Docstoc

Deforestation

Document Sample
Deforestation Powered By Docstoc
					Deforestation


     Converting forests for
    agriculture & tree farms
Headwaters Redwood Forest,
California
Headwaters Forest -- 200,000 fragmented acres
Forest Background
 The area of the world's forests,
  including natural forests and plantations,
  was about 3.5 billion ha in 1995
   Source: UNITED NATIONS STATE OF THE FORESTS
    REPORT (SOFO - 1997)

 This is 26.6 percent of the total land
  area of the world except for Greenland
  and the Antarctic.
Forests in Decline
Between 1970 and 1995 the world’s
 natural forest cover declined:
  about 10 per cent
    • as wood and paper consumption increased by
      two-thirds
  at a rate averaging 0.5 per cent per
   year
    • equivalent to an annual loss of forest the size
      of England and Wales.
 Habitat Shrinkage and fragmentation
          play a key role . . .




           “interior” forest characteristics
. . . reducing
     upon which many species depend
Deforestation Rates

 Worldwide, deforestation is continuing at a
  rapid rate, and in the developing world, it is
  most rapid, at an estimated annual rate of
  0.65 percent
 Deforestation is most rapid in the tropical
  zone of the developing world, with the
  highest annual rate of loss over this period in
  tropical Asia-Oceania (0.98 percent annually)
 Globally, 11.3 million hectares (ha) of the
  world's forests are lost each year
  Deforestation rates may be
       slowing slightly in
     the developing world
 Natural Forests in Developing Countries:


1990-1995             1980-1990
 decreased 13.7         decreased 15.5
 million ha annually    million ha
                        annually
“Frontier Forests”
Study by the World
Resources Institute

 Studied the world’s “Frontier
  forests” -- the original, natural
  forests present 8,000 years ago
  before agricultures dispersed
  widely
Findings of Frontier
Forests Study

 “Almost half of Earth’s original
  forest cover is gone
 Much of it was destroyed within
  the last three decades”
 Only 1/5 of this remaining, original
  forest is relatively undisturbed
The remaining,
original forests . . .
 Almost 70% of the remaining,
  original forest is in Russia, Canada
  and Brazil.
 Most of this is in the inhospitable
  northern boreal forests of Russia
  and Canada
More Findings of the
Frontier Forests Study . . .
  Outside of the remote northern forests,
   about 75 percent of the remaining
   frontier forests are threatened
  Including the least accessible original
   forests, 39% of the total faces
   immediate threats by logging,
   agricultural clearing, and other human
   activity
                                                  Oceana:
                                                  Australia,
                                                  NewZealand,
                                                  Papua New
                                                  Guinea




PNG: Forest type: Tropical
Threats: Logging and oil pipeline development. (A large oilfield
has been discovered about 180 miles inland.)
At risk: A vast tract of relatively undisturbed tropical forest of
exceptionally high species richness. Homelands for several
groups of indigenous people.
 Logging Continues to
 Shrink Forests
With the world's forests continuing to
 shrink, after holding 10 meetings on
 five continents since 1995, the
 Intergovernmental Panel on Forests,
 comprised of more than 70
 governments, ended two years of
 talks in February 1999 . . . .
Without
agreeing
to any
binding
curbs on
logging
The United
 States
 helped block
 any
 agreement,
 fearing
 slower
 economic
 growth.
It not just
government
inaction that leads
activists to
frustration and rage
...

It is that the
government
directly supports
deforestation
U.S. Citizens subsidize the
destruction of their own
forests


U.S. Forest Service lost $1 billion
 between 1995 and 1997 by subsidizing
 the timber industry.
      • According to the U.S. Government’s General
        Accounting Office.
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
You
get
what
you
pay
for
And a U.S.Agriculture Office
Inspector General report
released in January 1999
acknowledged widespread
corruption in its timber
program, finding:
* The “integrity of
environmental decisions was
not maintained”

  U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Office of Inspector General Evaluation Report No. 08801-10-AT
  January 1999, “Forest Service Timber Sale Environmental Analysis Requirements.”
Moreover:
* “environmental assessments”
were inadequate; and
* “findings of no significant impact”
were false.

This report and hundreds of
lawsuits documents that federal
resource agencies routinely disobey
environmental laws and their
statutory obligations to enforce
them.
   Ecological
  Apocalypse?

Yes -- but this begs the
 question of our class:
     What is our
 responsibility in this
    kind of world?

Do we have any duties
    to this world?

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:4
posted:10/24/2012
language:English
pages:48