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Self-Study Report - Saginaw Valley State University

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					SAGINAW VALLEY
STATE UNIVERSITY




  Self-Study Report




   Prepared for the Commission
on Institutions of Higher Education
of the North Central Association of
       Colleges and Schools




                                 JANUARY 1994
                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS


PREFACE

Purpose of the Self-Study Report ......................................................................................................... 1
Self-Study Process ................................................................................................................................ 1
Organization of the Self-Study Report ................................................................................................. 2



INTRODUCTION

Overview of Saginaw Valley State University ..................................................................................... 3
Accreditation History ............................................................................................................................ 5
Significant Program Developments Since 1987 Accreditation ............................................................ 6
Responses to the North Central Association Team Report ................................................................... 7
Unique Dimensions of Saginaw Valley State University ................................................................... 10
    Commuter Students ...................................................................................................................... 10
    Student Profile .............................................................................................................................. 12
    Geographic Region Served of SVSU ........................................................................................... 16
    Valley Library Consortium .......................................................................................................... 16
    Marshall Fredericks Sculpture Gallery ........................................................................................ 17
    Regional Math/Science Center ..................................................................................................... 17
    Earth Vision - Environmental Education: An EPA Priority ........................................................ 18
    Project SOLVE ............................................................................................................................. 18



PART ONE:
                     The Mission and Goals of Saginaw Valley State University

1.1 Early Mission Statements ............................................................................................................. 19
    Five Early Objectives ................................................................................................................... 19
    1980 Character and Goals of SVSC............................................................................................. 20
    1986 Mission Statement............................................................................................................... 21

1.2 Institutional Mission and Goals.................................................................................................... 22
    Assessment of Mission and Goals ............................................................................................... 22
    The Mission of Saginaw Valley State University ........................................................................ 23


1.3 Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 24




                                                                          i
PART TWO:
                                 The Organization, Resources and Programs of
                                       Saginaw Valley State University

2.1 Organizational Structure and Systems ......................................................................................... 25
    Organization ................................................................................................................................. 25
    Governance .................................................................................................................................. 28
       Student Government ............................................................................................................... 30
       Labor Organization ................................................................................................................. 31

2.2 Human Resources ......................................................................................................................... 32
    Students ........................................................................................................................................ 32
    Faculty.......................................................................................................................................... 33
    Staff .............................................................................................................................................. 35
    Advisory Board ............................................................................................................................ 37
    Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 37

2.3 Financial Resources...................................................................................................................... 38
    SVSU Foundation ........................................................................................................................ 41
    University Expenditures............................................................................................................... 42
    Budget Considerations ................................................................................................................. 45
    Advisory Board ............................................................................................................................ 45
    Summary ...................................................................................................................................... 46

2.4 Physical Facilities ......................................................................................................................... 47
    On-Campus Facilities................................................................................................................... 47
    Future Growth .............................................................................................................................. 50

2.5 Support and Equipment Resources .............................................................................................. 50
    Melvin J. Zahnow Library and Audio Visual Services................................................................ 50
    Computer Services ....................................................................................................................... 55
    Other Support Services ................................................................................................................ 59

2.6 Educational Programs .................................................................................................................. 61
    College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences..................................................................................... 61
    College of Business and Management ......................................................................................... 65
    College of Education.................................................................................................................... 68
    College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences .......................................................................... 70
    College of Science, Engineering and Technology ....................................................................... 73
    Supporting Academic Programs .................................................................................................. 74
       Honors Program ...................................................................................................................... 74
       General Education ................................................................................................................... 75
    Faculty Research and Scholarly Activities .................................................................................. 77




                                                                            ii
2.7 Support Services ........................................................................................................................... 80
    Minority Services ......................................................................................................................... 80
    Conference Bureau....................................................................................................................... 80
    Evening Services .......................................................................................................................... 80
    International Programs ................................................................................................................. 81
    Recruitment and Admissions ....................................................................................................... 82
    Orientation ................................................................................................................................... 82
    Student Life and Campus Activities ............................................................................................ 83
    Lifelong Resource Center ............................................................................................................ 85
    Academic Support Services ......................................................................................................... 85
    Scholarships and Student Financial Aid Counseling Center ........................................................ 88
    Counseling Center ........................................................................................................................ 90
    Health Services ............................................................................................................................. 90
    Programs for Substance Abusers.................................................................................................. 91
    Registrar's Office .......................................................................................................................... 92
    Office of Marketing Research and Information Services............................................................. 92
    Graphics Center ............................................................................................................................ 93
    Continuing Education ................................................................................................................... 93
    Business Industrial Development Institute (BIDI) ....................................................................... 93
    Alumni Relations.......................................................................................................................... 94



PART THREE:
               Accomplishment of Purposes at Saginaw Valley State University

3.1 Assessing Institutional Mission and Goals................................................................................... 95
    Introduction .................................................................................................................................. 95
    Institutional Purpose Goal............................................................................................................ 95
    Funding from Outside Sources .................................................................................................... 98
    Research Growth Compared with Overall SVSU Growth ........................................................ 100
    Library and Laboratory Support for Research ........................................................................... 101


3.2 Prospective System of Assessment ............................................................................................ 105
    Early Efforts ............................................................................................................................... 105
    Creation of the University Task Force on Assessment .............................................................. 107
    Current Assessment Efforts ....................................................................................................... 108
       Arts and Behavioral Sciences ............................................................................................... 110
       Education .............................................................................................................................. 113
       Nursing and Allied Health Sciences ..................................................................................... 114
       Sciences, Engineering and Technology ................................................................................ 114
       Business and Management .................................................................................................... 115
    Academic Program Review Cycle - Policies and Procedures ................................................... 116



                                                                         iii
PART FOUR:
                    Planning for the Future of Saginaw Valley State University

4.1 Planning at Saginaw Valley State University ............................................................................ 119
    Background ................................................................................................................................ 119
    Context for Planning .................................................................................................................. 119
    Short Term Planning .................................................................................................................. 121
    Long Term Planning .................................................................................................................. 121


4.2 Results of Self-Study Process .................................................................................................... 122
    Strengths and Challenges ........................................................................................................... 122
    Issues for the Next Decade ........................................................................................................ 129


4.3 Summary .................................................................................................................................... 130




Affiliation Status of Saginaw Valley State University ..................................................................... 131




                                                                        iv
                                                LIST OF FIGURES

Figure Title                                                                                                                    Page No.
   No.
   1 Access Map ......................................................................................................................... 4

     2    Age of SVSU Students Fall 1993 ..................................................................................... 11

     3    SVSU Students by Levels 1985-93................................................................................... 12

     4    Ethnic Origins of SVSU Students Fall 1993..................................................................... 13

     5    1993 Enrollment by County .............................................................................................. 14

     6    Undergraduate Majors by College Fall 1993 .................................................................... 15

     7    Graduate Majors by College Fall 1993 ............................................................................. 16

     8    Administrative Professional Personnel Fall 1993 ............................................................. 35

     9    Full Time Employees by Employment Category.............................................................. 36

     10 SVSU General Fund Revenue Sources 1977-78 .............................................................. 39

     11 SVSU General Fund Revenue Sources 1992-93 .............................................................. 40

     12 General Fund Budget Fiscal Year 1985-86 ...................................................................... 42

     13 General Fund Budget Fiscal Year 1992-93 ...................................................................... 43

     14 General Fund Budget Fiscal Year 1992 ............................................................................ 44

     15 SVSU Physical Facilities Historical Development/Current Status ................................... 48

     16 Office of Sponsored Programs .......................................................................................... 78

     17 No. of Students Completing Financial Aid Application by June 1................................... 89

     18 SVSU Foundation Support for Faculty Research/Scholarship 1985-92 ........................... 97

     19 Grant Awards by Fiscal Year ............................................................................................ 98

     20 Hours of Faculty Release Time: Academic Year ............................................................. 99




                                                                      v
                                           LIST OF APPENDICES


APPENDIX A ................................................................................................................................. 132

     NCA Steering Committee Members .......................................................................................... 133

     NCA Subcommittee Members ................................................................................................... 134



APPENDIX B ................................................................................................................................. 138

     Organizational Chart of Saginaw Valley State University ........................................................ 138

     SVSU Board of Control Membership ........................................................................................ 139



APPENDIX C ................................................................................................................................. 142

     History of Saginaw Valley State University Buildings ............................................................. 143



APPENDIX D ................................................................................................................................. 144

     Task Force on Assessment Time Line ........................................................................................... 145



APPENDIX E ................................................................................................................................. 149

     The General Institutional Requirements .................................................................................... 150



APPENDIX F ................................................................................................................................. 155

     Basic Institutional Data Forms ................................................................................................... 156




                                                                       vi
         LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS



AACSB      American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business
AASCU      American Association of State Colleges and Universities
ABET       Accreditation Board of Engineering & Technology
ABS        College of Arts & Behavioral Sciences
ACS        American Chemical Society
ACT        American College Testing
ALA        American Library Association
AOTA       American Occupational Therapy Association
A/P        Administrative/Professional (staff member)


BAS        Bachelor of Applied Studies
BBTTP      Bilingual/Bicultural Teacher Training Program
BIDI       Business Industrial Development Institute
B&M        College of Business & Management
BSN        Bachelor of Science in Nursing
BSW        Bachelor of Social Work


CAPC       Curriculum & Academic Policies Committee
CD-ROM     Compact Disc Read Only Memory

CIESIN     Consortium for International Earth Science Information Network
COMP       College Outcome Measures Program
CSWE       Council of Social Work Education




                          vii
ED      College of Education
EIT     Engineer in Training
EPA     Environmental Protection Agency


FIPSE   Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary Education
FTIC    First Time in College (students)
FTE     First-Time Entry (students)


GPA     Grade Point Average
GRE     Graduate Record Examination


IEPE    Institute for Environmental Policy and Education


LAC     Learning Assistance Center
LEAD    Leadership Education and Development
LEP     Limited English Proficient
LTFP    Long Term Financial Planning


MAGB    Michigan Association of Governing Boards of State Universities
MAT     Master of Arts in Teaching
MBA     Master of Business Administration
MEA     Michigan Education Association
MIS     Management Information System
MLA     Modern Language Association
MSN     Master of Science in Nursing
MTEG    Manufacturers' Technology Exchange Group
MTTC    Michigan Test for Teacher Certification




                       viii
NAHS          College of Nursing & Allied Health Sciences
NCA           North Central Association
NCATE         National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
NCHEMS        National Center for Higher Education Management Systems
NCLEX         National Council of Licensing of Examination
NEA           National Education Association
NLN           National League for Nursing
NSF           National Science Foundation


OCLC          On-line Computer Library Center
OFP           Office of Federal Programs (of AASCU)
OIP           Office of International Programs
OPAC          On-line Public Access Catalog
OTR           Occupational Therapist, Registered


PHE           Physical and Health Education
PPC           Professional Practices Committee


SET           College of Science, Engineering & Technology
SOLVE         Science Outreach Leadership Venture for Excellence
SOS           Save Outdoor Sculpture
SVSC          Saginaw Valley State College
SVSU          Saginaw Valley State University


VLC           Valley Library Consortium


West Campus   Business Innovation and Professional Development Center




                             ix
                                           PREFACE
                        Purposes of the Self-Study Report

       The Saginaw Valley State University 1992-93 Self-Study Report was written to demonstrate
that the University has met the North Central Association for Colleges and Schools criteria for
continued accreditation. In addition, this Report demonstrates that the University has pursued and
achieved its accreditation goals during the past eight years.

       The Saginaw Valley State University self-study process was structured to involve as many
campus community members as possible to promote openness among University constituents and to
share information. Finally, the Self-Study Report provided the campus community with opportunity
to define the University's present and future qualities, its roles, and to clarify understanding about its
purposes and directions. This study will serve as a valuable point for continued planning as the
University strives for excellence in the next century.



                                     Self -Study Process

       Saginaw Valley State University began preparations for its institutional review in March
1991 when the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Associate Vice President for Academic
Affairs attended the North Central Association Annual Meeting in Chicago to become more
informed about the continuing accreditation process. In August 1992, President Eric Gilbertson
appointed the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs to serve as Institutional
Reaccreditation Coordinator and Chair of the Self-Study Steering Committee. At the same time, the
President appointed a 12-member Steering Committee to organize and conduct the self-study. Each
Steering Committee member served as a chair or co-chair of a subcommittee. Each chair selected
subcommittee members from across the campus community .The Steering Committee and the
subcommittee members are listed in Appendix A.




                                                    1
       In March 1993, three members of the Steering Committee and the Vice President for
Academic Affairs attended the North Central Association Annual Meeting in Chicago to participate
in workshops and gather materials related to the accreditation process. During the fall and winter
semesters of 1992-1993, the Steering Committee met bi-weekly to discuss processes, coordinate and
formulate information-gathering strategies, plan for campus forums, and receive updates on the
subcommittee progress. Subcommittees held five campus forums during the 1992- 93 academic year
to review collected information for the preliminary report and collect additional input. Following
these forums, the Steering Committee discussed the subcommittees' preliminary reports. The self -
study coordinator prepared several preliminary drafts which were reviewed by the Steering
Committee during the summer 1993. A complete Self-Study Report draft was distributed to each
faculty member, student government leaders, and the administrative and professional staff before the
fall 1993 semester. This report reflects information gathered during campus-wide forums during the
fall semester 1993.



                      Organization of the Self-Study Report

       The Self-Study Report begins with this Preface and an Introduction, followed by four main
sections that address the four evaluation criteria for continuing accreditation. The Introduction
provides:

       1) Overview of the University and its Service Area

       2) Review of the Institution's Accreditation History

       3) Summary of Significant Developments since the last comprehensive accreditation review

       4) Responses to the concerns expressed by the North Central Association visiting team in
               the last comprehensive evaluation

       5) Information about several aspects of Saginaw Valley State University

       Following the main report is the Statement of Affiliation Status and all appended materials,
including the General Institutional Requirements and Basic Institutional Data Forms.




                                                   2
                                  INTRODUCTION

           Overview of Saginaw Valley State University
       SVSU was founded as a private institution named Saginaw Valley College in 1963. It is the
newest of the state's universities. The name of the College was changed to Saginaw Valley State
College in 1965 to reflect its status as a state-supported public college. The name again changed on
November 4, 1987, as the state of Michigan authorized the renaming of this institution to Saginaw
Valley State University.

       Saginaw Valley State University has enjoyed continuous growth since its inception in 1963.
Classes began in 1964 with 119 students, and enrollment has grown steadily to 6,975 in fall 1993. In
the recent past (fal11981 through the present), enrollment has grown an average of 5% per year. As
the only public four-year institution of higher education serving East Central Michigan, SVSU
serves as an educational, public service, and research resource for the greater Saginaw valley.

       The majority of SVSU’s students come from the surrounding area, which has a population
base of approximately 400,000. About one-ha1f of SVSU students are in the traditional age range for
college students; the nontraditional students often have labor-market experience and are preparing
for occupational change. Over 90% of the students commute to the campus.

       The institution's growth is a result of many factors, including generous private support that
enabled the institution to purchase its campus site and begin holding classes. Private support has also
enabled the institution to expand its physical facilities to accommodate new programs. Continued
private support has prompted the development of academic programs and co-curricular activities that
draw students and nonstudents alike to the campus.

       The institution's growth has also been a result of the attractiveness of strong academic
programs, small class sizes (averaging 24 students), reasonable tuition and fees, and diverse
extracurricular activities. The University's location amid three cities (Saginaw, Bay City and
Midland) combines a rural atmosphere and urban advantages. The University is large enough to
support a variety of learning opportunities while also offering personalized attention and
considerable interaction between students and faculty. International exchange of professors and
students brings the added dimension of other cultures to the campus.


                                                   3
                                               Figure 1

       The institution has grown in its public service and research capabilities over the past several
years. Many of these activities are detailed in later sections of this Report.

       SVSU consists of five colleges: the College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences, the College of
Business and Management, the College of Education, the College of Nursing and Allied Health
Sciences, and the College of Science, Engineering and Technology. Presently, students are enrolled
in more than 60 programs of study leading to bachelor's and master's degrees.

       The University has 176 full-time faculty, 82% of whom hold doctoral or terminal master's
degrees. Many faculty have received local, state or national recognition for their work, including the
achievement of Fulbright Fellowships.

        Since 1986, several major buildings have been constructed: Brown Hall which houses
classrooms and faculty offices; a Science Building which has state-of-the-art laboratories; the
Zahnow Library which has expanded holdings and facilities by 50%; the Arbury Fine Arts Building
and the Marshall Fredericks Sculpture Gallery; and a student apartment complex. In addition, a
physical education complex, Ryder Center, has an indoor track, an arena for basketball, a
multipurpose area, an Olympic-size swimming pool and racquetball courts, as well as classrooms
and office facilities.

        The University is located on a 782-acre site three miles south of I- 75 on M-84, Bay Road at
Pierce. (See Figure 1.) Its central location to three cities and easy access via freeway from other
communities has enabled many to commute to and from the campus and has contributed to the
University's growth.




                                                   4
                                 Accreditation History


       Saginaw Valley State College became a candidate for accreditation with the North Central
Association in 1968. Accreditation at the baccalaureate level was granted in 1970. Following a
comprehensive NCA visit in 1974, SVSC was granted accreditation at the master's level (with
special reference to the Master of Arts in Teaching, MAT). In 1977, SVSC was granted accreditation
for its Master of Business Administration. The next comprehensive visit was in October 1979.
Following this visit, the Commission continued accreditation at the master's degree-granting level
with the requirement that all new master's Degree Programs be granted approval by the Commission
prior to initiation. In March 1984, SVSC requested approval of a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice /
Political Science beginning in the winter semester of 1985. This request was approved by the
Commission in June 1984. Approval of a Master of Science in Nursing was granted in 1989.

       In 1986-87, SVSU received an NCA comprehensive evaluation. The commission acted to
continue accreditation with a request for a focused visit in 1989-90. The NCA team conducted a
Focused Evaluation on February 12 and 13, 1990, to determine whether there had been improvement
in the relationship between the administration and the faculty since the 1986 on-site visit. The team
recommended that the Focused Evaluation had been satisfactorily completed. They stated that the
institution had markedly improved the relationships between administration and the Faculty
Association. (This relationship will be described in more detail in the section devoted to responses to
the North Central Association Team report.) The Team agreed that SVSU met all the requirements
for continued accreditation and had the capability to continue to meet the requirements of the
Commission. The next comprehensive visit was then scheduled for 1993-1994.




                                                   5
                      Significant Program Developments
                                  Since 1987 Accreditation
Accreditation for the Engineering Programs:      Accreditation Board for Engineering &
                                                 Technology (ABET) 1991

Accreditation for the College of Education:      National Council for Accreditation of Teacher
                                                 Education (NCATE) 1992

Accreditation for the MSN Program:               National League for Nursing (NLN) 1992

Reaccreditation of Social Work Department:       Council of Social Work Education (CSWE) 1990

New Baccalaureate Programs:                      Bachelor of Applied Studies (BAS) 1993
                                                 Special Education 1993
                                                 Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR) 1993

Outreach:                                        Master of Business Administration (MBA)
                                                 Faculty going to Taiwan and Taiwanese students
                                                 coming to SVSU 1991



                     Significant Staff and Administration
                                     Changes Since 1987

      Retirement of President Dr. Jack M. Ryder in 1989; Dr. Eric R. Gilbertson appointed August
       1989
      Resignation of Dean of Arts and Behavioral Sciences; Dr. Judith B. Kerman appointed 1991
      Resignation of Dean of Education; Dr. Ellen Curtis- Pierce appointed 1992
      Resignation of Library Director; Jean Houghton appointed 1992
      Retirement of Dean of Business and Management; Search in process


                  New Positions and Program Expansions
                                              Since 1987

Program expansions, in response to the University-wide long-range plan published in 1991, led to
the following new positions:
      Full-time Director of International Programs 1992:                        Lee Heywood Pelton
      Full-time Director of Multicultural Programs / Affirmative Action 1990:      Dr. Roosevelt
       Ruffin

                                                  6
                Responses to the North Central Association
                                        Team Report


       In Report of a Visit to Saginaw Valley State College (November 1986), the North Central
Association evaluation team identified four areas of concern. This section will describe each of
these four areas of concern and summarize the action taken by the University in response to each.
Some of these topics will be discussed in additional detail elsewhere in the Self-Study Report.



1.     “The adversarial relationship which exists between the administration and the Faculty
       Association has hampered both confidence in administration policies and effective
       communication between faculty and administration. This situation may well threaten
       the institution's ability to reach its full potential in serving its constituents.”




               Because of the concern about the adversarial relationship, a focused visit was
       recommended: “An evaluation is scheduled for 1989-90 focused on the relationship which
       exists between the administration and the faculty.” A Self-Study For The Focused
       Evaluation was submitted in December of 1989, and the visit took place in February 1990.
       The focus visit team held interviews that included a broad cross- section of faculty and staff
       in relation to the issue. A total of 26 individuals were interviewed, including the former
       president, the current president, current and immediate past presidents of the Faculty
       Association, Board of Control members, deans, department chairs, faculty, and self -study
       committee members. The team reported that the interviews “clearly show that the
       relationships that exist between the administration and the Faculty Association at this time
       are considerably improved since the Evaluation Team Report of November 3-5, 1986.” Since
       1990, the faculty and administration have successfully negotiated two contracts, one for the
       1990-93 period and the second for the 1993-96 period.




                                                  7
2.   “Planning at SVSC does not effectively integrate budget allocations with the planning
     process. The administration also needs to respond more specifically to requests for
     priority consideration, and to the specific planning documents submitted by all
     academic and administrative units.”




            In 1990, President Gilbertson initiated a new planning approach, which began by
     establishing the Planning Task Force made up of 25 people affiliated with the University.
     The Planning Task Force included students, faculty, alumni, deans, controller, physical plant
     staff, registrar, coordinator of minority services, vice president for academic affairs, vice
     president for public affairs, and Board of Fellows members. Eight focus groups were formed
     composed of the task force members to deal with specific identified dimensions of the
     University. The focus groups addressed the following areas:

     1) Undergraduate Education                             2) Cultural Diversity

     3) Campus environment and culture / student life 4) Human Resources

     5) Public Service                                      6) Graduate Education

     7) Technology                                          8) International Programs




     Each focus group presented its findings and recommendations to the Planning Task Force.
     The entire Planning Task Force dealt with two additional areas: campus physical planning
     and the Consortium for International Earth Science and Information Network (CIESIN). The
     Planning Task Force held hearings with all parts of the campus community invited. The final
     report included findings and recommendations and is presented in the document entitled
     Promises to Keep: Towards a University of Vitality, Distinction and Pu1pose. This document
     will be available for inspection by site visitors. Among the results of the planning process is a
     more systematic identification of hiring priorities to meet programs' needs. The President
     also holds regular meetings with representatives of the Faculty Association Budget Advisory
     Committee to discuss institutional priorities.




                                                 8
3.   “The Academic Vice President and the faculty should jointly address the issue of
     enrollment management, resource availability and the issue of the number of overloads
     and part-time faculty being utilized to meet student enrollment demands.”




             Since this concern was identified, the University has taken a number of actions. In the
     1989 report, it was noted that admissions standards were voted by the faculty and accepted
     by the administration. In 1989, the proportion of first-time-in-college (FTIC) students with
     exceptionally low-grade point averages (below 2.0) fell to 1.2% (8 students out of 681).
     These students were admitted because they demonstrated other characteristics that were
     desirable and part of SVSU' s overall mission and goals. In addition, the University abides by
     the 1989 NCAA Proposition 48 which mandates and raises academic standards for student
     athletes.

             Since 1989, there have been selected admissions for certain students with low GPAs
     and beginning in 1990, the University has required these students to participate in the
     Summer Challenge Program. The University started this program in response to requests by
     high-school counselors and parents to extend opportunity to underachieving students. The
     Summer Challenge Program enrolls approximately 20- 25 students per year and provides
     intensive supervision, assistance with study skills, and a head start on the academic
     experience. Partly related to the Summer Challenge Program's existence, the number of
     FTICs with low GPAs increased to 20-25 students.

             In 1989, the Enrollment Management Committee was formed. This committee has
     subsequently been replaced by the Enrollment Planning Team composed of the Vice
     President for Public Affairs (Chair), Directors of Institutional Research, Admissions,
     Academic Advising, the Controller, the Registrar and an Academic Dean. The number of
     course sections to be offered each semester is controlled by the Academic Vice President.
     Usually the number of sections remains constant or is limited to an increase of one or two
     percent. The approach has been one of “controlled growth” with modest increases in the
     number of faculty in order to meet needs. The amount of overload teaching is contractually
     defined so that no faculty


                                                9
       member is permitted to teach more than 30 hours in an academic year. Pressures continue
       from students and other segments of the University to increase offerings; however, the Vice
       President for Academic Affairs is committed to matching offerings with qualified faculty and
       adequate classroom resources.



4.     “The Academic Vice President and the faculty should work cooperatively to address
       campus-wide concerns about the current General Education requirements.”




               Following a period of study and debate, the Vice President for Academic Affairs
       encouraged the Curriculum Committee to complete the task of general education revisions. A
       completed plan was submitted to the faculty in March 1987. The plan included 39 credit
       hours of required general education courses, which both expanded and broadened the areas of
       expected student knowledge. The faculty ratified the revised program in April 1987.
       Beginning fall 1988, this program affected entering first-time students. These requirements
       applied to transfer students with associate degrees beginning in 1990. Most faculty have
       accepted the revised requirements as an improvement over the previous requirements.
       However, there is now a movement to refine and/or clarify some aspects of the general
       education requirements as described in Part 2.6 of this report. This movement was prompted
       in part by the Planning Task Force recommendations.




       Unique Dimensions of Saginaw Valley State University
                                       Commuter Students


       Nine out of ten students attending SVSU commute to campus. They often leave campus as
soon as possible after class to continue work or family responsibilities; however, many stay on
campus for special events and participate in the campus activities. Both commuter and campus-
resident students participate in Student Government and the many campus clubs and organizations.




                                                 10
       Nearly half (47%) of the students attend SVSU part time, and many of these may work at
full-time jobs outside of school. Of those attending full time (12 credits or more for
undergraduates), many also work at least part time. While the University does not collect
systematic data on student employment, a survey of new freshmen conducted in fall 1992
indicated that 12% intended to work full time while attending SVSU. Similarly, most MBA
students report in class that they are employed full time, as do most master's degree students in
Nursing and Education.

                          Age of SVSU Students Fall 1993
        Age                   Number of Students                  Average Credit Hours
     Under 18                           22                                 6.36
       18 - 19                        1,053                                13.35
       20 - 21                        1,095                                12.73
       22 - 24                        1,464                                11.00
       25 - 29                        1,142                                8.07
       30 - 34                         653                                 7.54
       35 - 39                         561                                 6.71
       40 - 44                         484                                 6.33
       45 - 49                         295                                 5.65
     50 & Over                         149                                 4.91
   Age Unknown                          57                                 9.56
                                      6,975                                9.77
                                                  Figure 2


       The average age of SVSU students is 28, well above the traditional college-age population.
(See Figure 2 for the distribution of ages.) At least one measure of different behaviors among
students of different ages is the average credit-hour loads. The older students tend to carry one or
two classes while the youngest students more often carry a full-time course load. There are other
differences that age data alone cannot measure. The adult education literature has thoroughly
documented the fact that adult students often have very different demands on their time and
consequently different learning needs than do younger students.



                                                  11
SVSU faculty and staff are cognizant of the differences among students. Also, to better assist these
students, the University supports an office for nontraditional student services (Lifelong Resource
Center), as well as an Office of Evening Services.


                                         Student Profile

       In fall 1993, SVSU enrolled 6,975 students. Of these, 5,678 (81.4%) are undergraduates,
750 (10.8%) are graduate students, and 547 (7.8%) are nondegree students. (Figure 3) Nondegree
students include teacher certification students, post-baccalaureate




students and some undergraduate guests and auditors. Four-hundred twenty-three (423) students
attend classes off campus. Undergraduate off-campus students attend classes at Cass City.
Graduate students in Education attend off -campus classes in Macomb County. The off - campus
courses and programs are closely linked to on-campus programs, and many Cass City students
take classes both on and off campus in any given semester.




                                                  12
       The student body includes 703 (10%) from minority groups (African American, Hispanic,
Asian, and American Indian) and 78 (1%) nonresident aliens. As the University's total student
body has grown, so too has the number of minority students. The service region (14-county area)
in which SVSU is located is approximately 10.13% minority. Thus the University, through
recruiting and retention programs, seeks to attract minority students. (Figure 4)




       Most SVSU students come from the four-county region of Saginaw (35.9%), Bay (17.2%),
Tuscola (8.5%), and Midland (7.7%). The remainder are largely residents of nearby counties in the
Thumb (5.7%), and north along the Lake Huron shore (4.3%). Ninety-four students (1.3% of the
total) are from outside Michigan, including foreign countries. (Figure 5 on the next page)

       Nearly 60% (4,179) of SVSU’s students are females. On average, the female students
carried 9.4 credit hours while the males carried 10.3 credit hours. Female students are typically
slightly older than the male students. The average age of female students is 29 years while male
students average 27 years. Nearly 64% of the minority students are female.




                                                  13
1993 Enrollment By County




         Figure 5




          14
SVSU offers several majors that females predominantly choose: teacher education, social work,
and nursing. Engineering tends to be ma1e-dominated while other disciplines include a more even
gender mix. The University has at least one formal program in place (Project GET -SET) to help
support students' choices to enter fields in which they are not the predominant gender.
Additionally, the Lifelong Resource Center sponsors a mentor program for female students who
want to meet people in their future professions. This program is operated in conjunction with a
local executive and professional women's service club.
       SVSU offers more than 60 majors through its five colleges. Figures 6 and 7 list the fall
1993 breakouts of undergraduates and graduates by college. (Figure 7 on the next page).




                                                15
                           Geographic Region Served by SVSU

       SVSU was established to serve a 14-county East Central Michigan region. The campus is
located in the region's population center. Students, faculty, staff, and site visitors come to campus
from many of the region's communities -- and some from beyond this area. Figure 5 presented
earlier shows the student enrollment from each of the 14 counties in the service region.


                                 Valley Library Consortium

       The Valley Library Consortium was established in 1980 with three founding members:
Delta College, the Public Libraries of Saginaw, and Saginaw Valley State University. As early as
1985, the Consortium took steps to allow for future growth. SVSU served as the host institution
and leader in determining the Consortium's development. In June 1989, following several months
of discussions, the group issued a formal invitation to area libraries and library systems to join the
Consortium. By late September, 14 regional libraries and library systems expressed interest in
joining the group. A Wickes Foundation grant and matching funding provided resources to share
the automated library system with the libraries committed to the project.




                                                  16
        The Consortium worked together for over eight months to identify and select an automated
system, Dynix. Subsequently, SVSU has been in the process of implementing this automation. The
Consortium successfully meshes needs of libraries with widely varying size, which serve different
constituencies, and which fill compatible but different missions. The goals are both
technologically and politically ambitious, but thanks to the generous support of the Wickes
Foundation they are now being realized. A detailed report of the automated library system will be
available on site for site visitors to review.


                           Marshall Fredericks Sculpture Gallery

        The mission of the Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Gallery is to collect, preserve,
protect, exhibit, study, and interpret the art of Marshall M. Fredericks and the records and
materials related to his life and work. The Gallery builds, presents, and maintains its collections
and programs for the enjoyment, enrichment, and edification of the Saginaw Valley State
University community and the public. The Gallery is used frequently for curricular and
extracurricular activities. Students utilize the collection through class visits, independent studies,
and internships in addition to informal visits for personal satisfaction. More than 100 K-12 school
groups (2,500 people) visit annually for special guided tours. Another 2,500 come in groups
associated with the University, local churches and civic organizations, or in commercial tour
packages. Total attendance averages about 10,000 annually.


                                Regional Math / Science Center

        The Center includes services and materials for teachers in area high schools. The Center
provides in-services for teachers, student enrichments, science consultation and a resource library.
A lab on wheels for K-8 students allows teachers to check out an entire teaching module that
contains all the materials necessary to do a unit in earth science, physical science or life science.
An activity booklet is included to match the materials. The 21 modules have been recently revised
to meet the new State Science Objectives. In addition, many math learning materials are available
for checkout. A resource guide lists all available materials.




                                                   17
               Earth Vision - Environmental Education: An EPA Priority

        As a result of the 1990 National Environmental Education Act, environmental education
has become one of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) critical
assignments. Earth Vision, EPA's Grand Challenge for High Schools, is one of the new
environmental initiatives. This is a professional development and educational program for high-
school teachers and students. It is a joint venture between the EPA and Saginaw Valley State
University. Earth Vision will help high schools develop environmental research programs using
computational science and access to high-speed computers. It is the first computational science
education program to concentrate solely on environmental issues. It offers Saturday tutorials and
provides multitiered outreach activities. During the summer, competitively selected teams of high-
school teachers and students participated in a three-week educational program at SVSU. Each
team is supported by mentors and by an SVSU outreach support team. Each student is supplied
with a scientific workstation and a telecommunications link to the National Environmental
Supercomputing Center in Bay City. During the academic year, the participants conduct
environmental research activities at their high schools. Students and teachers benefit by enhanced
curricula in science, mathematics, and computer science. Additional information will be available
in the site visitors room.
                                         Project SOLVE
       This project has been funded by the Michigan Department of Education Title II Grant each
year since 1986. The 1994 grant will allow the University to serve the needs of intermediate
school districts in the area of professional development for elementary, middle and high-school
science teachers. A two-week workshop is presented by University faculty in a mentoring
relationship with four to five high-school teachers in biology, chemistry, earth science and
physics. Teachers and students who are in schools with modems have the ability to communicate
with SVSU faculty and ask questions and receive answers by using the computer linkage and a
toll-free phone line at no cost to their district. Each participant receives science content updates
and recent development lectures in each of the four science areas. Each teacher receives a manual
of science projects developed by SVSU, Delta College faculty and elementary and middle-school
science teachers that can be used in their own classroom. The teachers have a total of 30 hours in
various laboratories to work on the science projects. An additional 10 hours of laboratory rotations
are included in the workshop. Teachers must apply for admission to the program and provide part
of the fees.

                                                   18
       PART ONE: The Mission and Goals of Saginaw Valley
                                 State University
                                 Evaluative Criterion One:
                  “ The institution has clear and publicly stated purposes, consistent
               with its mission and appropriate to a post-secondary educational
               institution.”

     SVSU publishes a purpose (mission) statement in its bi-annual Catalog. As the University
responds to growth and organizational changes, the purpose statement is reviewed and changed to
reflect accurate goals and purposes which are appropriate for this institution. This section will
review past mission statements and present the current mission statement.


1.1 EARLY MISSION STATEMENTS

                                       Five Early Objectives

The 1966-67 catalog provided five objectives supported by the Board of Control. Each objective
was described in terms of the institution's beliefs:

(1) The maintenance of a free society:

       We believe the strength of the American people rests on our position as free men. We also
       hold that the health of society depends on the fulfillment by the individual of the
       responsibility that liberty imposes. We believe that higher learning has the duty to maintain
       the traditions of freedom and to extend its horizons.

(2) Quality:

       We affirm our belief that craftsmanship is a responsibility of each individual. In the
       academic world, teacher and student alike must accept a personal commitment to high-
       level performance. This means that the quality of achievement at this College should
       compare favorably with that of other institutions where a commitment to excellence is
       evident.



                                                       19
(3) The search for truth:

       We believe a free society requires the availability of truth. Public processes are dependent on
       freedom of inquiry and the right to know. We have faith in the free market of ideas in which
       we test the declarations and assumptions of others, and are willing to have our own positions
       tested as well.

(4) Service:

       The primary impact of this institution, especially during its early years, will be on the
       immediate metropolitan area in which a third of a million people now reside. The College is
       dedicated to serve the area by helping to make it a center for learning, discovery and culture.

(5) Cooperation between public and private enterprise:

       It is our intention to create an atmosphere in which public and private efforts may
       work together in cooperation and with effect, and to pioneer ways in which private
       giving may assume a larger share of leadership in meeting the needs of higher education in
       cooperation with public support.



                             1980 Character and Goals of SVSC
The 1980-81 catalog described the Character and Goals of SVSC:
       Saginaw Valley State College is a comprehensive State college which grants bachelor's and
master's degrees. Its primary mission is to meet a regional need for higher education, although the
college also serves students from across the State of Michigan, other States and foreign countries.
SVSC’s original liberal arts curriculum continues to provide a firm base for programs currently
offered through schools of Arts and Behavioral Sciences, Business and Management, Education,
Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, and Science, Engineering and Technology.


“The four goals of the College are:


(1)    To foster the intellectual and personal growth of students. In pursuit of this goal, SVSC is
       committed to provide opportunities for acquiring accurate and pleasing use of language,
       understanding numeration and performing rapid and accurate simple computation,
       distinguishing between the essential and irrelevant and between straightforward and
       sophistical reasoning, acquiring a general understanding of society and. of the individual
       within it, engaging in problem-solving and conducting scientific inquiry, emulating the

                                                  20
       scholarly life, choosing between opposing viewpoints, overcoming provincialism,
       demonstrating respect for human diversity, training in chosen professions, participating in
       co-curricular activities, developing a general view of our cultural heritage, preparing for
       graduate programs and professional schools, developing self-discipline, a sense of personal
       worth and purpose, enthusiasm for learning and life, and the skills and attitudes
       needed to nurture effective interpersonal relationships.

(2)    To encourage and support research, pure learning and intellectual and artistic creativity
       by attracting a faculty committed to academic inquiry and expansion of human
       knowledge, developing balanced and adequate library facilities, acquiring facilities suitable
       for research, obtaining professional-quality fine-arts facilities, and affording faculty
       members opportunities to increase their professional development.

(3)    To advance human capability in society at large by conducting applied research, sharing
       ideas with community groups and institutions, helping talented persons select areas of
       greatest personal fulfillment and social need, and enhancing the knowledge and culture
       appreciation of the public at large.

(4)    To encourage constructive evaluation of society. The College recognizes that society must
       change in order to endure, and must tolerate people of different philosophies, convictions
       and values. It also supports participation in activities aspiring to improve community
       life.”




                                      1986 Mission Statement

In October 1985, the Board of Control adopted a revised statement:
       Saginaw Valley State College was founded in 1963 primarily to meet higher education needs
in East Central Michigan. The University offers a comprehensive array of traditional baccalaureate
degrees. The same general education requirements support all of the undergraduate curricula.
Master's degrees also are granted in fields for which there is substantial regional demand.
Approximately one-half of SVSU’s students are in the traditional age range; the others are older
students, most of whom are preparing for occupational advancement or leadership roles in their
community. The primary mission of SVSU is to promote the intellectual and personal growth of
students. A highly qualified faculty, most of whom hold terminal degrees, teach in both day and
evening classes. Classes are designed to be relatively small. Support services and co-curricular
offerings are planned to meet the needs of both residential and commuting students. Periodic
program review is used to monitor the quality and the impact of formal and informal learning
opportunities. As an important part of its mission, the University fosters research and



                                                  21
creative activities. The goals of the research program are to extend knowledge, inspire superior
teaching and contribute to the intellectual life and social well-being of the region. Community
service is another element of the University mission. SVSU sponsors continuing education courses,
conferences, workshops and technology transfer efforts. Cultural events, many campus activities and
the University library are open to the public. The library serves as the administrative center of a
regional consortium formed to encourage resource-sharing. SVSU faculty and staff cooperate with
area businesses and civic organizations in ways that contribute to the economic and cultural vitality
of the region. Two commitments are common to the instructional, research and community service
components of the University mission. First, SVSU actively cooperates with area community
colleges to assure broad access to education and efficient use of resources. Second, SVSU is
dedicated to helping students and area citizens acquire the knowledge and skills they need to
function effectively in the increasingly interdependent nations of the world.




1.2 INSTITUTIONAL MISSION AND GOALS

                               Assessment of Mission and Goals
       During this self-study process, the Mission and Goals Committee carefully studied the
mission statement that was adopted in 1985. The committee sought to clarify and to simplify the
wording of that statement in order to better guide institutional activities. After the committee
developed a revised statement, the self-study committee held a University-wide forum to discuss this
draft and to receive reactions and input. Following this forum, the Board of Control studied the
revised statement and offered some minor suggestions to the Committee. The President devoted his
January 1993 State of the University Address to the proposed mission and purpose statement. The
committee further considered all suggestions, and submitted a final draft statement to the Board of
Control, which was adopted on March 29, 1993. This mission statement will be printed in the fall
1994-96 catalog. The revised, adopted mission statement is as follows:




                                                   22
                     The Mission of Saginaw Valley State University
       The primary mission of Saginaw Valley State University is to provide opportunities for
individuals to achieve intellectual and personal growth. A concurrent mission is to develop
individuals' potential to provide leadership and professional skills for the civic, economic and
cultural well-being of the region, state and society. The University also exists to serve as a cultural
and intellectual resource dedicated to the development, acquisition, and dissemination of knowledge.



                                 The Purpose of the University

   To provide a comprehensive array of baccalaureate degree programs and a select number of
    master's degree programs.

              Baccalaureate degree programs are based upon a foundation in the liberal arts, the
              development of strong academic skills, and include studies in depth in one or more
              academic or professional disciplines.

              Master's degree programs concentrate studies in fields that address the needs of the
              East Central region of Michigan or take advantage of unique opportunities and
              particular strengths within the University.

   To strive for excellence in teaching, learning, research, service and creative endeavors, and to
    stand as an example in those regards.

   To provide academic and support services that address the educational needs of a- diverse
    student population that varies by gender, age, ability, experience, lifestyle, cultural background
    and economic circumstances.

   To represent and advance the ideals and values of higher education in a democratic society by:

              Pursuing and defending freedom of inquiry, thought and expression.

              Practicing and encouraging respect, integrity, civility, decency and fairness in human
              relationships.

              Promoting understanding among people and by people for their world.

              Maintaining an openness of opportunity for all people to reach their fullest personal
              and professional potential.




                                                   23
      To contribute to the quality of life for the people of the region, state, and society by:

               Providing expertise, leadership, and other support in the development of ideas and
               strategies for addressing social, technological, and economic issues.

               Creating, sponsoring, and hosting events and activities that help people understand
               and appreciate the varieties of human culture, art and accomplishment.

               Promoting responsible participation in a democratic society by people both within
               and outside of the University community.




1.3 SUMMARY


       SVSU’s mission and goals statement evolved in harmony with the institution's dynamic
nature, growth and regional constituency. The current Statement of Mission and Purposes will
continue to be examined on a regular basis to affirm its relevancy to the changing needs of SVSU’s
students, the region, and society in general. This ongoing review reflects SVSU’s institutional
commitment to provide quality education which will prepare the graduates to contribute to the
region's vitality. Copies of the Statement of Mission and Purposes are posted throughout the campus
to serve as a reminder for faculty, staff and students of the University's focus.




                                                   24
PART TWO:                   The Organization, Resources and
                            Programs of Saginaw Valley State
                            University

                                     Evaluative Criterion Two:
                “The institution has effectively organized adequate human,
                financial and physical resources into educational and other programs to accomplish
               its purposes.”



2.1 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND SYSTEMS
                                            Organization
       Saginaw Valley State University is a public institution of higher education that grants
baccalaureate and master's degrees. Saginaw Valley State University's governing body is an
eight-member Board of Control appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the
Senate. The University President is an ex-officio Board of Control member without a vote. Each
member's term of office is eight years. The Board of Control annually elects from its members a
Chair, Vice Chair, Secretary, and Treasurer. A chart depicting the organizational structure of the
University appears in Appendix B.


Board of Control:
       By statute (Public Acts of 1965, No. 278), the Board of Control is the state's designated legal
authority for supervision of the University's affairs, including property control. The Board's powers
include enactment of rules, bylaws and regulations for the conduct of its business and institutional
governance. The Board approves tuition and fees, appoints or removes personnel on the institution's
behalf based on the generally accepted principles of academic tenure, determines compensation to be
paid for services and materials, confers such degrees and grants such diplomas as are indicated. The
Board of Control is the “Body Corporate” of the University. It is a policy-making, rather than an
administrative, body. It meets in regular session each month except July. Special meetings may be
called. All meetings of the Board are open to all interested public, students, faculty, staff and are
usually held on the campus. Requests made to the legislature for operating and capital outlay
resources must be approved by the Board of

                                                   25
Control. The current Board of Control members are listed in Appendix B, following the
organizational structure of the University.
       As specified in the Michigan Constitution, Article VII, Section 3, SVSU is excluded from the
State Board of Education’s control.


President:
       The Board appoints the President, who is the institution's chief executive. Acting on authority
delegated by the Board, Saginaw Valley State University's President assumes primary responsibility
for the University's educational, financial, and administrative functions. The President ensures that
the University operates according to policies established by the Board of Control. The President
communicates institutional present and future needs and concerns to the Board of Control and relays
pertinent University matters to the campus community. The President serves as the chief external
spokesperson for the University as it carries out its many roles, as defined in its Statement of
Mission and Purposes. The office's responsibilities are presented in the presidential position
description.


Vice Presidents:
       The President has delegated authority over the major functional activities of the University to
three vice presidents: the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Vice President for Administration
and Business Affairs, and the Vice President for Public Affairs. In addition, the Dean of Student
Affairs holds a comparable level position. Four other executive positions report directly to the
President as well.


       The Vice President for Academic Affairs administers all phases of the University's
instructional programs. This position oversees planning and budgetary supervision for all
undergraduate and graduate courses of study offered by the University. The Associate Vice President
for Academic Affairs, each of the Deans of the five Colleges, the Director of the Bilingual /
Bicultural Center, the Director of the Melvin J. Zahnow Library, and the Director of Sponsored
Programs report directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. These individuals make up the
Deans and Directors Council which meets regularly during the academic year to confer on academic
matters, share information, and participate in decision-making related



                                                   26
to the institution's academic operations. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and the Associate
Vice President for Academic Affairs are members of the President’s Staff, which meets bi-weekly to
discuss and consider all aspects of University operations.


       The Vice President for Administration and Business Affairs reports directly to the
President and is responsible for the planning and administration of the budget, Bookstore, Food
Services, Computer Services, Engineering Services, Personnel, Physical Plant, and Public Safety.
This officer, as well as the Controller, serves on the President’s Staff, which meets bi-weekly to
discuss University operations.


       The Vice President for Public Affairs reports directly to the President and is responsible for
advancement, Admissions, alumni relations and annual giving, the Business and Industrial
Development Institute, Conference Bureau, corporate relations, development and the SVSU
Foundation, Marketing Research and Information Services, and Public Information. This person
meets with the President’s Staff for bi-weekly meetings. In addition, this Vice President serves as
liaison with the Michigan legislature related to all matters which have importance for or relate to the
University.


       The Dean of Student Affairs serves on the President’s staff and reports directly to the
President. This position is responsible for Academic Support Services, Athletics and athletic
promotions, Housing and Residential Life, the Lifelong Resource Center, Minority Services, the
Registrar's Office, the Scholarships and Student Financial Aid Office, and Student Life. The Dean of
Student Affairs serves the traditional Dean of Students role, which deals with student problems or
complaints and acts as an advocate for both students' rights and responsibilities. This office also
serves as Team Leader for the University Orientation Program and is advisor to Student
Government, the Professional Journalistic Practices Committee, and other student organizations.




                                                  27
         The Executive Assistant to the President and Secretary to the Board of Control assists
the President in his service as the University's chief executive officer. This position coordinates
details related to the Board of Control meetings and carries out assignments relating to Board
matters or actions. This position oversees the agenda and serves as secretary for the President’s
Staff.


         The Special Assistant to the President for International Programs reports directly to the
President and serves as a member of the President’s Staff. This position oversees SVSU’s
relationships with foreign institutions, all international students and faculty coming to the University,
and the SVSU programs for students and faculty going abroad.


         The Director of Institutional Research reports directly to the President and serves as a
member of the President’s Staff for the bi-weekly meetings. This position supports administrative
decision-making by providing the necessary enrollment, staffing, financial, and other data and
information. This position maintains official enrollment records and cost of instruction data for the
University and develops reports for internal and external use based on official records, surveys and
other sources.


         The Director of Multicultural Programs / Affirmative Action reports directly to the
President and provides guidance and supervision in recruitment and appointment of any faculty or
staff in line with affirmative action guidelines. In addition, this office provides guidance and
supervision for the offering of multicultural programs for faculty and students on campus and in the
community.



                                            Governance
         Several organized groups and formal structures share decision-making at Saginaw Valley
State University. This section briefly describes the three standing groups: President’s Staff, Deans
and Directors, and Student Senate. In addition, there are two labor organizations, and three major
committees which directly affect the governance of SVSU. A detailed description of the structures,
procedures, functions, and roles of these groups will be available for review in the Site Visitors'
Resource Room.


                                                   28
       The President’s Staff is chaired by the President with the Executive Assistant serving as the
secretary. This group includes the three Vice Presidents, the Associate Vice President for Academic
Affairs, the Dean of Students, the Executive Director of Development and SVSU Foundation, the
Director of Sponsored Programs, the Director of Institutional Research, the Assistant Vice President
for Administration and Business Affairs and Controller, and the Special Assistant to the President
for International Programs. This group meets bi-weekly and serves as an executive-level advisory
group which establishes the administrative procedures needed to implement Board policies, assists in
administrative decisions, considers budget and enrollment matters, regulates University facilities
use, and determines the appropriate group or committee to address University-related issues.


       Deans and Directors meet regularly, usually bi-weekly, to discuss academic matters, faculty
development, planning of academic offerings, and related matters within their respective units. This
group holds an annual summer two-day “retreat” to review and evaluate the prior year's activities
and to plan for the coming academic year.


       Standing Committees related to the faculty include the Professional Practices Committee
(PPC), College Research and Development Committee, Curriculum and Academic Policies
Committee (CAPC), and the Graduate Committee.


       a) The PPC is responsible for reviewing and recommending on matters of tenure,
               promotion, sabbatical leaves, serious discipline, discharge, termination and evaluation
               of faculty.


       b) College Research and Development Committee is responsible for recommending the
               allocation of funds for research and development and for release time
               recommendations according to a two-step process as defined in the Saginaw Valley
               State University / Faculty Association Contract.




                                                  29
       c) The CAPC reviews and makes recommendations on all proposals dealing with any
           change in existing curriculum, new courses, new academic programs and the academic
           calendar as well as the annual review of existing policies and/or procedures related to:


               1) Academic Admissions, Retention, Probation and Dismissal standards in all
                  programs
               2) Standards for Academic Honors
               3) Academic Policies of Financial Aid
               4) Other Student Academic Regulations


       d) The Graduate Committee is responsible for curriculum and academic policies /
           procedures related to the graduate programs only, monitoring the quality of graduate
           programs, granting approval for faculty to teach graduate courses, and related matters.


Each committee's membership and procedures are specified in the Contract.


                                       Student Government

       The budget for the support of student government comes from the assessed student fees each
semester. Spaces for the elected officers are provided by the University with guidance and
consultation provided by the Dean of Students. The Student Government President is paid $ 135 per
week, the Vice President $112 per week and the Treasurer $95 per week.
       SVSU’s Student Government is comprised of twelve elected senators and three elected
officers: president, vice-president and treasurer. Elections for these positions take place each spring.
Student Government convenes weekly in the fall and winter --biweekly during the spring / summer.
The meeting times and locations are posted at the Student Government Outpost (Brown Concourse)
or may be obtained from the Student Government office (first floor Wickes). These meetings are
open to the student body.




                                                   30
       Senators and Officers, who have regular hours in the Student Government office, are
available to discuss concerns or ideas students may have. Student Government, which is the voice of
the student body, needs continual student input to act on behalf of the students. Senators are involved
each semester with various committees. Some of the standing committees include Budget,
Legislative / Bills, Publicity, Quality Control, and Special Events. It is not necessary to be a member
of Student Government to serve on a committee.


Student Government Focal Points:
      Acts on the Students' behalf in matters of campus-wide concern
      Allocates money for clubs, events, research grants and study abroad
      Assists with grade grievances
      Rents popcorn machine to clubs for fund raising




                                       Labor Organizations

       The Saginaw Valley State University Faculty Association, MEA / NEA, represents full-time
faculty members and is affiliated with the Michigan Education Association and the National
Education Association. This collective bargaining unit has generally ratified a three-year agreement
(with some one-year contracts early on) which 1) covers all major aspects of employee-employer
relationships including salary adjustments and fringe benefits; 2) defies certain rights and
responsibilities of each party; 3) provides a grievance procedure; and 4) determines the faculty's role
in academic procedures. The current agreement is effective 1993- 1996.


       The Support Staff Association, MEA / NEA, consists of secretarial, clerical, custodial,
grounds and maintenance staff. Recently a four-year (retroactive) agreement was concluded through
the 1994-1995 academic year. The collective bargaining agreement covers all major aspects of
employee-employer relationships and includes provisions for salary adjustments, evaluations, and
related matters.




                                                  31
2.2 HUMAN RESOURCES

                                               Students
       Characteristics and qualifications of SVSU’s students have been described earlier in the
Introduction to this Report.


Qualifications:
       SVSU employs admissions standards recommended by the faculty and approved by the
administration. Ordinarily, students applying for admission on the basis of their high-school records
must graduate from high school with a grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or higher in college-
preparatory subjects. Those with a minimum seven-semester grade point average of 2.0
or higher may be admitted if test scores and extracurricular involvement indicate they are likely
to succeed in college. Students who did not graduate from high school are eligible for admission
if they present satisfactory results on the General Education Development Test. The University
evaluates factors such as experience, apparent level of motivation, and testing for mature students,
admissions. Test results of basic skills (reading, composition, mathematics) for each student are used
for counseling and placement purposes and are not a factor in the admissions decision. In addition,
the Summer Challenge Program as described in the Introduction allows selected students to enter the
University under those provisions.


Clubs and Organizations:
       There are currently 53 student organizations on campus. These clubs provide opportunity for
students of similar professional, political, social and special interests to meet together and plan
activities. A complete listing will be available for the site visitors. Clubs and organizations register
with the Office of Student Life and Campus Activities. The University cooperates with club /
organization activities as long as events are approved and function according to University policies
and procedures. A registered club does not indicate that the University supports or adheres to a club's
views or positions, nor that SVSU will be held liable for actions taken against a club or organization
because of its association with the University.




                                                    32
Student Publications:
       There are three student publications available for participation and contributions by students:
the Valley Vanguard student newspaper, the Cardinal Sins (featuring students' original works of
poetry, short fiction, essay, photography and two-dimensional art) and the Health Concepts
Newsletter (published by students in the nursing curriculum). Each publication is assisted by faculty
advisors and monitored by the Professional Journalistic Practices Committee, chaired by the Dean of
Student Affairs. Students are encouraged to submit articles and participate in each publication's
production.



                                               Faculty
       One major institutional strength is the well-prepared and dedicated faculty which has a strong
interest in student learning. The faculty comes from a broad range of undergraduate and graduate
preparation to add diversity and a broad view in teaching and professional development. There are
176 full-time faculty members with 82% holding doctoral degrees or terminal master's degrees. The
full-time faculty is supplemented by a well-qualified adjunct faculty.
       There are 122 male members of the full-time faculty and 54 females. As of summer 1993,
the average age of male faculty is 49.4 years, with females 45.8 years. The faculty percentage with
tenure at SVSU is 76.5%. Full-time faculty salaries and benefits are comparable with other public
institutions of higher learning which have a similar size in the state of Michigan. The faculty
Contract establishes minimum salaries for each rank.


Faulty Appointment, Promotion, Tenure, and Recognition:
       All faculty recruitment and hiring are carried out following standardized procedures,
including the involvement of the Affirmative Action Office. Employment notices are prepared by the
appropriate department head, approved by the dean and the Vice President for Academic
Affairs, and sent to the Personnel Office, where they are placed in The Chronicle of Higher
Education, the appropriate professional publications, and other publications as recommended by the
faculty and dean of the respective college. The hiring department's search committee reviews all
applications and then recommends candidates for campus interviews. While on the campus, the
interviewee is given an extensive itinerary which includes conferences with department members,
meetings with the department chair, dean, and Vice President for Academic Affairs.


                                                  33
The candidate usually gives a classroom presentation as requested by the departmental search
committee. The search committee recommends a candidate to the dean for probationary
appointment, which decision is finalized by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The dean
prepares the final appointment letter which includes specific elements required by the Contract. The
University's President follows with a letter of confirmation.
       The faculty Contract specifies teaching loads for faculty which are not to exceed 30 credit
hours during the academic year, with 24 credit hours as the expected minimum. The faculty member
may consent to overload teaching with additional compensation according to the Contract.
The process and criteria for promoting faculty and granting tenure is laid out in the Contract.
Individuals eligible for promotion or tenure prepare and submit a “PPC file” documenting their
teaching, scholarly, and service effectiveness. Teaching performance is evaluated by classroom
visits, peer evaluations, and student evaluations. Scholarly and creative activities must also be
documented and evaluated, as are University service, leadership in student activities, and community
service. The evidence is reviewed by members of the PPC which then recommends which
individuals should be considered for promotion or tenure. The Vice President for Academic Affairs
reviews this list and submits it with recommendations to the President who, in turn, makes a
recommendation to the Board of Control.
       The University also recognizes faculty members' excellence in teaching, research, and
service by bestowing formal awards each year at spring commencement exercises. The nominees are
solicited from among faculty, staff, students and alumni; the committees related to each major award
review the nominees' qualifications and recommend the recipient to the President. The Landee
Award for Teacher Excellence carries a monetary award of $1,500. The Warrick Award for
Excellence in Research has a $1,000 monetary value, as does the House Award for Teacher Impact.
The Ruben Daniels Award (also available to staff) is given in recognition of community service.
Each of these major awards represents a different aspect of faculty members, responsibilities and
capabilities. In 1994, the adjunct faculty will be included in such recognition of excellence through
the creation of the Mary H. Anderson Adjunct Faculty Award, with a $750 monetary value.




                                                  34
       In addition, the Faculty Association presents annual awards to faculty members who have
made outstanding contributions in research and University service during the academic year. SVSU
is also recognized for distinguished teaching by the Michigan Association of Governing Boards of
State Universities (MAGB). The annual Statewide Higher Education Awards Convocation honors
each institution's distinguished teachers. SVSU submits the winner of the Landee and the Warrick
awards for this recognition.



                                                 Staff
Administrative, Technical, and Support Staff:
       The members of the Administrative and Professional (A/P) staff at Saginaw Valley State
University are not unionized and include the directors, librarians, and technical staff positions.
Executive Administrative / Professional positions are advertised in The Chronicle of Higher
Education as well as throughout the contiguous states of Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, Illinois, and
Minnesota. Executive Administrative / Professional positions require a master's or doctoral degree;
others usually specify education either at the associate or baccalaureate level. In relation to
education, Administrative / Professional personnel at Saginaw Valley State University are well
qualified for their respective positions. Figure 8 depicts the numbers of administrative personnel in
four seniority groups. SVSU’S Administrative / Professional ranks include an appropriate balance
between new and more experienced staff. This balance enables a diverse and dynamic work
environment.


                       Administrative Professional Personnel Fall 1993
         Years of Service            Number of Employees                        Percent
                0-5                              52                               43%
                6-10                             38                               26%
               11-15                             20                               15%
            16 and Over                          22                               17%
               Total                            144                              100%

                                               Figure 8



                                                      35
       Clerical and service staff are represented by the SVSU Support Staff Association
(MEA/NEA). There are 71 full-time and 12 part-time secretarial / clerical staff and 56 full-time
service staff. The 176 full time faculty are supported by 14 secretaries for a ratio of 1: 12.57. Of
the secretaries two are on 10 month assignment, one is at .6 and one at .75 time. The resulting full
time equivalent secretaries not counting the 10 month appointees is 13.35 for a ratio of 1:13.18.
Secretaries provide test preparation, letters, course syllabi and take telephone messages for faculty
in their respective areas. Qualifications for each position are established through the department
with advice from the Personnel Office. Most openings are recruited via advertisement in local
newspapers. Figure 9 depicts the number of full-time faculty, A/P, clerical, and service staff
employed at SVSU.




                                         Advisory Boards
       Advisory Boards serve the University in relationship to a variety of programs, as well as the
University as a whole. The Board of Fellows advises the President and holds monthly breakfast
meetings. This group is composed of business, professional, and community leaders in the region
who have indicated a sincere interest in the University's roles, functions, and welfare. The President


                                                  36
appoints the Board of Fellows, with the approval of the Board of Control. The Board of Fellows may
nominate new members.
       Each College has at least one or more advisory groups composed of community members
with particular qualifications and/or interests in line with the role of the respective college. Selected
programs have advisory groups to enhance a program's efforts, such as the program for the Lifelong
Learning Center and Multicultural Advisory Committee.
       The Institutional Review Board (IRB) serves to review projects and research efforts in order
to protect human and animal subjects. This group is appointed by the President and includes four or
more faculty members from across the University, a representative from the Alumni Association, a
representative from the Board of Fellows as a community member and a Veterinarian in relation to
animal subjects. The group meets as needed to review procedures and protocols and approve
projects.




                                              Summary
       Saginaw Valley State University has created a climate of mutual respect and appreciation
among its many human resources and the constituencies they serve. Because of its relative small size
and emphasis on personal attention both in and out of the classroom, students have ready access to
faculty and all administrative offices.




                                                    37
2.3 FINANCIAL RESOURCES
       Saginaw Valley State University maintains records in accordance with the principles of fund
accounting to observe limitations and restrictions placed on the uses and resources available by the
state legislature, the governing board, management, or other authorities. The University uses four
current and three noncurrent fund groupings for reporting and internal operating purposes. The
current funds consist of the General, Designated (use restricted by administrative policy), Auxiliary
Activities, and Expendable Restricted (use restricted by donor or supporting agency). The noncurrent
fiends consist of the Student Loan Fund, Plant Fund, and the Agency Fund. The Student Loan Fund
is used to account for loan transactions to students. The Plant Fund accounts for institutional
physical properties / acquisitions, reserves fiends for maintenance, remodeling and replacement. The
Agency Fund accounts for amounts withheld from payrolls, the employer portions of payroll taxes,
various payroll benefits and for the amounts held in custody for students, University organizations,
or others.



                                             Revenues

       Total current funds revenue (General, Designated, Auxiliary Activities, Expendable
Restricted) for fiscal year 1992-93 was $43 million. The current funds revenue reported in fiscal year
1985-86 ($21.6 million) was approximately half this amount. During this seven-year period, the
current funds revenue sources experienced a shift in terms of proportionate share from tuition and
fees from federal grants and contracts and from state appropriations. State appropriations have
declined to 35% of total current fiends while federal grants and contracts have increased from less
than 10% to 25% of total current fiends. On the current fiends revenue side, federal grants and
contracts experienced a similar increase in recorded activity during this same period. It is noteworthy
that during the period July 1989 - June 30, 1992, research activity became a major contributor of
current funds expenditures through the University's role as fiscal agent for the Consortium for
International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). The University's role as CIESIN’s fiscal
agent has now ended; however, the University continues as a member of CIESIN and received
contracts from that organization during 1992-93 for a wide range of activities.




                                                  38
       The shift in funding is even more pronounced when reviewing the University's General
Fund source of revenues, shown in Figure 10. Even with state appropriations representing a
diminished share of operating revenues, it still continues to be the largest share of the University's
revenues. This trend is common among all of the state universities in Michigan. During a recent
three-year period the University requested appropriation increases of 8.5% for fiscal year 1990-
91, 9.5% for




fiscal year 1991-92, and 5% for fiscal year 1992-93. The University received state appropriation
increases of 6.7% in fiscal year 1991, 2.6% in fiscal year 1992 and .4% in fiscal year 1993. State
appropriations increased to SVSU have appeared to be more generous than those to other institutions
of higher education. These increases, however, were largely due to additional state funding for the
cost of operating new buildings. Appropriations for University operations have not kept pace with
inflation or enrollment increases. (Long Term Financial Planning [LTFP] paper will be available on
site for inspection.) Of particular concern to the University is the continued enrollment increases
without state funding or recognition for changing enrollment patterns.




                                                  39
       Since the University has experienced enrollment growth during periods of diminishing state
appropriations, an increase in base tuition rate and fees has generated revenue for the University's
operations. Figure 11 portrays the relative shares of tuition, state appropriation, and other revenue




for the University's General Fund. The key forces influencing tuition rates are the amount of state
appropriations, political concerns, the level of expected enrollments, the estimated tuition other
similar institutions will charge and the students’ estimated response to increased tuition rates.
       Between 1974-75 and 1991-92, SVSU’s enrollment increased 145% while undergraduate
tuition rose 345%. The real increase in price was considerably smaller. When adjusted for inflation
(Consumer Price Index-CPI), tuition and fees rose 62%. The University's tuition increased at a
somewhat slower rate than did other state universities' rates around the nation. Since 1981-82 (the
earliest year for which we have national figures), annual tuition increases at all other public
universities in the country have exceeded SVSU’s in 8 of 11 years. (LTFP May 1992) Tuition
increases adopted at the University have been among the lowest of Michigan's state universities over
the past several years. This pattern of annual tuition and fee increases at the University does not
mean that these increases can continue to be assessed without a potential influence on student access
to the University. However, current University enrollment patterns indicate that tuition rate
increases do not directly affect student enrollment numbers.




                                                   40
       Some University activities provide services to the community and also provide a budgetary
resource to the general fund. The College of Business and Management’s MBA program in Taiwan,
the College of Education's Professional Development program, the Continuing Education programs
in Nursing, and the Ryder Center operations are examples of programs set up to achieve income over
operating expenses.
       During fiscal year 1991, the University implemented new policy directions for selected
programs and services by increasing or adding fee charges to students. Laboratory and special course
fees were established to reflect differences in program costs and to charge a slightly larger share of
these costs to students who are direct beneficiaries. A tuition restructure was approved by the Board
of Control on October 11, 1993, and will be implemented in Winter 1994 to replace almost all
course and laboratory fees with a new blended tuition arrangement. The new structure provides for a
single undergraduate tuition rate for most courses and a higher rate for upper division courses in
Education, Engineering, Nursing and Occupational Therapy.




                                        SVSU Foundation
       The Saginaw Valley State University Foundation (Foundation) is an independent corporation
formed for the purpose of receiving funds for the sole benefit of the University. During the 1992-93
year, the Foundation transferred $768,000 in financial support to the University. Private support has
contributed donated land, funds for buildings, scholarships, and support for pivotal components of
the University. Even though the gifts have been generous, the funds from private sources make up a
relatively small portion of the University's annual operating revenues. In 1987, the University
transferred the Endowment fund assets to the Foundation. The combination of University and
Foundation endowment assets within the Foundation was implemented to consolidate investment
and accounting responsibilities. The Foundation transfers appropriate amounts from the individual
endowments to the University accounts to be expended according to the specific purpose of each
endowment.




                                                  41
                                   University Expenditures
       The fiscal year ending June 30, 1993, included total current fund expenditures of $43 million.
As described in relation to revenue, expenditures for fiscal year 1992-93 almost doubled the level of
expenditures recorded during fiscal year 1985-86. Unlike current funds revenue, current funds
expenditures have not experienced any major shifts in allocation. A review of the University's
general operating expenditures by function reveals a relatively constant expenditure pattern between
1985-86 and 1991-92. (See Figures 12 and 13.) The largest share of the University's expenditure




                                                 42
is for faculty and staff compensation; in 1992-93, approximately 73% of the General Fund budget
was expended on compensation. (Figure 14 on next page) The University is by nature a labor
intensive endeavor, with salaries and associated benefits representing a substantial portion of total
costs. When compensation increases for University employee groups are considered, they are
developed to achieve a balance between recognition of increased productivity and an understanding
of current economic realities. The University has successfully completed the negotiations of the




                                                  43
employment contracts with the Support Staff Association (expires in June 1995) and the Faculty
Association (expires in June 1996).
       During fiscal year 1990, the University implemented personnel programs that began to direct
cost-containment measures in the compensation area. The first of these eliminated and/or
consolidated several administrative positions, which resulted in compensation savings. The
University continues to review noninstructional positions as they become open for consolidation or
elimination.




       Another large University expenditure is departmental supplies, materials and services.
Because of student enrollment growth and inflation for a number of years, departmental operating
needs have exceeded resources. As indicated previously, some department programs generate funds
to supplement their program budgets.
       University utilities have constituted a stable, declining share of the General Fund budget. The
University negotiated a natural-gas purchase and storage program and implemented a computerized
energy management and control system. The University has presented a capital outlay request to
state officials for a central heating and cooling plant to further assist in utility cost-containment.




                                                    44
                                     Budget Considerations

       Promises to Keep, formulated by the Presidential-appointed task force, identified University
priorities, one of which was the addition of full-time faculty positions. New faculty lines have been
authorized in each year of the University's budget since fiscal year 1989. In fiscal year 1992, the
University added nine full-time faculty members. In fiscal year 1993, the University added six new
full-time faculty positions to the budget. These positions became permanent University base budget
commitments.
       Considering the growing need for instruction in the classroom, the reliance on part-time
faculty will continue. Thus, competitive compensation levels for adjunct faculty are important. The
University budget for fiscal year 1991 and fiscal year 1992 included special allocations to make
improvements in adjunct faculty compensation. The newly negotiated contract with the Faculty
Association includes a provision for “Lecturers” who are appointed initially for one year with duties
consisting of teaching and departmental service. Subsequent to the first year, a lecturer, if
reappointed, will be appointed for two years at a time for up to two additional appointments. Any
appointments after five consecutive years of service will be for four years at a time. The specific
Contract provisions for lecturers will be available for on-site review.
       Until 1992, the University operated on a management information system that dated back to
the 1960s. Through a combination of borrowing and additions to the plant fund, the University
created a resource to update the management information system. Funding for acquisition,
implementation and servicing of an information system was allocated during fiscal year 1992.
       The University is committed to replacement of equipment originally acquired with the
opening of each building. While buildings were adequately equipped upon construction, funding has
not been sufficient to absorb on a large scale the replacement or repair of equipment. The University
can incorporate some equipment costs into its annual budget, but not all identified needs are readily
met. When there have been positive year-end balances, the University has appropriated funds for
equipment replacement.
       Since the Michigan legislature approved the funding process for the final planning and
construction of the West Complex, the University has taken steps toward future funding for the
operating costs associated with the new building.




                                                    45
                                             Summary
       The University's financial resources have kept pace with its basic mission. Because the state
of Michigan keeps funding at a steady rate, the need for increased tuition will continue. The
University has resources and monitors these closely in order to keep its commitment to students, the
community, and the educational needs of this region.


Assessment:
       As noted earlier, the University employs fund accounting to functionalize resources in terms
of sources and uses. Saginaw Valley State University conforms to the Manual for Uniform Financial
Reporting which state of Michigan Colleges and Universities developed to promote uniformity and
comparability of financial information among state's colleges and universities. This authoritative
document for audit and reporting purposes was influenced by the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants' guide, Audits of Colleges and Universities.


       Saginaw Valley State University has used the auditing services of Ernst & Young for the past
six fiscal years. The audit process commences in May with Ernst & Young testing documents in
accordance with University policies and procedures, followed by the Controller's office personnel
preparing the general ledger for closing. Financial statements are prepared in August by the
Controller's office for on-site examination by the auditors. The preliminary financial statements are
reviewed in September with the University's Board of Control Finance Committee, and final
presentation of financial statements are taken to the Board of Control for approval in October. The
University financial audit and Federal Awards audit for fiscal year 1992-93 were completed with no
material findings. With the conversion of the financial system software during fiscal year 1992- 93,
Ernst & Young also performed a limited scope review which considered the overall access controls
of the University and specific manual and system controls over the payroll and registration
applications. No significant control deficiencies were noted with this review.




                                                  46
2.4 PHYSICAL FACILITIES
                                      On-Campus Facilities
       SVSU is located on the north edge of Saginaw County, where it meets the Bay County line.
The location is strategically close to the three urban areas of Saginaw, Bay City, and Midland. Two
interstate freeways and a major state road ensure access from a 14-county service area.
       The campus comprises 782 contiguous acres. The central campus has grown around a
fountain courtyard with classroom buildings, dormitories, and a building which provides food
service and selected student activities. All of these buildings are harmoniously faced with brick. In
addition, a new facility, the West Complex, has been recently approved and funded by the state of
Michigan. This facility, at a projected cost of $33.3 million, will house classrooms, a conference
center, telecommunications center, student-study and lounge areas, theatre, recital hall, and offices
for the College of Business and Management faculty and Dean. Construction is expected to begin in
early 1994. A history of the buildings and their locations is presented in Appendix C.
       Since its inception, SVSU has used space creatively, building first for instructional use, then
later adapting the space for support functions. When the University began operation as a private
school in 1963, it used temporary quarters at Delta College, which is located approximately five
miles from the current campus. In 1967, the University moved to its present location. The chart on
the following page summarizes the individual facilities and building dates for the campus. (Figure
15)
       The campus's attractive landscape evolved with growth. This evolution includes increased
access to main roads, lighted parking areas, wind-barrier pine trees, outdoor physical-education
facilities, and Student-recreational areas, which gradually created an attractive, consistent campus
setting. Until the approval of the Science Building, Brown Hall, and Zahnow Hall, only about 32%
of the physical plant --some $6.5 million-- had been funded by the State. Private funding, mostly
from local sources, paid for construction of several buildings, which is a strong indicator of the
esteem in which the University is held in the community. In addition to the private funding for the
football stadium and field, another private contribution to the University enabled the building of the
Marshall M. Fredericks Sculpture Gallery and Arbury Fine Arts Center at a cost of $7 million. The
Gallery brings site visitors from around the nation, state, and the community. Arbury Fine Arts
Center also provides faculty offices and classrooms and additional areas for on-campus and local art
exhibits.


                                                  47
             SVSU Physical Facilities Historical Development and Current Status

Year Name of Facility            Original Purpose                 Current Purpose in 1993
1966   66 Building               Classrooms, Offices, All         Personnel, Purchasing, Physical
                                 Functions                        Plant Functions
1968   68 Building               Classrooms, Offices, All         Personnel, Purchasing, Physical
                                 Functions                        Plant Functions
1969   Wickes Hall               Classrooms, Offices,             Administrative Offices, Faculty
                                 Laboratories, Student, Faculty   Offices, Classrooms, Student
                                 Lounges                          Services (Remodeled 1986)
       Doan Center               Cafeteria, Student Activities    Cafeteria, Student Activities,
                                                                  Conference Room
       Outdoor Theater           Summer Performances              1974 remodeled to make year
                                                                  around
       Student Dormitories       Housing Space for 500            Student Housing
                                 Students
1972   Cardinal Gym              Physical Education, Offices      Incorporated in Ryder Center
1975   Presidential Residence    Housing for President            Housing for President
1978   Pioneer Hall              Engineering Classrooms,          Engineering Classrooms, Offices
                                 Offices, Nursing Classrooms,
                                 Offices
1980   Six Mobile Unit           Classrooms                       Special Projects, Student Clubs
       Children’s Center         Child Care                       Child Care
1981   Mobile Unit               Bookstore                        Bookstore
1985   Apartment Complex         40 Units for Student Housing     40 Units for Student Housing and
                                                                  international faculty
       Administrative Services   Administrative Offices           Expanded and Leased to CIESIN
1986   Science Building          Classrooms, Offices, Library     Classrooms, Offices, Library
       Brown Hall
       Zahnow Library
1988   Arbury Fine Arts          Art and Music Departments,       Art and Music Departments,
       Center,                   Classrooms, Sculptures           Classrooms, Sculptures
       Marshall M. Fredericks
       Sculpture Gallery
1989   Ryder Center              Athletic Facilities, Offices,    Athletic Facilities, Offices,
                                 Classrooms                       Classrooms
                                             Figure 15




                                                 48
Energy Conservation Measures:
              Newer University buildings use the latest technology in energy conservation
      measures. SVSU uses energy-efficient glass and proper insulation to keep energy costs at a
      minimum. SVSU’s staff and faculty are committed to manage facilities effectively and
      efficiently.


Off-Campus Facilities:
              In 1967, a women's group from Bay City, Midland and Saginaw organized the
      Triskelions for the purpose of obtaining unrestricted scholarship funds for SVSU students.
      Through donations they purchased, in 1974, a house for their operation located at 136
      Townsend Street in Midland. This group raises scholarship funds through a 50/50
      consignment shop, which is operated through the dedicated services of over 90 volunteers.
      The University provides maintenance for the facility. Over the years, this group contributed
      more than $275,000 in scholarship funds.
              SVSU offers off-campus courses for undergraduates in Cass City, about 50 miles
      from SVSU, in the local high-school facilities. The College of Education offers graduate
      courses about 100 miles from SVSU at the Macomb Intermediate School District, the
      Chippewa Valley Middle School or the Iroquois Middle School. Some of these facilities
      assess a nominal rental or service fee. Fieldwork and training courses are assigned through
      the cooperation of tri-city community agencies for criminal justice, nursing, occupational
      therapy, education, and social work.
              Since the closure of Wurtsmith Air Force Base, courses are no longer offered in that
      site; however, efforts continue to serve student needs in the area through the Huron Shores
      Education Consortium. The consortium represents the educational interests of five local
      school districts (kindergarten through 12th grade, and the intermediate school district) and
      several institutions of higher learning. Joining SVSU in this consortium are Alpena
      Community College and Michigan State University. The consortium has submitted a request
      to the Federal Department of Education, requesting Public Benefit Transfer of control of
      classrooms, the library, and other buildings that would become the coordinating center for
      ongoing educational programs for the Northeastern portion of the Lower Peninsula of
      Michigan. The executive director of the Huron Shores Educational Consortium moved the
      administrative offices to the Oscoda site in September 1993.

                                                 49
                                            Future Growth
           The Doan Center is being renovated and enlarged to include a bookstore, larger kitchen
facilities and expanded seating capacity for dining. The short-range growth plan for SVSU includes
the construction of the West Complex (217,000 square feet) which will be connected to the
expanded Doan Center. The University plans to break ground within the next year for the West
Complex, which will involve two years of construction. The West Complex will house the College
of Business and Management, including administrative and faculty offices, student lounges, and
classrooms. There will be a 600-seat theatre with a scene and stage shop along with a 400-seat recital
hall. Plans also include telecommunications and video-production areas. The facility will also house
student administrative, government and development offices, a conference center and banquet rooms
for campus and community use. Expanded parking areas will be developed to accommodate the
needs of the West Complex. The building plans for the West Complex will be available for review
on site.
       As part of its long-range planning, SVSU continues to develop and update its master plan,
which includes a general classroom building, possible student living quarters, and a plant for a
campus heating and cooling system. The 66-68 (Services) Building will be renovated. It currently
houses the Engineering Services, Physical Plant, Purchasing, the Graphic Center and Mail Room. An
additional facility, Founders Building (privately funded), is in the initial planning phase. It will
accommodate about 100 people for multiple uses.



2.5 SUPPORT AND EQUIPMENT RESOURCES
                    Melvin J. Zahnow Library and Audio Visual Services
           The Library's primary mission is to support the University by meeting the informational,
research, and classroom equipment needs of its students, faculty, and other users. The Library and
Audio Visual Services are centralized under the Library Director and housed in the Melvin J.
Zahnow Library. The organization is divided into four departments:

            a)    Reference, including Periodicals, Government Documents, Bibliographic
                  Instruction and Interlibrary Loan
            b)    Circulation, including Collection Maintenance and Archives
            c)    Technical Services, including Acquisitions, Cataloging and Systems
            d)    Audio Visual Services, which provides equipment for classroom use in addition to
                  A-V format materials.

                                                    50
The Library also houses the Educational Resource Center and is host institution for the Valley
Library Consortium.
       The Library is staffed by a Library Director, eight professional librarians (classified as
Administrative-Professional), two nonlibrarian Administrative-Professionals, one library intern,
eight clerical and 12 FTE student workers. The Valley Library Consortium has a staff of three, one
professional librarian, one additional Administrative-Professional and one clerical worker.
The Library was established early in the history of the University. Originally housed in the '66
Building on the south side of the campus, the Library moved to the ground floor of Wickes Hall in
1968-69 and in 1987 to the newly completed Zahnow Library Building. The present facility has
66,726 square feet and spans three floors, seats 425 and is open 84.5 hours per week.
       In 1978-79, the Library joined the On-line Computer Library Center (OCLC) to facilitate
cataloging and expand interlibrary loan capability. This activity was expanded in 1979-80 when the
Library joined the Michigan Library Consortium and became the host institution for the Valley
Library Consortium (VLC). Through the VLC, Saginaw Valley State College, Delta College and the
Public Libraries of Saginaw shared an automated circulation system. In 1990, the VLC was
reorganized, its membership expanded, and new hardware and software purchased. The VLC
presently serves 14 area libraries with a joint on-line catalog and shared circulation system.
The 1986 North Central Association Evaluation Team Report for the Library was positive, noting
increased budgets, circulation, collections and staffing, improved procedures for collection
development and the establishment of an archives / special collections program. Since that time, the
Library has continued to increase collections and improve services.
       The total collection reported in 1980-81 was 99,692 bound hard-copy volumes. By academic
year 1987-88 when the library moved to the new building, the total hard copy collection was
172,032 volumes. Currently (June 30, 1993), the Library holds 200,729 paper volumes, 254,097
microvolumes and 13,997 audiovisuals, a total collection of 468,823, including government
documents. Reflecting the increasing importance of media, especially video, in teaching and
learning, Zahnow's film and video collection grew from 386 items in 1985-86 to 1,423 in 1992-93.
       Archives / Special Collections contains 30 processed collections, all of which are available
for research. University Archives adds approximately 400 items each year including the student
newspaper Valley Vanguard and the student magazine Cardinal Sins for which indexing is provided.
In addition, Archives Records Management contains 178 boxes of University office records and




                                                  51
newspaper articles relating to Saginaw Valley State University. Library collections have been
developed in cooperation with faculty using a formula based on enrollment, use and cost. A portion
of the monographic budget is set aside each year for faculty purchases. The Library controls the
remainder through a subject liaison system.
          The Library provides on-line access to the collection through VALCAT, the VLC on-line
catalog. Public access terminals are located on all three floors and at all public service points (Audio
Visual Services, Circulation, Periodicals and Reference). Periodical literature is accessed by means
of paper indexes, CD-ROM indexes and on-line database searches. The Library has steadily
increased the number of Compact Disc Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) indexes over the past several
years. CD ROM indexes allow faster searching, offer more sophisticated search techniques than
paper indexes and usually include abstracts as well as citations. One index provides full text for
many of the articles cited.
          Throughout the 1980's, the University received funds from the Wickes Foundation and others
to upgrade library collections with the result that the library was able to double holdings during this
period.
          In 1985-86, the Supply and Equipment budget was $48,503 and the acquisitions budget
$323,900, a total of $372,403. The current (1992-93) Supply and Equipment budget is $58,995 and
the acquisitions budget is $360,380, a total of $419,375. While this is not a dramatic increase, it does
reflect continued University support during a period when many libraries' budgets were decreased.
          Even more significantly, the University General Fund support for library acquisitions has
steadily increased. The University does not depend on gifts for the long-term support of the Library,
and it steadily increased General Fund allocations from 60% of the acquisitions budget in 1986-87 to
96% in 1992-93. In fiscal year 1986-87, the University's general fund allocation was $278,917
compared to $168,195 from the SVSU Foundation. In 1992-93, the University's allocation was
$347,380, compared to $13,000 from the Foundation.
          As the Library collection improved, borrowing on Interlibrary Loan decreased, while lending
increased. In 1985-86, Zahnow borrowed 2,569 items and loaned 1,249. By 1988-89, the Library's
number of transactions was 2,354 borrowed and 2,650 loaned. In 1992-93, the Library's borrowed
number was 2,559 while 2,433 were loaned.




                                                   52
       Circulation, which is the best growth and use index, has increased 529% in ten years. In
1983-84, the Library had fewer than 36,000 items circulated. Library circulation increased to
130,000 by 1987-88 and in 1992-93 to 190,296 items.
       The Library staff is productive, service-minded, and works together well. Librarians are well
qualified. All hold the MLS degree from ALA (American Library Association) accredited
institutions, and several hold subject master's degrees. The Library updated position descriptions to
reflect changes in technology and to focus on quality public service. The University has made efforts
to invest in staff development and continuing education. The Library also contributes to staff and
student development by presenting exhibits and the Melvin J. Zahnow Lecture series. In 1991- 92,
the Library sponsored 14 lectures on subjects ranging from Acid Rain to Women in the Circus.
       The Library is also responsible for A-V equipment for classroom use. Like other library
services, equipment circulation has increased dramatically. In 1991-92, 4,249 items were circulated,
a 20% increase over 1988-89. The Library's portable equipment was upgraded, and permanently
mounted video-display equipment was installed in larger classrooms.


Assessment:
       The library and A-V equipment services have grown and improved dramatically since the
last NCA evaluation. The following are the identified strengths of the Melvin J. Zahnow Library:
(1)    Increases in library use far exceed the rate of University growth.
(2)    Through VALCAT and due to expanded collections on site, students have access to 1.4
       million items in a variety of formats.
(3)    Reference assistance has been extended by adding 20 hours during evenings and weekends.
(4)    The new building provides more seating and shelving space, as well as an atmosphere more
       conducive to study.
(5)    Access and security have been improved by new handicapped-access and book-security
       systems.
(6)    Additional Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) terminals, CD ROM stations, photocopiers
       and microreader printers have been made available to library users.
(7)    Equipment for classroom use has been upgraded, and permanently mounted video-display
       equipment has been installed in the larger classrooms.




                                                  53
(8)    Financial resources are adequate to meet demands, and there is every expectation that the
       University will continue to support the Library.
(9)    Expenditures for collection development and equipment have been effectively focused for
       maximum benefit.
(10)   The staff is well trained, productive and has a strong service orientation.


       The Library's principal concern (areas which might be strengthened) is the increasing costs of
library materials, especially periodicals. The Library has been forced to cancel subscriptions, lacks
the means to add new subscriptions in areas of growth and has increasingly relied on other libraries
or document delivery services. The Library is actively pursuing creative solutions such as fu1l-text
retrieval, joint automation and cooperative purchasing to ease this problem.


Evidence of Effectiveness:
       The Library considers one measure of effectiveness to be use. According to this measure, the
Library has become increasingly effective over the past ten years. Circulation has risen well over
550,0l0 and bibliographic instruction sessions increased seven-fold. Interlibrary loan, a measure of
dissatisfaction, decreased slightly as the number of students increased. However, the Library
realizes that use is not the same as effective use.
       In 1991-92, the Library began developing mechanisms to measure effectiveness of its
teaching mission. The Library developed and tested a survey in January 1993, which was designed
to test progress toward three main goals: 1) that the student is aware that knowledge is made up of a
variety of types of information, both recorded and unrecorded, and understands how recorded
information is structured and communicated; 2) that the student knows how recorded information is
organized and accessed in the library environment; and 3) that the student uses knowledge beyond
the college classroom.


Plans for the Future:
       The Library plans to call for increased automation and cooperation with other area and state
libraries. The completion of the campus network and MichNet gateway will provide both access to
the VLC on-line catalog and access from our system to other catalogs and information sources
available on the network. The Zahnow Library is striving to increase access to materials not



                                                      54
currently in the on-line catalog. These efforts include accessing audiovisual materials, such as tapes
and films, as well as traditionally uncataloged collections, such as government documents.
          In cooperation with the other members of the VLC, the Library is adding its serial holdings
to the on-line database and implementing issue-by-issue check-in on line. On-line serials is not only
a public service, but a necessary building block to mount indexes on-line and increase electronic
exchange of journals, which the Library sees as the best answer to the problem of escalating journal
prices.
          Library-planned developments in the equipment delivery area include the addition of
permanently mounted video-display equipment in larger classrooms. At the same time, the Library is
planning for media delivery in the new building which will allow “piped-in” images and sound.
Other Library building-related planning includes improvements in lighting and development of a
disaster plan.
          Since the Library is a highly automated and rapidly changing environment, the University
supports continuing staff education to insure leadership and appropriate skills for the Library's and
University's regional resources future. Thus staff, including clerical staff, continue to attend
appropriate workshops. In addition, the Library continues to support extension courses in Library
Science from Wayne State University.
          Many visionaries have seen future libraries as a small cabinet of disks or a computer and a
modem. However, even though such technologies in libraries has grown, traditional collections of
books and journals have also continued to grow and are expected to do so for the foreseeable future.




                                         Computer Services
          Computer Services provides information technology services and resources to support the
University's mission. Computer Services emphasizes resource service, not technology for its own
sake. Computer Services supports a central data base which is used for general support of
administrative operations (admissions, registration, financial aid, student records, payroll, billing,
and accounting). Computer Services works with other campus departments to assist in accessing
and transforming data into meaningful information. It also provides supervision of computer labs
which are used for classroom teaching and student learning activities.




                                                    55
       In addition, Computer Services is responsible for installing computer hardware and
associated software; providing repair service for work stations and microcomputers; assisting offices
and educators with funding by maintaining a contingency account for innovative ventures; and
working with the campus community to experiment in new technology. Computer Services provides
optical scanning services for surveys, evaluations and classroom testing, and microcomputer training
for faculty and staff in popular microcomputer software packages. The Computer Services
organizational chart will be available on campus for review.


Management Information System (MIS)
       Management Information System Programming and Support has three programmers /
analysts who provide support to many others on campus: one supports the financial area (payroll,
Accounting, Billing, etc.); one supports student records (registration, grades, transcripts, etc.); and
the third supports Admissions, Financial Aid, and Institutional Research. Each member assists
campus offices to determine what data are available, to collect data when it is possible to do so, and
to assist in providing data in presentable formats. This staff also trains other campus support staff.
The Assistant Director of Computer Services supervises MIS Programming.
       In 1991, a complete MIS was purchased from Datatel. All necessary aspects of its basic
implementation (Registration, Admissions, Transcripts, Payroll, Accounting, etc.) are completed.
The programming staff is working on making the reports emanating from the systems more readable.
Computer Operations is also assisting in this project.


Networking
       Campus networking has been funded for the first phase to connect many faculty and
administrative offices to each other and the Internet. Campus networking will expand to include
faculty offices and other University offices not currently on the network. The Library is part of the
campus network. The University has a voting membership in Merit, which is a statewide network
headquartered at the University of Michigan.
       Delta College and Northwood University in Midland share similar administrative hardware
and software with SVSU. Each school has shared an informal agreement to provide backup in the
event of a disaster. Neither Delta nor SVSU formally provide storage for each other's backup tapes.




                                                   56
Computer Operations
       Computer Operations houses four medium-sized computers. Three are strictly for instruction:
A DEC MicroVax II, a DEC RISC Computer and an IBM 9370. The fourth computer, a PRIME
5370, is for administrative support. It contains over four-billion characters of data and is attached to
some 120 terminals, printers and microcomputers. It also provides administrative and faculty support
such as class rosters, financial data, grading, room assignments, and payroll. The staff inputs data
from surveys, class evaluations, and classroom tests, much of it with an optical scanner.


Microlab Support
       Microlab Support provides computer-lab coordination to insure proper staffing with student
assistants. The labs are Nursing, Statistics, English Composition, Education and Science and
Engineering. The Coordinator assists in hardware and software upgrades in the labs. Recently, the
Statistics Lab was upgraded and enhanced with 25 computers. Data sheets explaining details of these
labs are available. The staff provides microcomputer repair, software troubleshooting, and
installation when possible.


Instructional Support
       Instructional support is provided by staff members who are responsible for systems
programming supervision of computer labs used by the College of Science, Engineering and
Technology; statistical support (such as SPSS); and network installation and maintenance. In
computer labs, there are now four computers in the mid-sized category, three strictly for instruction.
Fifty-two terminals are attached to these four computers; all are accessible via modem from the
homes of faculty and students. In computer labs supervised by Computer Services, there are 106
microcomputers, mostly IBM-type. Computer Services provides services for 179 micros for
students, 142 for faculty and 175 for administrative offices. In addition, there are 52 terminals in the
instructional area and 232 in the administrative area. Total terminal work stations: 687.
       There are several specialized computer labs on campus: one for music and art in the Arbury
Fine Arts Center, another for basic skills in the student affairs area of Wickes Hall, another in the
Chemistry Department, and CADCAM equipment in the Engineering area.




                                                   57
Assessment:
Computer Services' major strengths include:
       1) Excellent staff with considerable experience and little turnover
       2) Good rapport with staff and faculty
       3) An extensive administrative data base of over four-billion characters (transcripts
               alone are nearing a million records)
       4) Adequate space and funding
       5) Adequate main computers [three types for instructional purposes enabling students
               to use popular operating systems including IBM's VMlSP CMS, DEC's VAXlVMS
               and DEC's ULTRIX (UNIX)]
       6) Well-documented programs with clear procedures for lab use.


Computer Services seeks:
       1) To be less conservative and more innovative in using nonstandard equipment and
               software
       2) To improve the handling of peak-load periods
       3) To be open more hours in some computer labs
       4) To evaluate student / computer ratio needs.


       Computer Services plans to continue work on the MIS, especially in the budgeting area. The
degree auditing area was recently completed. As funds are allocated, Computer Services will review
two similar computers of larger capacity and speed. If these computers are located in separate areas,
SVSU will be able to provide its own backup in the event of disaster. In addition, Computer Services
will add three new labs in the new West Complex building.
       Computer Services recognizes the need to continue to develop multimedia computer labs for
instructional purposes. It also will move from an IBM micromode to a balance between Apple or
Macintosh, IBM, and any emerging technologies. In the near future, Computer Services will develop
a written disaster plan for an interim period with a more strategic one when the two new computers
are installed. Given the allocation of the necessary resources, the network development can take
advantage of the fiber backbone that runs through most buildings on campus by developing a
complete campus network. Computer Services will form an intracampus E-Mail, access to student
records, and interconnectivity priority issues.

                                                  58
       Computer Network System plans are in progress for the new building, with the first phase of
the installation expected to be completed during fall 1994. Each respective building will have the
appropriate wiring to enable future connections for network establishment. The first phase will
permit selected faculty offices and deans' offices to be connected to the Michigan networks. Details
of these plans will be available for examination during the campus visit.


                                     Other Support Services
       The following eight service areas contribute essential services to the University operations.
Most of these services have low visibility to the campus community so long as they operate
effectively. These service areas have provided the needed services in a generally excellent manner.


Physical Plant Services:
       This department is responsible for the overall maintenance services for the campus buildings
and grounds. These services include the maintenance of campus grounds, utility systems, buildings
and additions to the campus. The department has allocated funds to provide these services for
interior and exterior repairs, custodial services, operating and maintaining the utilities on the
campus, care of trees, shrubbery, lawns, sidewalks, and trash collection. In addition, this department
maintains all door locks and elevators. Additional projects may be completed by the Physical Plant
Services in relation to minor alterations to buildings or structures and service on specialized
equipment. A full description of services will be available for inspection on site.


Campus Safety:
       Public Safety Officers are responsible for law enforcement, physical plant and personal
security, and emergency response for the campus. The Department of Public Safety was granted
official police authority by the Michigan Legislature and the SVSU Board of Control in 1982.
Departmental personnel are employees of the University, and the department is part of the
University's division of Administration and Business Affairs. The department is also responsible for
the administration of the campus parking program.




                                                   59
Purchasing:
       The function of the SVSU Purchasing office is the organization and administration of
centralized purchasing services for all University departments. The Purchasing office has
responsibility for securing competitive goods and services for all areas of the University and
developing new sources of supply in order to maximize efficient cost and supply expenditures.


Bookstore:
       The SVSU Bookstore is managed and operated by Barnes and Noble of New York City. The
primary purpose of the SVSU Bookstore is to stock sufficient quantities of required and
recommended textbooks and class materials on a timely basis. The Bookstore also offers a full
selection of school supplies, clothing and emblematic merchandise, trade and reference books, and
cap and gown rentals. It also becomes involved in campus activities.


Food Service:
       The SVSU Food Service is managed by ARA Services of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and
provides several services to the University community. This service provides meals for residence-
hall students, food for special dinner events, and catering for various functions around campus. In
addition, it operates the “Bagel Wagon” in the Zahnow Library, the concession stand in Wickes
Stadium, and the concession stand for special events at the Ryder Center.


Telephone Service:
       The SVSU Telephone Service provides various services to the campus community. It
interacts with Ameritech to have new and/or additional telephone lines and trunks installed. It has a
call cost-accounting system hooked up to a telephone switch so that all long-distance calls can be
charged to the proper department. It handles all moves and changes of telephones on campus.


Mail Service:
       The SVSU Mail Service receives, sorts, and delivers all incoming mail to the campus. Mail is
picked up and delivered within the campus. The office provides meter services and prepares
outgoing mail for delivery to the U.S. Postal Service. In addition, this office prepares all third-class
bulk mailings, UPS ground and overnight packages, other overnight carrier uses, certified and
registered mail, and sells stamps and postal services to the campus community.

                                                   60
Cashier:
       The SVSU Cashier's office receives cash deposits from various campus departments and
provides check-cashing services to faculty and staff. Student-loan checks are disbursed from the
Cashiers office, and payments are received and credited to student accounts for registration, housing
and other University functions. The Cashier's office is responsible for maintaining control over
University cash assets. Checks for vendors and SVSU employees are disbursed by the Cashier's
office, as well as responding to inquiries from students as to account balances.


2.6 EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS
                                      Curricular Programs
Introduction:
       Saginaw Valley State University's undergraduate academic mission is carried out by five
colleges: Arts and Behavioral Sciences; Business and Management; Education; Nursing and Allied
Health Sciences; Science, Engineering and Technology. Deans are administration members who
report directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The following section briefly reviews the
organization, activities, and programs of each college. More detailed information concerning specific
requirements and courses is found in the Saginaw Valley State University Catalog, which is
published bi-annually. Each college is responsible for the accuracy of its program description and
course listings. The Catalog changes are initiated by the appropriate department and approved by
CAPC, the University Faculty, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the President.


                  Each college's program will be discussed in the following section.


                          College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences
Curriculum:
       The College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences includes a diverse group of disciplines: Art /
Design, Communication / Theatre, Criminal Justice, English, History, Humanities, Modern Foreign
Languages, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work / Youth Services, and
Sociology. All departments, with the exceptions of Philosophy and Humanities, offer




                                                  61
undergraduate majors in their related disciplines; all except Humanities offer minors. An
interdiscip1inary minor in gerontology is offered by the Departments of Sociology and Social Work.
In addition, a Master of Arts degree is offered collaboratively by the Political Science and Criminal
Justice Departments. The College also oversees the Marshall Fredericks Sculpture Gallery and
sponsors lectures, art exhibits, music and theatre performances, poetry and fiction readings,
workshops, and other cultural activities which enhance the study of related disciplines, campus life
and surrounding community.
       The College has a significant service function for other academic programs on campus. The
majority of the University's general education courses, the core liberal education components of all
students' education, are offered by the College. In addition, a large proportion of the enrollments in
the English Department are in English Composition or in the Basic Skills areas of reading and
writing at a precollege level for students whose test scores fall below University standards. Master of
Arts in Teaching (English) and teacher-education programs which lead to subject matter
specialization in the arts, humanities or social science disciplines also require significant coursework
in the College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences.


Program Components Which Support University Mission:
       Underlying and unifying the diverse programs and areas of study. Within the College is a
concern with what it means to be human. In support of this major focus of baccalaureate education,
program components include the following: the role of arts in human life; study of legal, social and
political systems; an understanding of cultures through study of history, languages, literature and art;
the application of scientific methodology to the study of human behavior; an enhancement of
expressive and communicative skills. More generally, students pursue intellectual and personal
growth through study in the various disciplines; all programs stress critical and analytical skills and
the development of maturity in thought and judgment. Each unit within the College has identified
components of its program offerings which support the University mission. An analysis prepared for
this self-study will be available for review by the site visitors on campus.




                                                   62
Project between ABS and Education:
       The College of ABS has worked cooperatively with the College of Education's efforts to
strengthen student expertise in the disciplines in which SVSU offers teacher-education programs.
The faculty in both colleges have worked over the past few years to enhance communication
between and among the two faculties while making the experiences of the education majors more
relevant to their teaching role. Departments including English, History, Music, Modern Foreign
Languages, Communication / Theatre and Psychology have worked closely with the College of
Education on such projects as preparation for NCATE accreditation, the development of special
courses required for teacher-education programs, the enhancement of the Bilingual / Bicultural
Education program, social-sciences certification, an English minor for the elementary-education
major, supervision of student teachers in selected areas, and evaluation of State of Michigan
Teacher Certification Tests. The College of ABS and College of Education cooperate in oversight of
the Saginaw Valley Writing Project, which was initiated by an English faculty member.


Bachelor of Applied Studies:
       The Bachelor of Applied Studies degree is a new program which accepted its first students in
fall 1993. It is part of the College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences and supervised by a faculty
committee from all five colleges, chaired by the ABS Dean. This program is open to students who
hold a technical or applied associate degree which has been approved by the University's Alternate
baccalaureate Committee as sufficiently rigorous and whose academic and career needs permit
pursuit of an alternative baccalaureate degree. Programs with appropriate rigor have been conferred
by an accredited two-year program and involve critical thinking, scientific subject matter, higher
order skills or a grounding in theoretical concepts. The Bachelor of Applied Studies requires all the
usual coursework components of the SVSU bachelor's degree except the conventional major;
students must complete 124 hours of coursework, including an approved minor and the standard
General Education, Basic Skills and upper-division requirements. However, the approved associate
degree is transferred as a block and stands in lieu of the major. Thus the students in the B.A.S.
program acquire precisely those components which clearly distinguish baccalaureate education from
career training, with emphasis on the liberal learning aspects. This program is not intended to
prepare a student for a first job; rather it helps persons who received adequate vocational preparation
through the associate degree and who are usually already employed in a related field to enhance their



                                                  63
career prospects or enrich their personal and intellectual growth. Students who are failing in
conventional Bachelor's programs are not eligible for this program unless they hold a technical
associate degree, which is not usually the case.


Assessment Activities:
       Each department has been given the opportunity to engage in an assessment pilot project.
Some departments have designed specific goals and objectives to serve as the basis for outcome-
assessment plans and data collection. Among efforts in progress are: 1) formal and informal surveys
of recent graduates to determine the extent to which they were successful in securing employment in
their field of preparation, and their level of satisfaction with the educational program; 2) employers'
surveys regarding the graduates; 3) fieldwork experiences; 4) standardized examinations in their
major and minor for student teaching; 5) capstone seminar experience; 6) portfolio; and 7)
performance measures in art, music, and social work.


Faculty Role and Research Activities:
       Each department's faculty is well qualified, both academically and with field experience
relevant to their respective discipline. Faculty members have published books and served as
principal leaders in writing projects for the University. With few exceptions, the faculty holds
doctoral degrees. A significant proportion of the faculty gives conference papers, publishes in
journals or exhibits and performs on a regular basis; three have published books in the past two
years. (See Bulletin of Faculty Research and Publication.) Many are regularly involved in
professional peer review activities in their disciplines, including leadership in professional societies
and academic conferences, review of manuscripts for textbook companies, and juring of
performances and exhibitions for other institutions. SVSU emphasizes involvement of undergraduate
students in research, and a number of faculty have involved their students as co- authors in research
projects, journal publications and conference papers. Several have served as principal leaders in
writing projects for the University. ABS faculty members are heavily represented among the
winners of the University's teaching, research and teacher-impact awards.




                                                   64
Program Review:
       The College and departments conduct program review on a regular basis, especially in
relation to curriculum offerings. During the self-study process, each department addressed future
plans. Program review materials will be available for site-visit review.

                            College of Business and Management
Curriculum:
       The College of Business and Management includes the departments of Accounting,
Economics, Law and Finance, Management and Marketing. Each department offers majors and
minors in relevant disciplines. In order to encourage students to achieve attributes which
complement their professional skills, the College of Business and Management requires course
distribution to be almost equally divided between business and nonbusiness courses. Undergraduate
courses are offered throughout the day and evening.
       The College of Business and Management also offers a Master of Business Administration
Degree. The MBA program focuses on coursework within the discipline of business. The Master's
level courses are offered primarily in the evening hours since the majority of the students work full
time and attend classes on a part-time basis.
       In order to become more acquainted with the challenges associated with the global
environment of business, the College of Business and Management began to offer an MBA degree to
a selected group of Taiwanese business executives. The program is designed to be completed over a
two-year period. Courses are offered in accelerated modules in both Taiwan and on campus. Five of
12 required courses are offered on campus over two four-week summer sessions, five are offered in
Taiwan by the SVSU faculty members who travel abroad in four-week modules, and two courses are
accepted by transfer from other universities. As of August 1993, there have been two classes which
have graduated 29 and 21 students in the first and second class respectively. A third class has
completed about half of the program. The “Taiwan Program” began in the spring of 1991 and adds
an international dimension to the graduate program. The program is intended to meet the needs of
middle and upper-level managers who wish to enhance their knowledge of business and sharpen
their managerial skills without interrupting their professional careers. In turn, the business faculty
gains insight into the operations of other international companies through their students. The
program has been a positive experience for those who have participated by broadening their global
perspective of business.


                                                   65
Program Components Which Support University Mission:
        In order to prepare students for a career in business, the program seeks to provide the
essential tools for making business decisions. Students learn the fundamental concepts and principles
that underlie the operations of a business enterprise. Students develop techniques to identify
problems, process relevant information, and evaluate possible solutions. Since an essential
component of a student's ability to succeed in the future involves other related disciplines, the
College of Business and Management requires students to complete specialized courses in English,
communication, mathematics, and computer science.
        Within the College of Business and Management, methods of instruction are varied and may
include lectures, case studies, and computer simulations. Each department has its own techniques
that are designed for effectiveness. The Management / Marketing Department has experimented with
group projects that evaluate real business problems. Other courses require students to evaluate their
peers or may employ role-playing techniques. The Finance Department uses term papers, essay
exams and computer projects to reinforce certain communication and technical skills. The
Economics Department uses lectures and discussion to emphasize a citizen's social and behavioral
environments. Students also explore some issues associated with private and public economic policy.
The Accounting Department keeps current with services rendered in the accounting profession by
using decision-making problems and experimenting with coursework requiring classroom
participation. Law and finance has a capstone class for finance majors (FI405). Also, the
department uses students' surveys through the University's survey procedure and has used much of
the information which is included in the ten-year report. The student's performance is measured by
exams and other assignments. Proficiency is measured because the students must pass all core
classes with a grade of C or better and must pass prerequisites. In addition, there are numerous
licensing exams in finance such as the broker's license, the Chartered Financial Analyst Exam, real-
estate broker's exams, insurance exams and others.
        At the graduate level, students are challenged to resolve more complex, ambiguous problems
through real-world examples and case-study approaches as an important component in coursework.
The graduate program builds on the academic and business experiences of the participants. Students
are expected to broaden their perspective of business in preparation for higher managerial
responsibilities.




                                                   66
Faculty Role and Research Activities:
       The faculty from the College of Business and Management is highly qualified and brings a
substantial body of teaching and research experience to their assignments. Many faculty are actively
involved in research and have been successful in publishing papers in academic journals or have
presented their research at conferences. Many faculty encourage student participation in their
research or have supervised students' honors theses. The Department of Economics formerly
oversaw the Center for Economic and Business Research which conducted surveys for businesses
and published the SVSU Economic and Business Review. The Center also published a working
papers series for faculty who wished to have these documents made available for the public. The
SVSU Economic and Business Review was published from 1980 to 1992 as a vehicle to provide
public dissemination of basic and applied economic and business research for firms in the Tri-Cities
region. The Review was used by local business as a source of data regarding local economic
indicators. The Review provided opportunities for students, faculty and members of the business
community to conduct applied research which fostered future economic development. With the loss
of funding for this effort, other resources are being explored to continue publication.
       The College of Business and Management seeks to established ties to the business
community through the Wickson-Nickless Distinguished Business Lectureship Series and the SVSU
Economic Society. Both programs invite speakers to campus and allow students a first-hand
exposure to the business world. The SVSU Economic Society also publishes a student journal,
Laissez Faire.


Assessment Activities:
       Formal surveys of graduates to assess program success have been done at the University
level. The College of Business and Management is preparing a survey of seniors majoring in
business for fall 1994. The survey results will be evaluated and the survey technique may be
modified in future uses. At present, faculty has used conventional techniques to evaluate students'
classroom performance. The faculty complies with contractually prescribed measurement techniques
to assess faculty performance such as the distribution of faculty evaluation forms. The Accounting
Department reviews student results of the CPA examination as a measurement of the overall
department effectiveness. Using a five-year moving average, candidates from SVSU are compared
with the national averages. The SVSU candidates have consistently exceeded the national averages
and have compared favorably with other state institutions within Michigan. As part of the

                                                  67
AACSB self-study process, the College of Business and Management is analyzing other options to
assess students' performance and program success.


Program Review:
        The College of Business and Management has applied for precandidacy status, which is the
first step in the accreditation process leading to membership in the American Assembly of Collegiate
Schools of Business (AACSB). The College has completed its mission statement and is now in the
process of preparing a self-study and plan of action. The self-study will involve all departments,
covering both graduate and undergraduate programs. The study will review five processes including:
1) faculty composition and development; 2) curriculum content and evaluation; 3) instructional
resources and responsibility; 4) reflection and monitoring of students; and 5) intellectual
contribution. The College of Business and Management expects to complete its plans by fall 1994.
The College of Business and Management faculty members have made AACSB accreditation a goal
in an effort to improve the quality of its program for the benefit of the students, faculty, College,
University and community.




                                       College of Education
Curriculum:
        There are three departments within the College of Education: 1) Teacher Education, 2)
Educational Leadership Services, and 3) Health and Physical Education. The programs received
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accreditation in 1992. The
Department of Teacher Education has undergraduate programs in elementary and secondary school
teaching, as well as special education leading to a teacher of emotionally impaired (EI) or a teacher
of the learning disabled (LD) endorsement. An interdisciplinary minor in bilingual education is
available for students in the elementary education and secondary teaching certificate programs.
These programs lead to initial certification or a bachelor's degree in education with provisional
certification.
        At the graduate level, the Department of Teacher Education provides advanced preparation in
elementary, middle school, and secondary teaching leading to either a Master of Arts in Teaching
(MAT) degree or teaching credential. In addition, the Department of Teacher Education provides
higher level preparation for teachers in early childhood, reading and special education.

                                                   68
       The Health and Physical Education major is either in teacher education or fitness
management. The Department of Health and Physical Education offers minors in physical education
and coaching. This department is developing support for the Occupational Therapy program with
courses in kinesiology, physiology of exercise and motor learning.
       The Department of Educational Leadership Services offers the Master of Education (MEd)
with major emphasis in educational leadership, curriculum development or educational supervision.
This degree is designed to meet the NCATE standards in addition to fulfilling the requirements of
the State of Michigan's School Administrator Certification code.
Program Components Which Support University Mission:
       The Department of Teacher Education's Programs are based on the expectation that the
teacher is a critical instructional decision-maker. The faculty provides teacher-preparation learning
experiences that are student-centered and proactive within the social context of today's public
schools. Teacher education is a heavily field-based program, which enjoys a strong and productive
relationship with local practitioners. The Department of Health and Physical Education provides a
balance between theory and practical application. Students are provided with learning experiences
designed to prepare them to be career leaders. The student has opportunities to benefit from the latest
technology and the equipment to develop skills in research and clinical skills. Testing and research
are a part of the learning activities with clients for diagnostic and prescriptive applications. All
equipment and programs are computer-based so that students use computers for writing, research,
networking and data base development. The Department of Educational Leadership and Services
prepares leaders who articulate vision, use reflective thinking, and value participatory-collaborative
decision-making.
Assessment Activities:
       Assessment activities are broad-based and include admission criteria, Michigan Teacher
Certificate Testing, GPA requirements, an early warning system, a sequenced plan of study, a
program portfolio, timelines for program completion, criteria for enrollment in practice / field based
experiences, and monitoring procedures for program completion.
       Students in the Health and Physical Education Program are engaged in field-based
experience in all teaching and health courses. Students are involved in producing video materials on
fitness and participate in conducting and writing research projects. In addition, they produce creative
projects which are designed to use knowledge and skills achieved in the program.



                                                    69
       The Educational Leadership Department uses a variety of assessment strategies including
admission instruments, evaluation of learning and instruction, exit evaluation strategies incorporated
into the capstone course, and follow-up studies of graduates. A student's behavior is examined
during simulation of leadership and administrative activities. In addition, faculty members use
observation of collaborative teams at work, feedback from mentors during field experiences, and
assessment of computer spread sheets relative to budget and related data. Students critique
colleagues and their own performance in administrative leadership tasks.


Faculty Role and Research Activities:
       Faculty members participate in scholarly activities including the presentation of papers at
professional meetings, publication of textbooks and articles published in national journals. This past
year, two faculty members published textbooks in their respective specialties. In the last five years,
each faculty member has presented at least one paper at a conference and several have published
papers in refereed journals. Each faculty member is actively involved in providing consultation and
leadership to the educational programs in the K - 12 system in which the education students have
field experiences. In each department, all faculty possess terminal degrees in the appropriate major.


Program Review:
       The College has recently completed (1992) the NCATE review process and received
accreditation from that organization. Each faculty member was involved in the self-study process
and the preparation of the self-study report. The complete report will be available for on-site review.


                      College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences
Curriculum:
       The College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences includes the departments of Nursing,
Medical Technology, and Occupational Therapy. The undergraduate nursing program, established in
1976, provides opportunity for beginning students to complete the baccalaureate degree in nursing
and for registered nurses graduating from associate-degree or diploma programs to complete a
baccalaureate degree in nursing. The professional courses are limited to those students selected into
the professional program. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program has been accredited
by the National League for Nursing (NLN) since 1982, and by the Michigan Board of Nursing since
the program began. The Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program received initial accreditation

                                                  70
from the National League for Nursing for a full eight years in 1992. In addition, the College of
Nursing and Allied Health Sciences is a member of the American Association of Colleges of
Nursing.
       In the Bachelor of Science degree in Medical Technology, the student completes coursework
and an approved internship program in an affiliated or nonaffiliated hospital in order to become
certified. The program is relatively small with five to eight graduates each year, and is coordinated
by a faculty member in the Biology Department.
       The Board of Control approved the Occupational Therapy program on February 17, 1992,
and the first class was admitted to this program in fall 1993. Students are selected according to the
established criteria. One class of 40 students will be admitted to the professional program each fall
semester. Two qualified faculty have been appointed to the program. The program has been
developed according to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Essentials and
Guidelines, and faculty will be working on the accreditation process during the program
development in order that the graduates may be certified.
Program Components Which Support University Mission:
       The faculty shares in the responsibility to foster students' intellectual and personal
development as competent and productive citizens and professional leaders. The program is
committed to providing leadership and learning opportunities which prepare professionals to
advance the profession in order to meet continuing and changing health-care challenges. The faculty
provides opportunity for continuing professional education in the region. The faculty is involved in
the definition and regulation of professional practice and collaboration with scholars in other
disciplines to generate knowledge.
Assessment Activities:
       Program assessment takes place at three levels. Course syllabi indicate the evaluation
methods for all course requirements. Theoretical knowledge is assessed with teacher-constructed
tests and student-produced papers. Clinical performance is evaluated through the use of clinical
evaluation instruments. Students do self-evaluations at each level and respond to a survey at the time
of the program exit to determine the program's general satisfaction level. The responses are
incorporated into curriculum and course revision. The NLN examinations are also used at designated
points in the program. At the completion of the undergraduate program, a student is



                                                  71
eligible to write the licensure or registry examination. Nursing graduates to date have achieved a
high level of success. As part of the ongoing assessment, graduates and their employers are surveyed
approximately every two years. The responses are used for curricular development and revision.
Evaluation at the graduate level is achieved through the writing of a critical incident, which the
student develops early in the program, as well as a critique of their growth in a functional role. The
final assessment is a thesis or field study in which the student is expected to integrate knowledge of
core and functional role content, as well as the research process.


Faculty Role and Research Activities:
       Each faculty has a master's degree in their professional area with clinical expertise in the
areas in which they teach. Six of the nursing faculty have earned doctorates in nursing or related
fields, and one of the Occupational Therapy faculty members has an earned doctorate. Two members
of the nursing faculty are actively engaged in doctoral studies, and the remaining faculty members
have obtained advanced coursework or certifications. All faculty members attend conferences and
seminars in areas of their clinical interest as well as in their functional roles. Faculty members are
actively involved in presentations at national and international conferences. Some have maintained a
clinical practice. Several faculty are engaged in personal or consortium research efforts. A current
project relates to work with hypertensive, hospitalized clients in the community.


Program Review:
       The Department of Nursing has conducted and prepared two self-study projects for the
National League for Nursing accreditation. The NLN reviews have resulted in the maximum
accreditation of both the BSN and MSN programs. The self-studies will be available on site.
Continuing accreditation is based upon peer review, which determines if guidelines established for
evaluation are met. The medical technology program has been reviewed periodically by a combined
committee of biology and chemistry faculty to determine program relevance and currency. The
Occupational Therapy Program will work with the AOTA in order to meet accreditation guidelines.
The AOTA Self-Study Report is due for review in April 1994 with a site visit scheduled in 1995.




                                                   72
                     College of Science, Engineering and Technology


Curriculum:
       The College of Science, Engineering and Technology includes the departments of Biology,
Chemistry, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mathematical Sciences, Mechanical
Engineering, and Physics. Each department offers one or more major and minor programs; the
Engineering Departments co-sponsor the Engineering and Technology minor. In addition, the
departments of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematical Sciences participate in the Master of
Arts in Teaching program by offering graduate courses in their disciplines.


Program Components Which Support University Mission:
       The Mathematical Sciences Department offers two courses which are part of the basic-skills
program, seven courses which support General Education and a number of other courses for various
professional programs. The Biology, Chemistry and Physics departments offer a wide variety of
courses supporting General Education and the needs of certain professional programs such as
nursing, engineering, and education. The Computer Science Department likewise supports
professional program needs and General Education along with meeting student interest in computer
literacy. Engineering departments offer programs which match closely human-resource needs in
regional manufacturing.
       All College programs are student-centered, and each department has a student professional
organization to encourage positive faculty-student interaction. An important characteristic of all
College programs is the commitment to strong hands-on laboratory experiences; as a result,
graduates are highly valued by employers. In addition, students develop teamwork, problem-
solving, speaking and writing skills at appropriate points in the programs. Students also have
opportunities to work with faculty on research projects which include presentations at national and
regional conferences and to industrial sponsors. Recognizing that minorities and women do not
pursue careers in science, engineering and mathematics, the College has pooled funding from a
volunteer organization called Michigan Multicultural Pre-Technical Education Partnership (M3
PEP), NASA and a private foundation to provide enrichment activities for these groups.




                                                  73
                                      Assessment Activities
Faculty Role and Research Activities:
       Faculty members in the College have academic degrees appropriate to their discipline and
consistent with their teaching assignments. Many faculty pursue research related to their specific
interests and publish their results in respected journals or present them at regional, national and
international conferences. Others pursue research sponsored by the Applied Technology Research
Center, a research unit in the College. Some participate in contract research or assist in projects
through the SVSU Independent Testing Laboratory. The College supports invention disclosure.
Consequently, there have been three patents issued since 1987 and a fourth is filed. An active
program of technology transfer ensures placement of valuable University technology and appropriate
reimbursement to participating organizations and individuals.


Program Review:
       The Chemistry program is certified by the American Chemical Society and completes
periodic reviews to continue that certification. Programs in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering
were first accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology in 1990 and have
been visited again in 1993. Programs in Biology, Chemistry and Physics have completed ten-year
program reviews since 1982 and a review of Mathematical Sciences has recently been completed.




                               Supporting Academic Programs
Honors Program:
       Selected students have an opportunity to enrich their academic studies and gain greater
flexibility in determining their courses through the Honors Program. Students complete Basic Skills,
General Education requirements, maintain a 3.4 SVSU grade point average, write a thesis under the
direction of a faculty member, complete at least four Honors courses, and complete 124 credit hours.
The Honors Committee is chaired and composed of faculty members.
       There are two stages to the Honors Program. The first Stage is coursework. Beginning in the
fall 1993 semester, at least two Honors courses are offered each semester. These Honors courses
satisfy General Education requirements. Course enrollment is limited to 20 and covers more
sophisticated material in greater depth, with greater individual attention than is possible in general


                                                   74
course sections. Each course has a major writing component. The Honors Committee plans to
develop a two-year rotation with two, and eventually three, different courses offered each semester
to make it possible for Honors students to satisfy all of their General Education requirements with
Honors courses. The second stage of the Honors Program involves a thesis. Each student entering
the program is asked to identify his / her thesis faculty advisor by the junior year (or in the fourth-to-
last semester for part-time students). The faculty advisor is asked to write a letter of recommendation
supporting the student's competence to write a thesis and the faculty member's willingness to serve
as thesis advisor. The student is expected to complete the thesis proposal and have it approved by the
Honors Committee by the end of the third-to-last semester. The thesis is written and submitted to the
Thesis Advisor and the Honors Committee Chair for approval during the second-to-last semester and
presented in a public forum during the final semester.
       The Honors Committee sponsors an Honors Convocation each spring to recognize both
students graduating with honors and Honors Students. The convocation includes a presentation by an
outstanding academician on a current topic or issue. The faculty participates and wears academic
regalia in recognition of students.


General Education:
       The current general-education program consists of 39 credit hours in nine content areas:
Literature, 3 credits; Arts, 3 credits; Numerical Understanding, 4 credits; Natural Sciences, 7 credits;
Historical and Philosophical Ideas, 3 credits; Social Science Methodologies, 3 credits; Social
Institutions, 3 credits; Communication, 9 credits; International Perspectives, 4 credits.
       The general-education program in place at the time of the NCA visit in 1986 consisted of 24
credits in three areas. Partly in response to the 1986 Institutional Self-Study, and in response to
faculty discussions, the general-education program was revised. The 39 credit requirement in nine
areas requires that students study the languages and perspectives of a considerable variety of
academic disciplines, areas of knowledge that will provide contexts for their lives and their major
areas. The general-education program draws on traditional liberal arts and sciences, providing
students a broad range of intellectual inquiry and disciplinary knowledge. At the same time, the
inclusion of categories fits an institutional commitment both to fu1l-time, part-time, and transfer
students.




                                                   75
       At the recommendation of the General Education Subcommittee of the self-study, the Vice
President for Academic Affairs sponsored meetings of representatives of departments offering
courses in each of the nine categories of general education during spring 1993 to discuss the goals
and coherence of each category. Several of these meetings produced revisions of category
objectives, which began moving through the curriculum approval process in fall 1993. A working
model was developed by the Dean of the Science, Engineering and Technology and the Dean of the
College of Arts and Behavioral Sciences. The faculty who teach the courses in a general education
category are brought together to present to the group how a specific course meets the general
education category requirements. These courses are discussed by the group with resulting
recommendations for course modifications and/or refinement of the category requirements. As a
result a change in the objective of the General Education Category 4. The curriculum / Academic
Policies Committee acted to support the revision (with 7 yes and 1 abstain); it now awaits ratification
by the full faculty. A draft for an improved rationale for the general education program is also in
circulation.
       During the upcoming academic year, discussion and reconsideration of specific elements of
the General Education requirements will continue. Goals in each category need greater specificity,
and more courses in each category need to clearly meet these goals. Some faculty perceive that
General Education needs further development, with consideration for increasing requirements in
some areas. One potential addition may be an upper division requirement in General Education that
provides students opportunities to integrate learning from a variety of different disciplines. New
categories may be added, such as Cultural Understanding or Computers and Society. The President
has asked the Dean of ABS and the Dean of SET to oversee review of General Education in light of
Section n of Promises to Keep. The two Deans and the Vice President for Academic Affairs have
held meetings with representatives of departments that teach in each of the nine General Education
categories to discuss goals, coherence, and academic rigor in each category. These meetings took
place in the fall 1993 semester.
       Although outcomes of General Education are a challenge to measure, initial steps towards
assessment of General Education are being undertaken. Alumni surveys are sent to gauge student
perceptions of general education.




                                                  76
                          Faculty Research and Scholarly Activities
       One goal for Saginaw Valley State University is the exchange of ideas through the teaching-
learning process. The University's mission statement emphasizes teaching. Another part of SVSU's
mission, however, is the creation of knowledge and the expansion of the boundaries of artistic and
cultural expression. The expression and creation of knowledge adds to the common body of
knowledge in each discipline. Research and scholarly activities as described at SVSU are materials
or ideas available to a public. In the mission statement, the University exists:


       to serve as a cultural and intellectual resource dedicated to the development ... of knowledge ... and
       to contribute to the quality of life for the people of the region, State and society by ... providing
       expertise, leadership, and other support in the development of ideas and strategies for addressing
       social, technological and economic issues ... and ...[to create] ... events and activities that help
       people understand and appreciate the varieties of human culture, art and accomplishment.


With this statement, the University recognizes a need to support its faculty and staff in their research,
scholarship and creative activities. The report of the SVSU Planning Task Force, Promises to Keep,
noted that "[a]n increasing number of regular faculty members engage in...scholarly activity,"and
recommended the development of a framework for encouraging faculty to remain active in their
disciplines by increasing the faculty development funds available through the SVSU Foundation. In
addition, research importance and other scholarly activities are reflected in current contract
provisions between the University and Faculty Association. The University annually provides funds
to support faculty members' professional development, and College Research and Development
Committees review grant proposals submitted to the SVSU Foundation, as well as requests for
release time for Foundation-funded research.


Office of Sponsored Programs:
       The Office of Sponsored Programs provides support to faculty and staff who are interested in
seeking external funding. The Office maintains an up-to-date library of resources which provides
information on federal, state, and private funding sources. This program provides assistance in
identifying funding sources, development of project ideas, proposal preparation, budget development
and liaison with sponsors.


                                                       77
       The University maintains a membership with the Office of Federal Programs (OFF) at the
American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU). The Director of the Office of
Sponsored Programs is the University's liaison with this support unit. In addition to the on-site
funding source research materials at SVSU, individual project funding searches are submitted to
OFP in Washington, D.C. through the Office of Sponsored Programs. The Office also provides
professional development for faculty and staff in the areas of proposal development and
grantsmanship. Figure 16 depicts proposals submitted and funded.




       The Bulletin of Family Research & Publications provides evidence of SVSU's scholarly and
research activities in its annual compilation of publication and research records. The document
includes records of exhibitions of artistic works as well as papers and publications. While there is a
category for activities such as performances in music, theatre, or poetry readings, these activities are
seldom listed. Also missing are other research results including those of staff who do not hold
faculty status but who conduct research or engage in creative or scholarly work. In actuality, this
compilation represents only a portion of the totality of faculty and staff research, creative, and
                                                   78
scholarly work. Nonetheless, the volume of submissions to the Bulletin has increased over the years
from 100 separate items from 46 people in 1987-88 to 161 separate items from 65 people in 1991-
92. The increase reflects two phenomena: an increase in the number of faculty members, and a
maturation of individuals' efforts that result in publication, display or performance. Many items
listed in the Bulletin include collaborations with others: other faculty at SVSU, SVSU students, and
people not employed or enrolled at SVSU. The University is particularly interested in faculty-
student collaboration on published research. Similar faculty-student interaction occurs in the
supervision of student thesis research, through the Faculty Association Mentorship Program, the
Undergraduate Honors Program and in the Graduate Programs in Criminal Justice/Political Science
and Nursing.
        The University's support for research includes funds from the SVSU Foundation and external
sources. External funds are principally from government sources such as the National Science
Foundation (NSF) and the State of Michigan's Research Excellence Fund. However, some private
research grants have been obtained. Many research grants must be matched with funds from the
University's own resources. Faculty and staff are becoming more active in working with the Office
of Sponsored Programs to write proposals for specific project funding.


SVSU as a Cultural Resource
        The SVSU mission statement addresses the University's role to serve as a cultural resource
for the surrounding community, giving people opportunity to experience, enjoy and learn to
appreciate the full range of cultural and artistic activities. In Promises to Keep it was recommended
that SVSU plan more cultural events at the University to "promote [the] awareness of cultural
diversity and [encourage] an appreciation for cultural differences in ...campus events and
programming" and sponsor more large-scale cultural events keyed to...academic interests, the
aesthetic and personal growth of students, and attractiveness to the larger community" (Promises to
Keep, 1991: 25-26).
The Board of Control, President, and faculty share a commitment to the production of knowledge,
the application of that knowledge to the problems of larger society, and to the development of the
University as a cultural resource by encouraging research, scholarly and other creative activities at
SVSU.




                                                  79
2.7 SUPPORT SERVICES

                                        Minority Services
       The Office of Minority Services was developed in 1988 and provides academic, social and
cultural support for minority students. Specific services include academic and personal counseling,
tutoring, a book-loan program, minority-grant information, and moral support. The office also assists
with University recruitment efforts and community outreach programs. Social and cultural programs
sponsored in whole or part by the Office of Minority Services include Black History Month, Festival
of Unity, Hispanic Heritage Month, Adopt-A-School, Should I Be Thinking of College Now?,
campus visitations, workshops and speakers. Minority Services strives to fulfill the University
mission through encouraging creative thinking, thought and expression by students, providing
educational/social/cultural programming and fostering a sense of belonging and personal growth for
minority students.


                                       Conference Bureau
       The Conference Bureau provides coordination and scheduling of both off-campus and on-
campus events that may serve other than regularly scheduled classes. If a community group wishes
to schedule a continuing education event on campus, the Conference Bureau reserves space and
services required for the event. Classrooms which are available or the limited nonclassroom spaces
designated for such events may be used. Future buildings will include spaces suitable for
conferences and educational events for various professional groups.


                                         Evening Services
       Evening Services operates in response to the extensive number of University evening
students and adjunct faculty affiliated with the University. This office provides secretarial support
for Adjunct Faculty and the Lifelong Resource Center and, after 4:30 p.m., serves as an auxiliary
location for other student services. Previously supervised by the Dean of Student Affairs,
reorganization resulted in direction now being provided by the Director of Student Life. This shift
created a higher frequency of communication with students and faculty and increased involvement in
various University programs and activities. The staff is closely involved with the development of
such university publications as: The Adjunct Faculty Handbook, KIOSK, Pointers, and Commuter

                                                  80
Student Handbook. Evening Services has relocated to a more centralized site, allowing for better
visibility and enhanced student contact. Additional student employee hours have enabled the office
to operate with the extended hours of 9 am to 9 pm.


International Programs
       The Office of International Programs provides study-abroad opportunities for SVSU
students, faculty, staff, and services for international students. This office responds to initial
inquiries from international students and organizations, handles admissions for international
students, provides international students orientation to the University, serves as an initial source of
assistance for students, and maintains immigration information and records required by the
Immigration and Naturalization Service. It offers counseling / advising services and works with
other student services offices to provide programming for international students and those interested
in learning about different cultures and traditions. SVSU has developed an international student body
of approximately 60 to 80 students. For SVSU students interested in study-abroad programs, this
office acts as a resource center and assists students in understanding, selecting and applying for
study-abroad programs. The office develops opportunities for SVSU students to study abroad
through sister-school relationships and through SVSU-sponsored opportunities abroad. Sister-school
relationships have been developed with, and exchanges exist with, universities in Japan (two),
Poland, Turkey, France, Mexico and the People's Republic of China. These exchanges provide
opportunities for SVSU to send students and / or faculty to these universities, and allows SVSU to
receive students and/or faculty from these universities. Through consortium relationships, SVSU
also provides study-abroad opportunities in Austria, Italy, Mexico and Japan.
       SVSU recently added a full-time Special Assistant to the President for International
Programs, who also acts as Director of International Programs. SVSU has increased the number of
students studying abroad to the point where 17 students studied abroad on a full-time basis for at
least a semester in the 1992-93 year, and numerous other students study abroad for shorter periods
during summer or spring breaks. The Office of International Programs moved from supervision by
the Vice President of Academic Affairs to reporting directly to the President. This shift recognizes
that the role of the OIP falls under various administrative groups on campus (including Student
Affairs) and affirms the commitment of the President and the University to International Programs.



                                                    81
OIP continues to work closely with the Vice President for Academic Affairs, as well as the various
offices of Student Affairs.
                                 Recruitment and Admissions
       Recruitment and Admissions is a component of SVSU Public Affairs Division. This unit
coordinates a variety of marketing initiatives and recruitment strategies that encourage potential
students to enroll at SVSU. Many of these program actions and objectives depend on cooperation
with, and assistance from, other University departments and personnel.
       Efforts to fulfill the University's mission include: 1) concentrated recruitment efforts and
programs in the main service area, East Central Michigan; 2) stressing commitment to serve
community endeavors; 3) responding to individual student needs related to the admissions process;
and 4) increasing the yield (i.e., enrolled) rates among people of color through Minority Follow-up
Program. Since 1985, the following achievements have been recorded: 1) annual enrollment
increased, despite fewer applications, due largely to personalized attention given to applicants; 2)
no-need scholarship awards have increased and attracted a higher caliber of student; 3)
marketing/recruitment techniques have allowed the Office of Admissions to remain effective in its
mission with no additions to the staff; 4) key committees (e.g., Retention, Orientation, Campus Life)
have allowed Admissions staff to focus on areas pertinent to student needs; 5) minority programs
(e.g., Wade McCree, King/Chavez/Parks) have been developed and implemented to enhance
recruitment of minority students.
       In 1989, the Office of Admissions was moved from the Student Affairs Division to the Public
Affairs Division. This reorganization resulted in the Admissions Office reinforcing a commitment to
outside constituencies and focusing energies and resources on external (as opposed to internal)
functions. The result has been stronger communication links with prospective and admitted students
as well as high-school counselors. Another benefit has been the availability of the collective
resources and talents of the Public Affairs Division to impact the mission of the University.
Each individual who receives counseling and/or a tour appointment is mailed a questionnaire to
evaluate the service received. Admitted students are surveyed to evaluate, among other things,
recruitment strategies.


                                            Orientation
       Until 1990, the SVSU Orientation Program was administered through the Office of Campus
Activities. Following recommendations presented in Promises to Keep, an Orientation Team was

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formed, with the Dean of Student Affairs as chair. The team membership structure was a University
cross-section in the following areas: Admissions, Registrar, Academic Support, Career Counseling,
Financial Aid, Controller, Housing, faculty and administration. Broad representation in the
program's development has resulted in a more comprehensive presentation of the University to new
students. Orientation is comprised of three separate programs: New Student, Transfer, and Parent
Orientations. Transfer-student orientation is held four times a year - in April, May, June and August.
New students and parents select from a schedule in June and early July. Attendance at Orientation is
not required; however, over 90% of new students attend. New students and parents are involved in
activities that introduce them to the University in a full-day program that includes a campus tour,
mini-sessions highlighting career decisions, understanding academic requirements, communicating
with faculty, commuting/living on campus, diversity and course registration. The transfer student
attendance rate is considerably less. Transfer students require less information than new students and
are provided with a half-day program.
       Critique of the Orientation Program is ongoing due to the nature of the team approach. In
addition, all participants formally evaluate their day-long program near the end of their orientation.
Changes in the program have occurred between sessions as a result of these evaluations.


                             Student Life and Campus Activities
       The Office of Student Life's purpose is to complement the University's primary academic
mission by enhancing campus life, the campus environment, student leadership and the student
educational experiences. The office achieves this goal by exposing students to, and encouraging their
participation in, social, cultural, educational, recreational and governance programs. Thus, the Office
of Student Life works to coordinate campus events and facilitate the development of student
organizations and leadership skill building.
       This office supports the mission by: 1) providing opportunities to build personal, leadership
and professional skills through events, organizations and leadership programs; 2) enhancing the
intellectual and cultural well-being of the region, state and society through cultural-arts
programming -- Valley Festival of the Fine Arts, Center Stage Concert Series, Children's Concerts,
lectures and performing arts series; 3) striving for excellence in creative endeavors through programs
and services offered; 4) offering programs and clubs to learn democratic principles; and 5) hosting
events and activities that help people understand and appreciate the varieties of human culture, art



                                                   83
and accomplishment. In 1990, the Office of Student Life and Campus Activities was moved from the
Doan Center to the first floor of Wickes, closer to other student
service-oriented operations. Student Life and Campus Activities will benefit from the opening of the
Business and Professional Development Building as it: 1) centralizes student publications,
organizations and governance; 2) offers more lounge space for improved interaction; and 3) provides
an improved venue for performing-arts programs.
          The Director of Student Life serves as chairperson for the Campus Life Team, a committee
representing a cross-section of the University called to action as a result of the Promises to Keep
recommendations. The group's charge was to better coordinate events occurring on campus, to
enhance the cultural climate of the University and to inspire a sense of identity and spirit among
members of the University community through sponsored events. The Campus Life Team sponsors
the "Mini-Grant Program for Cocurricular Learning Experiences" which provides financial support
(ranging from $50-$500) to faculty for the development and expansion of creative, out-of-class
learning for students.


Activities:
          The Student Life program, under the office of the Dean of Student Affairs, provides a wide
range of intellectually stimulating events, such as the Humanities Lecture Series, Flint Artists
Exhibition, and self-esteem workshops. In addition, the program provides many social events that
permit students to interact with each other and faculty. Student Life brings speakers to campus to
allow the student body to gain perspective on world issues, as well as local social issues and
problems. A weekly-events calendar notifies students of happenings for the week as well as future
events.


Athletics and Recreational Activities:
          In 1989, the Ryder Center was constructed and added to University facilities. This complex
enables the University to provide more programs for the faculty, staff, students and residents of the
Tri-City area. In 1991-92, over 110,000 people attended activities held in the Ryder Center. In 1991,
a renovated Wickes Stadium was opened. These facilities provide the University community a
combination of competitive and noncompetitive activities to further enhance each member's physical
well-being and to teach the lessons and values that can be learned from these activities for the



                                                   84
benefit of both participating students and spectators. The program is administered to assure the
financial stability necessary for providing student-athletes with adequate opportunities for


competition as an integral part of a quality educational experience. Student-athletes are expected to
reflect the high standards that characterize participation in competitive sports in the collegiate
setting. The admission, academic standing and academic progress of student-athletes is consistent
with the policies and standards adopted by the University for the student body. The Ryder Center
allows students admission to all athletic events at no charge.


                                    Lifelong Resource Center
       The Lifelong Resource Center serves to promote academic, social and personal development
of the Adult Learner at Saginaw Valley State University. The following activities are examples of
the services that are provided to the adult learners: 1) individual support and guidance for adults
contemplating reentry into academia, as well as nontraditional students currently enrolled; 2)
workshops and seminars addressing topics of particular interest to the nontraditional student; 3) a
career mentor program for women; 4) community outreach through the Humanities Lecture series
and participation on the planning committee for the Valley Festival of the Fine Arts; 5) opportunities
for group involvement and interaction through the single parent support group and the nontraditional
student organization; and 6) fair and unbiased student elections in association with the SVSU
Election Commission.


                                   Academic Support Services
       Academic Support Services assists all students to achieve their academic and career goals
and to encourage their full participation in college life. To enhance student success, this staff works
closely with academic departments and faculty members on the development and implementation of
policies, procedures, and curricula. Recognizing the importance of co- and extracurricular activities,
this staff joins with other Student Affairs units to present activities that enrich college experience.
This office supports the University's purposes by providing support services that address the
educational needs of a diverse student body, by representing the ideals and values of higher
education in a democratic society and by contributing to the quality of life in the region, state, and
larger society.



                                                    85
       To accomplish this mission, a diverse group of prepared and experienced professionals,
reflective of the University's diverse student population, offers a range of services. Services include
academic advising, career advising, basic skills testing, and tutoring and academic skill
development. While all students may avail themselves of these services, new students (including
new transfer students), freshmen, probationary students and Summer Challenge students receive
special attention. The Summer Challenge program provides selected first-time-in-college students
(who might not otherwise be admitted) with an opportunity to acquire study skills and complete
selected courses designed to give them a better chance at success in the fall semester.
       The academic-advising role is varied and complex. Advisors help students understand and
comply with University rules and regulations. Advisors also help students define and pursue
academic goals which prepare them for lives beyond the University. Students often need guidance
and assistance as they are challenged by contingencies that affect their academic performance.
Students establish a relationship with staff early during orientation and testing. That relationship
continues as they select majors, explore careers, and receive tutoring and learning assistance. During
the junior and senior years, students are encouraged to work closely with faculty members in their
majors as well as advisors who assist them in monitoring progress toward graduation.
       Basic-skills testing (measures of competence in reading, writing, and mathematics) is
provided year round, including special testing held in spring and summer for those students coming
to orientation programs. Times and days vary to accommodate diverse student schedules. With few
exceptions, tests are scheduled several times per month and at varied times of the day, including late
afternoon and early evening. Increased enrollment has made finding test sites and times more
challenging in recent years.
       In fall 1988, the Learning Assistance Center (LAC) opened its doors as a new component to
the Office of Academic Support Services. The LAC is designed to provide students with a resource
center focused on reading, writing, and math skills. It also offers assistance in the areas of study
skills, time management, testing-taking strategies, and other areas of student development. The LAC
houses 24 Zenith computers (IBM compatible) and has an extensive, growing inventory of software
for student use. The LAC is home to the Writing Center and the Peer Tutoring program -- areas that
continue to experience growth in student use and popularity. Cost-free peer tutoring is offered in
introductory mathematics, science, accounting, economics, and foreign-language courses. The LAC
also houses the Math Department's retesting area where students enrolled in Basic Math (Math 081)



                                                   86
can retake chapter tests. The LAC is also used by the English Department as a valuable component
to its reading development classes (English 082 and 083).
       As part of the Learning Assistance Center, the Writing Center supports the development of
student writers by providing tutorial assistance to any student engaged in a writing project, whether
course-related or personal. Student tutors are prepared to help students generate ideas, organize and
develop their thoughts, understand and use appropriate documentation, and revise their work.
Students come to the Center from all disciplines and at all stages of their University work.
       The Career Resource Center is designed to provide students with the resources necessary for
career decision-making. The Coordinator of Career Services came to SVSU in January 1990, as part
of the Placement, Cooperative Education, and Career Services Office. In 1991, a reorganization of
those services moved Career Services into Academic Support Services. This relocation has
strengthened the link between career and academic decision-making and brought a range of new
services and opportunities to the office. The Career Resource Center offers valuable information to
anyone seeking career information, employment trends, educational requirements, and salaries.
Students who are undecided about a field of study, or those making a career change, benefit from
consultation and computer-assisted self- and career assessment. In addition, the Center offers
selected services to graduates, alumni, homemakers, dislocated workers, unemployed adults, and
those planning to attend graduate school. The coordinator makes presentations and offers workshops
to student, faculty and community groups on a range of career and employment topics.
       In 1985, the Office of Academic Support Services underwent several major changes when
Wickes Hall was extensively remodeled and new quarters for student service units were created on
the first floor. This relocation has had a positive impact on the delivery of services. The physical
proximity of Academic Support Services, Admissions, Registrar, Financial Aid, Placement, Student
Life, Minority Services, and Cashier means convenient access for students and site visitors.
Registration and other student business are more efficiently handled. New offices have allowed for
the development of the Learning Assistance Center and more comfortable surroundings for serving
students. Additional meeting space has meant convenient scheduling for committees and working
groups. In all aspects, relocation has increased the visibility and efficiency of the unit.
       In addition to relocation, Academic Support Services was part of a campus-wide
reorganization undertaken in October 1989 to improve service delivery and coordination efforts.
Being part of the Student Affairs Division has improved communication between the Registrar,
Financial Aid, and Student Life offices with shared concerns and roles. Increased interaction has

                                                    87
meant more input into programming and participation in co-curricular events. Reorganization also
brought Career Services under Academic Support Services in 1991. This has been a natural union of
services and resources, allowing closer ties between academic advising and career exploration, and
opportunities for new programming. In addition to improving communication and cooperation, the
reorganization has increased opportunities for staff development through in-service and conference
events. This has tightened the working relationships among staff members.
       Two significant and recent developments have affected services and created opportunities.
The first is the University's new, comprehensive management information system. When in place,
this system offers possibilities for computer-assisted advising and improved record keeping which
could lead to a number of initiatives to improve services and delivery.
       The second development is the Americans with Disabilities Act, which calls upon all units to
reassess their services and delivery systems in light of its provisions. The Coordinator of Learning
Assistance is involved with campus efforts to provide a positive, nurturing environment for students
with learning disabilities. Efforts are made to individualize services as students' needs are identified.




                           Scholarships and Student Financial Aid
       The Office of Scholarships and Student Financial Aid consists of three major departments:
Scholarships, Grants, and Loans. Each department is headed by an Administrative/Professional
Staff member. Other peripheral forms of financial assistance fall under one of these departments for
organizational and administrative purposes. The unit's primary activities are informational in nature.
As a community service, SVSU conducts Financial Aid Might presentations at local high schools.
Other activities occur on campus to raise the awareness of financial-aid availability. These activities
normally take place during Financial Aid Awareness Week which is usually scheduled in January.
       Since "the primary mission of Saginaw Valley State University is to provide opportunities for
individuals to achieve intellectual and personal growth," the Office of Scholarships and Student
Financial Aid assists students in obtaining the funds necessary to attend SVSU. All forms of
financial assistance are listed in the departmental brochure. Since the 1988-89 academic year, the
volume of student inquiries in the office has increased by 40% (Figure 17 on next page). Part of this
increase was due to worsening economic times, part was due to an increased emphasis upon student
service, and part of this increase was due to the introduction of the Free Single File financial aid

                                                   88
application during the 1990-91 academic year. Since the 1988-89 academic year, no new permanent
staff has been added to handle the increased numbers of students seeking financial assistance.

       During the 1990-91 academic year, SVSU became the first school in the state of Michigan to
designate an Electronic Data Exchange vendor to function as a United States Department of
Education Stage I Electronic Destination Point Servicer. Thus students could choose any financial-
aid application, and the University would use the electronic output to process their financial aid.
These neutral forms reduced confusion and also saved students an $8.50 processing fee.




       During 1992-93, the Office of Scholarships and Student Financial Aid was an active
participant in the conversion to the new MIS which was purchased by the University. This change in
software enabled the office to streamline policies and procedures. In 1993-94, the Office of
Admissions and the Office of Scholarships and Student Financial Aid are offering the CASHE
scholarship search program. CASHE is a comprehensive data-base search of available scholarship
opportunities to students based upon their unique student profile. Through the CASHE search
students can find financial assistance that is not offered through federal, state or institutional
programs. While many scholarship search companies are charging students $45.00 to $900.00 to do
such searches, SVSU does this search as a community service at a cost of $15.00. For all 1993-94
newly admitted SVSU Students the CASHE scholarship search is without charge.




                                                    89
          Since 1985, the Office of Scholarships and Student Financial Aid has been reorganized
several times. The most recent organization into three specific units of Scholarships, Grants, and
Loans allows staff members to specialize in an area. It also contributes to greater accountability.
Previously the A/P staff were generalists rather than specialists. Generalists are very difficult to
train, and responsibility for specific programs was unclear. Now students with a problem in a
specific area, such as a Pen Grant, can talk with a staff specialist on Pen Grants, rather than a
generalist who may or may not be able to help the student. This concept is even more important
when loans can involve the lender, the guarantor, or the loan servicer (all of which may be out of
state).


                                         Counseling Center
          SVSU's Personal Counselor provides individual counseling for personal and social concerns.
Students may request help with everyday occurrences or a crisis situation, such as a death in the
family, depression, substance or sexual abuse. Drop in or scheduled appointments with the Personal
Counselor are without charge and confidential. This office fulfills the University's mission by:
providing educational/cultural/recreational programming; sponsoring workshops to enhance personal
growth (self-esteem, test anxiety, suicide prevention, listening skills, etc.); administering the
Meyers-Briggs Type Inventory to encourage appropriate choices regarding careers and life planning;
providing individual counseling to assist with conflict resolution; serving as a resource to other
campus programs and operations; fostering a sense of belonging and value for all students. Selected
achievements of note since 1985 include: 1) newly organized services in the Student Life Center; 2)
excellent networking with total student services; 3) Self-Esteem workshops sponsored with Housing
and Substance Abuse Prevention; 4) Test Anxiety workshops offered to first-semester nursing
students.


                                           Health Services
          The purpose of the SVSU Health Services Program is to facilitate learning by promoting
student health through assistance with existing health problems and through educational information/
programming to encourage healthy, productive lifestyles. These activities support the university
mission by: 1) helping students meet personal health needs so that they are not hindered in study and
learning (individual); 2) providing learning opportunities for personal growth in the area of personal
health care (one-on-one teaching, group programs); 3) providing programming that

                                                   90
will allow students to have the knowledge necessary to incorporate healthy habits into their lifestyles
(programming); 4) providing opportunities for students to learn about health concerns as these affect
the student and others (programming); 5) providing opportunities for students to learn about
community resources for health and discover their own health status (health fair); 6) providing
students with opportunities to contribute to the health of the community (blood drives).
       Health Services staff recorded the following achievements since 1985: 1) moved to new
facilities that are well suited for students' needs; 2) met the needs of increasing numbers of students
(1984-85 -- 3,166 client visits; 1992-93 -- 4,306 clients); 3) implemented an active immunization
program, targeting freshmen students in the residence halls; 4) employed more complete, updated
nursing protocols; 5) assisted personnel in implementing a Hepatitis B vaccination program for
University employees.


                               Programs for Substance Abusers
       Part of the Student Life Center, Substance Abuse Prevention is a campus-wide prevention
and education campaign designed to prevent substance abuse and to intervene if problems already
exist. This Center provides confidential alcohol and other drug awareness counseling. Informative
educational material is available upon request. The Center also has videos, pamphlets, basic
counseling and referral, prevention seminars, volunteer training, and promotional prevention
strategies for campus members.
       In accordance with the University's mission, the Office of Substance Abuse Prevention
provides educational programming, opportunities to develop leadership skills, opportunities for
creative endeavors, and substance-free support services. In addition, it addresses the diverse needs of
a student population that varies by gender, age, ability, experience, lifestyle, cultural background and
economic circumstances, understanding and respect among all people, as well as wellness and
healthy lifestyles. Several changes have been accomplished since 1985: 1) a Substance Abuse
Prevention Services was created; 2) a policy encompassing students and employees was written and
approved, bringing the University in compliance with Federal guidelines; 3) a full-time specialist
position was created in 1988 with the help of a Federal Fund for the Improvement of Post-Secondary
Education Grant. In 1990, the University supported this position as permanent part-time. This
specialist is responsible for alcohol and other drug assessments, referrals, support and education of
alcohol and other drug related issues.

                                                   91
                                           Registrar's Office
        The Registrar's Office's objective is to economically provide timely and accurate student
records to the SVSU students, faculty and staff. Office responsibilities include transfer credit
evaluation, registration, records maintenance, grade processing, transcript production, general
enrollment certification, veterans benefits certification, athletic eligibility certification, transcript
production, degree audits, commencement processing, and computer systems development. The
Registrar has additional enrollment management responsibilities when office members serve on
selected committees or task forces. Office staff serve on committees for commencement, Nursing
admissions, orientation, international programs, and professional development.
        The Registrar's Office, in 1985, implemented transcript and transfer credit modules in a
computer system designed by the SVSU Registrar's staff. In 1992, the University purchased a
management information system. Some components of the new system are not as efficient and
effective as the old system because they are less customized. In 1994, it is projected that a degree
audit module will be implemented within the new University MIS.


                 Office of Marketing Research and Information Services
        The Office of Marketing Research and Information Services supports University efforts to
optimize the relations with external groups and internal groups and to better serve students and the
general public. This Office directs actions which serve a growing student body by increasing
participation in University programs and increasing revenues generated. The staff provides in-house
graphic design and typesetting services for institutional publications ranging from business cards and
stationery to semester class schedules, course- description catalogs and University viewbooks.
Publication services include start-to-finish assistance as needed, beginning with audience
identification and concluding with distribution of completed work.
        The Interior, a bi-weekly newsletter for campus personnel and University-related groups, is
written and published by the Information Services Staff. In addition, the staff produces the Alumni
Announcer and newsletters designed to communicate with various University constituents. These
publications inform readers about program and physical plant developments, policies and
procedures, and invite participation in campus events and activities.
        The office provides photographic services for University publications and events or arranges
for commercial photographers. The licensing program monitors and promotes the use of University

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logo and trademarked symbols. Marketing research activities focus on examining the characteristics
of the communities and students served by SVSU, as well as determining the level of satisfaction
with the University's programs and services. The office prepares and places selected media
advertising to inform the public about class offerings and special events.


                                         Graphics Center
       This center provides duplication/printing services to the University faculty and staff.
Graphics Services include printing of course syllabi, examinations, course materials and most of the
University communications across the campus. New equipment has been added to the Center to
increase its efficiency and to expand the quality of services provided. For the most part, the center is
able to respond in a timely fashion with exceptions during the peak- load periods of the academic
year. In addition to the graphic center, each of the major office areas across the campus have ready
access to copy machines for smaller copying requirements.


                                      Continuing Education
       The Conference Center offers services to assist with the scheduling of continuing education
seminars and workshops for internal and external groups. There are periodic sessions offered
throughout the academic year to enable faculty, staff, and students to become updated on relevant
issues pertinent to the University community and selected disciplines. For example, the College of
Science Engineering and Technology has offered selected sessions for engineers in the community.
The College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences has offered continuing education sessions for
practicing nurses and nurse leaders in the region. Usually there are one to three presentations of a
scholarly nature each semester with additional sessions related to social or political issues of the
community. The professional development sessions are without charge and open to all members of
the University community.


                    Business Industrial Development Institute (BIDI)
       BIDI works to unite SVSU's regional communities' resources in an effort to enhance growth
and development of business and industry. Through its Small Business Development Center, BIDI
offers three types of research services: business plan development, database searches and market
research. This office can assist a potential or established business owner to compile a complete



                                                   93
business plan. A plan can also be created for requesting financing of a new business or an expansion
of a current business. BIDI clients have received funding from financial institutions, private
investors and the state of Michigan. The Manufacturers' Technology Exchange Group (MTEG) helps
manufacturers understand, identify, and adopt advanced production technologies and methods to
improve their competitive advantage. BIDI coordinates several exchange groups to bring together
members of the manufacturing community. Through its Midwest Manufacturing Technology Center
affiliate office, it helps companies effectively apply manufacturing technologies and offers
conferences and seminars. Another BIDI office activity involves the Saginaw Valley Entrepreneurs
Club, established in 1983, to provide area entrepreneurs an opportunity to meet other entrepreneurs
and professional resource persons. Meetings are held at SVSU eight months of the year (September
through May), usually on the second Wednesday evening of each month.


                                        Alumni Relations
       The purpose of the Alumni Association is to promote the general welfare of Saginaw Valley
State University and build loyalty and support among its graduates. The Association seeks to
maintain a mutually beneficial relationship between the University and its alumni and to promote
opportunities for alumni to serve the University. The Association is committed to develop and
conduct programs and activities for members of the Association and University students.
       Each University graduate is a member of the Alumni Association. There are no membership
dues at the present time. The Alumni Association is governed by a 15-member Board of Directors
elected from the general membership. The Board meets monthly during the academic year.
       The Alumni Relations Office provides services to the Alumni Association including the
assistance required for activities of the Board of Directors. The Director of Alumni Relations and
Annual Giving allocates one-half time to the Alumni Association with the assistance of a part-time
secretary. The Office maintains a database of more than 12,000 alumni members and provides lists
of alumni to various campus offices as required. The Director serves as the editor of the Alumni
Announcer, a newspaper mailed three times a year to all alumni. The Alumni Relations Office
sponsors selected events, including the Alumni Afterglow on Homecoming Day, and occasional
class reunions.
       The Alumni Board selects an annual recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award which is
presented at the spring Commencement ceremony. Recently the Alumni Board established a $14,000
endowed scholarship which was contributed by the Alumni Association members.

                                                  94
PART THREE:                   Accomplishment of Purposes at
                              Saginaw Valley State University

                                 Evaluative Criterion Three:
                           "The institution is accomplishing its purposes."


3.1 ASSESSING INSTITUTIONAL MISSION AND GOALS

                                           Introduction


        The University provides extensive baccalaureate degree programs as evidenced by the
catalog description of these programs. Master's Degree Program are offered in Education, Business
Administration, Political Science/Criminal Justice, and Nursing.
        The University's primary mission is "to provide opportunities for individuals to achieve
intellectual and personal growth." The next section presents information which demonstrates the
University's accomplishment of its mission in the context of student academic achievement, as it is
currently assessed and in the context of a projected plan for assessment of student-learning
outcomes. Other University goals related to support services that meet the educational needs of a
diverse student population are addressed along with the goal related to contributing to the quality of
life in the region.


                                  Institutional Purpose Goal


To provide a comprehensive array of baccalaureate degree programs and a select number of
Master's Degree Programs. To strive for excellence in teaching, learning, research, service and
creative endeavors, and to stand as an ale in those regards.

        The University recognizes outstanding academic potential and performance at its Spring
Honors Convocation shortly before the Commencement exercises. In addition, students graduating
in honors and with honors are recognized during the Commencement Program. The University offers
an Honors Program for selected undergraduate students. Honors students must research and write a
thesis which is presented in open forums to the University community. The Honors Program
recognizes the coursework accomplished by honors students and their thesis


                                                  95
work during the convocation ceremonies. These awards recognize problem-solving skills, applied
creativity, and critical thinking. At the same time, these awards generate in students high levels of
motivation to expand their knowledge. Faculty-student interaction occurs in the supervision of
student thesis research through the undergraduate Honors Program and in graduate programs in
Criminal Justice/Political Science and Nursing. Masters students in Nursing and Criminal
Justice/Political Science also prepare a thesis. Theses are printed and bound for later use by other
researchers.
       The University acknowledges an obligation to support its faculty and staff in their research,
scholarship and creative activities. The annual outstanding teaching award, (the Landee Award), the
outstanding researcher award (the Warrick Award), and the award for teacher impact (the House
Award) are some examples of recognition for faculty achievements and excellence. The Board of
Control, President, and faculty share a commitment to the production of knowledge, the application
of that knowledge to the problems of larger society, and the University's development as a cultural
resource by encouraging research, scholarly and creative activities. Some of these activities include
the annual performances of plays and music, readings of poetry and dramatic texts, and the creation
and exhibition of paintings, sculptures, prints, photographs, and other artworks within the University
community.
       Another project, the Save Outdoor Sculpture (SOS!), involves and benefits the community as
well as scholars on campus. The project includes training and coordination of volunteers across the
state who inventory outdoor sculpture, assess its condition and promote its proper care. Another
project, Earth Vision, has employed two undergraduates and one graduate student to support
activities and conduct environmental research using computational science (EPA funded). This
further increases student exposure to research activities, as well as providing support for faculty
research.
       The SVSU Foundation and external sources fund research. External funds are principally
from government sources such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the State of
Michigan's Research Excellence Fund; however, some private research grants have been obtained.
Many of these research grants must be matched with funds from University resources.
       Faculty and staff, working with the Office of Sponsored Programs, produce proposals for
funding. Figure 18 which follows summarizes the SVSU Foundation's support for research and grant
activities through the Office of Sponsored Programs.



                                                   96
       SVSU Foundation Support for Faculty Research and Scholarship
                               1985-1992
Year                             Projects                              Amount
1985    Faculty Research & Professional Development                    $       21,915.00
        International Presentation of Papers by SVSU Faculty                    2,000.00
        Clerical Support for Faculty Research                                   5,000.00
                                                               Total   $       28,915.00
1986    Faculty Research & Professional Development                    $       32,000.00
        Faculty Exchange - China & Japan                                        5,000.00
                                                               Total    $      37,000.00
1987    Faculty Research & Professional Development                     $      15,503.00
        Support to Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, and Letters
                                                                                5,000.00
        Annual Meetings at SVSU
                                                               Total    $      20,503.00
1988    Faculty Research & Professional Development                        $   14,000.00
        Write-to-Learn Project                                                  6,000.00
                                                               Total       $   20,000.00
1989    Faculty Research & Professional Development                        $   20,000.00
        Two-Way Interactive Television Study                                    5,000.00
                                                               Total       $   25,000.00
1990    Faculty Research & Professional Development                        $    9,375.00
                                                               Total       $    9,375.00
1991    Faculty Research & Professional Development                        $   21,872.00
        Writing Assessment & Improvement Task Force                            10,000.00
        Teaching Innovation Task Force                                         20,000.00
                                                               Total       $   51,872.00
1992    SVSU History Project                                               $   20,000.00
                                                               Total       $   20,000.00
                                         Figure 18




                                                97
       Significant research monies in recent years have come via projects in which SVSU
participates as a partner. Notable among these projects is the Consortium for International Earth
Science Information Network (CIESIN), which has provided $2.4 million for administration,
research activities, and use of facilities (a combined total for Fiscal 1990 - 1992). Also emerging is
the Environmental Protection Agency's EPA NESC in Bay City.




                                Funding From Outside Sources
       Funding from outside sources has increased considerably since 1986-87, due in part to the
addition of CIESIN funds awarded for activities at SVSU. Figure 19 presents a summary listing of
gent-award totals by source and year. Dollar amounts, however, are only a small indication of the
level of activity in seeking funding. Since the early 1980s, submitted proposals increased from
approximately 16 per year to a high of 71 in 1986-87. In 1992-93, 42 proposals were submitted. The
success of these proposals has varied from year to year as well. In the early 1980s, six or seven
proposals were funded each year. By 1987-88, 34 proposals were funded. As of this date, 18 of the
proposals submitted in 1992-93 were successful. Decisions on many of the others submitted in
1993-94 are still pending.


                 Grant Awards by Fiscal Year and Source of Award
              Research, Scholarly Activity, and Teaching Enhancements
Fiscal Year      U.S. Gov't        State Gov't       Private            Other            Total

1986-87                 446,064           269,820              31,505            3,431           750,820
1987-88                 214,138           338,750               9,050            2,147           564,085
1988-89                 216,359           684,819              19,300           34,828           955,306
1989-90                 478,656           724,728               9,454              -0-        1,212,838
1990-91               1,470,447           117,079              55,014              -0-        1,642,540
1991-92               1,568,944           153,416              10,577           99,750        1,832,937
1992-93                 298,351           429,689               3,000              -0-           731,040
                                              Figure 19




                                                  98
                     Release Time for Research and Scholarly Activities
       SVSU also provides opportunity for faculty to request release time for research or proposed
development for research. Additionally, faculty sabbaticals are used for research and professional
development. Listed below (Figure 20) are the release-time hours for sabbaticals and research for
each year since 1985. Staff are not eligible for release time or for sabbaticals for research purposes.
However, some staff still manage to conduct research and most administrative staff take time for
various forms of professional development in their areas of scholarship.

                      Hours of Faculty Release Time: Academic Year
              Year          Sabbatical         Research            Other             Total
            1986-87             180              32.33                0              212.33
            1987-88              72                59                 4               135
            1988-89              96              45.67               21              162.67
            1989-90              72                 7                19                98
            1990-91             144                71                13               228
            1991-92             108                90                 8               206
            1992-93              84                28                 7               119

                                               Figure 20


                 Evaluation of SVSU Research and Scholarly Activities
       Saginaw Valley State University supports research in a number of ways, including:
               1) Using University funds for research
               2) Using University funds and overhead to match external grants
               3) Assisting faculty and staff with obtaining grants
               4) Providing release time and sabbatical support
               5) Providing some student workers and other labor to assist in research
In view of the availability of release time and financial support, the faculty research productivity is
relatively high as evidenced by the scholarly presentations, publications and consultations. Since the
institution has placed highest priority on teaching performance (as evidenced in contractual
language) in evaluation of faculty for promotion, tenure and sabbatical leaves, it is reasonable to
expect that the faculty will continue to respond at about the same pace. As additional resources are
made available, it could be expected that research activities have the potential to increase.

                                                   99
                 Research Growth Compared with Overall SVSU Growth


          As the pressure of increased enrollments places greater demands on University faculty,
release time becomes more difficult to fund. The availability of release time is not a matter that will
be easily resolved as release time also affects students and teaching. The University believes that the
best teaching is done by its full-time faculty. Release time must be made up with increased teaching
by faculty colleagues and by part-time faculty. Under these circumstances, teaching quality may
suffer.
          Funds are made available to faculty for their scholarly growth and development through the
provision of the faculty Contract, which provides $350 per year per faculty member to attend
conferences, professional meetings, and/or related professional growth activities. In addition, each
department has a pool of $150 per faculty member to be allocated to faculty members within the
department. The method of allocation is deeded by a department's members. The respective faculty
members' dean may authorize additional payment of expenses for professional development
purposes from a Professional Improvement Pool of $25,000 which is disbursed by the Vice President
for Academic Affairs. Site visitors may see the faculty Contract for further details.
          Clearly, gent-funded research has surpassed other measures of growth at SVSU, largely
because of the advent of CIESIN funds in 1990. Grant funded research has more than doubled (from
$750,000 to $1.7 million) between 1986-87 and 1991-92 while enrollment increased 20% in the
same period. SVSU's general fund increased 57% during the same period.
          SVSU provides one faculty secretary whose primary responsibilities are typing and
preparation of research manuscripts. Her skills are invaluable to faculty preparing manuscripts for
publication. SVSU also has added some graduate student employees as research assistants. Since
few of the University's graduate students attend full time, this source is unlikely to grow greatly in
the future.
          SVSU's full-time faculty include 74% who are tenured and 51% who are full professors.
With no need to "prove" oneself for the purpose of obtaining promotion or tenure, faculty may have
little external incentive to involve themselves in research activities. Other measures are in place,
however. Among them are the Warrick Award, which recognizes excellence in research and
scholarship. The award has been given to nine people, six of whom were full professors at the time
they received the award. All faculty receiving it were tenured at the time.



                                                  100
       University financial resources for student research has not been an item of significant
discussion. Other support does, however, exist. One faculty member has six hours of release time to
coordinate and supervise the Honors Program. Other faculty members supervise student theses,
either Masters or Honors theses. The entire University community is invited to presentations of the
research results, and the entire University community recognizes the Honors Program graduates
(together with students graduating with honors) at an assembly each spring.




                      Library and Laboratory Support for Research
       SVSU's Library's mission statement clearly emphasizes undergraduate education. Research,
scholarly activity, and graduate-student research must rely on interlibrary-loan resources to obtain
necessary journals and other materials.
       Laboratories are, for the most part, well constructed. At least basic equipment and materials
are available and some faculty members have successfully applied for grant finding for additional
equipment to be used in teaching and scholarly work. The University has begun efforts to increase
computer access to international networks as well as to internal networks. The University is also
actively setting aside funds to build an equipment replacement pool.
       External sources, such as the EPA super computer, are affording SVSU researchers access to
new ways of conducting research, as are some of the telecommunications capabilities implemented
through CIESIN.



Goal: To provide academic and support services that address the educational needs of a diverse
      student population that varies by gender, age, ability, experience, lifestyle, cultural
      background and economic circumstances.




       SVSU supports the educational needs of its students through a variety of means. In this
section, we describe the key components of the University's programs for students beginning with
those designed primarily for brand new students and continuing through those for all students or for
specialized groups of students.




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       A major accomplishment in the academic support services area has been the introduction of
the Summer Challenge Program. First piloted in 1990, the Summer Challenge Program provides an
educational bridge from high school to the University. The program is designed for students who are
not academically well prepared and, therefore, otherwise ineligible for admission to SVSU. For
admission in the summer program, students must have the potential and motivation to succeed at the
University level. Priority is given to educationally disadvantaged students. Those selected for the
program undertake a five-week "Summer Challenge." Students must work on their reading, writing,
and mathematics skills through intensive tutoring and computer-based materials. Students must pass
one prescribed SVSU academic course with a grade of "C" or better. In addition to coursework,
students are introduced to student development programs in study skills, career exploration, library
use, and they participate in a range of University experiences. Only after successful completion of
the Summer Challenge are these students recommended for admission to SVSU. As a condition of
their admission, students agree to bi-weekly meetings with an academic advisor to monitor their
academic and personal progress. Mid-term grade evaluations are requested from their individual
faculty members to assist in this monitoring.
       Academic Advising plans to continue improving the delivery of services with new outreach
programs and, as developed, new computer capabilities. Academic Advising will continue to play an
integral role in new and transfer student orientation, including the training of student orientation
leaders. Career and Learning Assistance programming staff to work with all-University committees
and major events. The Academic Advising Center seeks to establish a permanent testing room to
provide frequent basic skills testing with less student inconvenience. Such a room would also make
possible more workshop activities and small group seminars. The advisory challenges of the nineties
are desirable ones--meeting the needs of a growing student body.
       Student leadership opportunities are available through a number of positions in the
Admissions Office. They include the Campus Tow Coordinator, University Orientation Program
Coordinators and various internships (telemarketing, high-school visitation, etc.) These positions are
held by undergraduates selected upon recommendations of SVSU faculty and staff. The results
enhance the commitment to personal attention toward prospective students while the interns gain
valuable leadership and administrative experience. Each individual who has a counseling or tour
appointment is asked to evaluate the service received by way of a mailed questionnaire.




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       The Bilingual / Bicultural Teacher Training Program (BBTTP) is designed to train highly
qualified bilingually endorsed teachers who will be able to address the needs of Limited English
Proficient (LEP) students and migrant children in the SVSU service area. The program has received
a federal grant each year since 1976, with the exception of two years. The program's success is
measured by the number of graduates placed in different school districts serving LEP students. The
BBTTP hires a consultant to evaluate the program each year. The external evaluator uses survey
questionnaires as a main vehicle for gathering data from students, faculty, staff and community
members. In order to analyze the data, the external evaluator conducts both qualitative and
quantitative analysis. The external evaluator's main goal is to assess the program's accomplishment
of its objectives. To date, these evaluation techniques have resulted in data that supports the position
that Bilingual students gain from the program's student-oriented approach, the staff team effort, the
increased number of students and the student support services (tutoring, counseling, cultural / social
activities, workshops, and others). Students involved in BBTTP have the opportunity to attend local
and state bilingual conferences, serve as volunteers to orient students from the public schools, assist
other students by tutoring in areas of expertise and participate in the Bilingual Advisory Committee
and in the Hispanic Student Association. Saginaw Valley State University continues to support
100% of the regular personnel expenses of the BBTTP. All federal funds are used to support
students who will be working towards teacher certification and bilingual endorsement. Both
traditional and nontraditional students participate in the BBTTP regardless of race, age, gender, sex
orientation and ethnicity. The BBTTP has strong ties with various community leaders. Hence, it
serves as a liaison between the University (Faculty/Staff/Students) and the community. Due to the
caring atmosphere, the financial assistance, and the support services provided by the Bilingual
Program, the retention rate is outstanding. At the present time, the program is operating at full
capacity of 60 students and has a waiting list.
       The Office of Housing and Residential Life contributes to the overall mission of the
University by creating a positive living-learning environment in the residence halls and campus
apartments. This environment fosters maximum student growth while continuing to be aware of the
needs and interests of our diverse student population residing on campus. The Housing and
Residential Life program has experienced growth in student leadership participation, including that
of minorities. The program has made advancements in offering self-esteem workshops in
cooperation with Student Life staff. It also modified the use of the Doan Center to provide much
needed social/recreational space for residence students.

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       The Office of International Programs contributes to the University mission by providing the
campus community with opportunities for exposure to a variety of cultures through study abroad for
those able to take advantage of those opportunities. Exposure to other cultures, traditions and
lifestyles is provided through international students and faculty on the SVSU campus. The Office of
International Programs offers programs to all interested students to enhance their education through
international experiences, on campus or abroad.
       The Office of Placement and Cooperative Education is responsible for placement,
cooperative education and student-employment programs, and the services each provides. Placement
offers career planning and placement services and programming to students, faculty/staff and
alumni. Cooperative Education develops partnerships between students, SVSU and area employers
that provide work-related learning experiences. The program is open to all majors and provides
work-related experience with classroom learning to prepare students for professional employment
upon graduation. Student Employment provides on-campus employment opportunities for students
who perform University support functions. Achievements in these areas include: growth in the
numbers of students involved in cooperative education; increased awareness of placement services
by students, faculty/staff and alumni; implemented off-campus work-study program; improved
coordination of career planning and placement programs and services; growth of Career Exploration
Day activities to include over 50 employers; trained and committed staff to customer service;
improved career planning and placement resources, publications and videos available to students,
faculty/staff and alumni; more involved campus-wide orientation and admissions. The Office of
Institutional Research annually surveys recent graduates to assess their satisfaction with Placement
Services and their job circumstances.
       Student Government is one way students may become involved in the University's
administrative process. The Student Government President holds a nonvoting position on the
University's Board of Control, serving as student representative to the Board, President, Dean of
Student Affairs and other University operations. The University Program Board and the Student
Senate Grade Grievance Committee are two important branches of Student Government. Student
Government funding (which supports Program Board) is provided through a portion of a general
service fee assessed to all students. The Dean of Student Affairs serves as the advisor to Student
Government. A healthy working relationship exists between University administration and Student
Government.



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3.2 PROSPECTIVE SYSTEM OF ASSESSMENT


                                           Early Efforts

       SVSU faculty and administration have long shared an interest in assessing program quality
and effectiveness. In the early 1980's, the University was invited to join a National Center for Higher
Education Management Systems (NCHEMS)/Kellogg Foundation Student Outcomes project. This
initiative, called the SVSU Outcomes Project, began with two open forums being held on campus to
gain an understanding of SVSU's faculty opinions on the project's design and direction. From
attendance at the forums, it was clear that faculty supported the project. A one-time sum of $10,000
was set aside to fund the preliminary assessment effort, part of which was expended to provide
matching funds to send members of the project team to an NCHEMS Dissemination Meeting in
Boulder, Colorado, in February 1985. At this meeting, the University secured the services of two
leading assessment consultants, Dr. Trudy Banta, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and Dr.
Richard Harpel, University of Colorado.


       One of the project's first activities was to issue a request for participation to all academic
departments. As a result of this call and from interest noted at the two open forums, eight
departments came forward to learn more about assessment issues: Communication and Theater,
Electrical Engineering and Technology, English, Mechanical Engineering and Technology, Modern
Foreign Languages, Nursing, Physics and Social Work. The NCHEMS consultants, Dr. Banta and
Dr. Harpel, visited the SVSU campus in June 1985 for a series of meetings with representatives from
the eight departments and the project team.


       To assist departments further with outcomes design, Dr. Aubrey Forrest, American College
Testing and Director of the College Outcome Measures Program (COMP), was invited to present a
half-day seminar on campus during October of that year. Dr. Forrest delivered a lively program to
about 50 faculty and staff which centered around higher education assessment, the ACT COMP Test
and other measurements of student learning.




                                                  105
This initial assessment effort had the following results:
(1) A number of faculty gained an insight into assessment issues and techniques.
(2) A great deal of experience was gained in using standardized tests like the ACT COMP test, the
       GRE and the Major Field Achievement Test, and this experience led the project team to
       doubt the effectiveness of large-scale standardized testing at SVSU for purposes of outcomes
       assessment.


(3) The project team found that a significant amount of assessment was already being done on
       campus, especially by the professional programs.


(4) Since trends in outcomes assessment seem to recommend the custom tailoring of
       measurement techniques to fit the nature of the programs, the faculty, the institution and the
       students, SVSU may wish to explore the use of multiple assessment measures: in some
       programs outcomes may involve professional accreditation actions, in others it could mean
       standardized testing scores, and in still others techniques like student interviews could be
       used.


(5) The initial project was to be viewed as a successful first phase of a longer-term assessment
       project, one which should move into a more comprehensive second phase.


Of the second phase, the SVSU Outcomes project recommended:
(1) Developing a campus-wide Outcomes Task Force with representation from each college and
       each academic department


(2) Developing participation incentives, a direct-cost support structure and appropriate personnel
       support for projects


(3) Cataloging and collecting results of past assessment activities and maintaining a working
       assessment library for faculty use




                                                  106
(4) Planning for some assessment activity involving faculty departments by May 1, 1992


(5) Assigning permanent oversight authority to an existing SVSU office


(6) Developing a procedure for dissemination of information on current assessment techniques




                  Creation of the University Task Force on Assessment
The Vice President for Academic Affairs appointed a Task Force on Assessment in early 1991.
The Task Force:
(1) Studied approaches to assessment being used in other institutions


(2) Identified methods currently in place at SVSU


(3) Disseminated information about assessment to the SVSU community


(4) Coordinated with faculty and administrative groups to ensure that appropriate channels are
       used in assessment initiatives


(5) Made recommendations for the development of an assessment initiative at SVSU for the
       following three to four years


The Task Force had representative membership from each of the five Colleges as well as the Office
of Academic Support Services and the Deans' Offices. The minutes and activities of the Task Force
will be available for the site visitors. The Task Force studied the current assessment approaches at
Kean College and Alverno College, as well as other state institutions. Selected members attended
workshops to become more informed about the assessment process and strategies to motivate faculty
participation. The Task Force formed a regular schedule of visits from professionals in the
assessment movement to explore what has been done elsewhere. To this end Dr. Michael Knight,
Assessment Director of Kean State College in New Jersey, worked with the Task Force in a one-day
workshop and then gave the orientation address to the faculty in the fall of 1991. Dr. James O.
Nichols, Director of Planning and Institutional Research at the University of Mississippi, gave a

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workshop for Task Force Members and interested faculty in the fall of 1992. His work on the
cognitive, behavioral and attitudinal assessment now forms the basis of the work being done in the
first phase with six pilot departments.
       The Task Force designed a working definition of assessment as "the articulation of goals for
each program, the gaining of feedback on progress towards those goals, and the using of feedback to
modify programs to achieve the goals." The group studied the approaches used by other institutions
as potential models or methods that could have relevance for SVSU. A library of assessment
materials was made available for faculty and staff use in the Office of Institutional Research.




                                  Current Assessment Efforts


       Responding to the recommendation from Promises to Keep -- "assemble information from
each of the departments as to student outcomes assessment efforts and findings in this regard" --
members of the Task Force group interviewed faculty members of University departments to
determine the kinds of assessment activities currently being conducted. From the interviews (and
from Ten Year Reviews and Self Studies when available), the Task Force identified four different
types of assessment currently in place at SVSU. These include: 1) standardized tests, 2)
performance, 3) portfolios, 4) surveys.
       Other means of assessment include capstone courses; informal measures such as dialogue
with students, alumni, and employers; the number and position of graduates employed in jobs related
to their field of study; and the number of graduates seeking further education.
       The Task Force on Assessment drafted a Statement of Principles and circulated it to the full
faculty in January 1992 for their reactions and feedback. The following principles and descriptions
made up the Statement of Principles.


Principle 1:   Programs require continuous review and adjustment to facilitate the achievement of
               their goals. The purpose of assessment is to enhance student learning and
               development by creating methods to:
               a) Articulate the goals of each academic program
               b) Gain feedback on the progress towards those goals
               c) Use the feedback to modify aspects of each academic program to facilitate
                   the achievement of its goals .



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Principle 2:   An effective assessment program requires adequate resources. The faculty should be
               provided with guidance, training, and financial support to implement each
               department's assessment program.

Principle 3:   Faculty will have the responsibility for the design, selection, and implementation of
               methods of assessment. There are many valid approaches to assessment; some are
               more quantitative, some more qualitative. The faculty in each program will identify or
               create and then use assessment instruments which best meet program objectives.

Principle 4:   For an assessment initiative to be successful, outcomes data should be used by faculty
               for the purpose of determining program effectiveness. An effective assessment
               initiative requires that data remain confidential. Data from assessment, then, shall not
               be used to make comparison among faculty, departments, or colleges. Neither shall
               they be used for faculty evaluation nor be employed in the retention, tenure,
               promotion, or merit award processes.

Principle 5:   Outcomes assessment is a long-term ongoing process involving continuous change
               and improvement. While some assessment projects may be of short duration, the
               program as a whole has a long-term focus.


       The Task Force on Assessment used the feedback from faculty to modify and improve the
statement of principles. The group designed a time line in relation to its charge and perceived
commitments. A copy of the Time Line is presented in Appendix D.
       The NCA Accreditation Steering Committee included an Outcomes Assessment
Subcommittee made up of some of the Task Force members plus selected other faculty members.
The committee was charged to gather and summarize current and planned assessment efforts related
to student achievement. The members of the subcommittee divided all departments by College and
gathered information in one of two methods: a) requesting a description of current outcomes
assessment efforts, or b) using an interview questionnaire developed by the Task Force on
Assessment. In using the questionnaire, subcommittee members met with department chairs,
reviewed outcomes assessment definitions and used the following set of questions:


       (1) Do you now measure or assess the competence of your seniors?
       (2) Are you currently doing any assessment projects in your department?
       (3) What sort of assessment project would you find helpful?
       (4) What sort of assessment process would you find least helpful?
       (5) Does the department participate in accreditation?
       (6) How would you assess your students -- focus on understanding, performance, or
           satisfaction?
       (7) What would you recommend be done to measure general-education outcomes?
       (8) What would you recommend be done to measure basic skills?


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       In addition, departments were asked to respond as to whether they had developed a statement
of purpose or objectives regarding student achievement and whether this statement was periodically
reviewed or updated.
       The results of the departmental inquiry are presented in the next section of this report which
summarizes the kind of assessment currently in planning or in progress.




                                 Arts and Behavioral Sciences

Art:               The nature of the discipline requires individualization in establishing
               goals. Student outcomes and achievement are measured in large part
               through public display and peer critique. Faculty also critique work
               individually and in groups. The department surveys alumni regularly
               regarding their learning experiences at SVSU.

Communication/Theatre: The department assesses students through examinations,
            performances, papers and projects. A national standardized test is not
            currently available. The student-learning experience is observed and
            assessed, formally and informally, on an individual basis as each
            student progresses through the sequence of major courses.
            Communication majors must successfully complete a capstone course
            required of all seniors. Theatre majors are evaluated on their
            performance and senior projects related to production.

Criminal Justice: The faculty is collaborating with a member of the Outcomes
               Assessment Initiative on an article exploring the merits of assessment
               as it applies to Criminal Justice majors.

English:           The department is reviewing its current curriculum by participating
               in a three-year national curriculum review project sponsored by the
               Modern Language Association and the Fund for the Improvement of
               Post-Secondary Education. Working with consultant Donald
               McQuade from the University of California, Berkeley, the
               department MLA FIPSE Committee has stimulated discussion among
               colleagues, written commentaries and proposals, and initiated
               dialogues with students that have helped generate a draft of program
               goals for the department. The activities of the MLA FIPSE
               Committee and related department activities will lead to a formalized
               statement of program goals and a proposal for a revised curriculum.
               A member of the department (the current chair) is a member of the
               SVSU Assessment Initiative and will work with the department
               towards establishing ways of assessing program quality once program
               goals are formalized and curriculum changes have been instituted.


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History:           The faculty are currently discussing the development of a senior
               project which will take the form of either a thesis or seminar, or
               possibly some combination of both. Such a project will help the
               department assess the quality of its offerings at the freshman,
               sophomore and junior levels. In addition, the department is interested
               in monitoring the progress of its student majors who take the history
               component of the State of Michigan Social Science Teacher
               Certification Test. At present, the department is studying ways to
               better prepare its majors for such an outcome.

Modern Foreign Languages: Students seeking teacher certification (this group includes the majority
             of foreign language majors and minors) are required to pass the Michigan Test for
             Teacher Certification in their respective majors and minors. The department
             continually monitors the progress of students in their language, literature, and culture
             courses; faculty members regularly consult each other about students' work. Students
             in the Honors Program must complete an honors thesis under the supervision of a
             faculty member; the topic of this thesis is closely related to the student's major. The
             last department internal self-study and external review included Professor J. Sanford
             Dugan of the Department of Foreign Languages at Eastern Michigan University.

Music:              All music majors perform for a faculty jury every semester (minors
               are encouraged to perform on juries), and all majors and minors must
               perform in ensembles which present public performances.
               Performances are considered one acceptable way to help assess music
               programs. In addition to the above requirements, all those enrolled
               in the Music Education program are required to pass the Michigan
               Teacher Competency Test prior to Associate Teaching. This test is
               the state licensure examination for music teachers. Associate
               Teaching is the capstone course for these students, during which
               students are observed by a cooperating teacher and a university
               supervisor. This final course is preceded by four other field
               experiences, all of which help the department to assess its program
               in practical settings. The department also has an informal, ongoing,
               relationship with its Music Education alumni. Alumni call faculty
               members for advice and get together with Music Education faculty
               at state and regional professional meetings.

Philosophy:        The department underwent a thorough review of its program in 1988,
               and this included both internal and external evaluations. As a result
               of that review and student enrollment factors, the department has
               appointed one additional member. The department uses several kinds
               of tests, examinations, and papers, all devised to allow them to assess
               the student's ability in respect to analyzing philosophical issues and
               tests, constructing arguments that serve as the ~ vehicle for such
               analysis, and engaging in the specialized research and writing




                                                 111
               required by it. Although there is no philosophy major, the faculty views a senior's
               thesis as the most viable indicator of achievement for future efforts.

Political Science: A senior seminar (PS 491) includes a research proposal and paper as
               the primary means of assessing student achievement in the program.
               A curriculum review process is currently in progress. Portfolio
               assessment is seen as the most likely evaluation method to emerge
               from this review. The purpose would be to aid and monitor students
               as they progress toward the capstone course.

Psychology:        The department monitors student performance in a variety of ways.
               Before graduation their performance in core courses and laboratory
               courses is evaluated. Research done under supervision of faculty
               members, as well as presentations of papers at undergraduate
               conferences, is also evaluated. The department has established goals
               and objectives for the graduates in psychology and tracks their
               progress by their acceptance to graduate programs and employment.
               The department has a capstone course in place where a portfolio
               system is being developed to evaluate the psychology majors before
               graduation. The department also conducts self-studies in which
               surveys of its graduates and their satisfaction with the psychology
               program is assessed.

Social Work:       The department has established program goals and objectives and
               admission and retention criteria to be fulfilled in order to earn the
               B.S.W. degree. These criteria reflect the mission statement and the
               Curriculum Policy Statement on the Council on Social Work
               Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for social work education.
               Continuous assessment is required by CSWE to accomplish program
               objectives. Assessment processes include: completion of ten social
               work practice competencies established by the West Virginia
               Undergraduate Social Work Curriculum Study; evaluation of student
               research projects and journals; surreys of alumni and agency
               employers; and acquisition of the State of Michigan Social Work
               Registration credential as granted by the Social Work Board of
               Examiners.

Sociology:         The department is in the process of developing goals and objectives
               with the expectation that a portfolio approach with examinations will
               best suit the department's goals.




                                                 112
                                          Education
Teacher Education: The department has established specific goals and objectives along
             with evaluative procedures to assess student progress as a part of the
             accreditation process. The department uses performance measures in
             field-based teaching experiences. In addition, a student portfolio,
             consisting of evaluations, projects and related information is
             reviewed prior to student teaching. Students complete state- j
             mandated competency exams for certification and endorsement; this
             information is reviewed periodically. Graduate students complete a
             capstone experience, either clinical or research-oriented, as an
             evaluative process. All students are surveyed in terms of satisfaction
             and employers are surveyed to measure perception of student
             preparation. Survey results are available in the College of Education
             Office.

Educational Leadership: A variety of techniques are used to assess student achievement of
              goals and objectives. Students complete a capstone course and I,
              administrative field internships. Collaborative teaching assignments
              and projects are observed and assessed as well as student papers and
              presentations. Students prepare videotapes that document their
              interactions while counseling another student and these tapes are
              reviewed for performance assessment. Students make presentations
              of their review and assessment of literature in the discipline and
              suggest personal applications. A number of simulation activities
              involve students in various roles which are evaluated by the faculty.
              Videotapes of leaders in action, as well as the student performance in
              computer applications, are critiqued. In addition, a survey of local
              employers is conducted with results shared with the faculty to help
              in future instruction. A written report of field experiences from the
              supervisors identifies the student's strengths and suggests ways to
              improve. The report is shared with the student and stored for future
              use.

Physical/Health Education: The achievement of PHE students is assessed according to the
              guidelines established by the Teacher Education Department. The
              department has established goals and objectives for majors/minors
              that are evaluated through performance measures in fieldwork and
              fitness.




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                                 Nursing and Allied Health
Nursing:          The department has established goals and objectives for the graduates
              of the BSN program. In addition, objectives have been established
              for the end of year (sophomore and junior) in the program. Related
              objectives required by the National League for Nursing accreditation
              are also evaluated. The major assessment techniques used to measure
              student achievement include standardized testing, clinical
              performance measures, alumni/employer surveys, NCLEX licensure
              examination results and student surveys at the completion of each
              level. Beginning in January 1994 students will be video taped each
              semester to document progress in communication and critical
              thinking skills.

Occupational Therapy: Since the program just began in the fall of 1993, no specific outcome
              measures have been used. However, there are plans to use clinical
              performance measures, portfolio, along related measures as well as
              with the certification examination results.




                          Science, Engineering and Technology
Biology:          The department established goals and objectives as part of its ten
              year review in 1986. The review, which included outside reviewers,
              measured student achievement through the use of an alumni survey
              and the examination of coursework. The department offers (but does
              not require) an independent research course. Records of the ten-year
              review are available in the department.

Chemistry:        A ten-year review (1989) includes a statement of objectives. The
              department has an annual review for program approval by the
              American Chemical Society (ACS). At five-year intervals, the
              review includes an analysis of student exams and research theses. A
              research capstone course is offered for seniors, though not required.
              The department recently conducted a survey of graduates to measure
              success in industry and graduate school; results are available for
              review.

Computer Science: Objectives were established as part of a curriculum review in 1987.
             The objectives are currently being updated through curriculum
             review. Student achievement is measured through upper division
             coursework and individual, informal feedback. A single capstone
             course is being considered. As an applied program, employer/student
             satisfaction surveys are viewed as valuable.




                                                114
Electrical Engineering: Objectives were established in 1989 as part of the self-study for
               ABET. Reaccreditation is in process for 1993-94. Student
               achievement is evaluated through work-sample review, a senior
               capstone design course, and an alumni survey. The department
               encourages but does not require students to take the
               Engineer-in-Training (EIT) exam, an initial step in the licensing
               process.

Mathematics:       The department has established a mission statement. Teacher
               Certification students must pass the mathematics portion of the
               Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) for endorsement.
               Outcome assessment is a departmental goal and is under active
               discussion.

Mechanical Engineering: The department established objectives as a part of its self-study for
             ABET accreditation in 1989. Reaccreditation efforts are in process
             for 1993-94. Assessment includes a review of student work samples
             and two required senior design capstone courses. Surveys of alumni
             and employers are also conducted. Students are encouraged to take
             the EIT exams.

Physics:           A statement of objectives was established in 1985 and will be
               reviewed in 1995. As part of the ten-year review process, the
               department examined student work samples and surveyed alumni as
               to their success in graduate school. The department offers but does
               not require the senior research course.




                                   Business and Management


       The College of Business and Management began a self-study process during the fall semester
of 1993. As part of that process, the College adopted the mission and vision statements which will
guide its future development. The College has identified its goals and the processes that need to be in
place to achieve these goals.
       As part of the College's plan for improvement, each department is expected to develop a
process for outcomes assessment. During the fall of 1993, the College conducted preliminary
surveys of the graduating seniors in Management 429 and current M.B.A. students. The College has
a capstone course in which the students are evaluated on their ability to integrate the functional skills
they have acquired during their coursework.




                                                  115
       The faculty currently uses various methods to evaluate student achievement. The knowledge
skills are assessed primarily through examinations, while other cognitive and behavioral skills are
assessed through oral presentations, writing assignments, case studies, and group projects. The
student evaluations are used as one of the indicators of teaching effectiveness. At present, the
Accounting Department tracks the success of students who sit for the certification examination in
accounting.
       In order to make the assessment process more meaningful, the departments of the College
will explore other outcome-measurement techniques such as standardized tests, alumni/employer
surveys, portfolio analysis, and licensure examinations. The Techniques that are deemed appropriate
will be incorporated as part of the portfolio of outcome- measurement methods.




              Academic Program Review Cycle - Policies and Procedures


       Under the direction of the Vice President for Academic Affairs, SVSU has continuously
supported periodic review of programs. The Program Review Cycle and Policies and Procedures has
been implemented to support efforts for outcomes assessment.
       Saginaw Valley State University began program reviews in a ten-year cycle. Since 1982-83,
more than 20 programs have been reviewed in the period of ten years, including some of the
professional programs such as Engineering and Technology, Accounting, Marketing and Finance.
       Since most of the professional programs have received accreditation from their respective
professional associations, SVSU decided to focus program reviews on those which currently do not
have any plans to apply for individual accreditation. All of the programs included in this review
cycle have base documents. Because of recent attention on student outcomes, SVSU will emphasize
assessment and student academic achievement in this second cycle of program review.




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Criteria:
       (1) Currency and relevancy of curriculum:
               Is the curriculum comprehensive and up to date with advances in the discipline?
               Does it provide for a relevant major and/or a relevant minor?
               Are service courses meeting student and programmatic needs?

       (2) Adequacy of program evaluation:
              Criteria for the assessment of student performance are to be established in each
              academic discipline.

       (3) Follow-up studies on graduates are to be established in every discipline.

       (4) Adequacy of faculty preparation, classrooms, laboratories, and other facilities, such as
           library holdings and advanced learning technologies.


Policies and Procedures:

       (1) Department:
              The department will carry out the following activities as a part of their
              program-review process. The department may require one or two semesters to
              complete the activities.
                     (a) Definition of program quality and measures for assessing it
                     (b) Data collection
                     (c) Preparation of self-study and report

       (2) College Review:
               Following the departmental activities, the College will engage in the following
               activities and may take up to six weeks to complete the process. An internal team
               shall be formed to review departmental self-study and report. The team consists of
               three faculty members outside the department under review: one member selected by
               the department; one member appointed by the respective dean; and one member
               appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

       (3) Consultant Review:
              Following the College review, a consultant review will be conducted and may take up
              to four weeks. The Department and the Dean jointly recommend an external
              consultant to the Vice President for Academic Affairs to conduct a site visit and
              review of all available data pertaining to the above-mentioned criteria. The consultant
              will present his/her assessment of the program and offer recommendations for
              improvement. Copies of the consultant's report shall be made available to the
              Department, the Dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs.


       A meeting or meetings will be held with participation from members of the department, the
respective dean and the Vice President for Academic Affairs to discuss the recommendations and
procedure/timetable of implementation of some or all of these recommendations.

                                                 117
Review Cycle:


                                     Review Cycle
      Year                                          Programs
    1993-1994     General Education, (Chaired by the College of Arts and Behavioral
                  Science), English, Math
    1994-1995     Computer Science, History, Modern Foreign Languages
    1995-1996     Art, Criminal Justice, Physics
    1996-1997     Bachelor of Applied Studies, Biology, Music
    1997-1998     Chemistry, Communications & Theatre, Political Science
    1998-1999     Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology


     Professional programs such as Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Education, Business and
      Management, Engineering and Social Work are not included since there programs are
      involved in Professional Accreditation processes. Interdisciplinary programs will be
      reviewed together with respective single disciplines.




                                              118
PART FOUR: Planning for the Future of Saginaw
             Valley State University

                                    Evaluative Criterion Four:
                      "The institution can continue to accomplish its purposes."


4.1    PLANNING AT SAGINAW VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY


                                            Background
       From its beginning, Saginaw Valley State University has experienced relatively rapid change
and growth in enrollment, facilities, programs, and services. In the past few years, planning efforts to
shape this growth have become an institutional priority. The early formalized efforts for planning
included all segments of the University in a grass-roots expression of needs and plans (goals and
objectives) within a five-year time frame. These plans were submitted to the Director of Planning
and then to the Deans, Vice Presidents and then to the President. All various unit plans were
reviewed by the Deans, Vice Presidents, and President in a retreat-type setting in order to set
priorities for the next academic year. When the new President came into office, a revised planning
process was initiated (described earlier in this report), which included the publication of the
document Promises to Keep.




                                      Context for Planning
       The Planning Task Force identified a number of themes to guide the University's progress
towards its larger goals, towards the keeping of its promises. The six themes are:


       (1) "In the short term, overall institutional enrollment growth will have to be
              limited or carefully controlled unless and until resources permit expansion."
               The University spent its first years growing and struggling to keep up with that
               growth. Developing the human, physical and fiscal resources needed to better serve
               students and the' public became a strong focus of this theme. Another aspect
               of this theme is the slow but steady shift from lower division to upper division
               students, as SVSU is more clearly establishing itself as the "senior" institution in the
               region.



                                                  119
(2) "There is a strong need to create and foster an institutional culture that
       values and encourages initiative and creativity at all levels and in all
       programs and services."
       Since resources are limited, the University must support and foster those individuals
       and units that are best positioned and most willing to seek out opportunities. It is
       important to develop programs of genuine distinction within the University and
       reward creativity in these efforts.

(3) "There is a strong need to develop a greater sense of community within the
       University -- a community with a culturally and intellectually stimulating
       environment, a more active campus life in which students and colleagues feel
       valued and supported."
       Since SVSU serves a largely commuter-student population, the larger goal is to
       develop a vital and stimulating campus identity and campus life. There need to be
       opportunities for faculty, staff and students to come together in the sharing of ideas
       and experiences. Planning for the physical campus and the social and intellectual life
       of the campus requires attention to and effort toward the development of an identity
       and sense of "community."


(4) "The primary institutional commitment must be for intellectual development
       of its students."
       This requires attention to the undergraduate curriculum with particular emphasis on
       the general-education requirements.


(5) "The institution must commit itself to serving a diverse population."
      The University needs to enhance its service to minority populations in terms of
      race, ethnicity, gender. Students need to learn respect for and be prepared to work
      with the diverse people who constitute our nation and the world.


(6) "The University must support the professional and personal development of
       its principal resource -- its faculty and staff.”
       Faculty and staff teach and work in a constantly changing environment -academic
       disciplines are constantly changing, the amount of information available has been
       expanding rapidly; technology presents new and unique opportunities, and the needs
       of the students and public are constantly changing. This requires that the people of the
       University constantly seek to improve their skills and understandings as they carry
       out the work of the University. The University needs to provide support for and
       develop an environment in which personal and professional development is a realistic
       expectation.



                                         120
                                       Short-Term Planning


       Institutional planning has been more thematic and broad in nature along the parameters
defined in Promises to Keep. The Board of Control adopts a statement of goals and objectives for the
entire institution each year which then forms the framework for the more specific goals and
objectives of individual University units. Each year the Deans, Vice Presidents, and nonacademic
department heads have encouraged, if not required, their respective units to engage in the
identification of goals and objectives for the academic year. These goals and objectives are then
incorporated into the goals and objectives of the respective unit which moves forward into the
Administrative Council Retreat for consideration and priority setting by the group. These priorities
then become the basis for budget allocation as funds become available. This planning process is
repeated each academic year, and has provided the structure for the individual units on the campus.
The President meets with the faculty Budget Committee almost monthly to discuss both the
short-term and the long-term budget allocations in relationship to the overall planning priorities.




                                       Long-Term Planning


       An effort comparable to the Promises to Keep will be initiated in the near future to consider
the next phase of development at Saginaw Valley State University. It is planned to include
representation from across the University faculty and staff, students and others. The planning efforts
will address the next phase of University development and the proposed strategies to achieve a
future orientated status in the community and the state. The additional physical facilities that are
projected for the near future will provide a focus to plan for effective use of the facilities in line with
the University's mission. In addition, all phases of the University's operation will be examined in
relationship to the future needs, resources, and directions. The planning process will be an
opportunity to explore multiple possibilities and to define the University's role for the future.




                                                   121
4.2 RESULTS OF SELF-STUDY PROCESS

                                    Strengths and Challenges
       The self-study process has provided an opportunity for each unit to carefully look at its
contributions to the University enterprise and to evaluate performance to date. At the same time,
each unit has identified strengths and related those strengths to the University's mission while
analyzing ways to improve performance. This section will present, arranged according to the
University goals, the major strengths and challenges which have been identified in the self-study
process, and reflect upon several larger University issues which the process of self-study has helped
to place in more realistic perspectives.




       Goal 1:         To provide a comprehensive array of Baccalaureate Degree Programs and a
                       select number of Master's Degree Programs.


                                             Strengths
Human Resources:
       Saginaw Valley State University has always taken pride in its faculty and staff who are
       committed to the institution and its primary mission of educating and serving the student
       body. This Report provides evidence that each personnel group is a major institutional
       resource. The growing diversity in tenors of geographic locale, nationality, ethnicity, age,
       and academic expertise, makes this campus one where students have an opportunity to learn
       from faculty and staff as well as each other. There are increasing numbers of students
       transferring into the University which further enhances the sharing of perspectives in the
       learning process.


Collaborative Efforts:
       As the subcommittees gathered the information involved in the Self-Study Report, it became
       evident to the Steering Committee there are several areas of the University that are engaged
       in collaborative efforts. One such example of internal collaboration is the




                                                  122
      interdisciplinary dialogue concerning the Teacher Education Program. As the students are
      expected to acquire more discipline specific expertise, the respective disciplines within the
      University have worked collaboratively with the College of Education in making the
      necessary opportunities for students. Several efforts designed to help students improve their
      writing skills were identified, both within the English Department and in other departments
      across the University. The new Bachelor of Applied Studies Degree involves collaborative
      efforts across each of the other Colleges. Externally, SVSU links with other state universities
      in collaborative arrangements, such as the Master of Science in Nursing collaboration with
      University of Michigan for the advanced nurse practitioner programs. The Master of
      Business Administration Program has collaborative arrangements with the students in
      Taiwan. Saginaw Valley State University has collaborated with the other public universities
      in Michigan to establish the Japan Center, where students may study for a year. The
      international exchanges of students and faculty are another example of collaborative efforts
      which enhance students' learning.




                                           Challenges
Assessment:
      The current plans indicate improved methods of assessing student academic achievement,
      both in terms of the assessment data already being collected, and additional methods of
      assessment. The plan is detailed in Part III, Section 3.2 of this Report. As indicated in the
      plan, it is expected that more faculty and staff will become involved with the enhanced
      assessment plans which will, in turn, better serve all student populations.




Technological Currency:
      In the Library, as well as in the audiovisual and academic computing areas, the delivery of
      services is increasingly dependent upon current technology. The need to stay current and
      provide quality services to students will continue to be an ongoing financial challenge to be
      addressed by the University.




                                                123
      Goal 2:         To strive for excellence in teaching, learning, research, service and creative
                      endeavors, and to stand as an example in those regards.


                                             Strengths


Increased Professional Development of Personnel:
      The University has made a commitment to support faculty in their professional development.
      This is done through the professional development funds available to each faculty member
      and the additional funds available through the Colleges for support of research activities and
      release time. Many faculty have published significant scholarly works, including textbooks,
      as described earlier in this Report. The faculty and staff are involved in current projects that
      provide assistance to area high-school teachers and students in the development of expertise
      in the science and math areas. (Details of these projects will be available on site.) In addition,
      the staff has the opportunity to attend local, state, and national conferences and workshops
      relevant to their respective responsibilities.




                                            Challenges
Continued Professional Growth:
      Given University resources, the need for increasing support of professional growth activities
      will remain an important concern. The University will need to continue collaborative efforts,
      as well as the procurement of external grant funds, to enhance and support additional
      professional growth in order to keep a leadership role in this area. As the student body
      continues to include more adult learners, more University members of the faculty/staff will
      need additional preparation and educational approaches to serving that population.




                                                  124
       Goal 3:         To provide academic and support services that address the educational needs
                       of a diverse student population that varies by gender, age, ability, experience,
                       lifestyle, cultural background and economic circumstances.




                                              Strengths
       SVSU Academic Support Services has expanded to include the special needs of the diverse
student population. In fulfillment of the University mission, the primary mission of the Lifelong
Resource Center is to promote the academic, social and personal development of the adult learner at
Saginaw Valley State University. The Academic Support Services provides individual support and
guidance for all students contemplating entry into academia. Workshops and seminars addressing
topics of particular interest to the students are provided along with opportunities for group
involvement and interaction. The Office of Minority Services provides academic, social and cultural
support for minority students. Specific services include academic and personal counseling, tutoring,
a book-loan program, minority-grant information, and moral support. Minority Services strives to
foster a sense of belonging and personal growth for minority students. The office also assists with
university recruitment efforts and community outreach programs.
       The Office of Multicultural Programs/Affirmative Action is proactive in promoting its role
and responsibilities to the surrounding community. The Office has been successful in informing the
minority community that it is welcome to the campus and that financial, academic and psychological
support is available. The Affirmative Action Office is an active participant in all University hiring.
The Office provides counseling to minority students, and works to remove any vestiges of
discrimination or abuse based on race, sex and national origin. The SVSU Board of Control adopted
a statement on Cultural Diversity in 1991 as an indicator of its commitment.
       Physical Disability Services provides information, referral services, problem-solving
assistance, vocational, educational, personal or disability-related counseling and faculty or staff
consultation for prospective or enrolled disabled students. The staff provides special need services,
equipment and support to students with disabilities to ensure access to programs and success.




                                                  125
       The Office of Student Life works to coordinate campus events and facilitate the development
of student organizations and leadership skill building. Part of the Student Life Center, Substance
Abuse Prevention is a campus-wide prevention and education campaign designed to prevent abuse
and to intervene if problems already exist. The Campus Life Team sponsors the "Mini-Grant
Program for Cocurricular Learning Experiences" which provides financial support ranging from
$50-$500 to faculty for the development and expansion of creative, out-of-class learning for
students.




                                             Challenges
       The University urgently needs additional space to better meet the programmatic needs of the
academic support areas. It is expected that these needs will be more fully met with the new building
projected to be available in the beginning of the 1996-97 academic year. The University will benefit
from the opening of the West Complex since it will centralize student publications, organizations
and governance, offer more lounge space for improved interaction, and will provide an improved
location for the performing arts programs.




       Goal 4:        To represent and advance the ideals and values of higher education in a
                      democratic society by:

                      a) Pursuing and defending freedom of inquiry, thought and expression

                      b) Practicing and encouraging respect, integrity, civility, decency and
                         fairness in human relationships

                      c) Promoting understanding among people and by people for their
                         world

                      d) Maintaining an openness of opportunity for all people to reach
                         their fullest personal and professional potential.


                                             Strengths
       The diversity and breadth of faculty research and professional activities reflect a healthy state
of academic freedom on campus. The faculty and students have a mutually respectful relationship,
with opportunities for due process in dealing with dishonesty or grade grievance

                                                 126
procedures. The general-education requirement related to International Perspectives gives each
student the opportunity to study and explore people and/or cultures of other parts of the world. The
institution makes every effort to keep tuition and fees relatively moderate in order to maintain open
opportunity for students. The broad scope of support services and financial aid assist potential
students to experience personal and professional potential.


                                             Challenges
       Each time the University enters into contract negotiations with any of the groups on campus
there is pressure on the human relationships within the group and the University. The negotiation
process, by nature, requires extreme positions which are sometimes interpreted as unreasonable and
results in negative reactions.
       The cost of providing the necessary resources for international programs presents a
continuous challenge to the financial resources of the institution. At the same time, the pressures to
increase tuition in order to acquire the financial resources for programs and operations places an
increased burden on students and potentially jeopardizes the availability of opportunity for many
students.




       Goal 5:         To contribute to the quality of life for the people of the region, state, and
                       society by:

                       a) Providing expertise, leadership, and other support in the
                          development of ideas and strategies for addressing social,
                          technological, and economic issues

                       b) Creating, sponsoring, and hosting events and activities that help
                          people understand and appreciate the varieties of human culture,
                          art and accomplishment

                       c) Promoting responsible participation in a democratic society by
                          people both within and outside of the University community.


                                              Strengths
       Saginaw Valley State University has implemented a wide variety of programs that provide
services to the communities and constituencies it serves. Examples include centers such as the
Business and Industrial Development Institute (BIDI), the Valley Library Consortium (VLC), the

                                                  127
Applied Technology Research Center, and the SVSU Speakers' Bureau. Each year SVSU produces a
number of cultural events open to the public free of charge or for modest fees. Faculty expertise and
the academic achievements of SVSU graduates are applied in ways that improve the quality of life in
the region. Recently, the University was successful in obtaining an endowed lectureship in the
College of Business and Management as well as lectureships in Philosophy and Technology and the
human condition. Efforts to get students and others to participate in their communities and in the
political process through volunteerism are an ongoing effort on the part of faculty and staff. The
effectiveness of University programs in meeting its goals is demonstrated by the increasing
community participation in the array of programs offered. Some programs, such as the "Science
Outreach Leadership Venture for Excellence" (Project SOLVE), have received awards and national
recognition. This project has been developed to address selected needs of elementary and
middle-school teachers in the region. The project is designed to provide teachers with 1) updated
science content in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science and Physics; 2) science projects for gifted and
talented students designed by College faculty with input from lead teachers and completed by
teachers during the workshop; 3) instruction in developing higher-level thinking skills and
stimulating creativity; 4) instruction in transferring new teacher skills to the creative student/rapid
learner; 5) hands on experience in doing science projects; 6) instruction and preparation in
computer-mediated-communication system; and an opportunity to work with selected school
students in the laboratory on selected science projects.
       BIDI, which serves to help people start up new businesses, was prominently mentioned as a
key component in Saginaw's economic recovery programs. SVSU personnel frequently are sought to
serve on local boards and panels. The University often is asked to undertake studies or other
activities to identify and offer constructive suggestions for resolving social issues. An example is the
1991-92 Drug Task Force study. Campus events designed to serve the student body and the
community include University Performing Arts Series, the Flutee and Valley Wind Quintet,
theatrical events, the summer Educational Leadership Academy, the Leadership Education and
Development (LEAD) Series, the Fiesta Hispanica, the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration
Dinner, Card's Party, Family Holiday at the Ryder Center, the Valley Festival of the Fine Arts, the
Saturday Morning Children's Hour, and the Festival of Unity.




                                                   128
                                              Challenges
       One of the challenges is the availability of the necessary spaces to conduct programs. There
will be some major benefits from the opening of the West Complex as it will: 1) provide improved
space and the support system for the performing arts programs; 2) provide conference spaces with
support systems (including teleconferencing capabilities); 3) centralize student publications,
organizations and governance; and 4) offer more lounge space for improved interaction.
       The availability of human expertise to conduct programs will continue to provide a challenge
since people are the backbone of activities, and it requires a degree of expertise and motivation to
keep involved with the wide range of internal and community activities.




                                   Issues for the Next Decade
       In a projected climate of constrained resources, there will be pressures to increase class sizes
and the resulting ratios between students, faculty and staff. This pressure could lessen a student's
personalized experiences. The University will need to use the available technologies to enhance
student learning, to the extent possible and affordable, including mediated and computer-interactive
learning strategies, as support for the traditional classroom learning activities. Additional strategies
to maintain the University's character as a small, person-oriented teaching institution will need to be
pursued. The continuing pressure for faculty to be involved in professional development, research
and community service will need to be supported and considered. In the next decade, the
University's challenge to remain relatively small and personalized will need to be met in new and
creative ways.
       In the rapidly changing society of the next decade, the faculty, staff and student body will
need to prepare for and respond to the ever-increasing rate of change and technology in their
community, region, nation, and world. In the future, the University will need to work even more
closely with precollege institutions to ensure that students bring with them the skills and abilities
necessary for success in higher education. The admission of better prepared students will decrease
the need for the University to provide developmental course work, and permit more creative
utilization of human and material resources.
       The continuing development of technology as it relates to the education of students will be a
challenge in the next decade. The University is engaging in a phase-in plan to network



                                                   129
various components of the campus in networking systems. Upgraded equipment, necessary in
maintaining current technology, will need to be acquired with the input of field experts to allow wise
purchase decisions.
       At the present time, Michigan's economy does not promise increases in financial support to
state universities. The present level of state funding does not accommodate general inflation and
increased costs of operation. The net effect is to constrain the University in all areas and place larger
financial burdens on students. The University will need to explore creative strategies to maintain
quality while limiting the financial burden. Resources will need to be reallocated and costs reduced
based upon institutional priorities. Revenues from private and external sources will need to continue
and to increase in order for the University to be maintained and to progress in the next decade.




4.3 SUMMARY


       Saginaw Valley State University is well positioned to carry out its mission in this decade and
beyond. It has an internal planning process which provides the mechanisms to set institutional
priorities, and it has the human and material resources with the potential to progress in fulfilling its
goals and objectives. The institution plans to progress toward fulfilling its goals and believes that
Saginaw Valley State University meets the fourth criterion of the four Evaluative Criteria for
Accreditation.




                                                   130
                 AFFILIATION STATUS OF
            SAGINAW VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY
                  University Center, MI 48710


Control:                               Saginaw Valley State University is a public institution.

Status:                                Saginaw Valley State University is accredited by the
                                       Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the
                                       North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.
                                       Initially accredited: 1970.

Educational Programs:                  The University offers programs leading to the
                                       Bachelor's degree and the Master's degree. It also offers
                                       credit and non-credit courses not part of these
                                       programs.

Location:                              The University offers courses and programs at its
                                       campus in University Center, Michigan. Some courses
                                       and programs are also offered in Macomb, Cass City,
                                       and Escanaba, Michigan. Selected MBA courses are
                                       offered in Taiwan.

Stipulations:                          New Master's Degree Programs be granted approval by
                                       the commission prior to initiation.

Reports Required:                      None.

Focused Evaluations:                   None.

Comprehensive Evaluations:             Saginaw Valley State University's most recent
                                       comprehensive evaluation occurred in 1986-87 with a
                                       focused visit in 1989-90. Its next comprehensive
                                       evaluation is scheduled for 1993-94.



                       * Teacher endorsement programs are offered.




                                          131
              APPENDIX A



Steering Committee and Subcommittee Members




                    132
                       NCA STEERING COMMITTEE


Members:


Stephen P. Barbus,                                Lawrence J. Kickham,
   Associate Professor, Teacher Education           Professor, Accounting

Marianne M. Barnett,                              Maureen C. Kozumplik,
  Assistant Professor, English                      Administrative Secretary, College of
                                                    Arts & Behavior Sciences
Brian A. Fisher,
   Assistant Controller, Office of the            Crystal M. Lange,
   Controllers                                       Dean, College of Nursing & Allied
                                                     Health Sciences, Associate Vice
Margaret M. Flatt,                                   President for Academic Affairs
  Professor, Nursing
                                                  Jan W. Lyddon,
Kenneth E. Gewerth,                                  Director, Institutional Research
   Associate Professor, Criminal Justice
                                                  Gretchen Mooningham,
Eugene J. Hamilton,                                  Professor, Mathematical Sciences
   Associate Vice President for
   Advancement                                    Paul Mann,
                                                     Associate Professor, English
Jean Houghton,
   Director, Zahnow Library & Learning            Merry Jo Starrine,
   Resources                                        Director, Housing & Residential Life




                                            133
               NCA SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS


Mission and Purposes:
Chair:         Margaret M. Flatt,                 Judith Hill,
                 Professor, Nursing                  Professor, Philosophy

               George W. Eastland, Jr.,           Fred H. Porterfield,
                  Professor, Chemistry               Director, Public Information

               William G. Elliot,                 Ervin F. Sparapani,
                  Professor, Business Law            Associate Professor, Teacher
                                                     Education
               Eric R. Gilbertson,
                   President, SVSU                Gladys A. Hernandez von Hoff,
                                                     Director, Bilingual/Bicultural
                                                     Education Center


General Education:
Chair:         Paul Munn,                         Judith B. Kerman,
                  Associate Professor, English       Dean, College of Arts &
                                                     Behavioral Sciences
               Gary Johns,
                  Associate Professor,            Thomas E. Kullgren,
                  Mathematical Sciences              Dean, College of Sciences,
                                                     Engineering & Technology



Programs of Instruction:
Co-Chair:      Gretchen Mooningham,
                  Professor, Mathematical         Lawrence J. Kickham,
                  Sciences                          Professor, Accounting

               Jean E. Brown,                     Donald E. Wiseman,
                  Professor, Teacher Education       Professor, Accounting

               Judith L. Apgar,                   Mohamed A. El-Kasabi,
                  Associate Professor, Nursing      Associate Professor, Electrical
                                                    Engineering & Technology
               Robert C. Braddock,
                  Professor, History


                                            134
               NCA SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS

Faculty and Instructional Support:
Co-Chair:      Kenneth E. Gewerth,
                  Associate Professor, Criminal    Jean Houghton,
                  Justice                             Director, Zahnow Library &
                                                      Learning Resources
               James M. Finzel,
                  Director, Computer Services      Allison Anadi,
                                                       Assistant Professor, Criminal
               James Sullivan,                         Justice
                  Associate Professor, English



Outcomes Assessment:
Chair:         Stephen P. Barbus,                  Sally Cannon,
                  Associate Professor, Teacher         Assistant Professor, English
                  Education
                                                   Jonathan Leonard,
               Melissa B. Hayden,                     Associate Professor, Electrical
                  Assistant Professor, Teacher        Engineering
                  Education
                                                   Elizabeth A. Roe,
                                                       Assistant Professor, Nursing


Students and Student Services:
Chair:         Merry Jo Starrine,                  J. Chris Looney,
                 Director, Housing & Residential       Coordinator, Basic Skills in
                 Life                                  English, Academic Support
                                                       Services
                  Diane L. Brimmer,
                  Director, Student Life           Claudette G. Charney,
                                                      Coach, Women's Basketball &
                  Emmie Busch,                        Softball
                  (Graduate Student)
                                                   Gail E. Sype,
                  Kent Nordin,                        Assistant Professor,
                  (Student)                           Management




                                           135
                NCA SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS

Research and Scholarly Activities:
Co-Chair:      Jan Lyddon,                           Kenneth Gewerth,
                  Director, Institutional Research      Associate Professor, Criminal
                                                        Justice
               Tai-Chi Lee,
                   Professor, Computer Sciences      Ellen Curbs-Pierce,
                                                         Dean, College of Education
               Gary Clark,
                  Associate Professor, Marketing     Michael W. Panhorst,
                                                        Director/Curator, Marshall M.
               Sally A. Decker,                         Fredericks Sculpture Gallery
                   Professor, Nursing


Financial Resources:
Chair:         Brian A. Fisher,
                  Assistant Controller, Office of    Judith B. Kerman,
                  the Controller                        Dean, College of Arts &
                                                        Behavioral Sciences
               Wayne E. Mackie,
                 Professor, Finance; Acting Dean,    James G. Muladore,
                 College of Business &                  Assistant Vice President for
                 Management                             Administration and Business
                                                        Affairs & Controller
               Barbara McGregor,
                  Assistant Professor, Social Work


Physical Facilities and Community Resources:
Chair:         Eugene J. Hamilton,                   Maureen C. Kozumplik,
                  Associate Vice President for         Administrative Secretary,
                  Advancement                          College of Arts & Behavioral
                                                       Sciences
               Stephen L. Hocquard,
                  Director, Engineering Services     Marilyn G. Frahm,
                                                        Director, Marketing
               Robert J. Tutsock,                       Research/Information Services
                  Director, Physical Plant




                                             136
                NCA SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS

Editor of Self Study Report:

              Marianne M. Barnett,
                Assistant Professor, English




                                          137
                APPENDIX B




Organizational Chart and Board of Control Members




                       138
139
140
           SVSU BOARD OF CONTROL MEMBERSHIP
Ruth A. Braun, Vice Chairperson                      Charles B. Curtiss, Treasurer

   2505 Court Street (Res.)                             93 River Trail Drive (Res.)
   Saginaw, MI 48602                                    Bay City, MI 48706
   (517)799-2769                                        (517)684-8486      (517)893-7700 (Office)

Term Expires: July 21, 1999                          Term Expires: July 21, 1995

Donna J. Roberts                                     George E. Ward

   Secretary & Assistant General Counsel                Chief Assistant Prosecuting Attorney
   The Dow Chemical Company                             12 Floor, Frank Murphy Hall of Justice
   2030 Willard H. Dow Center (Office*)                 1441 St. Antoine (Office)
   Midland, MI 48674                                    Detroit, MI 48226
   (517)636-1820                                        (313)224-5737

   6210 Siebert St. (Res.)                              12030 Glenview Drive (Res.*)
   Midland, MI 48640                                    Plymouth, MI 48170

Term Expires: July 21, 1997                          Term Expires: July 21, 1995

Thomas E. Rush, Chairperson                          Elias J. Escobedo, Jr.

   1414 E. Wackerly (Office)                            995 West Huron (Office*)
   Midland, MI 48640                                    Waterford, MI 48328
   (517)631-0030                                        (313)682-8400

   4204 Arbor Drive (Res.*)                             3525 West Acres Drive (Res.)
   Midland, MI 48640                                    West Bloomfield, MI 48324

Term Expires: July 21, 1999                          Term Expires: July 21, 2001

Robert H. Walpole, Secretary                         Burnett S. Kelly

   President Walbro Engine Management                   President, U.S. Area
   Corporation                                          Dow Conning Corporation
   6242 Garfield Street (Office*)                       Mail CO 2401 (Office*)
   Cass City, MI 48726                                  Midland, MI 48686-0994
   (517)872-2131                                        (517)496-4774

   4868 Woodview Lane (Res.)                            5701 Lamplighter (Res.)
   Cass City, MI 48726                                  Midland, MI 48640

Term Expires: July 21, 2001                          Term Expires: July 21, 1997

                              *   Indicated Preferred Mailing Address

                                               141
       APPENDIX C



History of Buildings and Locations




               142
143
   APPENDIX D



Task Force on Assessment
       Time Line




          144
                   PROJECT TIME LINE


       JULY:
           Form Subcommittees:
               One to study approaches used elsewhere

                   Another to study "readily available" instruments


       AUGUST:

            Prepare for faculty orientation:

                   Meet with Mike Knight
                    10:00 am - 12:00 Noon
                    August 22, 1991
1991




       SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER:

            Two Subcommittees report to team

            Decide on areas to be assessed and how:

                   Exploration of goals principles via mission statement

       NOVEMBER-DECEMBER:

            Prepare report to University
                What has already been done

                   Draft Statement of Goals Principles developed and
                    reviewed by faculty

                   Presentation of resource needs for SVSU assessment




                                   145
                  PROJECT TIME LINE


       JANUARY:

          Present Statement of Principles:

                  Faculty (CAPC)
                  Deans
                  President, Board


       FEBRUARY-MARCH:

          Review model assessment approaches/options with faculty



       APRIL-AUGUST:

          Prepare full proposal for assessment program at SVSU
1992




                  Statement of Principles
                  Administrative Structure
                  Guidelines for Assessment
                  Budget Requirements


       SEPTEMBER:

          Review draft proposal with faculty

                  Departments
                  Forums
                  Orientation


       OCTOBER-DECEMBER:

          Explore assessment of additional areas, as needed

          Prepare for site visit (report)




                                  146
                    PROJECT TIME LINE


       JANUARY:

            Select first round of departments to implement assessment program

                    those whose accreditation efforts produced goals/objectives for
                     programs/courses are obvious candidates



       FEBRUARY-APRIL:

            Departments (subcommittees) explore program goals with facilitator
            (curricula, services, extra-curricular activities)

            Departments (subcommittees) survey majors, alumni, employers,
1993




            discipline organizations on goals developed during exploration

            Committee (Task Force) prepares proposal on general education
            for faculty review

       MAY-AUGUST:
          Prepare for site visit

       AUGUST-DECEMBER:
          First wave of departments begins assessment program

                    Goals

                    Methods

            Second wave of departments begin goal development phase




                                   147
             PROJECT TIME LINE


       JANUARY:

            First wave departments implement assessment
1994


            Second wave departments finalize goals/methods via survey

            Third wave departments begin goals development

            Committee submits general education proposal to CAPC




                             148
          APPENDIX E



The General Institutional Requirements




                 149
                      THE GENERAL INSTITUTIONAL
                            REQUIREMENTS


Saginaw Valley State University certifies that it satisfies all of the General Institutional
Requirements stated in the 1992-93 edition of A Handbook Accreditation, as follows:


Mission and Authorization

1.a.   The institution has formally adopted and made public its statement of mission.

       The current Saginaw Valley State University Mission Statement was shaped by the
       deliberations of the Institution's Self-Study Process in 1992-93. It was then received by the
       faculty in a forum, reviewed and adopted by the Board of Control on March 29, 1993. Copies
       of the Statement of mission and purposes are posted throughout the campus catalog.

1.b.   The statement of mission is appropriate to an institution of higher education.

       Saginaw Valley State University's Mission Statement identifies the University as a public
       institution that offers baccalaureate degree programs and a select number of master degree
       programs. It stresses the University's commitment to quality teaching, research, and
       community service, and to developing its students intellectually, socially, and culturally.

1.c.   The institution confers certificates, diplomas or degrees.

       Saginaw Valley State University awards the Master of Business Administration, Master of
       Arts in Teaching-English Education, Masters of Arts in Criminal Justice-Political Science,
       Master of Arts Degree in Teaching, Master Degree in Education and Master of Science in
       Nursing. Baccalaureate degrees are offered in 63 fields of study. Selected endorsements are
       available for certified teachers.




                                                   150
1.d.   The institution has legal authority to confer its certificated, diplomas and degrees.

       Saginaw Valley State University is authorized to operate by the State of Michigan under P.A.
       1965, No. 278, "An Act to establish and regulate a state institution of higher education
       known as Saginaw Valley State College; and to fix the membership and the powers of its
       governing board. Authority to award specific certificates, diplomas or degrees is vested in the
       College's Board of Control under the above referenced enabling legislation.”

1.e.   The institution meets all legal requirements to operate wherever it conducts activities.

       Saginaw Valley State University operates all its activities in accordance with Federal, State,
       and Local requirements. The University's Catalog and other publications contain statements
       related to meeting legal obligations. Authority for such activities emanated from the Board of
       Control and the State of Michigan.

Educational Programs
2.a.   The educational programs are compatible with the institution's mission.

       The educational programs and curricula listed in the 1992-94 University Catalog fulfill the
       University's mission to offer educational programming that promotes the intellectual and
       personal growth of students.

2.b.   The principal educational programs are based on recognized fields of study at the post-
       secondary level.

       Saginaw Valley State University's educational programs at all levels are based on recognized
       fields of study. The various majors and minors are definitely comparable in rigor and
       substance with what other accredited post-secondary institutions offer.

2.c.   At least one of the undergraduate programs is two or more academic years in length (or
       the equivalent). If no undergraduate programs are offered, at least one of the graduate
       programs is one or more academic years in length (or the equivalent).

       Except for selected teacher endorsement programs, all undergraduate programs offered by
       Saginaw Valley State University are four years in length. The graduate programs are
       ordinarily one to two academic years in length.




                                                151
2.d.   General education at the post-secondary level is an essential element of undergraduate
       degree programs and a prerequisite to graduate degree programs.

       In order to earn a baccalaureate degree at Saginaw Valley State University, a student must
       complete 39 hours of course work in 9 areas designated as meeting general education
       requirements. In additions, all baccalaureate students must complete requirements in
       mathematics, reading, and writing. The General Education program's purposes are consistent
       with those of the Commission's 1983 Statement on General Education: "it is intended to
       impart common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that every educated person
       should possess."

       Candidates for admission to the Masters programs must hold a baccalaureate degree from an
       accredited institution.

2.e.   General education and/or a program of related instruction at the post-secondary level is
       an essential element of undergraduate certificate and diploma programs two or more
       academic years in length.

       The Curriculum/Academic Policies Committee, which oversees General Education, reviews
       curricular proposals to maintain stipulations apply to all undergraduate programs at the
       Institution.

2.f.   The certificate, diploma or degree awarded upon successful completion of an
       educational program is appropriate to the demonstrated attainment of the graduate.

       Requirements for the master's bachelor of arts, bachelor of science, and endorsements, are
       specified in the University Catalog and conform to established standards.

Institutional Organization
3.a.   There is a governing board, legally responsible for the institution, which established
       and regularly reviews basic policies that govern the institution and protect its integrity.

       As the source of all legal authority in the University, the Board of Control exercises final
       control over, and accepts ultimate responsibility for the University's assets, financial and
       legal obligations, and educational programs. It established and regularly reviews all policies
       that govern the University.

3.b.   The governing board includes individuals who represent the public interest.

       All members of the Saginaw Valley State University Board of Control are appointed by the
       Governor Michigan with the advice and consent to the Michigan State Senate for staggered,
       renewable eight-year terms. They serve without monetary compensation and represent the
       public interest.




                                                 152
3.c.   An executive officer is designated by the governing board to administer the institution.

       The President, who is the Chief Executive Officer of Saginaw Valley State University, is
       designated by the Board of Control to administer the Institution.

3.d.   A faculty comprising persons qualified by education and experience is significantly
       involved in the development and review of the educational programs.

       The University's Curriculum/Academic Policy Committee is comprised of administration,
       faculty, and students. The faculty on the Committee are chosen by an election of their peers
       in accordance with the contract between the Faculty Association and Saginaw Valley State
       University's administration. Article F of the contract covers the selection of faculty for
       seating on the Curriculum/Academic Policy Committee.

3.e.   Admissions policies are consistent with the institution's mission and appropriate to the
       educational programs.

       Admissions policies are specified in the University's Catalog (pages 5-9) and are consistent
       with the University's mission and appropriate to its educational programs.


3.f.   Admissions practices conform to the admissions policies.

       Admissions policies stated in the University Catalog are those followed in practice.
       Freshmen admitted to Saginaw Valley State University are comparable nationally to all
       college-bound students.


Financial Resources
4.a.   The institution has financial resources sufficient to support its activities.

       Saginaw Valley State University has demonstrated its financial solvency throughout the Self-
       Study Report. Part 2.3 describes the Institution's financial challenges and its responses.

4.b.   The institution has its financial statements externally audited on a regular schedule by a
       certified public accountant or state audit agency.

       Saginaw Valley State University's financial statements are audited annually by certified
       public accountants. The auditors are selected by the Board of Control every three to four
       years. State auditors audit the University's student credit hour reporting annually. State
       auditors also conduct operational audits on a regular schedule.




                                                153
Public Disclosure
5.a.   The institution published in its catalog or other appropriate places accurate
       information that fairly describes:

       a.   its educational programs,
       b.   its policies and procedures directly affecting students,
       c.   its charges and its refund policies,
       d.   the academic credentials of its faculty members and administrators.

       All information regarding Saginaw Valley State University's educational programs, policies
       and procedures directly affecting students, refund policies, and the academic credentials of its
       faculty members and administrators are accurately reflected in the University Catalog.
       Policies and procedures pertaining to scheduling, charges, and payment of fees are presented
       in each term's Schedule of Classes.

5.6.   The institution makes available upon request accurate information that fairly describes
       its financial resources.

       Audited financial statements are presented to the Board of Control annually. This
       information is public record.




                                                 154
                                      APPENDIX F



                              Basic Institutional Data Forms




Appendix F is in PDF format only. Please go back to the website looking at the PDF format files.




                                               155

				
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