; asca_news_0108
Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out
Your Federal Quarterly Tax Payments are due April 15th Get Help Now >>

asca_news_0108

VIEWS: 2 PAGES: 12

  • pg 1
									                                   ASCA NEWS

Welcome to the ASCA newsletter – keeping you in touch.

January 2008
A Very Happy New Year to all.

This newsletter is designed to keep you up to date with ASCA. We welcome your
thoughts, and hope you are enjoying the holiday season.

This edition contains some important Syllabus changes for teachers.

Don’t miss the McDonald’s Performing Arts Challenge Public Speaking
Championship information.

IMPORTANT
The ASCA mailing address has been changed, and is now:-

PO Box 4570
North Rocks. NSW. 2151



DATES FOR YOUR DIARY


ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING - The Annual General Meeting of ASCA will be held at
UTS Lindfield on Saturday afternoon, 23rd February 2008.

THE NSW AWARDS CEREMONY – will be held on Saturday 29th March at 1.30pm.
Venue will be Greenhalgh Auditorium, Kuring-gai Campus of the University of
Technology Sydney, Eton Road, Lindfield.

THE QUEENSLAND CEREMONY will be held later in the year




                    Australian Speech Communication Association
           The McDonalds Performing Arts
                   Challenge
                     PUBLIC SPEAKING
                ENTRIES CLOSE: March 26, 2008
           Check our website: www.culturalcouncil.org.au
              FOR AN ENTRY FORM IN JANUARY
                                            .
Prepared Speech: Note cards optional except for Event 313. No copy needs to be
provided for the adjudicator.
Impromptu Speech: A topic, provided by the adjudicator, will be given to each entrant
in the preparation room. Entrants are not allowed to take material of any kind into this
room, including mobile phones. Paper & pen will be provided for notes.


313: Public Speaking Championship (14 - 18 years)
Total Prize Value $1,500
See notes above under heading.
Entrants must enter and perform in one Prepared Speech AND one
Impromptu Speech event within their age range.
Heats: A Prepared Speech of an own choice subject. No note cards
allowed. Time limit up to 6 minutes. Up to 6 Finalists will be selected
for a Final if required. If no final required then entrants will be required
to perform their Impromptu Speech (see below) in addition to the
Prepared Speech.
Final: Two items to be performed: (a) A Prepared Speech of an own
choice subject. Time limit up to 6 minutes AND (b) An Impromptu
Speech. Preparation time 2 minutes. Speaking time up to 3 minutes.
Warning Bell at 2 minutes, final bell at 3 minutes. Prepared Speech
may be repeated from other events.
Winner: $1,000. Finalists: $100 each.
Sponsored by the Sydney Eisteddfod.
                                                             Entry Fee: $23
SYLLABUS CLARIFICATIONS FOR TEACHERS

Will you please note these changes in your Syllabus

1.Diploma of ASCA Section 5 - Impromptu speaking is to be on a general topic.

 2.Certificate of Communication Section 4 - Lead time is five minutes to peruse
the article before reading it to the audience and then leading a discussion.

 3. Senior Grade 6, Section 2 Impromptu Section - The Candidate should
submit three issues/themes to the examiner together with the news article of
approximately 350 words.

4. Senior Grades 6, 7 and 8, Section 4, Sight Reading – Candidates will be
given 30 seconds to scan the verse and prose.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


THE ASCA POETRY COMPETITION

2007 WINNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED SOON

Sneak Preview!!! The themes for the 2008 competition will be
                  - Family, Animals, Humour.
Perhaps some contestants can begin thinking and/or writing!!!
More information in the March newsletter.


                               ---------------------------------------------------


WEB PAGE –   check the web page
for this newsletter and information about Asca

                    www.australianspeechcommunication.com
    “Have something to say and say it as clearly as you can.
               That is the only secret of style”
                       -Matthew Arnold



“Creativity is the power to connect the seemingly unconnected” –
                           William Plomer




                 IMPROMPTU SPEAKING



       “All the great speakers were bad speakers at first”
                      -Ralph Waldo Emerson


      “Imagination is more important than knowledge”
                       Albert Einstein




Jillian Burgess
DipSoc,ASDA,LTCL,HonDipASCA,CELTA
                             IMPROMPTU SPEAKING
Jillian Burgess
DipSoc,ASDA,LTCL,HonDipASCA,CELTA

When you mention “Impromptu Speaking” most students freeze or become so apprehensive that
they cannot think of what to say, let alone arrange their thoughts in logical order or think of
references, examples, or stories. So to settle the butterflies it is necessary to develop strategies
and guidelines for the various types of speaking with minimum notice.

However, if you think about it, most of the talking we do on a daily basis is impromptu speaking;
telephone conversations, discussions with colleagues and friends, speaking at meetings; advising
friends and armchair conversations. Developing impromptu speaking skills and learning how to
organise our thoughts, experience and knowledge on any topic has the following benefits:

     •   Improves oral expression of thought
     •   Allows you to speak at meetings thinking quickly on your feet
     •   Provides greater skills when delivering prepared speeches, especially if you loose your
         train of thought and have to improvise.
     •   Builds personal confidence in a social situation.
     •   Develops leadership and communication skills.

Speaking in a confident manner starts at a young age. If you teach 5 to 7 years olds introduce
“TELLING TIME”
TELLING TIME
One minute sharing of information using the following
TOPICS:
Family, Pets, Toys, Book, Video, DVD, School Subject, Holiday, Hobby, Collection, Experience,
Special Birthday.
GUIDELINES:
Start with answering “Wh” questions
Who gave it to you?
When and Why? (Was it a birthday, or for something special?)
How do you look after it?
What do you do with it? What is it about?
Where did it come from?

HELP WITH
OPENINGS
Suggest a simple question such as: What is your favourite video? Mine is……
Consider using a statement such as “Everyone has a favourite video and mine is…….. I like it
because:

Then use the following rhetorical questions to help recall information and lead the audience
through
THE BODY of the talk: Who gave it to me? Or When did I get it? What is the most exciting part? Or
What is the moral or message in the video?
Then
CONCLUDE with some advice or a message
It is a good idea to keep a record and make a comment about the delivery.

TELLING TIME
TOPIC               OPENING             VOICE                EYE CONTACT         CONCLUSION

Comments for evaluating are: very good, good, improving, developing.

STORY TELLING
Young children also enjoy telling a story from a picture. Alison Lester’s “Imagine” can be used for
group story telling as well as individual story telling.
In small groups of 4 or 5 give each child a word from a group of words and allow them to weave
those words into a story keeping to a narrative structure. The children are given time to arrange
themselves in order of introduction of the word. Beginning with the
ORIENTATION, PROBLEM, DEVELOPMENT, SOLUTION, CONCLUSION
Groups of words such as:
     • Midnight, mushroom, fairy, girl, rain.
     • Party, dog, frankfurts, tablecloth, kennel.
     • Beach, bucket. shell, ball, towel.
     • Television, homework, brother/sister, biscuit, computer.
     • Spaghetti, fork, straw, tablecloth, Grandma
SPEAKING ON A WORD
Primary School Children enjoy speaking on a word for 30” saying all they can think of in the time
limit. They must not say ‘er’ ‘um’ ’like’ ’sort of thing’ or they have to stop.
     Words can be
         • Foods – vegetables, fruit, breakfast cereals
         • Clothes – socks, shoes, scarf, gloves, jeans
         • Sports - tennis, hockey, netball, soccer, football, AFL
         • School subjects – art, science, maths, spelling, writing
A task for senior school students and adults is to given them a word and ask them to speak on it
imaginatively and creatively for one to two minutes. For example words like:
WINDOWS, DREAMS, STORM, NEWSPAPER, CHOICES, COLOUR, GARDEN, COMMITMENT,
LEADERSHIP, WISDOM, HANDS, EYES,
POVERTY, WATER, SMILE, HUMILITY, COMPANIONSHIP

SPEAKING ON A WORD WITHOUT USING THE WORD.
The speaker concentrates so much on not using the word that the fear of speaking is forgotten. As
confidence increases the duration of the speech may be increased. Again a record is kept to
gauge the improvement.
It is a good idea to start with
Fruit, vegetables, colours,

DATE           WORD                 TIME           NO. OF        COMMENTS
                                                   UM’S
ADVERTISEMENTS

Advertisements are fun and can be done in small groups or as individuals. Set the criteria to be
included
Opening – Catch the listener’s attention with the unusual. For example take a well-known song
and use new words to sell your product.
Include the benefits, the results, the guarantee, the quality and/or reasons this product is the best
and must be bought.

Dorothy Leeds in her book “Powerspeak” lists the

TWELVE MOST PERSUASIVE WORDS

DISCOVERY
SAFETY
NEW
GUARANTEE
LOVE
HEALTH
EASY
MONEY
PROVEN
SAVE
BENEFIT
YOU
TASK
Using some of the most persuasive words above advertise a product.
(Have a bag of everyday products that the speaker may choose for this task, e.g. toothpaste, toothbrush,
shampoo, biscuits, dog food, cat food, dog toy, breakfast cereal, nail polish, toy car, jewellery.)


TASK FOR OLDER STUDENTS is to ask them to take one of the items out of the bag to DISCUSS. However,
choose a year (say 2050) and an occupation (e.g. anthropologist or archaeologist) and ask them to explain
what the item was and how it was used in the 21st century.

A FUN TASK
On separate pieces of paper write unusual or very descriptive colours like flamingo pink, electric blue, day-glo
orange, pea green. Have a list of questions; for example,
    • Tell us why you plan to paint your house this colour.
    • Explain why all your clothes this summer will be in this colour.
    • Tell the person to your right why he/she should buy a car in this colour.



NEWS ARTICLES
Take a short news article on a current issue. Discuss the article and debate any main points.
The teacher may ask the student to give an impromptu speech on the impact of the issue . If the issue lends
itself the impromptu speech can be a persuasive speech in the form of pleading a cause. For example: You
have been asked to speak to parents about ‘Healthy Canteens’.




TASK FOR TWO
One person speaks and another stands next to the speaker and performs all the gestures. This helps the
speaker maintain their focus. If the speaker hesitates or laughs call out change and the pair continue opposite
roles. Some examples are:

Waiting at the bus stop/train station.
Working on a street repair.
The joy of dancing.
Demonstrating how to fly a kite.
Rock climbing.
Cleaning your room.
Having streaks or foils put in your hair.
You are brought the wrong meal in a restaurant.

As students develop their confidence they are ready to tackle competition public speaking which also provides
an opportunity for students to listen and evaluate others. Here they can explore the use of voice, body
language and the ability to organize ideas in the various types of speeches.




                           Australian Speech Communication Association
EXTEMPORISED SPEAKING
One style of competition is to be given three topics of which one is chosen, then in three minutes a five minute
speech is developed to be delivered without notes. There is no minimum time limit. But if you speak for longer
than five minutes you are penalised. Some sample topics are:
A good parent…
A law should be made that..
Courage is…
Freedom is like the ocean because..
If I could accomplish one thing in life…
Little Red Riding Hood should have…
Other cultures…
The one event I remember most is…..
Teenagers would be better off..
If I were an author I would write about…
To get respect…
To me, success in life, lies in
Teenagers smoke because…
If I wanted to impress someone, I’d tell them about…
The person I admire most….
You can make a child feel special by…
If I wrote a personal mission statement, it would say…

Now you need to know the
                     FIVE EASY WAYS TO GAIN CONFIDENCE DELIVERING AN
                                         IMPROMPTU SPEECH
   1. Volunteer! Use every opportunity to practise.
   2. Repeat the topic out loud. This gives you time to think of something to say.
   3. Remember an impromptu speech is a mini-speech with a beginning or opening, a middle or body and
       an end or conclusion. One suggestion is to begin with “There are three reasons why” or “Three words
       come to mind, when I think of …….” Conclude with a message or a challenge.
   4. Personalize your response – “This reminds me of what happened when….” Or “I remember when”
   5. Stay within time.



THE SAME CRITERIA APPLIES TO THE STRUCTURE OF AN IMPROMPTU SPEECH AS APPLIES TO A
PREPARED SPEECH.

Here are some techniques to help you think quickly and deliver an effective speech clearly.
After you have established your main idea or message, open strongly.
INTRODUCTION:
Be different, be creative, use a quote (that you have memorised from the list you have collected), use a
question, or a story, sing a song.
Give a list of relevant items. Use something that leads into your main message. Start with
“I believe that……..the reason being”
“My experience shows………because……..”
*Remember if you don’t know where you are going any road will get you there”

Never start with “Today I am going to talk to you about”.
Never start with the title of your talk.

                           Australian Speech Communication Association
REMEMBER YOU WIN OR LOSE YOUR AUDIENCE IN THE FIRST 35 SECONDS OF YOUR SPEECH

LINK TO:
THE MAIN IDEA AND STATE THE OBJECTIVE

BODY:
Think of three main points then add an example to expand each point. The example can be a personal story
or an experience related to the topic.
This will give confidence and helps you to be convincing. Tell about a specific event, including:
When it happened
Why it happened
Where it happened
What caused it to happen
Who was involved and
How it happened.
After the story or example give an explanation and link into the final summary and conclusion.

Remember S E E
Statement
Example
Explanation

CONCLUSION:
Summarise the main points and finish with the message or main point you want the listener to take away and
remember.

SOME HINTS!
DON’T TRY TO COVER TOO MUCH
BE SHORT AND TO THE POINT
NEVER APOLOGISE
DO NOT THANK THE AUDIENCE
The International Training in Communication (ITC) Handbook gives the Bull’s Eye Plan for impromptu
speaking.

BULL’S EYE PLAN
  TO THE AUDIENCE                             YOU
1.Wake up!                      Start dynamically with an attention
Your attention, please.         getting introduction

2. This concerns you             Tell why it is important

3. Generally speaking           Make a clear, general statement

4. For example                  Give examples, stories and explanations

5. What to do                    Use your strongest most convincing
   Establish your point of      statement to summarize what you have
View, course of action or       said.
Objective.


                             Australian Speech Communication Association
This is only one plan. The following are other methods:

1. PRES Method.
When asked to express an opinion – to inform, persuade or inspire.
P – POINT
Make your point (Opening)
“The point I want to make is ……………………………..”

R – REASON
State your reason for making the point. (Body)
“ The reason I say this is …………………………………….”

E - EXAMPLE
Give an example to justify your previous remarks (Body)
“For example……………….”
“My experience……………..”

S - SUMMARY
Drive home the point again. Links the conclusion back to the opening.
“In summary my point is ……………….

2. PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE METHOD
When asked for your comment on a particular topic
P P F
POINT
Make your point (Opening)
P – Past
Reflect on the past issue (Body)
“In the past we did it this way……………”
P – Present
What is happening today (Body)
“However we now do it this way because…………………….”
F – Future
What will/could happen in the future
“In the future we envisage that……………………”
POINT
Drive home your opening point. Reminds audience what the point of your speech was all about (Conclusion).
Be brief.

3. The WH words may be used to structure the body of the speech.
Introduction
Who,          When,
What,         Where,
How,          Why
Used when asked to role play or to use their imagination.




                          Australian Speech Communication Association
4. YANA METHOD YES ARGUMENT NO ARGUMENT

This plan is good for controversial subjects – particularly those with two sides to the issue.
You can use phrases like:
On the one hand, I think that this is a good decision, because…..
On the other hand I believe there are good reasons why this should not be adapted. For example….
The conclusion would be:
So, because there are good arguments on both sides…………

5. Other methods are
    • Cause, Effect, Remedy
    • Before, The Event, The Result
    • Local, State, Federal
    • Community, National, International
    • Good, Bad, Indifferent
    • Using three words – Goals, Commitment, Leadership.

   The final section of Impromptu Speaking will be included in the March newsletter.

   BIBLIOGRAPHY
   Burgess Jillian: How to become a Powerful Speaker; World Vision Workshop 2005

   Burgess Jillian: How to be a Powerful Presenter; The Institute for International Relations, Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
   Hanoi, Vietnam, 2004

   Hannan, Hap P.: Look Who’s Talking! Sandstone Publishing 2001

   Leeds, Dorothy: Powerspeak, Piatkus 1993

   Persons Hal: The How-to of Great Speaking: Black & Taylor 1996

   Ryan Kevin & Adrian Pauley; Speaking and Debating with Style, Phoenix Education; 2000

   Stuart Christina: How to be an Effective Speaker, NTC Publishing 1988


                                --------------------------------------------------


REMEMBER – if you have any queries about ASCA, the syllabus, or
about the conduct of examinations, please email, or write, and they
will be handed to the committee for an answer.

CONTRIBUTIONS - to the Newsletter will be gratefully received by
the editor.

All newsletter correspondence please to
PO Box 4570, North Rocks, NSW 2151
or janadams@ozemail.com.au



                             Australian Speech Communication Association

								
To top