christmas bringing lots of presents for everyone.

1st- read the sentence skipping the word they do not know. (presents)

2nd- go back and think of a word that would make sense. Let’s say pudding.
Ex. Reread the sentence and think pudding (it makes sense).

3rd- see if the word sounds right. (pudding sounds right)

4th- see if the word looks right. (pudding does not look right because the word
    does not have a d or an ing at the end.

SO…
Go back and repeat steps 2 through 4.
All of these strategies should be used to
help students figure out unknown words.
If a student is reading and cannot figure out
   a word, DO NOT simply tell them the
   word. Help them to figure it out by using
   these strategies.

*If one strategy does not work, prompt the
   student to use another.
           EXAMPLE USING ALL
              STRATEGIES
The doctor told the lady important news
 about her child’s accident.
Strategy #1: use the picture (the picture probably won’t help with
   this word because it’s hard to show something being
   important, in a picture.
SO…prompt student to use another strategy.
Strategy #2: get your mouth ready
The student should get his mouth ready for the i sound, but that
   may or may not help to figure out this word.
SO…prompt student to use another strategy.
           EXAMPLE USING ALL
            STRATEGIES (cont)
Strategy #3 Find a word or part of a word that you know.
The student may use their fingers to find parts or words in
   important that they know.
They know or, so hopefully they can put together port. They
   should also see the word an or ant. After the student finds
   these familiar parts, he may or may not be able to figure out
   the word. If not…
Prompt the student to use another strategy.
           EXAMPLE USING ALL
            STRATEGIES (cont.)
Strategy #4 Look to cover an ending.
The word important does not have an ending; therefore, this
   strategy may not be too helpful with this particular word.

SO… prompt student to use another strategy

Strategy #5 Skip the word and come back: think what would
   make sense, does it sound right, and does it look right?

After using these strategies, the student will probably have
   discovered the word important on their own.
  It should make sense, look right,
           and sound right!

**Each time your child thinks they have
  discovered what a word is, have them
  reread using the word to make sure it
  makes sense, sounds right, and looks right
  (the letters seem to match the sound).
They will develop these strategies, and
  be able to use them on their own!
Although it seems that it would be much easier to simply
   tell the students the word they don’t know, it actually
   does them more harm than good.

After prompting your student to use these strategies, they
   will soon be able to know which strategies to use to help
   themselves when seeing words they do not know. This
   is what makes students better readers; knowing how to
   help themselves find out unknown words.

								
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