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					           The Webster University
TEACHER EDUCATION PORTFOLIO
  A Guide to Successful Portfolio Development




               Webster University
                 (version 9/06/05)
                     TABLE OF CONTENTS



I.     Glossary: Who’s Who? What’s What?

II.    Organizing Your Portfolio

III.   Developing a Philosophy of Education

IV.    Introducing---The Standards

V.     Sample MoSTEP standard with narrative

VI.    Instructions for Making
       Links to Performance Indicators

VII. MoSTEP Standards and suggested
       Artifacts

VIII. Webster U’s Lesson Plan Format

IX.    Webster U’s Unit Plan Format

X.     Frequently Asked Questions

XI.    Important Thoughts

XII. School of Education Goals

XIII. Evaluation for the Portfolio
                                I. GLOSSARY
                             Who’s Who? What’s What?

Portfolio—a pre-service teacher’s collection of projects, reflections, and
assorted materials that substantiate fulfillment of the eleven MoSTEP
standards

MoSTEP Standards—eleven areas of knowledge and skills established by
the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE)
that serve as a general guideline of competencies for new teachers. An
approved portfolio is the final step of certification requirements.

Performance indicators—the subdivisions of each of the eleven Standards
that more clearly define the skills and knowledge needed to fulfill each
Standard.

Artifacts—the documents (lesson plans, transcripts, evaluations, etc) included
in a portfolio that support fulfillment of the eleven MoSTEP standards

Narratives—written reflections on the artifacts and experiences included in
the portfolio that communicate how the pre-service teacher has changed and
grown as a professional

DESE --- the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in
Missouri
                               II. ORGANIZING YOUR PORTFOLIO

        Portfolios must be submitted in electronic format. The portfolio is basically composed of
        two components: The narratives and the artifacts. Everything you need to know about
        setting up an electronic portfolio is on the website http://owl.webster.edu/eportfolio

                     Your portfolio template has all of the Standards and Performance Indicators
   The                listed. MoStep Standards
   Standards
                     Each indicator should be followed by a list of the artifacts you used for
                      proof (use words to describe the artifacts, not just referral numbers). Also,
                      create links for each artifact.
                     After the list of indicators and the list of artifacts, your narrative should
 The Narrative        follow. This narrative should be no more than a page (single-spaced) and
                      should reflect on the perceived growth or changes you have made during
                      your pre-service education, specifically based on the artifacts you have cited
                      for this Standard. Combine the concepts from all of the performance
                      indicators into one essay. Do not just describe the artifacts in your
                      narrative. Reflect!
                               sample of a MoSTEP standard and narrative.

                 Guiding Questions to Help You Write Your Narratives
                When and how have you demonstrated your knowledge in general subjects and education
                 classes? Did you learn something new as you put the lesson or unit together?
                How did you organize this content accommodating for multiple styles so that you could reach
                 your particular population of students? What theorists did you follow to form your strategies?
                How did you use the students’ prior knowledge to strengthen your curricula?
                What guiding questions or activities did you use to engage your students in methods of inquiry?
                Describe how the interdisciplinary design of your curricula accommodated the diversity of your
                 learners.
                What strengths of mine do these artifacts reflect? What weaknesses do these artifacts point out
                 and how have the weaknesses changed or improved?



                 Artifacts to correspond to the Standards
The Artifacts       You should use links to connect your narratives to specific artifacts that you
                       feel fulfill a performance indicator. Since artifacts can be used more than
                       once for different performance indicators, you should color code or indicate
                       the specific part of the document that connects to the specific performance
                       indicator. (See Section VI to learn how to make a link). Only include
                       artifacts that you reflect on in your narrative. Some POSSIBLE key artifacts
                       to include are:
             Transcripts, Praxis scores, CBASE scores, Resume
             Letters of recommendation (from parents, mentors, others)
             Apprentice Teaching or practicum evaluations (with corresponding
              lessons)
             Lesson/Unit Plans (with corresponding evaluation forms)
             Excerpts from your professional journal
             Excerpts from students’ journals
             Awards/Certifications (only if you refer to them in narrative)
             Proof of presentations you have made at conferences
             Proof of workshop/conference attendance with reflections
             Samples of tests/quizzes that you authored
             Samples of papers/projects from a course (indicate what part of the paper
              supports the indicator).
             Copies of media/computer slides (paper version)
             Photographs that demonstrate a point (copies preferred)


Some artifacts will need to be scanned. Please refer to the Technical Support folder
on the Portfolio Word folder you downloaded from the internet.
               III. DEVELOPING A PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION
        Your beliefs influence your actions. Your personal belief system – your philosophy of education
– will determine what values you emphasize, how you organize and manage your classroom, what
content you stress, and which teaching methods you use.
        In order to develop your personal philosophy of education, think about the following questions:
              How do you view the role of school in society? What are the purposes of education?
              How do you view the student? What is the student’s role in his/her education?
              How do you view the role of the teacher? How is this consistent with the above beliefs?
                What are the primary responsibilities of the teacher?
              How do you view the subject matter to be taught, in keeping with the above? What
                curriculum do you value?
              How will your classroom organization and management reflect your values? What are
                your thoughts concerning discipline?
              How will you measure and report student progress? How will you view diversity? How
                do you envision others, especially families, supporting education?


Consider the following:

       1. The paper should express a strong, coherent set of values that permeate your views regarding
          the role of schools, students, teachers, curriculum and classroom organization and
          management. All ideas should work to support the stated values.

       2. The paper should use specific, concrete examples to explain and illustrate your philosophy.
          Relevant examples should support all the main ideas.

       3. Your paper should include all the relevant aspects of a philosophy of education: the role of
          schools, students, teachers, and curriculum, and the organization and management that
          support them.

       4. You should give evidence of deep personal thought and genuine expression. Your ideas
          should be original and well developed, reflecting intense analysis over time.

       5. The paper should engage the reader, stimulating thinking about teaching.

       6. The paper must be well written, with paragraphing, sentence structures and transitions
          supporting effective communication of ideas.

       7. Be sure to use appropriate conventions (spelling, punctuation, and formatting supporting
           effective communication of ideas).

Your personal philosophy of education will:

       1. Be one to two pages in length.

       2. Be neatly typed without errors (double spaced).

       3. Consist of complete, correct sentences and paragraphs.
       4. Be written in first person (I, me).

       5. Include no contractions (I’ve, it’s, etc.).

       6. Contain no errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation. Allow someone to proofread
          your paper.

       7. Avoid an outline form in the final paper. The outline should be only a mental guide.
           Be relatively personal and genuine. It should not seem stilted or overly formal.

       8. Avoid using jargon or terms that may be unfamiliar to others.

       9. Be consistent with the use of pronouns. Use a singular pronoun with a singular
          subject.

       10. State your view in a positive way. It is better to state what you advocate and let the
           reader infer what you do not support.

       11. Avoid overuse or repetition of the same word (e.g. pupil, school).

       12. Use correct capitalization. Do not capitalize subject areas unless they are proper
           nouns or begin a sentence (e.g. English, physical education, French, science, social
           studies).




                           IV. INTRODUCING THE STANDARDS
The following descriptions represent a synopsis of the 11 MOSTEP Standards. The actual Standards
(pp. 13- 23) are more detailed and are broken down into specific areas, called performance indicators.
Consider the following an introduction! Note the suggestions for potential artifacts.

   Standard 1: CONTENT KNOWLEDGE (knows central concepts, tools of inquiry; able to create learning
   experiences that make subject matter meaningful for students). Transcripts, lesson plans, course lists.

   Standard 2: CHILD DEVELOPMENT (understands how students learn and develop; provides learning
   opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students). Case study
   excerpts, papers, journal entries.

   Standard 3: DIVERSITY (understands how students differ in their learning styles; creates opportunities that
   adapt to diverse learners). Description of learners, IEPs, journal entries.

   Standard 4: CURRICULUM (develops, implements, and evaluates curriculum based upon student, district
   and states performance standards). Lesson and unit plans.
   Standard 5: METACOGNITIVE SKILLS (uses a variety of strategies to encourage critical thinking,
   problem solving and performance skills). Lesson and unit plans.

   Standard 6: CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT (uses group motivation and management skills to encourages
   positive social interaction, active learning and self-motivation). Management Procedures of lesson plans.

   Standard 7: COMMUNICATION (models effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication
   techniques to foster active inquiry, and collaboration). Letters to parents, colleagues; lesson plans.

   Standard 8: ASSESSMENT (uses formal and informal strategies to evaluate and ensure continuous
   intellectual, social, and physical development of learners). Assessment Procedures of lesson plans.

   Standard 9: PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES (is a reflective practitioner and seeks opportunities for
   professional development). Journal entries, professional workshops.

   Standard 10: COMMUNITY RESOURCES (fosters relationships with colleagues, parents, and educational
   partners in the larger community to support student learning and well-being). Journal entries, certificates,
   letters of commendation.

   Standard 11: TECHNOLOGY (understands theory and application of technology in educational settings and
   creates opportunities for all students to use technology). Copies of Power Point slides, discussion of
   Websites, activities with students using technology.

                       V. SAMPLE STANDARD WITH NARRATIVE
                                 (the links are not functional in this sample)

The purpose of this sample is to give you an idea of how to structure your artifacts and narratives. The
content of your pages will not be identical to this sample, however, the format and structure should
follow closely.

Standard 2: The entry level teacher understands how students learn and develop, and
provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social and personal development of
all students

Performance Indicators:
The entry-level teacher:
2.1 knows and identifies child/adolescent development (resume; transcripts; Journal entry 9)
2.2 strengthens prior knowledge with new ideas (Butterflies and Moths; Quick as a Cricket)
2.3 encourages student responsibility (Butterflies and Moths; Supervisor’s Observation)
2.4 knows theories of learning (Quick as a Cricket)

       Sample Narrative: I taught in three different situations prior to seeking classes in education
       and was aware that I did not always understand children. Still, I thought that my four years of
       working in these different educational settings should have given me a solid foundation for
       teaching (resume). When I finally took the Psychology of the Exceptional Student class in 1981
       (transcripts), I started to realize what my weaknesses were and how I could affect change. There
       were several times during that class when I thought to myself, “so THAT’s why so & so didn’t
       want to listen to me that day” or “if only I had known that there was such an urge toward
       independence throughout early childhood.” I found the papers in Psychology of the Exceptional
       Student to pose difficult challenges, but the work helped me to move from an instinctive level of
       teaching to a theoretically reinforced level. I have since applied the theories of development
       from this class and from Educational Psychology to make better choices for my management
        procedures (Quick as a Cricket) and to sincerely focus on the description of learners in my lesson
        plans (Learners: Butterflies & Moths).

        In the artifacts I have cited, I demonstrate an understanding of what children must know prior to
        attempting a given task (Quick as a Cricket: Learners). I also take into consideration that
        individual children will vary in their readiness to begin assignments, and have adapted my
        instruction to meet those needs (Instructional process for Quick as a Cricket: bullet two). I try to
        do this with my questioning techniques, using open-ended prompts as well as directed inquiry
        (Instructional process for Quick as a Cricket: bullet one). In my journal, I often reflect on
        behavioral problems I observe in the classroom (Journal entry 9).

        In Butterflies and Moths, students are responsible for all the artistic decisions they must make to
        create a close up of a specific insect. I am comfortable giving students the opportunity to choose
        when the area is art (Instructional process for Butterflies and Moths: bullet seven), but in general,
        I find it difficult to delegate responsibility to students, because I have more control if I make
        decisions for them. I am working on this (Observation). By reviewing individual cases with my
        mentor, I am able to see how each new experience, combined with the theories and practical
        applications from courses I have taken, help me to better comprehend the nature of child
        development. In my evaluations, my supervisor makes reference to my sensitivity to
        individual’s needs (Observation) which is a trait I treasure and hope to continue to develop by
        someday taking a counseling course.




        VI. INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING LINKS WITH PERFORMANCE
                             INDICATORS

                             Creating links in a Word document.

  The very first task in creating your electronic portfolio is to collect all of your artifacts and put
them in electronic format if they are not already. You can scan non-electronic documents into the
  computer to make them electronic. You will use either a Mac or Windows. Directions for both
 are below. Hyperlinks go from one file to another. A bookmark takes you to a specific place in a
                    file. You will need to use both as your create your portfolio.

                                    Creating links on the Mac
Creating a link on the Mac.

   1. Highlight the text that you want to create the link for.
   2. On the Tool Bar, click Insert.
   3. Go down to the Hyperlink connection and click. The Insert Hyperlink box will come up.
   4. Change the center setting from Web Page to Documents, if it is not already there.
   5. Click on Select and your list of documents will come up. Note: When you click on Select (Step
      4), if the document you want is not recognized, simply type the name of the file in the Link to
      box. This will accomplish the same thing.
   6. Click on the document you want.
   7. Click OK, and the link has been made.
Creating a bookmark on the Mac.

    1. Go to the artifact file to which you want to link.
    2. Optional: Highlight the portion of the text you want to be bookmarked. To do this, go to the
        Formatting Palette (either View>Formatting Palette or click on the tool icon of an “A on a
        scroll”)
    3. Put the cursor before the highlighted or plain text.
    4. On the Tool Bar click Insert and then click on Bookmarks.
    5. The Bookmark box will come up with a blue bar. Name the bookmark; do not include any
        spaces! Click Add.
    6. Go back to the portfolio text.
    7. Click Insert and go to hyperlink.
    8. The Insert Hyperlink box will come up.
    9. Select the file like you did for the hyperlink BUT…then
    10. Go to Locate. Click on the down arrow on Bookmarks and your named bookmark file will
        appear. Click on the bookmark you want.
    11. Click OK in the Bookmark box and then OK in the Hyperlink box.
    12. If it works, celebrate! If not, see below!

If links don’t work, think about the big picture. Are both the artifact file and the portfolio document in
the same folder? This is often at the root of the problem. The portfolio document can only link to your
artifacts if they are in the same folder.




                                   Creating links in Windows

Creating a link in Windows.
           Within your narrative, highlight the word that you want to create the link for.
           On the Tool Bar, click Insert.
           Go down to the Hyperlink connection and click. The Insert Hyperlink box will come
              up.
           Under “Link to” click on “existing file.”
           Choose folder and then the file that you want to link to and click OK.
           The linking word will now be blue. To test the link, press the control button on your
              keyboard and then left click the mouse.
           Celebrate!

Creating a bookmark in Windows.

      Go to the artifact file to which you want to link.
             If you wish to highlight and your tool is not visible, go to View>ToolBars>reviewing and click.
              This gives you the highlighting pen. Highlight text to be bookmarked.
             Put the cursor before the highlighted text.
              On the Tool Bar click Insert and then click on Bookmarks.
              The Bookmark box will come up with a blue bar. Name the bookmark; do not include any
               spaces! Click Add.
              Go back to the text in the Narratives file and highlight the linking word.
              Click Insert and go to hyperlink.
              The Insert Hyperlink box will come up.
              Double click on Artifacts and select the file you want to link to. Double click.
              The linking word(s) will now be blue. To test the link, press the control button on your
               keyboard and then left click the mouse. When you close the document, save all changes!
              If it works, celebrate! If not, see below!

      If links don’t work, think about the big picture. Are both the artifact file and the portfolio document in
      the same folder? This is often at the root of the problem. The portfolio document can only link to your
      artifacts if they are in the same folder.




      Choosing Artifacts

      Note: The following are just excerpts from artifacts; you should include full
      documents in your portfolio. The number in the box indicates which performance
      indicator from the Standards is being fulfilled by the artifact. Link to the place in
      the text that supports your narrative’s reflections using a bookmark (creating links).
      Your cursor will go right to the beginning of a bookmark, but highlighting with
      color can help distinguish the exact portion.

      I. from a letter of recommendation:
                      It was nice to see her bring in fresh ideas and strategies straight from the university. I
              know that even a seasoned veteran can learn from the best, and I benefited from these new
8.2           approaches to old problems. She was anxious to try new problem-solving strategies and include
              the students in their own self-assessments. There aren’t a lot of instances where we have big
              problems, but when there are… (This document would be even stronger if you link to the
              corresponding lesson plan that was observed and indicated which part of the lesson plan showed
              self-assessment).

      II. from a lesson plan (linking to the observation form that corresponds with the lesson is
      stronger documentation than just the lesson plan).

      Goals:
         Students will understand basic processes of the water cycle.
4.1      Students will understand the relationship of music to other disciplines.
          Students will have an understanding of how human ecology affects rain and
           ultimately the quality of our water supply.

      Outcomes:
         Students will be able to sing a simple song in ABA form.
4.2      Students will be able to make a diagram of the water cycle.
         Students will identify and research a form of water pollution and write a new verse
           to express the information.



      VII. MOSTEP STANDARDS and suggested documentation
      Standard 1: The entry-level teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and
      structures of the discipline(s) within the context of a global society and creates learning
      experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students


             Performance indicators:

             The entry-level teacher:

             1.1    knows the discipline;

             1.2    presents the subject matter in multiple ways;

             1.3    uses students’ prior knowledge;

             1.4    engages students in the methods of inquiry used in the discipline;

             1.5    creates interdisciplinary learning.


             Possible Documentation:

             Transcript indicating completion of the course of study with no grade lower than a “C” in
             professional education courses and a 2.5 GPA overall

             Documentation of having passed all sections of the C-BASE and the Praxis for those seeking
             certification

             Lesson plan with corresponding observation form from cooperating teacher or supervisor

             Resume

             Journal entries
Standard 2: The entry level teacher understands how students learn and develop, and provides
learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social and personal development of all
students

      Performance Indicators:

      The entry-level teacher:

      2.1    knows and identifies child/adolescent development;

      2.2    strengthens prior knowledge with new ideas;

      2.3    encourages student responsibility;

      2.4    knows theories of learning


      Possible Documentation:

      Instructional plans of lesson plan

      Written evidence from supervisor of field experiences with corresponding lesson plan

      Case study of a child

      Paper analyzing theories of learning and how these might look in the classroom

      Annotated bibliography of readings

      Comparison of approaches to teaching

      Written records assessing the growth of a child

      Instructional plans which use the developmental assessment of a child to plan learning
      experiences for that child


Standard 3: The entry-level teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to
learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.


      Performance Indicators:

      The entry-level teacher:

      3.1    identifies prior experience, learning styles and needs;

      3.2    designs and implements individualized instruction based on prior experience, learning
             styles, strengths and needs;

      3.3    knows when and how to access specialized services to meet students’ needs;
3.4    connects instruction to students, prior experience and family, culture and community.


Possible Documentation:

Journal entries

Adaptations made for students with special needs

Written records by supervisors, which note appropriate efforts to access resources and services,
to provide for the learning needs of students

Instructional plans which show linkage of the content to students’ families, cultures and/or
community

Use of literature that reflects the varying cultures of the students
Standard 4: The entry-level teacher recognizes the importance of long-range planning and
curriculum development and develops, implements, and evaluates curriculum based upon student,
district, and state performance standards.


       Performance Indicators:

       The entry-level teacher:

       4.1    selects and creates learning experiences that are appropriate for curriculum goals,
              relevant to learners, and based upon principles of effective instruction (e.g. encourages
              exploration and problem solving, building new skills from those previously acquired);

       4.2    create lessons and activities that recognize individual needs of diverse    learners and
              variations in learning styles and performance;

       4.3    Evaluates plans relative to long and short-term goals and adjusts them to meet student
              needs and to enhance learning.

       Possible Documentation:

       Lesson plans for Apprentice Teaching intensives with comments from cooperating teacher
       and/or supervisor

       Evidence of the knowledge and use of Show Me Standards, Curriculum, Frameworks, and
       district curriculum guides in lesson planning

       Journal entries reflecting upon student learning leading to the adjustment of learning goals to
       address the needs

       Evidence of goal-setting activities with students

       Evidence of student involvement in classroom decision-making process

       Unit plan




Standard 5: The entry-level teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage
students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.


       Performance Indicators:

       The entry-level teacher:
       5.1    selects alternative teaching strategies, materials, and technology to achieve multiple
              instructional purposes and to meet student needs.

       5.2    engages students in active learning that promotes the development of critical thinking,
              problem solving, and performance capabilities.


       Possible Documentation:

       Lesson plans showing identification use of a variety of instructional strategies for developing
       higher-level thinking, critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

       Instructional plans which script questioning sequences and discussion prompts

       Student assignments, which demonstrate the need to think critically, and a sampling of student
       responses

       Evaluation of published software designed to encourage critical thinking

       Questions to accompany an analysis of a piece of literature

       Integration of appropriate technology as a tool for problem solving




Standard 6: The entry-level teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation
and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active
engagement in learning and self-motivation.


       Performance Indicators:

       The entry-level teacher:

       6.1 knows motivation theories and behavior management strategies and                 techniques
       6.2 manages time, space, transitions and activities effectively;
       6.3 engages students in decision making,
Possible Documentation:

A classroom management plan to include management of student behavior

Written evaluation by a supervisor of ability to implement a management plan

Statement of management philosophy showing evidence of a range of management techniques

Plan for organizing the routines of the classroom so as to promote a positive atmosphere (include
an explanation of why you organized the day as you have)

An analysis of the management techniques used in a classroom

Narrative of a Care Team meeting, including the services and resources utilized to support the
student

Written records by supervisors attesting to specific strategies used to manage the classroom

Evidence of student designed management system or classroom rules

Photographs and analysis of room or model classroom

Journal entries discussing effective transitions, especially between learning activities and
between classes.
Standard 7: The entry-level teacher models effective verbal, nonverbal, and media
communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in
the classroom.


     Performance Indicators:

     The entry-level teacher:

     7.1      models effective verbal/non verbal communication skills;

     7.2      demonstrates sensitivity to cultural, gender, intellectual, and physical
              ability differences in classroom communication and in responses to students’
              communication (hard to document, usually in a journal where you talk about dealing with
              this);

      7.3     supports and expands learner expression in speaking, writing, listening, and other media;

     7.4      uses a variety of media communication tools


     Possible Documentation:

     Instructional plan demonstrating that preservice teacher has the ability to speak, write, listen and
     use media effectively

     Instructional plans showing the use of variety of media/technology tools integrated in the lesson,
     promoting critical thinking

     Examples of cultural and gender sensitive communications, such as copies of notes sent home or
     activities based on building awareness

     Videotape modeling effective verbal/non/verbal communications skills

     Samples of student work produced using media/technology with an analysis of how the media
     technology impacted the level of thinking.




Standard 8: The entry-level teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment
strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of
the learner.

       Performance Indicators:
       8.1    employs a variety of formal and informal assessment techniques (e.g. observation,
              portfolios of student work, teacher-made tests, performance tasks, projects, student self-
              assessments, authentic assessments, and standardized tests) to enhance and monitor his or
              her own knowledge of learning, to evaluate student progress and performance, and to
              modify instructional approaches and learning strategies.

       8.2    uses assessment strategies to involve learners in self-assessment activities, to help them
              become aware of their learning behaviors, strengths, needs, and progress, and to
              encourage them to set personal goals for learning;

       8.3    evaluates the effect of class activities on both individuals and the class a whole,
              collecting information through observation of classroom interactions, questioning, and
              analysis of student work; (do you assess as you go?)

       8.4    maintains useful records of student work and performances and can communicate student
              progress knowledgeable and responsibly, based on appropriate indicators, to students,
              parents and other colleagues. (show how you would record assessment.)

       Possible Documentation:

       Instructional plans using multiple forms of appropriate assessment of academic performance
       with explicit standards (e.g. pencil and paper tests, performance tests, portfolios, essays, self-
       evaluations, group evaluations.)

       Written records by a supervisor giving examples of your use of assessment to analyze student
       performance and to plan from the analysis

       Evaluation instruments produced by students

       Written records of student progress

       Student papers showing feedback given to students

       Development of and rationale for a grading system or procedure

       Sample of a narrative report card entry.
Standard 9: The entry-level teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually assesses the effects
of choice and actions on others. This reflective practitioner actively seeks out opportunities to
grow professionally and utilize the assessment and professional growth to generate more learning
for more students.


       Performance indicators:

       The entry-level teacher:

       9.1        applies a variety of self-assessment and problem-solving strategies for reflecting on
                  practice, its influences on students’ growth and learning, and the complex interactions
                  between them applies

       9.2        uses recourses available for professional development; (includes reflection)
       9.3         practices the profession’s ethical standards (by testimony)

       Possible Documentation:

       A record of participation in a variety of professional development activities (e.g. regional
       seminars or workshops, student organizations, professional organizations, school district
       inservice, observation of classrooms) with a reflection on your impressions

       Journals from field experiences demonstrating self-assessment and problem solving

       Instructional plans using the resources acquired through professional development activities

       Attendance at New Teacher follow-Up activities with written impressions

       Proof of use of resources from the metropolitan area

       Enrollment in professional organizations, which provide journals or similar resources

       Evidence of the use of on-line resources in lesson plans

       Written comments from the supervisor regarding adherence to professional ethical standards,
       including confidentiality

       Letters of recommendation based on teaching experiences
Standard 10: the entry-level teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents and
educational partners in the larger community to support student learning and well being.

       Performance Indicators:

       10.1           participates in collegial activities designed to make the entire
                      school a productive learning environment;

       10.2           talks with and listens to students, is sensitive and responsive to
                      signs of distress, and seeks appropriate help as needed to solve
                      students problems;

       10.3           seeks opportunities to develop relationship with the parents and guardians of
                      students, and seeks to develop cooperative partnerships in support of student
                      learning and well being;

       10.4           Identifies and uses the appropriate school personnel and community sources to
                      help students reach their potential; as stated previously, I believe a teacher needs
                      to use all resources available to enhance the learning process including school and
                      community services. As the recommendations indicate I used school services
                      such as the library and librarians often while at SLUH.

       Possible Documentation:
       Written records of interactions with those performing services for the students and/or for the
       school (e.g. school counselor, special ed teachers, librarian, school secretary, health workers,
       court-appointed workers)

       Written record of duties performed in the school (e.g. bus, cafeteria, or playground duty)

       Collaborative research efforts

       Narratives of parent/teacher conferences or IEP meetings

       Narrative of the process of identifying appropriate assistance for a child in need

       Evidence of parent involvement in the class, with a narrative

       PK-12 student evaluations of taught classes

       Team planning
Standard 11: Technology in Teaching and Learning: The pre-service teacher understands the
theory and application of technology in educational settings and has adequate technological skills
to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students.

      Performance Indicators:

      11.1 Demonstrates an understanding of technology operations and concepts.

      11.2 Plans and designs effective learning environments and experiences supported by
           informational and instructional technology.

      11.3 Implements curriculum plans that include methods and strategies for applying informational
           and instructional technology to maximize student learning.

      11.4 Applies technology to facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies.

      11.5 Uses technology to enhance personal productivity and professional practice.

      11.6 Demonstrates an understand of the social, ethical, legal, and human issues surrounding the
           use of technology in PK-12 schools and applies that understanding in practice.

       Possible Documentation:

       Samples of Power Point presentations (including graphics, sound, transitional slides, etc)
       designed by portfolio student

       Course listing of computer courses or workshops taken; excerpts from projects

       Lesson plans or activities that include a variety of technology opportunities that reflect research,
       searching, comparing and contrasting, high-order thinking skills, creativity, problem-solving
       skills, hands-on activities with a final product (digital cameras), etc.

       Letters of recommendation that refer to students’ use of technology
      Copy of computer ethics that the portfolio student has authored or discussed with   students

      Copy of rubric or assessment plan for a technology project

      Copy of a spreadsheet for evaluation




                    VIII. Webster U’s LESSON PLAN FORMAT

                                      Webster University
                                      School of Education
                                      Lesson Plan Format

Description of Setting: What characteristics of the classroom or setting are important to
the lesson? (Grade, physical set-up of classroom, number of students, environmental
factors)

Description of the Learners: What do you know about the learners that has influenced
your decision in planning this lesson? How do you know this? (Range of age, ability,
prior knowledge and skills, developmental levels, IEP goals)

Goals and Outcomes: In what way does this lesson address what you are trying to
accomplish with these students? (Goals are broad, speaking to the long-term needs of the
learner, and are rarely accomplished in one lesson; they answer the questions “Why do I
need to learn this?” Outcomes are related to goals but are narrow enough to be
measurable. Every outcome will need to be assessed. Outcomes answer the question
“What do I need to know and be able to do?”)

Show-Me Standards: What Show-Me Standards will be addressed?

Instructional Process: Describe in detail sequentially what the teacher and students will
do.
     How will you engage the learners, assess prior knowledge, develop schema, and
       set a purpose for learning?
     In what ways will you explain the purpose of the lesson to the students?
     In what ways will you demonstrate the processes you want your students to follow
       as they participate in the lesson?
     Describe the procedures you will use to guide students through the lesson.
     How will you scaffold your lesson so that students can gradually assume
       responsibility for learning?
     How will you guide students to reflect on what they learned and their own success
       in the learning process?
Detail within this lesson how you are providing for individual differences among the
students in your class; speak to the specific needs, modifications or accommodations for
individuals, not in generalities.

Assessment Procedures: How will you determine what each student knows and/or can
do? How will you record this and share it with the student? (Include any tool you will be
using to assess, including any scoring guide. If possible include a copy of the work of
one or two students in your final copy.)

Materials: List any materials, support materials, and technology used in the lesson. This
includes texts, literature, charts, and bulletin boards. Include a copy of anything you will
be using with the students.

Management Procedures: What procedures will you put in place to assure a successful
lesson? (Describe behavior management plan, including the rules in effect and how these
will be shared with students. Describe time management and procedures to smooth
transitions, especially for younger children.)

Reflection: What have I learned from teaching this lesson? (After the lesson, reflect on
what worked and on what you would do differently. Describe how you adjusted the
lesson to meet the needs of the learners. Reflect on what you have learned about the
students by teaching the lesson. Talk about what comes next, for the students and for
you. The purpose of this reflection is not to defend your teaching but to demonstrate that
you have learned from it.)
                       IX. Webster U’s UNIT PLAN OUTLINE


1. Unit title and rationale: description of the theme of the unit and why it is appropriate for the
   students. (The unit should extend at least six lessons for a three-credit practicum and at least
   four lessons for a two-credit practicum.)

2. Clear and Concise description of learners: range of age and ability, including reading ability.

3. Learner outcomes: description of what you expect the students to know and be able to do by the
   end of the unit.

4. Identification of the ShowMe Standards addressed in the unit (any standard that is addressed
   needs to be assessed).

5. A clear description of the behavioral and motivational goals you are working toward in
   designing management procedures for each lesson. (For example, you may be working toward
   better group interaction, more group independence, or motivation of reluctant learners).

6.   A description of how the unit takes into consideration the cultural diversity of the students.

7. Pre-unit assessment of learners’ prior knowledge and skill levels; submit assessment
   questions and procedures.

8. A day-by-day general plan listing the lessons to be included in the unit (May be completed as a
   calendar of lessons and activities).

9. Thorough daily lesson plans; At least six lessons for a three-credit practicum and at least four
   lessons for a two-credit practicum: include individual adaptations and modifications for all
   students with special needs, materials, classroom management techniques, and assessment
   activities. A minimum of one lesson must use technology. At least one lesson must be taught
   with university supervisor present.

10. A list of resources: including materials, people, print, and media both for teacher planning and
    student use.

11. Unit assessment of the learner outcomes including the assessment itself (the instrument or if
    not, paper and pencil, a detailed description), the scoring guide used to evaluate the assessment
    and the strategy used to share the information with students.

12.Reflection on P-12 learning after the unit is taught. (What do the students now know and what
     are they able to do? How well do they know and can they do it? What would you do next to
     further the development of the learning?)


NOTE: The assignment should be written in a clear, concise, professional manner with attention
given to proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
UNIT PLAN SCORING GUIDE

 #   Proficient                    Nearing Proficiency              Unsatisfactory               MoSTEP
 1   Clear description of unit     A serious attempt is made to     Vague description with         1
     that explains why it is a     explain the rationale in terms   little or no reference to
     good fit to the needs and     of the needs and abilities of    the needs and abilities
     abilities of the students     students, with a need for        of this group of
                                   more clarity.                    students.
 2   Description of the learners   Description of the learners      Description of the             2
     includes grade level, range   includes most of the             learners includes fewer
     of age and ability            designated components but        than half of the
     including reading ability.    with a need for more clarity     designated components:
     Description is clear and      or specificity.                  description is vague.
     specific
 3   Learner outcomes clearly      Learner outcomes describe        Learner outcomes               4
     and specifically describe     what the student is to know      inadequately describe
     what the student is to        and be able to do but tend to    what the student is to
     know and be able to do at     be too general.                  know and be able to do
     the end of the unit.                                           at the end of the unit.
 4   Identification of             Identification of appropriate    Incomplete                    1, 4
     appropriate content and       content and process ShowMe       identification of content
     process ShowMe                Standards (with most             and process ShowMe
     Standards (and eventual       included in the assessment       standards.
     inclusion of each in the      plan for the unit).
     assessment plan for the
     unit).
 5   Clear description of the      A serious attempt at             Vague description with         6
     behavioral and                determining the behavioral       little or no indication of
     motivational goals you are    and motivational goals, with     the goals of behavior
     working toward                a need for greater clarity.      choices.
 6   Clearly describes how the     Shows some evidence that         Does not consider the          3
     cultural diversity of the     the cultural diversity of the    cultural diversity of the
     students is used in the       students is used in planning     students in planning the
     planning of the unit.         the unit.                        unit.
 7   Pre-unit assessment of        Pre-unit assessment of           Pre-unit assessment of         1
     learners’ prior knowledge     learners’ prior knowledge        learners’ prior
     and skill levels is           and skill levels is somewhat     knowledge and skill
     specifically targeted and     vague but impact on              levels is minimal or
     directly impacts              instructional planning is        absent and its impact on
     instruction based on          evident. Questions are           instruction is unclear.
     student responses.            clearly specified.               Questions guiding the
     Questions guiding the                                          assessment and
     assessment and assessment                                      assessment procedures
     procedures are specified.                                      are not specified.
Unit Plan Scoring Guide Continued.
  #       Proficient                    Nearing Proficiency               Unsatisfactory             MoSTEP
  8       The general plan is a well    The general plan is complete      The general plan is         4, 5
          thought out mapping of        but does not show evidence        incomplete or it is
          the unit, with practical      of a clear understanding of       inappropriate given the
          consideration of the time     the limitations of time or the    time available and/or
          available and the             requirements of the learners.     the requirements of the
          requirements of the                                             learners.
          learners.
  9       Unit includes at least six    Unit includes at least six        Unit includes               3, 11
          lessons for a 3 credit        lessons (for a 3 credit course)   inadequate lesson plans.
          course and at least four      and at least four lessons (for
          lessons for a two credit      a two credit course) with a
          course. Lesson plans use      need for more clarity. Lesson
          the given format including    plans use the given format
          specific objectives and       including specific objectives
          detailed scripting of         and detailed scripting of
          instructional activities      instructional activities
          (including adaptations and    (including adaptations and
          modifications, materials,     modifications, materials,
          management, and               management, and assessment
          assessment activities).       activities).
  10      Resources in each             Resources in most categories      An inadequate attempt        10
          category are provided         are provided (people, print,      to search out resources.
          (people, print, and media,    and media, both for teacher
          both for teacher planning     planning and student use)
          and student use)
  11      Unit assessment includes      The unit assessment makes a       The unit assessment          8
          all unit outcomes, how        serious attempt to include        does not address most
          information will be shared    unit outcomes, but the means      of the unit objectives;
          with the student, and         of scoring information is         administration and
          includes a descriptive        vague. The scoring guide          scoring directions are
          scoring guide for             needs to better describe the      nonspecific.
          evaluating the assessment.    criteria.
  12      Detailed, specific            Global reflection on P-12         Limited reflection on P-     9
          reflection on P-12 learning   learning is evident. (What do     12 learning is evident.
          is evident.(What do the       the students now know and         (What do the students
          students now know and         what are they able to do?         now know and what are
          what are they able to do?     How well do they know and         they able to do? How
          How well do they know         can they do it? What would        well do they know and
          and can they do it? What      you do next to further the        can they do it? What
          would you do next to          development of the                would you do next to
          further the development of    learning?)                        further the development
          the learning?)                                                  of the learning?)
          Assignment is written in a    Assignment is written in a        Assignment is written in     7
          clear, concise,               clear, concise, professional      a nonspecific or
          professional manner with      manner with minimal               unprofessional manner
          attention given to proper     grammar, spelling, and            with multiple grammar,
          grammar, spelling, and        punctuation errors                spelling, and
          punctuation.                                                    punctuation errors.
                   X. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Why do I have to do a portfolio?
       Every person seeking certification at Webster University must demonstrate
through a portfolio that he/she is effective in using the skills or knowledge (called
performance indicators) as defined by the MOSTEP Standards. The Standards are a
general guideline of competencies for new teachers that were established by the Missouri
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) and approved by the State
Board of Education. The url site for the eportfolio is http://owl.webster.edu/eportfolio

What should a portfolio contain?
         Your portfolio must document that you have fulfilled the performance indicators of each
of the eleven MOSTEP Standards. The documentation is in the form of artifacts and narratives.

         The artifacts include materials you have developed (lesson and unit plans, unit
tests, resume, statement of philosophy, etc), as well as materials you have earned and
accumulated (transcripts, evaluations, awards, children’s work samples, etc). To help
you assemble your artifacts, this guidebook lists the MOSTEP Standards, their general
performance indicators, and some suggestions for artifacts that document your
performance with PK-12 students.

       The narratives, the reflection component, are key to your portfolio success.
Your reflections will refer to your artifacts, but primarily, these introspections should tell
what you have learned and how you have developed from your experiences. Narratives
are NOT a list of your experiences, but a response to the processes and reactions to
your experiences. (see Section VII) Those reviewing your portfolio are interested in
your responses to and understanding of your growth process. Each performance indicator
presents an opportunity for reflection.

How many artifacts do I need for each standard?
        One or two artifacts are recommended for each of the standard’s performance
indicators. You can repeat artifacts for more than one indicator.


When are the portfolios due?
       The portfolio is a requirement for all students seeking certification at Webster
University and is due two weeks after the completion of apprentice teaching or as soon as
possible. If a portfolio is submitted by the first Monday of the month and is approved,
paperwork will be sent to the State by the last Friday of the same month. If approval is
denied, the schedule begins anew after you resubmit. Certification applications will not
be sent until portfolios are approved.
How many artifacts should my portfolio contain?
        Students tend to include too many artifacts in a portfolio. While Webster does not
limit the amount of artifacts you can use, we encourage you to think about being very
concise. Two to three well-executed lesson plans can suffice for an entire portfolio.
Think quality, not quantity.

I’m not sure I understand narratives. What are they supposed to
do?
        In some ways, the narratives are the essence of your portfolio. What you say
about your artifacts is more important than the actual artifacts. Do not include anything
in your portfolio that you do not ultimately reflect on in a narrative. The narratives tell
the evaluator how you are growing as an educator.

Should I include worksheets from lesson plans?
       The artifacts in your portfolio should be your own. Worksheets that you have
authored (please indicate this) are appropriate, but copies from other teachers or
textbooks serve no purpose. There might be exceptions to this, but the reasons would
have to be explained in your narrative!!!



                         XI. IMPORTANT THOUGHTS

      In constructing this portfolio, you come to know yourself as a teacher.
The evidence you examine (artifacts) and your comments (narratives) will
ultimately change your teaching strategies to make them more effective.
This process of professional growth is powerful, individual, and lifelong. It
is what teachers do, and value, and continue to do.

      1) Begin gathering artifacts for your portfolio as early in your
teacher preparation program as possible. Your portfolio is dynamic,
changing as new pieces better demonstrate your competence. As you add to
your teaching strategies and practice these in school settings, document your
growing competence in your portfolio. In your narratives, reflect on weaker
moments and how they have changed or become stronger areas of your
expertise.

      2) Feedback along the way is important. We encourage you to
work on this collaboratively. An instructor from your area will review the
portfolio when it is completed, but you can get responses and ideas from
                                             28
your fellow students as the portfolio develops. This will not lead to cookie-
cutter portfolios, but to deeper reflection on the decisions you are making
and clearer communication of that thinking.

       4) Indicate whether your artifacts are authored by you or
another. Identify your work by putting your name on the lesson plans,
worksheets, and exams you have generated. If you have borrowed a
worksheet or test from another source for a lesson plan or assessment tool,
identify the source and, in your narrative, tell why you thought this
document was a good choice.




                     XII. SCHOOL OF EDUCATION GOALS

 The process and final product of the teacher portfolio corresponds
  to and reflects the goals of the School of Education at Webster
                     University as stated below.


                                       WEBSTER UNIVERSITY
                                      SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Vision: “ . . . We all must work to make this world worthy of its children.” (Casals, 1970)

Mission: The School of Education at Webster University provides its students with the knowledge,
experiences, and practical tools that help them guide both themselves and others toward lifelong
learning. The School of Education is a community of educator-scholars who apply critical reflections
and creative energies to enhance learning in schools and other educational settings. The faculty
strives to support this community by modeling effective teaching practices based on sound theory
and research. Personalized approaches create a challenging, yet supportive environment that permits
the risk-taking necessary for learning and growth. The School of Education encourages its faculty
and students to work actively toward this end, keeping in mind that action must be rooted in
visionary, yet realistic, thinking. This thought and action process underscores the development of an
inner-directed self-understanding, an outer-directed global perspective, and an appreciation of
human diversity that arises from both.

                                                  29
Theme: Developing a world of learners through knowledge, leadership, and life-long learning.




The mandala is a universal design that represents meaning. It appears in children’s early drawings
in many cultures and seems a fitting symbol to represent the conceptual schema of the School of
Education. The outer circle is the “world of learners” in cultural settings. Each quadrant represents
one of the school’s four goals for its candidates: to develop knowledgeable learners, informed
instructors, reflective collaborators, and responsive educators. The two axes represent the theme
components of knowledge, leadership, and life-long learning. These lines are broken to emphasize the
fluid relationship of the goals and integrated concepts.

Goals

    1. Education candidates will demonstrate knowledge of the subject matter,
       knowledge of the learner, and knowledge of pedagogy based on inquiry and
       scholarship.
       The knowledgeable learner:
       1.1 knows content that supports conceptual understanding;
       1.2 applies tools of inquiry to construct meaningful learning experiences;
       1.3 identifies developmental factors in student learning; and
       1.4 understands theoretical principles of effective instruction to plan learning
           experiences.
                                                 30
    2. Education candidates will incorporate multiple assessment and instructional
       strategies to support effective educational practices based on research and theory.
       The informed instructor:
       2.1 designs curriculum based on students’ prior knowledge, learning styles,
            strengths, and needs;
       2.2 understands and uses a range of instructional strategies;
       2.3 uses a variety of communication modes, media, and technology to support
            student learning; and
       2.4 employs a variety of formal and informal assessments to monitor learning and
            modify instruction.

    3. Education candidates will reflect on the roles educators take as leaders of change
       through collaboration with colleagues, students, and families in schools and
       communities.
       The reflective collaborator:
       3.1 values and integrates reflection to grow as a professional;
       3.2 promotes communication and collaboration with colleagues, families, and
           community leaders;
       3.3 seeks relationships with families and students to support student learning; and
       3.4 initiates change that benefits students and their families.

    4. Education candidates will demonstrate respect for diversity through responsive
       teaching and learning that values individual differences.
       The responsive educator:
       4.1 understands and responds appropriately to issues of diversity
       4.2 acknowledges social and cultural contexts to create effective teaching and
           learning environments;
       4.3 adapts instruction to the learner’s knowledge, ability, and background
           experience; and
       4.4 identifies resources for specialized services when needed.

Dispositions:

There are various definitions of dispositions. The dictionary suggests that dispositions are the
combination of traits revealed by one’s habitual ways of behaving or thinking. NCATE defines
dispositions as “the values, commitments and professional ethics that influence behaviors toward
students, families, colleagues, and communities and affect student learning, motivation, and
development as well as the educator’s own professional growth. “ (Professional Standards, p. 53)
Interpreting and assessing dispositions is often more intuitive than it is descriptive and measurable.
Regardless of the difficulty of assessment, there is significant value in focusing attention on qualities
that make an effective teacher.

    1.          Understands and Respects Self
                1.1 Understands and respects that s (he) may be different from others
                1.2 Embraces an openness to change (adaptability, flexibility)
                1.3 Exhibits curiosity

                                                   31
             1.4 Engages in reflection

    2.        Understands and Respects Others
             2.1 Understands, respects, and responds appropriately to diversity in a variety
                 of settings
             2.2 Exhibits empathy
             2.3 Commits to fairness and honesty
             2.4 Listens respectfully to other points of view

    3.       Understands and Respects Professional Communities
             3.1 Commits to professional behavior in university and school cultures
             3.2 Practices informed decision-making in university and school cultures
             3.3 Communicates and collaborates in university and school cultures
             3.4 Accepts academic rigor (willingness to work/ high expectations)
             3.5 Affects change with courage and confidence
.




                      XIII. EVALUATION FOR PORTFOLIO
                 MoSTEP RUBRICS FOR PORTFOLIO EVALUATION
MOSTEP Standard 1: The preservice teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry and
structures of the disciplines within the context of a global society and creates learning experiences
that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for students.

Meets the Standard                      Not Yet Meeting the Standard            Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher demonstrates     The preservice teacher demonstrates     There is insufficient
strong knowledge of relevant central    a basic knowledge of the disciplines,   evidence upon which to
concepts, tools of inquiry and          possibly only exhibiting the            make a determination.
structures of the disciplines with no   knowledge or skills of a discipline
serious gaps or inaccuracies in         rather than the central concepts that
understanding.                          unify the discipline. The preservice
                                        teacher’s work, however, may
                                        demonstrate flaws or gaps in
                                        disciplinary understanding.
Lesson preparation and instruction      There is little or no evidence of       There is insufficient

                                                    32
reveal the ability to make              teaching content in a meaningful          evidence upon which to
connections between and among the       context that connects to students’        make a determination.
content, other disciplines, and         interests and lives or to connect
student background and life             subject matter within and across
experiences.                            disciplines


MOSTEP Standard 2: The preservice teacher understands how students learn and develop, and
provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social and personal development of all
students.

Meets the Standards                     Not Yet Meeting the Standard              Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher applies          The preservice teacher demonstrates       There is insufficient
knowledge of how students learn and     a basic knowledge of theories and         evidence upon which to
develop to create developmentally       principles of human development           make a determination.
appropriate learning opportunities      and learning (e.g. paraphrases the
that not only strengthens prior         most major developmental and
knowledge and encourages student        learning theorists). However, there
responsibility, but also supports the   is little or superficial evidence of
intellectual, social, and personal      using this knowledge to create
development of all students.            developmentally appropriate
                                        instruction.


MOSTEP Standard 3: The preservice teacher understands how students differ in their approaches
to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.

Meets the Standards                     Not Yet Meeting the Standard              Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher demonstrates     The preservice teacher demonstrates       There is insufficient
the ability to adapt instruction and    a recognition that students differ in     evidence upon which to
assessment to meet the diverse          their approaches to learning but          make a determination.
physical, intellectual, and cultural    offers only occasional or narrow
needs of individual students            evidence of the ability to implement
                                        even the most basic adaptations to
                                        meet the needs of individual
                                        learners.
Based in high expectations,             The preservice teacher may assert a       There is insufficient
activities connect with and build       belief in the individuality of learners   evidence upon which to
upon students’ individual strengths,    (possibly considering only ability        make a determination.
prior experiences, family, culture,     differences), but instruction appears
and community heritages.                predominately designed for the
                                        whole class.
The candidate demonstrates              Overt knowledge of when and how           There is insufficient
knowledge of when and how to            to access specialized services is         evidence upon which to
access specialized services.            superficial or absent.                    make a determination.



MOSTEP Standard 4: The preservice teacher recognizes the importance of long-range planning and
curriculum development and develops, implements, and evaluates curriculum based upon student,
district, and state performance standards.

Meets the Standard                       Not Yet Meeting the Standard             Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher demonstrates      The preservice teacher                   There is insufficient

                                                     33
the ability to create and implement       demonstrates the ability to create        evidence upon which to
short-term curriculum goals, the          and implement short-term                  make a determination.
ability to set and/or to work toward      classroom curriculum without
long-term curricular goals, and the       providing evidence of either the
ability to evaluate the impact of         ability to set and/or to work toward
delivered curriculum.                     long-term curricular goals or the
                                          ability to evaluate the impact of
                                          delivered curriculum.
The preservice teacher is aware of        Although lesson plans may include         There is insufficient
state and district knowledge and          references to state knowledge and         evidence upon which to
performance standards and considers       performance standards, references         make a determination.
those, as well as student needs, when     tend not to be reflected in what K-
planning lessons.                         12 students were actually asked to
                                          do.
Instructional planning and                Lesson tend to focus on whole-class       There is insufficient
implementation consider individual        instruction.                              evidence upon which to
student learning styles and are                                                     make a determination.
constructed to build student skills in
developmentally appropriate ways.
During implementation, the                Little evidence is available to           There is insufficient
preservice teacher demonstrates           indicate the teacher’s ability or         evidence upon which to
flexibility by evaluating and changing    inclination to evaluate and change        make a determination.
long- & short-term goals and/or           goals and/or instruction to meet
instruction to meet student needs.        student needs.


MOSTEP Standard 5: The preservice teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage
students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.

Meets the Standard                       Not Yet Meeting the Standard               Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher uses and          The preservice teacher uses a limited      There is insufficient
subsequently evaluates the impact        set of instructional strategies,           evidence upon which to
of a variety of instructional            materials, or technology to create         make a determination.
strategies, materials, and               lessons mostly at the
technologies to meet individual          recall/recognition level; the candidate
student needs                            may not distinguish multiple
                                         activities using the same strategy
                                         from using different strategies.
Artifacts reveal the use of a variety    There is little or no evidence of either   There is insufficient
of strategies to encourage students’     the ability to create learning             evidence upon which to
development of critical thinking,        opportunities that encourage students;     make a determination.
problem solving, and performance         development of critical thinking,
skills                                   problem solving, and performance
                                         skills or the ability to align
                                         instructional strategy with content
                                         and/or skills to be taught
The candidate offers evidence of the     The candidate reveals only limited         There is insufficient
ability to engage each student in        evidence of the ability to engage each     evidence upon which to
active learning; moreover,               student in active learning; rather,        make a determination.
instructional artifacts emphasize a      instructional artifacts emphasize a
balance between teacher-centered,        frequently teacher-centered, whole-
whole-class instruction and more         class approach to instruction
student-centered, individualized
instruction.

                                                       34
The candidate uses student work in         The candidate tends to assert the           There is insufficient
the evaluation of a strategy’s impact      positive impact of a strategy rather        evidence upon which to
on student learning.                       than provide evidence via student           make a determination.
                                           work.




MOSTEP Standard 6: The preservice teacher uses an understanding of individual and group
motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction,
active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.

Meets the Standard                         Not Yet Meeting the Standard                Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher provides            The preservice teacher may recount          There is insufficient
evidence of not only knowing but           the principles (or theorists) of            evidence upon which to
also applying motivation theories          individual and group motivation and         make a determination.
and behavior management strategies         behavior management but offer little
and techniques to create a                 or no evidence of the ability to
collaborative, participatory, and          design and implement a
individualized learning environment        collaborative, participatory, or
that encourages positive social            individualized learning environment
interaction, active engagement in          that encourages positive social
learning and self-motivation.              interaction, active engagement in
                                           learning, and self-motivation.
The preservice teacher demonstrates        Maintaining control may be                  There is insufficient
the capacity to actively engage            emphasized over student                     evidence upon which to
students in their own learning and         empowerment.                                make a determination.
the effort to encourage all students
to set, monitor, and adjust their
learning goals and behavior.


MOSTEP Standard 7: The preservice teacher models effective verbal, nonverbal, and media
communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the
classroom.

Meets the Standard                          Not Yet Meeting the Standard                Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher uses clear and       The preservice teacher demonstrates         There is insufficient
articulate verbal, nonverbal and            effective personal oral and written         evidence upon which to
media communication tools in all            communication skills and                    make a determination.
interactions with students, parents,        presentation techniques, including
colleagues and the community.               limited media communication to
                                            communicate with students, parents,
                                            colleagues, and the community.
The candidate uses these                    The candidate can describe how these        There is insufficient
communication tools and techniques          communication skills might be used          evidence upon which to
to support the learner’s development        to develop learners’ skills or to foster    make a determination.
of effective communication skills and       active inquiry, collaboration, and
to foster active inquiry, collaboration,    supportive interaction in the
and supportive interaction in the           classroom without actually giving
classroom.                                  evidence demonstrating the ability.
Interactions with students tend to          Interactions with students tend to          There is insufficient
treat students as valued individuals.       treat students as all being the same.       evidence upon which to

                                                        35
                                                                                    make a determination.
Use of communication/media                 Use of communication/media               There is insufficient
technology is appropriate and varied.      technology is limited and                evidence upon which to
                                           conventional.                            make a determination.




MOSTEP Standard 8: The preservice teacher understands and uses formal and informal assessment
strategies to evaluate and ensure the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the
learner.

Meets the Standard                           Not Yet Meeting the Standard           Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher understands and       The preservice teacher                 There is insufficient
uses formal and informal traditional and     demonstrates a basic knowledge         evidence upon which to
performance-based assessment                 of formal assessment strategies for    make a determination.
strategies to evaluate and ensure the        a variety of purposes (i.e.
continuous intellectual, social and          intellectual, social, and physical
physical development of the learner,         assessment); alternatively, the
including but not limited to                 candidate may reveal only a
understanding of state                       narrow range of even formal
knowledge/performance standards and          assessment strategies, tending to
their assessment.                            focus on whole-class knowledge
                                             testing.
Evidence demonstrateds a knowledge of        Provides little or no evidence of      There is insufficient
state knowledge/performance standards        knowledge of state knowledge/          evidence upon which to
and their assessment.                        performance standards or their         make a determination.
                                             assessment.
This teacher maintains and uses data         There is little or no evidence that    There is insufficient
from assessment activities to inform         the candidate uses information         evidence upon which to
instruction and to provide constructive      generated from assessment to           make a determination.
and specific feedback to students,           inform instruction or to foster
parents and colleagues.                      student self-assessment or growth.
The candidate consciously encourages         There is little or no evidence of      There is insufficient
and supports students’ self assessment       the ability to maintain useful         evidence upon which to
as a means to enhancing their own            records of student performance         make a determination.
learning and achievement; moreover,          and/or to communicate
evidence reveals the willingness and         constructive and specific feedback
ability to use assessment data to offer      to students, parents, or colleagues.
constructive feedback to students,
parents, and colleagues.
Student work samples verify                  Knowledge and skills tend not to       There is insufficient
candidate’s assessment knowledge and         be supported by student work           evidence upon which to
skills.                                      samples.                               make a determination.


MOSTEP Standard 9: The preservice teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually assesses
the effects of choices and actions on others. This reflective practitioner actively seeks out
opportunities to grow professionally and utilizes the assessment and professional growth to generate
more learning for more students.

                                                      36
Meets the Standard                       Not Yet Meeting the Standard              Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher is a reflective   The preservice teacher does not           There is insufficient
practitioner who demonstrates the        consistently exhibit the ability to       evidence upon which to
capacity and the inclination to          think about and articulate the quality    make a determination.
examine and assess the effects of        of his/her own learning, choices,
his/her choices and actions on self      and actions on student learning.
and others; candidate reflections
analyze the impact or actions on
student learning (vs. merely
describing what transpired).
The candidate offers evidence that       There is evidence that this teacher       There is insufficient
he or she consciously applies            can articulate and apply professional     evidence upon which to
professional ethical standards within    ethical standards to situations posed     make a determination.
this reflective process.                 to him or her; alternatively, there
                                         may be no evidence that the
                                         individual has considered ethical
                                         standards.
The candidate uses reflection to         Candidate reflections are primarily       There is insufficient
analyze actions and decisions, and       descriptive of what occurred; if          evidence upon which to
based on his/her findings the            reflection is used at all, it yields at   make a determination.
candidate refines practice and/or        most only minor refinements in
seeks out opportunities to grow          learning and practice, seeking no
professionally                           opportunities for professional
                                         growth.

MOSTEP Standard 10: The preservice teacher fosters relationships with school colleagues, parents,
and educational partners in the larger community to support student learning and well-being.

Meets the Standard                       Not Yet Meeting the Standard              Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher seeks             The preservice teacher confines           There is insufficient
opportunities to develop caring,         his/her activities to the classroom       evidence upon which to
professional, and productive             and to interactions with the              make a determination.
relationships with school colleagues,    cooperating teacher.
parents, and educational partners in
the school and larger community to
support student learning and well-
being
The candidate demonstrates               The candidate shows no evidence of        There is insufficient
knowledge of when and how to             going beyond the classroom to             evidence upon which to
access specialized services.             connect with others to support            make a determination.
                                         student learning, including but not
                                         limited to knowledge of when and
                                         how to access specialized services.


MOSTEP Standard 11: Technology in Teaching and Learning: The preservice teacher understands
the theory and application of technology in educational settings and has technological skills to create
meaningful learning opportunities for all students.

Meets the Standard                       Not Yet Meeting the Standard                Insufficient Evidence
The preservice teacher demonstrates      The preservice teacher demonstrates         There is insufficient
continual growth in the uses and         at most a basic (or very limited)           evidence upon which to
troubleshooting of current and           knowledge of computer technologies          make a determination.

                                                      37
emerging computer technologies to          with little recognition of need to stay
run software; to access, generate, and     abreast of evolving technologies.
manipulate data; and to publish
results.
The preservice teacher applies current     The preservice teacher plans and           There is insufficient
research on teaching and learning          delivers learning opportunities that       evidence upon which to
with technology to plan and deliver        integrate computers into the               make a determination.
developmentally appropriate learning       classroom, but these opportunities
opportunities that integrate a variety     employ only a limited range of
of software, applications, and             learning software and little beyond
learning tools (e.g., graphing             games, word-processing, presentation
calculators, language translators,         software, and computerized work
scientific probe-ware, musical             sheets.
composition software, electronic
maps, etc) to support the diverse
needs of learners.
The preservice teacher identifies,         The preservice teacher identifies,         There is insufficient
locates, explores, and evaluates for       locates, explores                          evidence upon which to
accuracy and suitability,                  computer/technology resources              make a determination.
computer/technology resources              including applications, tools,
including applications, tools,             educational software, but does not
educational software, and associated       evaluate these critically with regard
documentation.                             to such issues as developmental
Designs and utilizes technology-           appropriateness, accuracy, or
enhanced, learner- centered                suitability to support local, state, or
classroom strategies and activities        national standards. Designs and
(including teaming and/or small            utilizes technology-based, teacher-
group collaboration) to address the        centered classroom strategies and
diverse needs of students. Facilitates     activities, with no differentiation of
technology-enhanced learning               instruction. Facilitates technology-
experiences that develop students’         enhanced learning experiences that
higher-order thinking skills,              are limited to knowledge or basic-
creativity, and problem-solving skills;    skills acquisition and communication.
content standards; and student
technology standards.-


The preservice teacher uses               The preservice teacher exhibits little     There is insufficient
technology resources in assessing         or no use of technology resources in       evidence upon which to
student learning of subject matter        assessing and managing data on             make a determination.
using a variety of assessment             student learning of subject matter;
techniques to collect and analyze         alternatively, uses technology to
data, to interpret results, and to        asses only the recall/recognition of
communicate findings to improve           knowledge and basic skills.
instructional practice and maximize
student learning (including the use
of technology resources for learning,
communication, and productivity).
The preservice teacher uses               The preservice teacher reveals little      There is insufficient
technology resources to engage in         or no evidence of the inclination or       evidence upon which to
ongoing professional development          ability to use technology resources to     make a determination.
and lifelong learning, continually        enhance professional development
evaluates and reflects on                 learning, rarely reflects on
professional practice to make             professional practice regarding the

                                                       38
informed decisions regarding the use   use of technology in support of
of technology in support of student    student learning, may use technology
learning, uses technology to           to communicate with peers but not
communicate and collaborate with       with parents and the larger
peers, parents, and the larger         community or to collaborate or
community in order to nurture          conduct research.
student learning and to conduct
research and to solve problems.
The preservice teacher models and      The preservice teacher models and        There is insufficient
teaches legal and ethical practice     teaches legal and ethical practice       evidence upon which to
related to technology, information,    related to technology, information,      make a determination.
and software resources, as well as     and software resources, but does not
the safe and healthy use of            demonstrate the inclination to teach
technology resources, applies          this to students; alternatively, may
technology resources to enable and     disregard matters of copyright or fair
empower learners with diverse          acknowledgment of resources and
backgrounds, characteristics, and      materials taken from print or
abilities, including facilitating      electronic sources; expresses some
equitable access to technology         concern for the safe and healthy use
resources for all students.            of technology resources; does not use
                                       technology resources as a means to
                                       empowering learners with diverse
                                       backgrounds, characteristics, and
                                       abilities; does not overtly consider
                                       the issues of equitable access to
                                       technology resources for all students.




                                       SCORING GUIDE
3=Meets Requirements 2=Does Not Yet Meet Requirements 1=Not Sufficient Evidence



Standard 1 General Score                3            2        1
     Knows the discipline                                                      3       2        1
     Presents content in multiple ways                                         3       2        1
     Uses students’ prior knowledge                                            3       2        1
     Strengthens thinking skills                                               3       2        1
     Creates interdisciplinary learning                                        3       2        1
Comments:



Standard 2 General Score               3        2     1
     Understands children, their interests and needs                           3       2        1
     Strengthens prior knowledge with new ideas                                3       2        1

                                                   39
    Encourages student responsibility                             3   2   1
    Knows theories of learning                                    3   2   1
Comments:



Standard 3 General Score               3       2       1
     Assesses learning needs                                      3   2   1
     Individualizes instruction                                   3   2   1
     Uses special services when appropriate                       3   2   1
     Connects to family, culture and prior experience             3   2   1
Comments:



Standard 4 General Score               3         2       1
     Encourages problem-solving                                   3   2   1
     Guides learning experiences                                  3   2   1
     Teaches for diverse learning styles                          3   2   1
     Builds in assessment standards                               3   2   1
     Does effective long range planning                           3   2   1
Comments:



Standard 5 General Score                3      2         1
     Selects alternative teaching strategies                      3   2   1
     Fosters critical thinking and problem-solving                3   2   1
Comments:




Standard 6 General Score              3         2        1
     Maintains atmosphere conducive to learning                   3   2   1
     Manages time, space, transitions, activities                 3   2   1
     Engages students in decision making                          3   2   1
Comments



Standard 7 General Score                  3      2        1
     Demonstrates verbal/ non-verbal communication skills         3   2   1
     Is sensitive to cultural, physical, and gender differences   3   2   1
     Involves students in writing, speaking and listening         3   2   1
     Uses a variety of communication tools                        3   2   1
Comments:

                                               40
Standard 8 General Score               3    2           1
     Uses formal and informal assessment methods               3   2   1
     Involves students in self-assessment                      3   2   1
     Keeps record of student work                              3   2   1
Comments:



Standard 9 General Score                3       2    1
     Shows commitment to teaching                              3   2   1
     Evaluates self as teacher                                 3   2   1
     Uses instructional materials and community resources      3   2   1
     Practices the profession’s ethical standards              3   2   1
Comments:



Standard 10 General Score              3         2      1
     Maintains collegial relationship with colleagues          3   2   1
     Is sensitive to students emotional or learning needs      3   2   1
     Communicates with parents and teachers                    3   2   1
     Uses school and community resources                       3   2   1
Comments:



Standard 11 General Score              3       2       1
     Understands technology operations and concepts            3   2   1
     Integrates technology in curriculum to support learning   3   2   1
     Applies technology to assessment strategies               3   2   1
Comments:




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