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					        Proof of Concept Network Project

                           Final Report




Prepared By

Jennifer Dunbabin, Project Applications Coordinator/Manager
                                                   TABLE OF CONTENTS

1    PURPOSE OF REPORT ......................................................................................................... 6

2    PROJECT RATIONALE ......................................................................................................... 6
     2.1    Background ..........................................................................................................................................................6
     2.2    Vision .....................................................................................................................................................................6
     2.3    Supporting Policy ...............................................................................................................................................7
     2.4    Design ...................................................................................................................................................................7
            2.4.1       Network ..................................................................................................................................................8
            2.4.2       Applications Software ........................................................................................................................ 10
            2.4.3       Applications Projects ......................................................................................................................... 10
            2.4.4       Governance and Project Management .......................................................................................... 11

3    PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION .......................................................................................... 12
     3.1    Network Build ................................................................................................................................................. 12
            3.1.1 South Australia .................................................................................................................................... 14
     3.2    Victoria .............................................................................................................................................................. 15
            3.2.1 Australian Capital Territory ............................................................................................................ 16
     3.3    Applications Software .................................................................................................................................... 16
            3.3.1 VET Virtual ........................................................................................................................................... 17
            3.3.2 Practitioners’ Large Mail Box .......................................................................................................... 18
            3.3.3 mine.edu.au/Mahara ........................................................................................................................... 20
     3.4    Applications Projects...................................................................................................................................... 21
     3.5    Governance and Project Management ...................................................................................................... 23

4    PROJECT OUTCOMES ....................................................................................................... 24
     4.1    Network ............................................................................................................................................................ 24
     4.2    Applications Software .................................................................................................................................... 25
     4.3    Applications Projects...................................................................................................................................... 26

5    FOR FUTURE REFERENCE ................................................................................................ 26
     5.1    Network Build ................................................................................................................................................. 27
     5.2    Applications Software .................................................................................................................................... 29
            5.2.1 Server Considerations....................................................................................................................... 29
            5.2.2 Client Considerations ....................................................................................................................... 30
            5.2.3 Bandwidth Considerations ............................................................................................................... 31
            5.2.4 Bandwidth Calculations ..................................................................................................................... 32
     5.3    Applications Projects...................................................................................................................................... 35
     5.4    Governance and Project Management ...................................................................................................... 36

6    ATTACHMENTS .................................................................................................................. 37
     6.1    Project Workplan (14 November 2008) .................................................................................................. 37
     6.2    Participating Partners and Teaching Institutions ..................................................................................... 48
     6.3    VET Virtual Flyer ............................................................................................................................................. 50




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report                                 January 2010                                                                 Page 3 of 51
       6.4       Practitioners’ Large Mailbox Flyer .............................................................................................................. 51


                                                                      Figures
Figure 1 - The initial Proof of Concept Network vision ................................................................................................. 9
Figure 2 The Network in December 2009 ................................................................................................................. 13
Figure 3 Project Communication Example ................................................................................................................... 14




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report                            January 2010                                                       Page 4 of 51
                                      Acknowledgements


Other contributors to the report are:

Jamie Sunderland from AARNet Pty Ltd on the network design and build, and

Chris Richter from Ricoshae Pty Ltd on applications software and apllications.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                     Page 5 of 51
1 Purpose of Report
The purpose of this report is to document the:
     project rationale and intentions
     project implementation and outcomes, and
     lessons learnt.


2 Project Rationale
2.1     Background

During 2005 – 2007 the Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector, through the
Australian Flexible Learning Framework, funded the Access to Bandwidth Project (A2B) to
investigate and make recommendations on the provision of a national high capacity network
for the sector. In the course of the Project a network design was recommended and trialled
(see Figure 1). The design was that of using AARNet to provide a national backbone for
state networks. This model was shown not to deliver the levels of connectivity or
performance required. In addition, metered traffic meant that cost was a serious inhibitor to
the type of uses envisaged for a VET network. As a result, the Proof of Concept Network
Project was set up to test to an alternate model of provision of connectivity – the end-to-
end type provided by AARNet for the higher education sector, by building fibre-optic tail
circuits between the AARNet backbone and selected TAFEs.

2.2     Vision

The vision underpinning the Access to Bandwidth Projects and this Project was the need to
provide VET sector with a very high capacity network with no constraints on usage. To
serve VET needs it must operate as a national network.

The Australian Research and Education Network (AREN) was the model for the Project: a
not-for-profit network established to provide high capacity, high performing network
services to the research and tertiary education sectors and an affordable price.

The Commonwealth has invested significant amounts of money to develop this network
along with the universities and research organisation. It is desirable and economically sound
to re-use this infrastructure to provide this infrastructure to provide an expanded tertiary
network to include the VET sector.

DEEWR identified an opportunity: it noted many TAFEs were proximate to the existing
tertiary network and that for, in networking terms, a small amount of funds, the tertiary
network could be expanded to include the majority of TAFEs.



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 6 of 51
It was hypothesised that a national network would:
     enhance the capacity of TAFEs to meet the skills needs of the future
     enable the widespread use of interactive e-learning materials and virtual classrooms
     provide easy and speedy access to content collections no matter where they are located
      in Australia
     facilitate mutual recognition, credit transfer and cross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoral
      portability
     expand the number of course offerings for learners in regional, remote and Indigenous
      communities
     reduced time-frames for completion of courses of study
     facilitate microeconomic reform of TAFEs by allowing them access to markets across
      Australia
     in the longer term, influence future funding directions to ensure effective use of public
      funds to reduce duplication of teaching effort and resources across the nation.

2.3     Supporting Policy

The vision of a high capacity, end-to-end, optic fibre network for the VET sector was
supportive of and complementary to current Federal policies and initiatives such as:
     the Bradley Report and subsequent Council of Australian Government decisions to
      develop more clearly a tertiary sector from both the higher education and VET sectors
     build on the Australian Government’s $88 million investment in the high-speed research
      network for universities, the Australian Research and Education Network (AREN), by
      extending this network to the training sector
     the Digital Education Revolution, and
     the National Broadband Network.

The network would also provide the essential infrastructure to mitigate the looming
shortage of teachers by providing a platform where scare knowledge could be shared
Australia-wide.

2.4     Design

The Project’s aim was to:

     demonstrate the benefits a high speed dedicated network can provide to vocational
      education and training, and
     assist in developing effective strategies for cross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoral
      collaboration for any future national tertiary education network.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                            Page 7 of 51
It was a proof of concept project to test the benefits of, and identify issues associated with, a
cross-jurisdictional high speed fibre-optic network, that would deliver end-to-end
connectivity to vocational education and training institutions.

The Project’s Workplan is attached (at 7.1).

2.4.1    Network
DEEWR requested a minimum core network capacity of one gigabit. AARNet’s proposed
design was for a separate one gigabit wavelength to each connected institution, where
possible. To ensure no cross-institutional contention on the backbone, it was scaled up to
10 gigabits. Links of these capacities are now standard across tertiary and research
networks in Australia and overseas.

From a technical architecture perspective, the proof-of-concept network was designed to
reflect the thinking of how the VEN may look. It was intended to be a parallel network
sitting alongside the AARNet network utilising AARNet’s Dense Wave Division Multiplexing
(DWDM) optical transmission equipment with new equipment to provide the routing for
the VET sector.

The Proof-of-Concept Network (POCN) would provide a dedicated backbone network for
the VET institutions that would peer with the AARNet network enabling direct
communications between the VET sector and the Higher Education and Research sectors.
The Network was not planned to have Internet access via AARNet due to Whole of
Government (WoG) internet purchasing arrangements. Canberra Institute of Technology
(CIT) and the Victorian dual-sector institutions were existing AARNet customers and so had
access to the Internet via AARNet.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 8 of 51
Figure 1 - The initial Proof of Concept Network vision




The original Workplan anticipated that Stage 1 of the network would be complete on 17
October 2008. The Workplan that was agreed in November 2008 pushed each of the stages
back by several months.
Stage 1 which was due for completion by end of 2008 comprised:
   Canberra Institute of Technology
   SABRENet TAFEs (10) in South Australia, and
   in Victoria the dual sector TAFEs (Swinburne, RMIT, VU and Ballarat who were already
    connected), Gordon Institute and the Victorian College of Agriculture and Horticulture.
Stage 2 focussed on testing hypotheses, evaluating and adjusting and was scheduled to run
December 2008 through November 2009.

Stage 3 involved additional sites in Victoria and should this not be successful, other sites
might be considered either in Victoria, other states or private RTOs. This was to be
completed by June 2009.

In Victoria the other TAFEs identified for connection were:

   William Angliss
   Wodonga
   East Gippsland, and


   Further Tail builds were approved in March 2009 including
   Kangan Batman



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report       January 2010                     Page 9 of 51
   Gordon
   Holmesglen
Already on-net in Victoria were the four dual sector institutions:
   Swinburne University of Technology
   RMIT
   Victoria University, and
   University of Ballarat.

2.4.2    Applications Software
A critical aspect of the Network business model is to provide applications on-net so that the
traffic between users of the software platforms will travel only over the network. This has
the benefit of traffic travelling on an uncontested, over-provisioned network, and that traffic,
because is on-net being unmetered. In addition, applications that required high capacity
connectivity to work were required.

VET Virtual was refined and redeveloped to meet the needs of the Access to Bandwidth
(A2B) Project and as such is an ideal application to offer to the Network users.

Two other applications were developed during the course of the Project:
   the Practitioners’ Large Mail Box, and
   mine.edu, an e-portfolio application using Mahara.

2.4.3    Applications Projects
There were two strands to the POCN Project: building the network and using it. The
applications projects were to be the vehicle for testing network applications, structured to
demonstrate the capacity for such a network to improve education and training outcomes.
The POCN was to be completed to Stage 2 by late 2008, leaving a whole teaching year for
any applications projects to run. Applications projects had to be centred around teaching
delivery that could only occur with high capacity connectivity. The following guidelines were
provided. Applications ideally should:
   be something that is not presently available, or is currently available but not realising its
    maximum potential due to less-than-adequate bandwidth
   not merely replicate an application that is already available
   be an exemplar of the benefits of high-speed connectivity
   have an identifiable educational outcome
   cross jurisdictional borders (at least 2 applications)
   demonstrate cross jurisdictional collaboration (at least 1 application)
   involve more than 1 institute (at least 2 applications)
   involve video conferencing (at least 1 application)



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 10 of 51
   demonstrate a bandwidth-hungry application (at least 1 application)
   be distinctly different in technique and form (not just 3 examples of videoconferencing)
   involve a variety of learning disciplines
   involve at least one traditional trade
   apply across the tertiary sector or whole-of-education sectors (at least 1 application),
    and
   be able to be implemented without undue impost of time or other resources by
    institutions (essential).

2.4.4     Governance and Project Management
The parties involved and their roles are outlined below:
   Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace
    Relations (DEEWR) (sponsor, project leader, collaborative partner)
   AARNet Pty Ltd (network provider, collaborative partner)
   Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) (collaborative partner)
   SABRENet Limited (collaborative partner)
   Government of South Australia’s Department of Further Education, Employment,
    Science and Technology (DFEEST) (collaborative partner), and
   State Government of Victoria’s Victorian Skills Commission (VSC) (manager of financial
    relationship with AARNet Pty Ltd, collaborative partner).

Governance and division of responsibilities
The collaborative model employed for this project was one that required considerable
goodwill and accommodation of the needs and interests of other parties and enormous
enthusiasm to implement a worthwhile proof of concept. However, as the sponsor of the
project, DEEWR had to approve all activities undertaken as part of the project and had the
ultimate decision-making power in relation to how funding will be allocated and when
project activities will be ceased.

VSC was responsible for the management of the financial relationship with AARNet Pty Ltd,
on behalf of all parties to the project.

CIT, DFEEST and VSC were responsible for engaging with TAFE practitioners in their
respective jurisdictions to identify champions who will lead their state’s activities in relation
to the running of applications that trial potential uses of the network.

SABRENet Limited, DFEEST and AARNet Pty Ltd were responsible for developing an
effective and efficient method of connecting the SABRENet TAFEs to the AARNet backbone.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 11 of 51
AARNet were responsible for establishing, managing and operating the infrastructure that
will support the network.

All parties were responsible for ensuring effective working relationships that provide the
best environment in which to test the concept of a fibre-optic TAFE network.




3 Project Implementation
During the implementation period the National Broadband Network was announced on
7 April 2009 followed by the Vocational Education Broadband Network (VEN) on 22 April
2009. These announcements changed the policy environment for the POCN Project and
added demands on resources in DEEWR that were already overstretched managing the
POCN Project.

3.1    Network Build

When the first Workplan was prepared it was understood to be feasible that Stage 2 of the
network build would be completed by the end of December 2008. This was not achieved
due, in large part, the extensive negotiation required leading up to the signing of the
agreement between DEEWR, VSC and AARNet. Formal agreement was reached in
November 2008. In addition, the method of contracting and administrative structures led to
long lead times in the signing of the agreement between DFEEST and AARNet. The Project
Manager at the time had to spend substantial amounts of time negotiating with the parties.
The remainder of this section deals with the implementation activity and issues that
occurred once the initial negotiation and contracting phase was complete.

The remainder of this section deals with the implementation activity and issues that
occurred once the initial negotiation and contracting phase was complete.

A fibre-optical backbone has been established between Adelaide, Melbourne and Canberra
with associated routers that allow for a private inter-TAFE network with dedicated
bandwidth to carry TAFE traffic separately to the rest of the AARNet traffic. This link is a
single wavelength and single router connection in each State for the Proof-of-concept
network. The separate network allows flexibility and an extended set of services that are
not available on the Standard AARNet network, such as differentiating connectivity between
TAFEs, Universities and Internet access. When the first Workplan was prepared it was
understood to be feasible that Stage 2 of the network build would be completed by the end
of December 2008. This was not achieved due, in large part, the extensive negotiation
required leading up to the signing of the agreement between DEEWR, VSC and AARNet.



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                       Page 12 of 51
Formal agreement was reached in November 2008. In addition, the method of contracting
and administrative structures led to long lead times in the signing of the agreement between
DFEEST and AARNet. The Project Manager at the time had to spend substantial amounts of
time negotiating with the parties. The remainder of this section deals with the
implementation activity and issues that occurred once the initial negotiation and contracting
phase was complete.

The resulting network architecture is represented in Figure 2.

Figure 2 The Network in December 2009




The main reasons for the changes in network design were as follows:

        lack of coordinated technical planning involving representatives from all institutions,
         state jurisdictions and their outsourced technical consultants

        differing and sometimes conflicting requirements from states and institutions with
         regards to routing and network security

        requirement to access to certain applications hosted within the Higher Education
         and Research Network, and

        requirement to access AARNet’s Internet connectivity and content offered as un-
         metered through AARNet’s extensive peering network.

The project never had a technical meeting between all jurisdictions, including the project
representatives together with their government infrastructure departments and their
respective outsourced WoG gateway service providers. This caused issues where a technical
design that suited all parties was not agreed upon. Instead each jurisdiction’s outsourcer told


Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 13 of 51
AARNet the terms under which a connection could be made. This became an iterative
process with AARNet acting as the go-between, but having to pass all requests back through
the relevant IT department to provide instructions to the Outsourcer (possibly with some
approval from TAFE management and the State Infrastructure Department in between).
Figure 3 shows a representation of the layered and indirect lines of communication that
occurred when the network provider worked with the jurisdictions where IT services were
outsourced. This dynamic was particularly in evidence in engaging with the network
management model in place in South Australia. It resulted in there being several layers
between the PoCN practitioners and project representatives and the outsourced technical
staff who actually implement the required changes. Figure 3 represents the communication
flows for the Dental Hygiene Project and the setting up of the VPN.

Figure 3 Project Communication Example




3.1.1    South Australia
South Australia has a strong whole of government culture for contract and network
management, with centralised network management and a tiered set of firewalls. This had
significant impact on the project timelines and consequently the ability to conduct
applications projects. In addition the resulting convoluted network design meant South
Australian VET practitioners did not benefit from being part of the PoCN to any great
degree during the course of the Project.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                      Page 14 of 51
After some long delays relating to negotiations over Terms and Conditions of Service, the
standard AARNet Access Agreement was signed in June in its original form with no
amendments made.

The design of the interface between AARNet and SAuGov networks had to be customised
to meet the terms set by the Department of Transport Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI)
who run the State ICT Services Group and manage StateNet, South Australia’s WOG.
These terms did not allow normal inter-network exchange of routing information and did
not allow inbound connections into the TAFE network.

DTEI and their outsourcer (Dimension Data) refused to allow any form of dynamic routing
exchange between the state network and AARNet so all changes were manually made with
iterative changes to static routing and Network Address Translation rules based on
observation of what was and was not working and individual work orders. It was pointed out
early that videoconferencing is generally incompatible with Private IP addressing and
Network Address Translation (NAT) unless some form of proxy or firewall traversal device
was used. All other PoCN members had a connection to AARNet using Border Gateway
Protocol (BGP) Routing which AARNet uses to assign customers to particular communities
and decide which communities have routes between each other.

Instead of the participating TAFEs in South Australia being able to work freely with any of
the other participants in the Project access to connectivity between Gilles Plains TAFE and
CIT for the dental project was set up to run over a private network between the two sites.
The connection must be made from the South Australian end of the link. CIT will not be
able to make calls from their system during the trial, but will receive the videoconference
call and streaming video from Adelaide. An IP address on the standard AARNet network
also had to be provided for connectivity to the VETVirtual servers.

3.2    Victoria

In Victoria, TAFEs are autonomous entities with few constraints on the contracting ability,
including network provisioning. However, the VSC has proposed a state-based TAFE
Broadband Network, and while the contracts for the provision of network services were
with individual TAFEs, the Victorian TAFEs initially insisted on an “on-net only” connection
because of the proposed state-based network. However after the initial implementation they
found little value in the limited connectivity and each of the connected sites soon asked to
have their connection changed to include full Internet access and unmetered access to
AARNet’s peers and content providers. This was the cause of the change in design of the
network in Victoria from what was originally proposed.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                      Page 15 of 51
At the end of the Project the following TAFEs were connected: Kangan Batman, William
Angliss, Wodonga and Gordon and the four dual-sector institutions. On the signing of the
head contract between the VSC and DEEWR, VSC had been given a high degree of
discretion as to which TAFEs would be connected. The indecision and changes of TAFEs to
be included or not was also detrimental to Project outcomes. For example, East Gippsland
TAFE was not connected. Although VERNet provisioned the circuit in the first week of June,
the connection was cancelled by Victorian Skills commission days before it was due to be
activated. AARNet initially proposed to do a direct build into Gordon TAFE and then later
negotiated access to fibre owned by another carrier which was already installed into the
TAFE building, however VSC preferred that VicTrack be engaged build a new connection
into Gordon TAFE in line with their state-based network plan. Although VicTrack provided
initial estimates, final quotes to order against were not provided as they could not provide a
circuit to any of AARNet’s sites within Melbourne CBD.

3.2.1    Australian Capital Territory
CIT has been connected to AARNet since June 2003. ACT information technology
infrastructure is managed centrally, by InTACT. Joining the PoCN should have been, and
was, a matter of course for CIT. However, because of South Australia’s restrictions on the
type of connectivity and VPN had to be established. This meant substantial unanticipated
work and it was difficult to schedule given the demands already on InTACT. They had
initially agreed to have a new switch installed into the network to provide the private
network. However, when it came time to test links from the newly installed
videoconference system, InTact setup the local subnet using an address range within the CIT
public IP range (which is advertised globally through the standard AARNet network). They
did not want to use the private network as this would restrict the videoconference system
from being able to connect to anyone except the South Australian TAFEs.

3.3     Applications Software

A website was created to support the practitioners in using the applications and also for the
members of the Practitioners’ Network to promote the use of the applications in their
institutions. Its address is: http://www.proofofconceptnetwork.com/site/. Currently it is
password protected: the username is ‘applications’ and the password is ‘pocn’.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                      Page 16 of 51
These applications will continue to be hosted by AARNet in 2010 and available to the VET
sector to use.

3.3.1    VET Virtual
VET Virtual is a web-based interactive meeting and teaching space.




VET Virtual has provided an interactive location for teachers and students to communicate
and meet when distance or after hours have made it difficult for face to face classes. On
average VET Virtual was actively used by 262+ teachers and students each month. Most
participants made use of audio while trainers extensively used video, the white board and
PowerPoint presentations.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                     Page 17 of 51
Statistics

                             August             September       October           November
Sessions                                                       266
Maximum users at one         8                  6               11                7
time
Bandwidth to Server          2.07GB             1.14GB          1.59GB            0.96GB
Bandwidth from Server        9.78GB             5.53GB          11.24GB           1.48GB
Average session length       42min              38              42                36
Individual connections       308                297             239               204

Locations

Australia                                            91%
China                                                9%
European Union
Finland
United Kingdom
Greece
Indonesia
Korea Republic of
Philippines
Singapore
United States

VET Virtual has provided a select group of teachers the opportunity to see what is possible
when using a high bandwidth web based conferencing application.

As a result of this project we are compiling a collection of quotes from teaching staff and
student in relation to their experiences of VET Virtual during the past 12 months. These will
be made available on www.vetvirtual.org.

Although many of the POCN team members did not, or could not, take up the
opportunities made available it has provided a wealth of information on the development,
technical and provision of web based services across jurisdictions. This information will be
invaluable in the future deployment of high speed applications across Australia. These
findings will provide a base to make decisions on how a high bandwidth service can be
implement and the issues relating to multi user high bandwidth applications. The
recommendations are at Section 5.2.

AARNET has been invaluable in providing the servers and server support for all of the
Applications used in this project. AARNet will continue to host VETVirtual during 2010 and
it will be available to VET practitioners.

3.3.2    Practitioners’ Large Mail Box
In many disciplines, for example multimedia, there is the need to transfer large files that
aren’t readily accommodated with current tools.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                          Page 18 of 51
There are two versions of the large mail box called Large Mail Box and Filesender. Large
mail box was the initial file up loader allowing up to 800MB files to be emailed.

Following the success and interest from university educators and other organizations
Filesender was added to the mix to allow up to 2GB files to be exchanged. Statistics are
supplied for both as both applications made use of the same network infrastructure and
were used by educators in Australia and overseas.

Statistics
                                 Large Mail Box            Filesender
Number Files Uploaded            160                   221
Number Files Downloaded          87                    97
Bandwidth Uploaded               5.83GB                91GB
Bandwidth Downloaded             1.25GB                17GB
Upload Speeds                    9Mbps                 2Mbps – 53Mbps
Download Speeds                  9Mbps - 23Mbps        2Mbps – 70Mbps

File types uploaded: zip, jpg, ppt, rar, png, doc, dbf, fa, pdf.

Large Mail type services are the type of service where people say “Why would I need this”
and then one day when they are desperate to get a large file to another colleague – suddenly
become acutely aware of the implications of having the service available on a fast network.

As the rollout of fast bandwidth continues and multimedia files become larger and most in
use – more and more people will see the benefits of this and will be delighted to get on
board and make use of the network.

An end to end connectivity testing tool (using high definition video) so that participants can
ensure they have appropriate levels 'last mile' connectivity as well as firewall pass through at




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 19 of 51
their institution, so that the trials are truly assessing the benefits of high capacity
connectivity.

3.3.3    mine.edu.au/Mahara
mine.edu.au is an e-portfolio service, set up using Mahara, an open source e-portfolio system
with a flexible display framework. Mahara, meaning 'think' or 'thought' in Te Reo Māori, is
user centred environment with a permissions framework that enables different views of an
e-portfolio to be easily managed. Mahara also features a weblog, resume builder and social
networking system, connecting users and creating online learner communities.




mine.edu.au/Mahara has been provided through POCN for educators, particularly at CIT, to
trial the application and see how it could fit into their role or organisation to provide
ongoing services as student’s complete courses and move out to employment. While CIT’s
e-portfolio project could not be funded, Mahara was installed and supported and the team at
CIT could trial their project.

mine.edu.au can be accessed from http://apps2.vetvirtual.org/mahara. It currently has 41
members.

At this stage Mahara is being trialled but the response has been positive in that other
organizations have now implemented their own version of Mahara.

One important aspect of Mahara is the ability to upload videos, images and audio to use in
your portfolio. Having a high speed network provision will allow students to load there
portfolio media quickly which will reduce the frustration caused by slow networks when
trying to create your portfolio. This alone is a key reason to provide these types of services
on high speed networks.



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                              Page 20 of 51
There are many career paths that now require large digital files that would otherwise be
difficult to put into a portfolio, such as architects, musicians, video producers, clothing
designers, advertising and many other IT-based careers.

3.4    Applications Projects

The major aim of the Project was to test the hypothesis that a high speed dedicated network
would provide benefits and advantages to vocational education and training. To do this the
network, once built, needed to be used and the outcomes of the use evaluated and the
Applications Projects were intended to do this. The extensions of time required for the
network build made it almost impossible to run the intended projects over the network.

A budget of $250,000 was available for this purpose. The small amount available was
problematic for this aspect of the Project.

An Applications Coordinator was appointed in January 2009, three days per week, reporting
to DEEWR. The role was increased to 4 days per week in July. The purpose was to
coordinate and guide the Applications Projects and support the practitioners.

A Practitioners’ Network was established and met monthly. Membership comprised
representatives of each participating institution and the collaborative partners (see 6.2).
Engagement structures with practitioners varied from jurisdiction. CIT was straightforward
from a jurisdictional perspective. In South Australia one person was nominated to be the
point of contact and to work with practitioners in SA. In Victoria a two tier approach
existed, with Skills Victoria and with the institutions themselves. Again, in Victoria, the
engagement was with e-learning practitioners or managers. A wiki was set up for the
members to use at http://pocn-practitioners-network.wikispaces.com/.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 21 of 51
Project submissions were called for and submitted in April. At this stage the Project from an
applications perspective was hampered by the limited funding.

Five applications were received:
   ACT – E-portfolio ($50,000)
   SA – Dental Hygiene Project (in conjunction with ACT) ($120,000)
   Vic – TAFE TV ($30,000)
   Vic – Cisco Telepresence ($350,000), and
   Ricoshae Pty Ltd (Chris Richter) – Large File Streaming ($20,000)

Anne Caddy, Wayne Hoare and Jen Dunbabin met in Hobart on 7 April to assess the
applications. At this stage it was understood there was up to $750,000 available for
application project funding.

It was agreed to fund the following projects:
   E-portfolio
   Dental Hygiene
   TAFE TV, and
   Large File Streaming.

It was also agreed to provide each jurisdiction with support of $20,000 for the administrative
load placed on them.

In June 2009 VSC advised that this was no longer the case, and in fact the Project may be
overspent. Consequently, the E-portfolio Project and TAFE TV were discontinued.

Dental Hygiene Project
This application project involved establishing a point to point high definition video
conferencing link between Canberra Institute of Technology and Gilles Plains Campus, TAFE
SA to deliver components of dental hygienist training across these campuses. The project
will enable students to view high definition oral examinations using an intraoral camera,
demonstrations of instrument use in real-time and to participate in class discussions via
video conferencing.

Students were to be able to observe real time examination and practices on a high definition
viewing medium with supporting dialogue and conversation.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 22 of 51
As noted in 3.1.1, this Project encountered many difficulties in established the video
connection and hence none of the planned teaching sessions occurred. CIT and Gilles Plains
will use the network and equipment for teaching in the first semester of 2010.

The implementation of this project highlighted that most TAFE campuses do not have the
network infrastructure to deliver the required connectivity to particular buildings or
classroom. Both CIT and Gilles Plains had to lay fibre to connect the buildings that were to
be used to their central network hub.

3.5    Governance and Project Management

In mounting this project VET was at the vanguard of technology in education. The
developmental and ground breaking nature of this Project, which involved multiple
jurisdictions and fields of activity (practitioners, networks, policy), along with the heavy
reliance on gratuitous contributions from the collaborative partners and the need for
confidentiality, had a marked impact on both the governance and management of the Project.
The complexity of this type of undertaking cannot be underestimated.

The contributions made through goodwill to the Project by many people were much
appreciated, however, because of the demands of their roles often the Project work rightly
had to fall in line with other demands. TAFEs now are big businesses with big business
models of management which made it difficult for even the most enthusiastic practitioners to
devote the time required to the Project. This model is not a sustainable one.



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 23 of 51
There were many external agendas that had impact on the progress and direction of the
project; agendas that were often in conflict with the agenda of the Project, which was to
establish a national end-to-end proof of concept network. It would be simplistic to analyse
this Project purely as a project management exercise and many useful learnings about
implementing a national infrastructure in a federal environment would be lost.

Due to the very small window of opportunity to secure the $2.5 million for the Project, the
funds we distributed to the VSC before to Project started. This put the Project at a
disadvantage from the start as there was no mechanism available to DEEWR to ensure
performance according to agreed timelines.

Other blockers included:
     the focus on the Project of establishing a national network clashing with jurisdictions’
      focus on what was seen to be required at a state level to build a state network
     inadequate staffing at DEEWR and lack a continuity of staff working on this complex
      project
     the amount of negotiation required for agreements to be reached between project
      partners
     jurisdictions’ insistence in controlling access to practitioners, and
     because of the greenfields nature of the Project, the lack of jurisdictional understanding
      of scope and imperatives.


4 Project Outcomes
The Project did not achieve many of the timelines or outcomes set out in the Workplan.
Contributing to this was the time it took to establish the network which made it impossible
to run the applications projects as envisaged, changed network design and the limited funds
for applications projects, and the confidential nature of the Project (it could not be widely
discussed until April 2009) which made general communications and promoting engagement
across even the participating institutions difficult.

4.1     Network

By the completion of the project a network of as shown in Figure 2 was built. The core
between Adelaide, Melbourne and Canberra was completed on 16 June 2009.

By the completion of the project a network as shown in Figure 2 was built. The core
between Adelaide, Melbourne and Canberra was completed on 16 June 2009 and continues
to operate as a private network, however all participants have a connection to the standard
AARNet network and the private network is not being used.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 24 of 51
It became apparent during the implementation of the network that organisations that were
connected to the AARNet backbone saw little or no value in establishing and maintaining a
separate private network when the other institutions were reachable through the AARNet
connection.

Tea Tree Gully TAFE has been connected to the South Australian State Government
(StateNet) hub via SABRENet.

Connection between the StateNet hub and AARNet has been established, however it is
limited to specific applications between specific hosts. It does not provide direct
communication between all SABRENet connected TAFEs and all AARNet connected
institutions as was envisaged due to StateNet restrictions.

The VPN required by StateNet did not support videoconferencing due to the way it used a
single IP address that was connected to the private network using Network Address
Translation (NAT). Videoconference streams from South Australia are now routed via the
public network using the gateway operated by the Tele-Learning Consortium (TLC) within
SA TAFE.

While a VPN circuit was installed into Canberra Institute of TAFE (CIT) for the dental
hygiene project, it is not being used as this would limit the connectivity of the
videoconference system to connections to South Australia only.

In Victoria, connections were established between AARNet and Wodonga TAFE, William
Angliss TAFE and Kangan Batman TAFE. A circuit to East Gippsland was provided through
VERNet, but was cancelled prior before a working service to AARNet could be established.

Although AARNet provided options for connectivity to Gordon TAFE, these were not
approved by Skills Victoria who instructed AARNet to pursue connectivity through Victrack.

AARNet and VicTrack did come to agreement on Terms of Service and Acceptable use,
however VicTrack were unable to provide a quote on which AARNet could place an order
for a point-point service between either Gordon or Holmesglen TAFEs and any AARNet
point of presence within Melbourne CBD. It is understood however that Gordon TAFE
currently has some level of connectivity to AARNet through its link to Deakin University.

4.2    Applications Software

This aspect of the project progressed well, in that the software was available to practitioners
to use and well supported. In addition, the wider VET community used these national
platforms.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                          Page 25 of 51
The difficulties some members of the POCN Project had in using the software shows that
much work is still to be done on national interoperability. For example, the intention of the
Project was to use VETVirtual for meetings, including the Practitioners’ Network meetings.
This did not eventuate because the firewall and security requirements of some participating
institutions did not support real time communication. This indicates the importance of
initiatives such as the Australian Flexible Learning Framework’s e-Standards for Training
work (http://e-standards.flexiblelearning.net.au/) particularly resources such as the VET
Teacher E-learning Toolkit.

This is a microcosm of experiences for practitioners looking to work with interstate
colleagues or participate in national online real time events: of all the platforms available,
invariably one jurisdiction or another could not access the platform, hence the work of the
Framework, noted above.

4.3     Applications Projects

As noted previously the Applications Projects’ implementation was hampered by financial
and network constraints. However, Wodonga TAFE’s experience serves as evidence that
the thesis to be tested by the POCN Project is sound.

Wodonga TAFE in Victoria has been connected to AARNet as a full-service customer since
April. They are very happy with the performance and reliability of the AARNet network
services and the positive impact on high capacity connectivity and note the following
outcomes:
     the connection has allowed a dramatic increase in productivity of our remote sites
      which are VPN connected due to improved speed and adjustments we have been able to
      make for how they connect,
     we have been able to build on our website (which is locally hosted) and incorporate new
      features and improvements to help our students access information.
     there has been an increase in the use of TAFE VC by our staff (previously our 2MB Link
      could not cope well with accessing this hosted service),
     we now have the ability to video conference from the desktop using Attend Anywhere
      online video conferencing software and Logitech webcams, and
     gained to ability to use the Elluminate service provided by the TAFE Development
      Centre and eWorks to use for webinars etc.


5 For Future Reference
There have been many learnings from the Proof of Concept Network Project and they,
along with some recommendations, are set out below.


Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                          Page 26 of 51
5.1    Network Build

Recommendation – overarching network design
In the Project it has become clear that there are two models of network design and desired
use that are coming in to conflict: the corporate and the educational; closed versus open. It
is critical for educational outcomes that educational needs underpin the development of the
VEN.

Recommendation – model clauses
It would be beneficial to develop a set of broad principle agreements around practice, policy
and procedures so that these could be inserted into legal documentation to support national
consistency in contractual arrangements for the VEN.

Recommendation - future network capacity
Network capacity should be at least three times the expected load. Trends in higher
education and research network design, both in Australia and overseas are currently at 10
gigabits and have experienced exponential growth.

Recommendation – infrastructure on site
A holistic approach to upgrading network bandwidth and building the VEN is needed. It is
not sufficient to upgrade single link to door step, in most cases it will also require a program
of upgrades to the internal network of each institution, both cabling and hardware. A
number of Victoria TAFEs had to upgrade their routers. Another hitch was that Telstra
assigned IP address ranges could no longer be used and AARNet had to supply a new range
which meant renumbering of servers and updating Domain Name Services.

Learning - design principles
The VEN design should be kept as simple as possible, with minimal filtering and very broad
routing rules using a dynamic routing protocol such as BGP. Routing and filtering will quickly
become unmanageably complex if rules based on statically configured small address ranges
or individual source and destination address combinations are used.

Work needs be done with each jurisdiction during the early design phase to clearly
understand what would be required to achieve this outcome within current jurisdictional
network policy settings.

Learning – difference between corporate networks and educational networks in
relation to security and flexibility
Corporate networks are often built using “walled garden” principles where the bulk of
communications is internal and security threats are seen as being primarily from external
sources. These networks generally have a single (although technically diverse and resilient)



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 27 of 51
centrally managed gateway/firewall/DMZ system that imposes quite heavy restrictions on
network use – particularly related to inbound connections.

Education networks are generally more flexible with security threats just as likely to come
from internal networks as from the wider internet. An education network sees itself as part
of the global network as both a contributor and consumer of content, rather than as a
private network hidden behind a market front. To achieve the desired educational
outcomes, there needs to be a closer relationship between the needs of the education
practitioners and the ICT management that controls network security.

Where network security is centralized and/or outsourced, it is likely that there will be
significant delays in making any adjustments to security policies to enable shared applications
and collaboration due to the multi-layered approval processes required.

Learning – multi-carrier environment
The Higher Education and Research sector uses AARNet as both its inter-organisation
carrier as well as the Internet provider. If the VEN is to use one carrier to provide inter-
organisation connectivity and another to provide Internet access, then each jurisdiction or
institution must be able to maintain dynamic routing between multiple carriers. The list of
address ranges (both in IPv4 and IPv6) will change regularly over time as new sites connect
and organizations and affiliations change. Static programming of gateways will quickly become
obsolete and will need constant updating across multiple jurisdictions unless dynamic routing
is used.

Learning – use of private networks and videoconferencing
Where private IP addressing and/or Network Address Translation (NAT) schemes are used,
inter-jurisdiction Videoconferencing and Voice over IP will not work without installing a
proxy/gateway (also known as a Session Border Controller) which acts like a PABX routing
calls from a private network via a public interface.

Learning – acceptable use policies
Building the VEN and a wider education network will require the re-use of many existing
networks. The underpinning intention to create and national education network may run up
against the acceptable use policies of these existing networks.

Learning – IT department work schedules
There is a need to be mindful of fact that generally that IT departments in education need to
apply for project funding well before end of year for work to be done in following year and
that future activity is planned in advance so it can become part of the various departments’
planning cycle. IT departments usually prepare budgets in September-November of the year




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                       Page 28 of 51
before and by January/February have a list of approved projects for the year and allocate
staffing resources appropriately. Any additional work during that year cannot be guaranteed
to be allocated appropriate resources.

5.2     Applications Software

During the Project the following observations with made:
     having a large pipeline has a huge benefit provided the applications can make use of the
      benefits of this pipeline.
     end users local network and pc configurations play a major role in reaping the benefits of
      a large pipeline.
     often the increased bandwidth and latency go unnoticed in this type of environment as
      the expectations of the performance of technology is very high and while it is working
      efficiently you do not get a lot of feedback until things are not working.
     a bigger issue than the physical network can be the jurisdictional boundaries,
      expectations, requirements and security considerations.

5.2.1     Server Considerations
During this Project we tested multiple servers and server configurations including Windows
Server 2003 using PHP, .NET and Linux based Ubuntu Servers with Apache and PHP, 32bit
and 64bit.

The servers provided for this project were exceptional, high quality and capable of pushing
through a lot more data and handling many more users than we provided in the test cases.
What we did find is that although the server was consistent, the client networks and physical
computers we exactly the opposite, sending data with intermittent gaps in transmission.

Obviously having a capable server or servers is incredibly important, but it still hangs on the
assumption that the client is providing quality consistent information and that is an issue for
the individual organizations to either recommend that staff use more capable computers for
this type of media work and/or make policy changes to the QOS/bandwidth limiting of the
computers being used for this type of media interaction.

Recommendation
Having a specific collection of PCs maybe in a library or media room that are tuned and have
higher bandwidth allocations for using these types of services will provided a more enjoyable
experience and a controlled solution to provide large file or real time communication
experiences for clients.

In this scenario we also noted that Linux based servers, as opposed to Windows, handled
the large file transferring slightly better and with more tuning the windows based servers



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                           Page 29 of 51
could be made to run as efficiently as the Linux server. As there are many factors here it is
only an acknowledgement that straight out of the box the Linux based servers were efficient
at this type of interaction.

Also, some of the functions involved in VET Virtual, specifically the conversion of
PowerPoint to online presentations caused a considerable drain on server resources. On
most occasions it did not impact the use of the audio and video communication but under
heavier load it could be an issue.

Recommendation
Use separate servers for Real Time communication applications, Web HTTP services and
Large File Transferring. Large file transferring puts a heavy load on the server as well and
although it is not latency affected, if you have real time interaction from the same server the
real time latency will be dramatically affected by the large file processes.

5.2.2    Client Considerations
Applications were tested on varying client machines, browsers, operating systems and
locations.

The key areas of discussion revolve around the browser version, ports and network
locations in relation to local network management. The biggest issues were port availability
for streaming media and last mile bandwidth, quality of service and bandwidth limiting.

Recommendation
Putting together a specific policy in regard to additional non http ports for real time
communication will dramatically improve the experience for everyone using real time
applications. In fact the difference between http port 80 and using, for example, port 1935 is
a minimum of double usually more latency increase. If the policy was specific to only allowing
443 SSL port then you have an additional layer of security. Most Real Time Communications
servers support 443.

From the discussion with staff it has become apparent that although they do like the idea of
cloud services – they are still more interested in having there own version of an application
as opposed to relying on an external service. Even though the cost of maintenance,
hardware and support can be relatively high, the fact that they can locally control the
environment, server, security and other services makes the idea of using local service more
appealing. Self branding may also have a major role in this trend.

What this means is that although the new network provides a massively increased pipeline,
the clients seem to want to have their own services, self hosted and managed, that they can
provide for their students.



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 30 of 51
The smaller the organization, the more they want SAAS applications available On-net, the
larger the organization, the more they want their own, controllable environment.

Recommendation
Providing a service that can run as a local Real Time Communication service so that any
local data is kept inside the local network will provide lower latency and a controlled
environment. Communication from the local server to a central server for cross institute,
cross jurisdictional real time communication can be achieved using an Origin server. This is
sometimes referred to as an Edge/Origin strategy. This will also allow the organizations to
brand their local version of the Real Time Communication applications.




                                         Edge/Origin Strategy

5.2.3    Bandwidth Considerations
From a bandwidth point of view, most locations did not experience a major difference unless
connected directly to the pipeline as local machines and networks were often throttled
down to help provide quality of service or at least a more equal shared network
environment to stop heavy users dominating the bandwidth, which resulted in users being
able to do basic functions like checking email etc. without being affected by another user
downloading huge files.

A major unseen benefit is the massively reduced latency when using these applications
between on-net users. As many of the application users where both on-net and commodity
internet users, the fact that on-net traffic reduced latency by an incredible amount and
allowed large video formats as more users at once was not as apparent due to the students



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                      Page 31 of 51
accessing the applications form either home or work where they are limited by the
commodity internet providers that they are connected through.

There is no immediate solution to this except to recognize that to make the most of this
latency benefit means making the most of applications between on-net sites while
recognizing that commodity internet users will lag behind.

Recommendation
Making sure that clients are aware of the bandwidth limitations imposed on their local pc’s
will allow them to understand why a real time service is not responding as well as they had
hoped and providing an approved solution to increased bandwidth, decrease latency, if it is
required by the client.


5.2.4    Bandwidth Calculations
From the results of this project and ongoing testing we are able to estimate the bandwidth
usage for a typical scenario using video and audio conferencing on a personal computer
across the network. This also allows us to calculate the server load and bandwidth
requirements to and from the server. The following scenarios are provided as a guide only.

Presenter – Many Users
One way A/V                      Server Bandwidth                 Client Bandwidth
                                 BWS = N * S                      BWC = S
                                 N = Number of Users              S = Content encoded at constant
                                                                  bit rate
                                 S = Stream encoded at constant
                                 bit rate
EG. 100 users at 100kbps         10 Mbps = 100kbps * 100          100 kbps

You may want to vary the bandwidth for selected users that may be on a slower connection
(dial-up modem users). Calculation could then be 6.9Mbps = (100 kbps * 50) + (38 kbps *
50) assuming half were on dial-up modem.

Many to Many
Example: 4 user conferencing room with all 4 using video and audio at the same time.

Scenario                         Server Bandwidth                 Client Bandwidth
                                 BWS = (P * N ) * S               BWC = P * S
                                 P = Number of publishers         P = Number of publishers
                                 N = Number of Subscribers        S = Content encoded at constant
                                                                  bit rate
                                 S = Stream encoded at constant
                                 bit rate
EG. 4 users at 100kbps           1.6 Mbps = (4 * 4 ) * 100kbps    400 kbps = 4 * 100 kbps




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                         Page 32 of 51
Example: 10 user conferencing room with all 104 using video and audio at the same time.

                                 Server Bandwidth                    Client Bandwidth
                                 BWS = (P * N ) * S                  BWC = P * S
                                 P = Number of publishers            P = Number of publishers
                                 N = Number of Subscribers           S = Content encoded at constant
                                                                     bit rate
                                 S = Stream encoded at constant
                                 bit rate
EG. 10 users at 100kbps          10 Mbps = (10 * 10 ) * 100kbps      1000 kbps = 10 * 100 kbps


Our Experience with conferencing rooms
Presenter with 4 guest (Video and Audio) 306kbps Audio/Video
Scenario                         Server Bandwidth (Out)              Client Bandwidth
Cameras running at 306kbps       BWS = N * S                         BWC = S

                                 N = Number of Users                 S = Content encoded at constant
                                                                     bit rate
                                 S = Stream encoded at constant
                                 bit rate
                                 10 Mbps = 306kbps * 4            306 = 306kbps
Result Bandwidth                 1224 kbps                        306 kbps
Observation
             Quality of video is great.
             Frame rate is too slow.
             Latency about 350 to 500 milliseconds
             Could not use this for a conference if video is important.
             Audio delay is too high to hold a conversation
             Server is happy at 65%


Meeting Room with 4 participants (Video and Audio)
Scenario                          Server Bandwidth (Out)             Client Bandwidth
Cameras running at 306kbps        BWS = (P * N ) * S                 BWC = P * S

                                  P = Number of publishers           P = Number of publishers
                                  N = Number of Subscribers          S = Content encoded at
                                                                     constant bit rate
                                  S = Stream encoded at constant
                                  bit rate
                                  14.896 Mbps = (4 * 4 ) * 306kbps   1224 kbps = 4 * 306 kbps




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                            Page 33 of 51
Observat
ion
                 Quality of video is great.
                 Frame rate is OK.
                 Latency about 350 to 500 milliseconds (But this doesn’t matter as much as only one
                  way video and audio)
              Works well for a presenter
Server is happy at 65%


Presenter with 4 guest (Video and Audio) 70kbps Audio/Video
Scenario                         Server Bandwidth (Out)            Client Bandwidth

Cameras running at 70kbps        BWS = (P * N ) * S                BWC = P * S
                                 P = Number of publishers          P = Number of publishers
                                 N = Number of Subscribers         S = Content encoded at constant
                                                                   bit rate
                                 S = Stream encoded at constant
                                 bit rate
                                 1.12 Mbps = (4 * 4 ) * 70kbps     280 kbps = 4 * 70 kbps
Observation
    Quality of video is adequate.
    Frame rate is acceptable as latency is heaps lower.
    Latency drops to under 84 milliseconds
    Audio is excellent
    Easy to run a meeting at this bit rate
    Server is happy at 60%




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                           Page 34 of 51
Recommendation
Planning and calculating you initial expected use and working out the maximum users that
your network is capable of is imperative to planning you real time communication services.
You will find that there are many server options to limit bandwidth per user, per room,
number of cameras and many more server side settings to manage your real time
communication server. Make sure if you are running your own server you have someone on
staff that has experience and understands the system, requirements and administration to
keep control and troubleshoot your real time servers.


5.3    Applications Projects

Applications Projects showed that there were many points of possible failure in delivering
end-to-end high capacity connectivity – often based around the current setting of throttling
traffic at an institutional or state network level, in addition to firewalls and on-campus
infrastructure.
Recommendation
To run projects that require high capacity connectivity, usually using some type of real time
communication, to test the network capacity and reveal possible inhibitors to connectivity.


Learning – incorporating high capacity connectivity into VET practice

Enabling practitioners to effectively and comfortably use technology for training, particularly
real-time online activities requires significant work, energy and commitment. Relying on the
goodwill and enthusiasm of practitioners, administrators and network manager, as was the
case to a large degree in the POCN Project, is not feasible. These activities need to be
integrated across an organisation’s business planning, have the support of the executive, and
receive adequate funding to allow teachers the opportunity to go offline for planning, training
and trialling purposes.

Recommendation
Allow time to trial technologies well in advance so that it can be included in the teaching
plan for the following semester/year. Incorporating new technology into an existing teaching
plan will only be limited in scope until that technology is proven to be reliable and effective
in enhancing the material.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 35 of 51
5.4     Governance and Project Management

Recommendation
The Project demonstrated the complex nature of this type of undertaking, highlighting many
of the barriers such as the various approaches to security and network design across
jurisdictions, incompatibilities between large and smaller networks, the lack of confidence
existing between jurisdictional technical teams and differing state/territory governance
arrangements that in all likelihood will still exist when the VEN is implemented. It is
recommended that future applications projects consider appointing state-based ICT
committees with membership comprising at a minimum:
     an ICT Manager
     senior business manager, and
     a practitioner.

Learning – collaboration
There is a strong collaborative spirit within the VET sector and enthusiasm for innovation in
teaching. However, practitioners and administrators have many demands on their time and
skills, performance criteria to meet within their organisations, and little discretionary time.
It would be unwise to rely heavily of gratuitous contributions from VET practitioners and
administrators for a project’s success or to underestimate the amount of people hours it will
take in future projects of this nature.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010                        Page 36 of 51
6 Attachments
6.1        Project Workplan (14 November 2008)

                  Proof of Concept Fibre-optic TAFE Network Project
                                                   Workplan
1.    Description of project
      a. Aim/purpose
          This project will:
           demonstrate the benefits a high speed dedicated network can provide to vocational
               education and training
           assist in developing effective strategies for cross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoral
               collaboration for any future national tertiary education network.
      b.     Significance
            i.     VET needs
                   All Australian universities, and many nationally significant research institutions, are
                   connected to high speed network services through the Australian Research and Education
                   Network (AREN), which is operated and managed by AARNet Pty Ltd. With access to very
                   high bandwidth, the higher education sector is using resources such as video to enhance
                   other modes of teaching delivery. Researchers, teachers and students are collaborating
                   online and using online tools and resources to reduce duplication, enhance the learning
                   experience, share resources, work collaboratively and access online tools.
                   TAFEs, however, are connected to separate state and territory networks, with variable
                   connection speeds and significant challenges in conducting collaborative activities.
           ii.     Advantages of high speed network
                   A high speed network will:
                          o enhance the capacity of TAFEs to meet the skills needs of the future
                          o enable the widespread use of interactive e-learning materials and virtual
                              classrooms
                          o provide easy and speedy access to content collections no matter where they are
                              located in Australia
                          o facilitate mutual recognition, credit transfer and cross-jurisdictional and cross-
                              sectoral portability
                          o expand the number of course offerings for learners in regional, remote and
                              Indigenous communities
                          o reduced time-frames for completion of courses of study
                          o facilitate microeconomic reform of TAFEs by allowing them access to markets
                              across Australia
                          o in the longer term, influence future funding directions to ensure effective use of
                              public funds to reduce duplication of teaching effort and resources across the
                              nation.
           iii.    Policy context
                   Tertiary sector/network
                   The policy context for this project includes a move towards a tertiary education sector
                   where the boundaries between university-based and VET-based education and training are
                   becoming more and more blurred, with increased collaboration across, and increased
                   mobility between, the sectors. There is at present an inequity between TAFEs and
                   universities in relation to access to high speed on-net collaborative space. This project aims
                   to test the value to the VET sector of such a resource, with a view to consideration of what
                   this might mean in terms of a potential roll-out of this type of connectivity across Australia.


Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report         January 2010                                   Page 37 of 51
                                                                          Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


              A high bandwidth tertiary network would aim to provide a single post-secondary high speed
              network and put TAFEs on par with universities in terms of access to bandwidth. In addition
              to the benefits listed in 1.b.2 above, the focus on a move towards a tertiary sector/network
              will enhance collaboration across the VET sector and between the VET and higher education
              sectors; and improve articulation between universities and VET institutions.
              This project is intended to test the extent to which a high bandwidth dedicated fibre-optic
              network is of value to, and may provide improved outcomes for, education and training.
              Relationship with other government initiatives
              This proof of concept project will:
                     o build on the Australian Government’s $88 million investment in the high-speed
                         research network for universities, the Australian Research and Education
                         Network (AREN), by extending this network to the training sector
                     o complement work being done in the schools sector in relation to the Digital
                         Education Revolution
                     o complement work being done in the states and territories in relation to high
                         bandwidth connectivity and e-learning.
    c.   Outline of project
          DEEWR, the governments of South Australia, Victoria and the ACT, SABRENet Limited and
          AARNet Pty Ltd will collaborate to develop a proof of concept fibre-optic TAFE on-net network
          by:
             initiating a fibre-optic TAFE network connecting selected South Australian, Victorian and ACT
              TAFE sites, through the AARNet backbone (the fibre-optic backbone being used by the
              university sector)
          establishing a seamless connection between the TAFE and university networks that will
              enable cross-sectoral collaboration
          building fibre-optic tail circuits between the AARNet backbone and selected TAFEs
          most importantly, trialling network applications that demonstrate the capacity for such a
              network to improve education and training outcomes.
         NOTE - This project does not preclude participating TAFEs from also accessing AARNet
         commodity net services via fibre-optic circuits constructed for this project. However, the
         relevant TAFE contracting bodies would need to negotiate and pay for these arrangements
         separately (outside the scope and funding of this project).
    d.   Desired outcomes and how they will be measured
             i. Outcomes
                     o effective testing of the concept of an on-net education network for the TAFE
                         sector that will inform future decisions in relation to the potential roll out of a
                         national tertiary education network
                     o an understanding of the potential costs and benefits of a potential national
                         tertiary education network
                     o identification of issues associated with the development of such a network
                     o identification of effective strategies for cross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoral
                         collaboration for any future national tertiary education network.
              The project aims to test hypotheses about a TAFE network. Those hypotheses are:
                     1.   High speed network connectivity improves the capacity of learners in vocational
                          education and training to live and work in a digital world.
                     2.   High speed network connectivity improves the capacity of VET learners and
                          practitioners to collaborate across jurisdictions.
                     3.   High speed network connectivity improves the capacity of VET learners and
                          practitioners to collaborate across sectors.
                     4.   Connection to a high speed dedicated network improves the quality of delivery
                          of VET services.


Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report      January 2010                                 Page 38 of 51
                                                                         Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


                     5.   VET learning outcomes are improved by the use of a high speed dedicated
                          network.
                     6.   AARNet Pty Ltd is able to provide an on-net network that adequately services
                          the specific needs of the VET sector and provides the sector with value for
                          money.
            ii. How outcomes will be measured
                   1. Quantitative and qualitative reporting (to DEEWR) by the project’s collaborative
                        partners against each of the outcomes statements and hypotheses listed above,
                        to the extent appropriate to their individual areas of expertise
                   2. Qualitative and quantitative surveys of users (teachers and learners), using
                        survey instruments approved by DEEWR, at the following stages:
                             a. When teachers and learners first begin using an application
                             b. As action research during the course of applications - to inform ways in
                                 which the trial may be modified
                             c. At the completion of each of the application trials in which they are
                                 participating
                   3. Analysis by DEEWR of costs, benefits, lessons learnt and implications for any
                        future policy.
    e.   Essential outputs of project and how they will be identified as completed/implemented
             i. Essential deliverables of project
                    There are essential aspects of the Proof of Concept Fibre-optic TAFE Network Project
                    that must be achieved in order for the project to be regarded as successfully
                    implemented. Unless otherwise agreed by DEEWR, the following are the criteria by
                    which the project is to be regarded as successfully implemented:
                      i. By 24 December 2008, the TAFE fibre-optic network is established as either a
                         part of the university network currently managed and operated by AARNet Pty
                         Ltd or as a separate layer within the AARNet backbone.
                      ii. By 24 December 2008, the following sites are connected to the TAFE fibre-optic
                          network:
                              o Canberra Institute of Technology
                              o TAFE divisions of Swinburne University of Technology, RMIT, Victoria
                                  University and the University of Ballarat
                     iii. By 24 December 2008, the SABRENet sites of Panorama, Urrbrae, Regency, Gilles
                          Plains, Salisbury, Elizabeth, Gawler, Roseworthy and Tea Tree Gully will be
                          connected to the network
                     iv. Participants in the TAFE network are able to collaborate with university
                         practitioners through the AARNet university network during the course of the
                         project.
                      v. At least one network application/activity, designed to test the capabilities of the
                         network, has been run over the network for at least ten months (or, if more than
                         one application, for a period totalling at least ten months) and at least two
                         states have been able to adequately test how well that application/s is/are able
                         to be used for collaborative work.
                     vi. By 28 August 2009, all sites intended to be connected are connected (except
                         those that became unfeasible).
                     vii. The results of the network application trial(s) has/have been compiled into a
                          report that includes assessment by all stakeholders of the value of that/those
                          network application(s) and an assessment of how the results of this project may
                          inform any move towards the roll out of a national tertiary education network
                          across Australia.
            ii. How outputs will be measured


Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report       January 2010                               Page 39 of 51
                                                                             Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


                        i.   Reporting to DEEWR by the project’s collaborative partners against each of the
                             essential deliverables listed above, to the extent appropriate to their individual
                             areas of expertise
                       ii.   Analysis by DEEWR of the extent to which essential aspects of the project were
                             delivered, the costs, benefits, lessons learnt and implications for any future
                             policy.
2.   Structural arrangements
     a.   Parties involved and their roles
             Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
              (DEEWR) (sponsor, project leader, collaborative partner)
             AARNet Pty Ltd (network provider, collaborative partner)
             Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) (collaborative partner)
             SABRENet Limited (collaborative partner)
             Government of South Australia’s Department of Further Education, Employment, Science
              and Technology (DFEEST) (collaborative partner)
             State Government of Victoria’s Victorian Skills Commission (VSC) (manager of financial
              relationship with AARNet Pty Ltd, collaborative partner)
     b.   Governance and division of responsibilities
             The collaborative model employed for this project is one that requires considerable goodwill
              and accommodation of the needs and interests of other parties and enormous enthusiasm
              to implement a worthwhile proof of concept. However, as the sponsor of the project,
              DEEWR must approve all activities undertaken as part of the project and has the ultimate
              decision-making power in relation to how funding will be allocated and when project
              activities will be ceased.
             VSC is responsible for the management of the financial relationship with AARNet Pty Ltd, on
              behalf of all parties to the project.
             CIT, DFEEST and VSC are responsible for engaging with TAFE practitioners in their respective
              jurisdictions to identify champions who will lead their state’s activities in relation to the
              running of applications that trial potential uses of the network.
             SABRENet Limited, DFEEST and AARNet Pty Ltd are responsible for developing an effective
              and efficient method of connecting the SABRENet TAFEs to the AARNet backbone.
             AARNet is responsible for establishing, managing and operating the infrastructure that will
              support the network.
             All parties are responsible for ensuring effective working relationships that provide the best
              environment in which to test the concept of a fibre-optic TAFE network.
     c.   Funding and contractual arrangements
             DEEWR has provided funding of $2,534,000 (including GST) to VSC to manage the financial
              arrangements of this project. This funding must cover all expenditure on the project.
             On behalf of the collaborative partners, VSC will contract with AARNet to establish, manage,
              build and operate the network.
             Most of the $2,534,000 (including GST) funding will be used for the establishment and
              operation of the physical network and the building of fibre-optic tail circuits from the
              AARNet backbone to selected TAFE sites. This funding has been notionally allocated as
              follows:
                              o Set up network (Stage 1) and operate for 1 year              $ 975,920
                              o Build tail circuits                                          $ 786,777




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report        January 2010                                  Page 40 of 51
                                                                             Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


             Within the total funding amount of $2,534,400 (including GST), $250,000 is to be
              quarantined for the trialling of applications/activities/content on the network. This will
              include the cost of purchase, development and maintenance of those applications.
             AARNet will negotiate with DFEEST and VSC in relation to an access agreement for access to
              the AARNet network.
             The distribution of funding within this project may be varied at DEEWR’s absolute discretion.
     d.   Infrastructure created as part of the project
             The construction of fibre-optic tail circuits for this project will leverage existing AARNet
              infrastructure constructed for other education and training purposes.
             It is the intention of all collaborative partners that infrastructure created by this project will
              extend the existing infrastructure and in turn be available for other education and training
              entities to leverage for future purposes.
             All collaborative partners have agreed that access to fibre-optic tail circuits created through
              the $2.534 million funding provided by DEEWR for this project will be readily available to all
              sectors of education and training.
3.   Phases of project:
a.   Stage 1.1 - set up network (November to December 2008)
                 i. Establish network
                 ii. Connect to the network the Victorian TAFEs that are already connected to AARNet
                     and to CIT
                iii. Set up a link/protocol between the proof of concept TAFE network and AARNet and
                     the universities connected through AARNet.
b.   Stage 1.2 - connect SABRENet sites to the network (November to December 2008)
                 i. Connect SABRENet sites to the network
c.   Stage 2 - test hypotheses, evaluate and adjust (December 2008 to November 2009)
                 i. Trial applications/activities/content on the network that test the hypotheses in 1.d.i.
                    above
                 ii. January 2009 - Mid stage evaluation against designated outcomes, hypotheses and
                     essential activities of the project
                iii. Adjustment of activities in line with issues arising, changing priorities and lessons
                     learnt, as approved by DEEWR
d.   Stage 3 - add new sites to the network (November 2008 to August 2009)
                 i. Stage 3.1 - Round 1 tail builds (November 2008 to April 2009)
                                 o The preferred option is to build fibre-optic tail circuits from the AARNet
                                   backbone to the following Victorian TAFE sites (Plan A):
                                         Wodonga
                                         East Gippsland
                                         William Angliss
                                 o If agreements are not in place to proceed with these builds by 30
                                   November 2008, or DEEWR decides these sites are not feasible,
                                   alternative sites will be selected (Plan B), subject to approval by
                                   DEEWR.
                                 o Alternative sites that may be considered include:
                                         Other Victorian TAFEs
                                         TAFEs in other states
                                         Private RTOs
                 ii. Stage 3.2 - Round 2 tail builds (March to August 2009)



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report        January 2010                                   Page 41 of 51
                                                                             Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


                                 o By 1 February 2009 DEEWR will decide which sites will be included in
                                   the tail circuit builds for Stage 3.2, if any.
                                 o The preferred option is to build fibre-optic tail circuits from the AARNet
                                   backbone to the following Victorian TAFE sites (Plan A):
                                         Holmesglen
                                         Central Gippsland
                                         Gordon (currently has weak connection through Deakin
                                                                            University)
                                         Kangan Batman
                                 o If agreements are not in place to proceed with these builds within this
                                   timeframe, or DEEWR decides these sites are not feasible, alternative
                                   sites, if any, will be selected (Plan B), subject to approval by DEEWR.
                                 o Alternative sites that may be considered include:
                                         Other Victorian TAFEs
                                         TAFEs in other states
                                         Private RTOs.
e.   Stage 4 - Evaluation (August to December 2009)
         As indicated in 1.d and 1.e. of this document, a range of quantitative and qualitative evaluation
         methodologies will be employed to assess the outputs, outcomes and lessons learnt in relation to
         the technical, administrative and, to some extent, pedagogical aspects of the project.


     AARNet will make all reasonable endeavours to meet milestones and timeframes set out in this
     Workplan. However, AARNet will not be held responsible for its failure to perform or delay in
     performing its obligations if that failure or delay is the direct result of events beyond AARNet’s
     reasonable control. If at any stage the above milestones cannot be met, DEEWR will at its absolute
     discretion vary the nature and or timing of activities to ensure the core elements of the project
     remain feasible. This may include the extension of milestone dates and/or the adjustment of project
     scope.


4.   AARNet lead times
         i. Tail builds
           AARNet has indicated the following lead time requirements in relation to the
           planning/permit/civil works involved in building tail circuits from selected TAFEs to the AARNet
           backbone/network:
                    i. build design/duct study: 8 weeks
                   ii. civil works/construction: 8 weeks
                   iii. commissioning/fibre installation: 4 weeks
                   iv. handover/documentation/testing: 2 weeks
           These builds will be executed using teams of contractors. It is therefore important to note that
           civil works contractors are effectively unable to conduct work in the period between December
           1st and January 15th.
           These lead times pertain to items 3.1 and 3.2. AARNet will make an effort to have lead times
           in items 3.1, 3.2 and 4 run in parallel where build planning permits.
         ii. AARNet lead times for tail fibre equipment and provisioning of bandwidth
           AARNet has indicated the following lead time requirements in relation to the equipping and
           provisioning of bandwith on fibre‐optic tail circuits from selected TAFEs to the AARNet
           backbone/network as built under 3.1 and 3.2 above:
                    i. Place orders with supplier – 1 week
                   ii. Equipment delivery lead time – 4‐6 weeks


Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report       January 2010                                Page 42 of 51
                                                                              Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


                    iii. Staging of equipment before roll out – 1‐2 weeks
                    iv. Roll out of core/backbone infrastructure – 1–2 weeks
                     v. Roll out of sites (1‐2 days per site) – 4‐6 weeks
                    vi. Testing of APL infrastructure – 1 week
                    vii. Integration with local TAFE infrastructure – 4‐6 weeks.
              AARNet will make every effort to have lead times in items 3.1, 3.2 and 4 run in parallel where
              build planning permits.
5.   Applications
     a.   Criteria for selection of applications to run on the network
          An “Applications Reference Group” has been formed with representatives from all participating
          jurisdictions, as well as AARNet, SABRENet and Skills Tasmania. The group will inform the project
          on matters to do with the selection and implementation of applications. The group agreed to the
          following criteria for the selection of applications:



     Applications or content to be used in the TAFE Network project, ideally should:

              Be something that is not presently available, or is currently available but not realising its
               maximum potential due to less-than-adequate bandwidth
              Not merely replicate an application that is already available
              Be an exemplar of the benefits of high-speed connectivity
              Have an identifiable educational outcome
              Cross jurisdictional borders (at least 2 applications)
              Demonstrate cross jurisdictional collaboration (at least 1 application)
              Involve more than 1 institute (at least 2 applications)
              Involve video conferencing (at least 1 application)
              Demonstrate a bandwidth-hungry application (at least 1 application)
              Be distinctly different in technique and form (not just 3 examples of videoconferencing)
              Involve a variety of learning disciplines
              Involve at least one traditional trade
              Apply across the tertiary sector or whole-of-education sectors (at least 1 application)
              Be able to be implemented without undue impost of time or other resources by institutions
               (essential).

     Applications that may also be considered include:

              An education administration activity (e.g. RPL, e-portfolio)
              A staff professional development activity.


          The group suggested a number of applications that satisfied the above criteria, and the project
          sponsor selected the most appropriate applications for use.
          The applications reference group will convene a “practitioners” group which will consider options
          for collaboration in curriculum, sharing of resources and the associated timetabling and staffing
          issues.
     b.   Indicative applications
                   i. ‘VET Virtual’ is intended to be the central application to be trialled on the network.
                  ii. A second and, possibly, third “high impact” application will be selected by the project
                      sponsor, DEEWR.




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report        January 2010                                 Page 43 of 51
                                                                          Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


     c.   Guidelines in relation to the circumstances under which the trialling of an application should be
          ceased (or varied)
          The project’s commitment to a certain application will be discontinued if and when the reference
          group decides that an application is one or more of the following:
                 i. not effectively demonstrating capabilities (e.g. not working, not working well enough)
                 ii. not demonstrating anything new or is deemed a proven concept or completed project
                iii. leading to a budget blow-out (can’t justify continuing)
                iv. too demanding of goodwill, accommodation and/or people resources.
6.   Communications
     a.   How to identify and talk about the project
                 i. The full title of the project is the “Proof of Concept Fibre-optic TAFE Network Project”.
                 ii. In all publications, promotional material and activities relating to the project
                     acknowledgement must be given to DEEWR’s sponsorship of the project, and the
                     cross-jurisdictional collaborative arrangements for the project, by including the
                     following statement:
                             “This work has been undertaken on behalf of the Australian Government,
                             South Australian Government, Victorian Government and Australian Capital
                             Territory Government, with funding provided through the Australian
                             Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace
                             Relations.”
                iii. The key messages about this project are:
                             1. This is a proof of concept project to test the benefits of, and identify
                                issues associated with, a cross-jurisdictional high speed, fibre-optic
                                network for vocational education and training.
                             2. This project is a collaborative endeavour between the Australian
                                Government and the state and territory governments of South Australia,
                                Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory.
                             3. This project is about governments working together to examine how
                                technology can deliver improved outcomes for vocational education and
                                training.
                             4. This project builds on previous Australian Government initiatives,
                                including $88 million provided for the development of the university
                                network known as the AREN.
                             5. This project furthers preliminary work done by the Australian Flexible
                                Learning Framework, through its Access to Bandwidth Project.
                             6. This project works synergistically with initiatives in the states and
                                territories in relation to high bandwidth connectivity and e-learning.
                             7. The Australian Government has provided $2.523 million to fund this proof
                                of concept project.
                iv. Communications to audiences external to the project, including press releases, must
                    be approved by DEEWR prior to release.
     b.   Internal communications
          Internal communications should reflect the collaborative and collegial nature of the project.
          At a minimum, the following communications must occur:
             Quarterly progress reports, including a final report, from AARNet will be forwarded to
              DEEWR for dissemination to the project’s collaborative partners.
             Individuals, sub-groups or steering committees working on individual aspects of the project
              will report to each other (if a group) and to DEEWR under any of the following
              circumstances:



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report      January 2010                                 Page 44 of 51
                                                                         Attachment 7.1 Project Workplan


                      o    Following meetings of the sub group or steering committee
                      o    At all decision points that may impact on the scope, direction, cost and/or
                           timeline of the project
                      o    Where issues or decisions may impact on other aspects of the project.
            DEEWR will communicate with collaborative partners as and when required to ensure
             coordination of the various aspects of the project, keep the project on track and update
             collaborative partners on progress of the project and any relevant issues.
7.   Procedure for variation of workplan
         This workplan includes areas of engagement that are subject to variation, particularly in relation
         to expenditure amounts, where fibre-optic tail circuits may be built and what applications will be
         trialled across the network.
         Where a variation is considered to be necessary, the details of the variation, including the reason
         why the variation is required, must be submitted to DEEWR as soon as the need for such a
         variation becomes apparent.
         DEEWR will, at its absolute discretion, agree, not agree or agree with amendment to the request
         for variation of the workplan.
         No variation may be made to this workplan without the written consent of DEEWR.
                                                 _____________




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report     January 2010                                 Page 45 of 51
                                                                                                                                                      Attachment 7.1 - Project Workplan

                        Attachment A - Indicative timeline for Proof of Concept Fibre-optic TAFE Network Project

       Date                                                                    Activity                                                                        Outputs (Who)
2008
September 5        Workplan agreed                                                                                                                    Workplan agreed (All)
October 17         Decision - which sites will be included in Stage 3.1 tail builds                                                                   Decision (DEEWR)
November 14        Sign off on funding agreement between Victoria and AARNet, based on agreed workplan; Stages 1.1 and 1.2 begin                      Funding Agreement (Victoria
                                                                                                                                                      AARNet)
November 17        Stage 3.1 – Commencement of Round 1 tail builds (they will be added to network as they come online)                                Tail builds begin
                                                                                                                                                      (AARNet/DEEWR)
                   Meeting of collaborative partners to evaluate project progress, resolve issues and identify actions to be taken                    Teleconference (All)
                   Meeting of Applications sub-group to plan initial applications to be run on network and decide future actions                      Teleconference (Aps)
                   Meeting of Technical sub-group to plan and coordinate build, identify issues and resolve to meet timeline                          Teleconference (Tech)
December 15        Stage 2 – Applications begin running on network                                                                                    Applications begin (Aps)
                   Meeting of Applications sub-group to decide next steps and ensure activities on track
December 17        Meeting of Technical sub-group to evaluate progress of network project to date, ensure build is on schedule, network is            Teleconference (Tech)
                   running effectively and initiate any actions necessary to resolve issues
December 24        Stage 1.1 complete - TAFE network established; AARNet-connected VIC/ACT TAFEs connected to network; peering with                   Teleconference (All)
                   universities established
                   Stage 1.2 complete - SABRENet sites connected to the network                                                                       SABRENet connected
                                                                                                                                                      (SABRENet, AARNet, DFEEST)
December 15        Quarterly Report No. 1 submitted by AARNet to DEEWR                                                                                Quarterly Report (AARNet)
2009
January 17         Meeting of Technical sub-group to evaluate progress of network project to date, ensure build is on schedule, network is            Teleconference (Tech)
                   running effectively and initiate any actions necessary to resolve issues
January 24         Meeting of Applications sub-group to evaluate effectiveness of initial network uses and refine future activities                   Teleconference (Aps)

                                                                                                                          Table of abbreviations
                                                                                                                  All      All collaborative partners
                                                                                                                  Aps      Applications reference group
                                                                                                                  Tech     Technical reference group



Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report                                         January 2010                                                                      Page 46 of 51
                                                                                                                                             Attachment 7.1 - Project Workplan

(Attachment A continued)


       Date                                                                    Activity                                                               Outputs (Who)
2009
February 5         Applications sub-group meets to evaluate roll out of applications and refine future activities                            Teleconference (Aps)
February 14        Decision - which sites will be included in Stage 3.2 tail builds, if any                                                  Decision (DEEWR)
February 17        Meeting of Technical sub-group to evaluate progress of network project to date, ensure build is on schedule, network is   Teleconference (Tech)
                   running effectively and initiate any actions necessary to resolve issues
February 21        Mid Stage 2 evaluation of applications commences                                                                          Mid Stage 2 evaluation (Aps)
March 2            Stage 3.2 - commencement of Round 2 tail builds                                                                           R2 tails begin (AARNet/DEEWR)
March 5            Applications sub-group meets to evaluate roll out of applications and refine future activities                            Teleconference (Aps)
March 12           Technical sub-group meets to evaluate progress of network to date, ensure build is on schedule, network is running        Teleconference (Tech)
                   effectively and initiate any actions necessary to resolve issues
March 15           Quarterly Report No. 2 submitted by AARNet to DEEWR                                                                       Quarterly Report (AARNet)
April 30           Stage 3.1 - completion of Round 1 tail builds                                                                             Stage 3.1 builds complete
                                                                                                                                             (AARNet/DEEWR)
June 5             Applications sub-group meets to evaluate roll out of applications and refine future activities                            Teleconference (Aps)
                   Technical sub-group meets to evaluate progress of network to date, ensure build is on schedule, network is running        Teleconference (Tech)
                   effectively and initiate any actions necessary to resolve issues
June 15            Quarterly Report No. 3 submitted by AARNet to DEEWR                                                                       Quarterly Report (AARNet)
August 28          All tail builds completed                                                                                                 Tails build complete
                                                                                                                                             (AARNet/DEEWR)
                   Stage 4 - Evaluation of project begins                                                                                    Project evaluation (All)
September 15       Final AARNet Report submitted by AARNet to DEEWR                                                                          Final Report (AARNet)
December 15        Evaluation, reporting, project complete                                                                                   Project complete (DEEWR)




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report                                       January 2010                                                               Page 47 of 51
6.2     Participating Partners and Teaching Institutions

Participating Jurisdictions and Partners

     Australian Government through DEEWR
     South Australia through DFEEST
     Victoria through the Victorian Skills Commission
     Australian Capital Territory through Canberra Institute of Technology
     AARNet
     SABRENet

Participating Institutions

South Australia

     Elizabeth
     Gawler
     Gilles Plains
     Panorama
     Regency
     Roseworthy
     Salisbury
     Tea Tree Gully
     Urrbrae

Victoria

     Swinburne University of Technology
     RMIT
     Victoria University
Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report                           January 2010   Page 48 of 51
   University of Ballarat
   Wodonga
   William Angliss
   Kangan Batman
   Gordon
   Holmesglen (withdrawn)
   East Gippsland (withdrawn)

ACT

   Canberra Institute of Technology




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010   Page 49 of 51
6.3    VET Virtual Flyer




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010   Page 50 of 51
6.4    Practitioners’ Large Mailbox Flyer




Proof of Concept Network Project Final Report   January 2010   Page 51 of 51

				
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