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					A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun.
1. 2. Our work on the planning commission covers all kinds of ideas and concepts.
1. The librarian took from her desk a new edition of one of the classics.

2. It was placed in the display case in the corner of the library.

3. Many books of mysteries and detective stories are found in the library.

4. One story about magic appears in our literature book.

5. This story contains clues to the solution of the mystery.

6. I have read many stories by Arthur Conan Doyle about Sherlock Holmes.

7. A wall of ancient Pompeii was discovered accidentally by an ordinary peasant.

Do you remember the title of the new book about morals?
2. Our work on the planning commission covers all kinds of ideas and concepts.
3. Those immense houses on the west side of town were built recently.
4. The man in the next room is the mayor.
5. Few of the citizens had ever seen that plan.
1. The book on the table in the English classroom is Barbara's book.
2. The girl in the neighboring house plays the flute every night.
3. Large blocks of the hardest granite formed the walls of the new building.
4. The roads of ancient Rome connected the cities of the empire.
5. I know that man in the gray suit and the suede shoes.


Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.
1. I like a leader who listens to his men.

2. The dog which I loved dearly was hit by a truck last night.

3. Rulon is a person who takes responsibility well.

4. All individuals who purchased tickets will be admitted.

5. The shirt that you bought me doesn't fit well.

6. The woman who baked the winning pie is my wife.

7. You called at a time when I was unable to answer.

8. Gayle is the one for whom you are looking.

9. Those who are willing to serve others will be rewarded.

10. One to whom much is given is expected to give much in return.

Worksheet #1
(From Peter Rabbit, by Beatrix Potter)
Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase).Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?"

                                                     * * * * *

Mr. McGregor was quite sure that Peter was somewhere in the toolshed, perhaps hidden underneath a flower-pot.
He began to turn them over carefully, looking under each.Presently Peter sneezed-- "Kertyschoo!" Mr. McGregor
was after him in no time, and tried to put his foot upon Peter, who jumped out of a window, upsetting three plants.
The window was too small for Mr. McGregor, and he was tired of running after Peter. He went back to his work. Peter
sat down to rest; he was out of breath and trembling with fright, and he had not the least idea which way to go. Also
he was very damp with sitting in that can.




Worksheet #2
(From Stories of the Pilgrims, by Margaret Pumphrey)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?"

                                                     * * * * *

It was a day of feasting in the village. More Indians came from their homes in the woods. More white men came from
the ship. Captain George Weymouth gave the chief a present. It was a string of blue beads. The chief was pleased.
He put the beads around his neck. He and Captain George Weymouth sat on a deerkskin in front of the chief's
house. The other white men sat near them.An old man of the tribe brought out his drum. He played and some of the
young Indian men danced. They made so much dust that the chief told them to stop.




Worksheet #3
(From The Silver Chair, by C.S. Lewis)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional
phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one

                                                     * * * * *

Now, for the first time, she heard the noise of waves and the crying of seagulls. And now, too, she smelled the smell
of the sea. There was no mistake about her speed now. She saw two waves meet with a smack and a spout of foam
go up between them; but she had hardly seen it before it was a hundred yards behind her. The land was getting
nearer at a great pace. She could see mountains far inland, and other nearer mountains on her left. She could see
bays and headland, woods and fields, stretches of sandy beach. The sound of waves breaking on the shore was
growing louder every second and drowning the other sea noises.




Worksheet #4
(From Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Ingalls Wilder)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional
phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one.

                                                       * * * * *

One morning Pa went away before daylight with the horses and wagon, and that night he came home with a
wagonload of fish. The big wagon box was piled full, and some of the fish were as big as Laura. Pa had gone to Lake
Pepin and caught them all with a net. Ma cut large slices of flaky white fish, without one bone, for Laura and Mary. All
they did not eat fresh was salted down in barrels for the winter.




Worksheet #5
(From Little House in the Big Woods, by Laura Ingalls Wilder)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional
phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one.

                                                       * * * * *

Every day Grandpa puts on his boots and his warm coast and his fur cap and he goes out into the snowy woods and
gathers the sap.With a barrel on a sled, he drives from tree to tree and empties the sap from the buckets into the
barrel.Then he hauls it to a big iron kettle, that hangs by a chain from a cross-timber between two trees.He empties
the sap into the iron kettle.There is a big bonfire under the kettle, and the sap boils, and Grandpa watches it carefully.




Worksheet #6
(From the Children's Homer--I think--or possibly Tales of Troy and Greece, by Andrew Lang)
Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional
phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

                                                    * * * * *

Hector too leaped from the chariot and took his sword in hand. Their men joined Patroklos and joined Hector and the
battle began beside the body of Hector's charioteer. Three times did Patroklos rush against the ranks of the Trojans
and nine warriors did he slay at each onset.




Worksheet #7
(From The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, by C.S. Lewis)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional
phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

                                                    * * * * *

There was soft grass on both sides of the river, and beyond the grass, tress and bushes sloped up to the bases of
the cliffs. There must have been some wonderful flowering shrubs hidden in that shadowy undergrowth for the whole
glade was full of the most delicious smells.




Worksheet #8
(From Dr. DoLittle, by Hugh Long)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each phrase). Remember! A prepositional
phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional
phrases, look for the verbs and draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

                                                    * * * * *

Queen Ermintrude had never in her life seen her husband so terrible as he got that night. He gnashed his teeth with
rage. He called everybody a fool. He threw his toothbrush at the palace cat. He rushed around in his nightshirt and
woke up all his army and sent them into the jungle to catch the Doctor.
Worksheet #9
(From Dr. DoLittle, by Hugh Long)

Put parentheses around each prepositional phrase, like this: (around each
phrase).Remember! A prepositional phrase is the preposition, plus whatever answers the
question, "whom or what?" After you find the prepositional phrases, look for the verbs and
draw a double line under each one, and a single line under the subject.

                                                                      * * * * *

Presently there was a big BANG! The ship stopped and rolled over on its side. "What's
happened," asked the Doctor, coming up from downstairs. "I'm not sure," said the parrot;
"but I think we're ship-wrecked. Tell the duck to get out and see." So Dab-Dab dived right
down under the waves.

Adjective clauses
1.    The first alarm clock, which woke the sleeper by gently rubbing his feet, was invented by Leonardo da Vinci.
2.    Children who have not received flu shots must visit the school doctor.
3.    Success, which encourages the repetition of old behavior, is not nearly as good a teacher as failure.
4.    I showed the arrowhead to Rachel, whose mother is an archaeologist.
5.    Merdine, who was born in a boxcar somewhere in Arkansas, gets homesick every time she hears the cry of a train whistle.
6.    The space shuttle is a manned rocket that can be flown back to earth and reused.
7.    Henry Aaron, who played baseball with the Braves for 20 years, was voted into the Hall of Fame in 1982.
8.    Oxygen--which is colorless, tasteless, and odorless--is the chief life-supporting element of all plant and animal life.
9.    Bushido, which is the traditional code of honor of the samurai, is based on the principles of simplicity, honesty, courage, and justice.
10.   Merdine danced on the roof of her trailer during the thunderstorm that flooded the county last night.

      11. He is a man who is respected by everyone.
      12. Mr. Jones, whose son attends the University, is our friend.
      13. He saw the place where he was born.
      14. It was a time when money did not count.
      15. Thomas Jefferson, who was born on the frontier, became President.
      16. Airplanes that are not carefully inspected should never be flown.
      17. A person who loves to read will never be lonely.
      18. The girl by whom he sat in class is an honor student.
      19. My father, who was a country boy, has made a success of his life.

				
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posted:10/23/2012
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