KEVIN'S BLOGS

					Update	
  History
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Sunday,	
  January	
  13,	
  2008

April	
  2006

I	
  apologize	
  for	
  having	
  to	
  tell	
  you	
  this	
  way	
  but	
  I'm	
  too	
  wiped	
  out	
  from	
  telling	
  my	
  family.	
  I	
  have	
  Stage	
  2-­‐3	
  Rectal	
  
Cancer	
  and	
  I'm	
  starIng	
  treatment	
  toward	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  month.	
  The	
  odds	
  are	
  good	
  but	
  they	
  are	
  just	
  the	
  odds.	
  
I'm	
  opImisIc	
  that	
  I'll	
  make	
  it	
  through.

I	
  feel	
  blessed	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  love	
  and	
  support	
  surrounding	
  me.	
  I	
  ask	
  God	
  to	
  grant	
  me	
  the	
  serenity	
  to	
  
accept	
  the	
  things	
  I	
  cannot	
  change.	
  I	
  can't	
  change	
  this,	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  live	
  this.	
  I	
  would	
  welcome	
  your	
  support,	
  love	
  
and	
  presence	
  during	
  what	
  looks	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  difficult	
  year	
  coming	
  up	
  for	
  me.	
  Please	
  wait	
  a	
  day	
  or	
  two	
  to	
  respond.	
  Call	
  
or	
  write.	
  Don't	
  be	
  hurt	
  if	
  I	
  don't	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  you.	
  I'm	
  realizing	
  that	
  it's	
  Ime	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  do	
  exactly	
  what	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  do	
  
with	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  my	
  days,	
  be	
  it	
  many	
  or	
  few.	
  It	
  takes	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  energy	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  this	
  with	
  people	
  I	
  love.	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  
do	
  a	
  call	
  or	
  two	
  a	
  day.

All	
  my	
  love
Kevin


PS:	
  When	
  was	
  the	
  last	
  Ime	
  you	
  had	
  a	
  check	
  up?	
  It's	
  really	
  important.

June	
  2006
I	
  finished	
  my	
  radiaIon	
  and	
  chemo	
  treatment	
  on	
  June	
  6th.	
  The	
  purpose	
  of	
  this	
  round	
  is	
  to	
  shrink	
  the	
  tumor	
  and	
  
give	
  the	
  surgeon	
  a	
  beVer	
  shot	
  at	
  success.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  long	
  haul,	
  the	
  longest	
  5	
  weeks	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  really	
  enjoyed	
  all	
  the	
  
people	
  in	
  the	
  hospital.	
  They	
  are	
  very	
  kind	
  and	
  thoughXul.	
  
It's	
  quite	
  a	
  calling	
  to	
  deal	
  with	
  people	
  everyday	
  that	
  have	
  to	
  face	
  this	
  disease.	
  One	
  discouraging	
  word	
  can	
  set	
  off	
  
all	
  kinds	
  of	
  fears.	
  An	
  act	
  of	
  kindness,	
  humor	
  and	
  encouragement	
  really	
  li\s	
  the	
  spirits.	
  I	
  can't	
  tell	
  you	
  how	
  much	
  I	
  
appreciate	
  the	
  job	
  they	
  do.	
  I'm	
  now	
  focused	
  on	
  healing	
  up.	
  This	
  Tues	
  will	
  be	
  two	
  weeks	
  from	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  
treatment.	
  I	
  was	
  planning	
  a	
  trip	
  to	
  NYC	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  my	
  niece's	
  8th	
  grade	
  graduaIon.	
  My	
  nurse,	
  Liz,	
  said	
  that	
  was	
  not	
  
a	
  good	
  idea.	
  I	
  thought	
  I'd	
  be	
  in	
  great	
  shape	
  by	
  then.	
  She	
  was	
  right.	
  In	
  many	
  ways	
  these	
  past	
  two	
  weeks	
  were	
  the	
  
most	
  difficult.	
  Go	
  figure,	
  it's	
  like	
  I	
  was	
  stuck	
  in	
  a	
  Iny	
  fallout	
  shelter	
  during	
  a	
  nuclear	
  explosion	
  and	
  I	
  couldn't	
  fit	
  
my	
  ass	
  in	
  all	
  the	
  way.	
  I	
  didn't	
  really	
  appreciate	
  the	
  intensity	
  and	
  collateral	
  damage	
  of	
  the	
  process.	
  It	
  takes	
  its	
  toll.	
  
I'm	
  always	
  the	
  last	
  to	
  know	
  when	
  I'm	
  pushing	
  myself	
  too	
  hard.	
  I	
  had	
  missed	
  my	
  acupuncture	
  the	
  last	
  week	
  of	
  
treatment.	
  My	
  acupuncturist	
  was	
  gone	
  for	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  weeks.	
  He	
  had	
  competent	
  subsItutes.	
  The	
  last	
  week	
  I	
  had	
  
my	
  chemo	
  pump	
  on	
  and	
  decided	
  to	
  just	
  skip	
  it.	
  I	
  was	
  really	
  hurIng	
  a\er	
  that.	
  I	
  had	
  lots	
  of	
  intesInal	
  distress.	
  I	
  
went	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  acupuncturist.	
  He	
  gave	
  me	
  some	
  herbs	
  for	
  my	
  condiIon	
  and	
  it	
  really	
  helped.	
  I	
  can't	
  say	
  for	
  sure	
  
of	
  the	
  cause	
  and	
  effect.	
  However,	
  I	
  can	
  say	
  that	
  when	
  I	
  go	
  I	
  feel	
  beVer	
  and	
  when	
  I	
  don't	
  I	
  feel	
  worse.	
  So	
  with	
  all	
  
the	
  powers	
  of	
  logic	
  I	
  can	
  muster,	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  keep	
  going.	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  in	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  pain	
  during	
  the	
  acupuncture	
  
treatments.	
  I	
  can't	
  sit	
  in	
  any	
  posiIon	
  for	
  too	
  long.	
  I've	
  got	
  all	
  these	
  pins	
  in	
  me	
  and	
  it's	
  important	
  to	
  sit	
  sIll	
  or	
  up	
  
to	
  an	
  hour.	
  The	
  pins	
  hurt	
  when	
  I	
  try	
  to	
  move	
  and	
  it	
  hurts	
  to	
  sit	
  sIll.	
  I'm	
  going	
  again	
  on	
  Tues.	
  I'm	
  gebng	
  in	
  touch	
  
with	
  my	
  inner	
  masochist.	
  

I'm	
  feeling	
  beVer	
  today	
  than	
  yesterday.	
  I'm	
  looking	
  forward	
  to	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  decent	
  weeks.	
  I	
  may	
  even	
  take	
  Ime	
  off	
  
from	
  work!	
  What	
  a	
  concept.	
  I	
  may	
  even	
  go	
  and	
  treat	
  myself	
  to	
  a	
  nice	
  trip	
  somewhere...ok	
  now	
  I'm	
  dreaming.	
  I	
  
have	
  an	
  appointment	
  with	
  my	
  oncologist	
  this	
  Friday	
  and	
  my	
  surgeon	
  on	
  June	
  26.	
  The	
  surgery	
  will	
  be	
  scheduled	
  
someIme	
  within	
  two	
  weeks	
  of	
  that.	
  The	
  results	
  of	
  the	
  surgery	
  could	
  impact	
  my	
  quality	
  of	
  life.	
  It	
  could	
  be	
  no	
  big	
  
                                                                                                     1
deal	
  to	
  way	
  big	
  deal.	
  The	
  examinaIon	
  of	
  the	
  extracted	
  Issue	
  will	
  tell	
  the	
  tale	
  of	
  my	
  next	
  step.	
  That	
  could	
  be	
  
anything	
  from	
  no	
  chemo	
  to	
  six	
  months	
  of	
  follow	
  up	
  chemo.	
  It's	
  an	
  interesIng	
  Ime	
  of	
  life	
  with	
  all	
  this	
  uncertainty	
  
around	
  me.	
  The	
  truth	
  is	
  we	
  are	
  all	
  living	
  with	
  the	
  same	
  uncertainty	
  but	
  it's	
  easy	
  to	
  ignore	
  it	
  when	
  you're	
  not	
  
aVached	
  to	
  medical	
  devices.	
  

George	
  Bush's	
  new	
  press	
  secretary,	
  Tony	
  Snow,	
  is	
  a	
  cancer	
  survivor.	
  He	
  had	
  colon	
  cancer.	
  It's	
  the	
  same	
  family	
  of	
  
the	
  disease	
  as	
  mine.	
  He	
  was	
  asked	
  what	
  that	
  was	
  like.	
  He	
  said	
  in	
  a	
  strange	
  way	
  it	
  was	
  the	
  best	
  year	
  of	
  his	
  life.	
  He	
  
really	
  got	
  to	
  see	
  and	
  appreciate	
  the	
  love	
  that	
  was	
  all	
  around	
  him.	
  It	
  manifests	
  in	
  friends,	
  family,	
  and	
  beyond.	
  I	
  
understand	
  what	
  he	
  means.	
  I	
  feel	
  closer	
  to	
  myself	
  than	
  at	
  any	
  Ime	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  see	
  things	
  much	
  differently	
  than	
  I	
  
did	
  before	
  my	
  diagnosis.	
  All	
  the	
  liVle	
  philosophies	
  I	
  repeated	
  to	
  myself	
  and	
  others	
  I	
  now	
  see	
  as	
  preVy	
  
meaningless.	
  I'm	
  face	
  to	
  face	
  with	
  this	
  universal	
  truth	
  with	
  nowhere	
  to	
  run.	
  It	
  puts	
  it	
  all	
  front	
  and	
  center.	
  It's	
  Ime	
  
to	
  face	
  reality	
  squarely.	
  I've	
  learned	
  that	
  we	
  only	
  have	
  one	
  job	
  in	
  this	
  life,	
  to	
  face	
  every	
  circumstance	
  with	
  deep	
  
loving	
  kindness.	
  The	
  daily	
  pracIce	
  is	
  to	
  look	
  into	
  what	
  keeps	
  us	
  from	
  living	
  that	
  way.	
  That's	
  true	
  for	
  everyone,	
  
everywhere,	
  every	
  Ime.	
  It	
  doesn't	
  maVer	
  if	
  you're	
  a	
  ChrisIan,	
  Jew,	
  Buddhist,	
  Atheist,	
  Hindu,	
  Moslem,	
  etc	
  etc....	
  
OK	
  so	
  I'm	
  sIll	
  spouIng	
  peVy	
  philosophy.	
  Old	
  habits	
  die	
  hard.	
  I'll	
  do	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  keep	
  you	
  all	
  up	
  to	
  date.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  
long	
  list	
  of	
  phone	
  calls	
  to	
  make.	
  I	
  apologize	
  for	
  not	
  being	
  able	
  to	
  always	
  pick	
  up	
  the	
  phone.	
  What	
  a	
  problem	
  to	
  
have,	
  too	
  many	
  friends	
  and	
  family	
  around	
  to	
  support	
  me.	
  I	
  have	
  had	
  to	
  turn	
  people	
  away.	
  Don't	
  let	
  that	
  stop	
  you.	
  
Please	
  remember	
  that	
  I	
  love	
  to	
  talk	
  with	
  you,	
  visit	
  with	
  you,	
  hear	
  your	
  voicemails,	
  emails	
  and,	
  yes,	
  Aunt	
  
Anne...even	
  snail	
  mail.	
  
Be	
  kind	
  to	
  yourself	
  and	
  everyone	
  you	
  meet.	
  
Love	
  
Kevin	
  



March	
  2007

For	
  my	
  next	
  act,	
  I	
  am	
  going	
  into	
  the	
  hospital	
  on	
  April	
  4	
  to	
  "take	
  down"	
  my	
  colostomy.	
  A\er	
  the	
  last	
  surgery	
  my	
  
doctor	
  said	
  there	
  was	
  only	
  a	
  slim	
  chance	
  that	
  this	
  could	
  be	
  done.	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  specialist,	
  Dr	
  Sonia	
  Ramamoorthy	
  at	
  
UCSD	
  and	
  she	
  feels	
  confident	
  she	
  can	
  do	
  it	
  (with	
  all	
  the	
  usual	
  caveats	
  and	
  warnings).	
  I	
  am	
  now	
  on	
  short	
  term	
  
disability.	
  The	
  process	
  will	
  require	
  two	
  surgeries.	
  The	
  first	
  will	
  reconnect	
  the	
  boVom	
  of	
  the	
  colon	
  and	
  disconnect	
  
the	
  top.	
  I	
  will	
  then	
  get	
  a	
  "protecIve	
  ileostomy"	
  for	
  two	
  months	
  while	
  the	
  boVom	
  heals.	
  A\er	
  the	
  two	
  months	
  
the	
  ileostomy	
  will	
  be	
  reversed.	
  At	
  that	
  point	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  poopin'	
  like	
  a	
  champ	
  again.	
  

I'm	
  told	
  that	
  the	
  first	
  surgery	
  is	
  not	
  as	
  bad	
  as	
  the	
  original	
  surgery	
  to	
  remove	
  my	
  tumor.	
  The	
  final	
  surgery	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  
big	
  deal.	
  In	
  telling	
  people	
  about	
  my	
  next	
  ordeal,	
  they	
  all	
  say	
  it's	
  good	
  surgery.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  hard	
  Ime	
  using	
  good	
  and	
  
surgery	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  sentence.	
  However,	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  real	
  possibility	
  that	
  I	
  could	
  be	
  back	
  to	
  normal	
  and	
  cancer	
  free.	
  
I'm	
  looking	
  forward	
  to	
  moving	
  into	
  the	
  next	
  phase	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  

I've	
  learned	
  one	
  lesson	
  very	
  well	
  from	
  all	
  this.	
  I	
  was	
  complaining	
  to	
  my	
  doctor	
  that	
  I	
  can't	
  believe	
  there	
  isn't	
  an	
  
arIficial	
  anus.	
  It's	
  very	
  simple,	
  open/close.	
  How	
  hard	
  can	
  that	
  be?	
  Well,	
  I	
  picked	
  the	
  wrong	
  doctor	
  to	
  bring	
  this	
  
up	
  with.	
  He	
  obviously	
  has	
  a	
  special	
  interest	
  in	
  anuses.	
  He	
  spent	
  a	
  weekend	
  learning	
  about	
  it.	
  He	
  informed	
  me	
  
that	
  the	
  anus	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  complicated	
  organs	
  in	
  your	
  body.	
  It	
  can	
  tell	
  the	
  difference	
  between	
  gas,	
  liquid	
  
and	
  solid.	
  I	
  can	
  detect	
  pressure.	
  It	
  can	
  shut	
  down	
  at	
  night	
  and	
  let	
  you	
  take	
  over	
  during	
  the	
  day.	
  Why	
  if	
  this	
  were	
  a 	
  
household	
  product,	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  on	
  every	
  infomercial	
  on	
  cable.	
  So	
  take	
  it	
  from	
  someone	
  who	
  knows	
  what	
  it's	
  like	
  
not	
  to	
  have	
  it,	
  love	
  your	
  anus.	
  Give	
  it	
  a	
  kiss	
  every	
  now	
  and	
  then.	
  It's	
  good	
  for	
  your	
  back.

It's	
  hard	
  to	
  believe	
  that	
  one	
  year	
  ago	
  I	
  was	
  waiIng	
  for	
  the	
  results	
  of	
  my	
  colonoscopy.	
  I	
  knew	
  they	
  found	
  
                                                                                                2
something	
  but	
  I	
  didn't	
  know	
  what	
  it	
  was.	
  This	
  Tues	
  is	
  the	
  first	
  anniversary	
  of	
  the	
  diagnosis.	
  Listening	
  to	
  the	
  news	
  
the	
  past	
  few	
  weeks	
  about	
  the	
  Edwards'	
  and	
  Tony	
  Snow	
  brings	
  to	
  the	
  forefront	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  what	
  my	
  mind	
  wants	
  
to	
  ignore.	
  We	
  all	
  know	
  we	
  are	
  going	
  to	
  die	
  but	
  there's	
  a	
  reality	
  to	
  it	
  that	
  just	
  doesn't	
  hit	
  unIl	
  it's	
  right	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  
you.	
  I	
  haven't	
  even	
  been	
  there	
  yet.	
  I	
  always	
  had	
  a	
  beVer	
  then	
  even	
  chance	
  at	
  long	
  term	
  survival.	
  That	
  has	
  not	
  
been	
  taken	
  away	
  from	
  me.	
  When	
  I	
  heard	
  Elizabeth	
  and	
  John	
  Edwards	
  talk	
  about	
  the	
  finality	
  of	
  her	
  disease	
  I	
  could	
  
only	
  feel	
  compassion	
  and	
  camaraderie.	
  They	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  facing	
  it	
  with	
  such	
  courage	
  and	
  dignity.	
  I	
  was	
  inspired	
  to	
  
hear	
  her	
  say	
  she	
  sIll	
  wants	
  to	
  live	
  
her	
  life.	
  How	
  many	
  of	
  us	
  are	
  living	
  our	
  life	
  like	
  we	
  have	
  few	
  tomorrows?	
  She	
  may	
  have	
  more	
  days	
  to	
  live	
  than	
  
many	
  of	
  us.	
  How	
  are	
  we	
  using	
  our	
  days?	
  

With	
  the	
  Edwards	
  on	
  the	
  front	
  page,	
  there	
  were	
  many	
  interviews	
  with	
  cancer	
  paIents	
  living	
  with	
  the	
  disease.	
  
They	
  were	
  all	
  so	
  encouraging.	
  To	
  see	
  these	
  everyday	
  people	
  fully	
  aware	
  of	
  their	
  circumstance	
  and	
  making	
  the	
  
most	
  of	
  the	
  Ime	
  they	
  have.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  serenity	
  to	
  their	
  presence.	
  It's	
  like	
  they	
  know	
  the	
  secret	
  but	
  can't	
  tell	
  us	
  
because	
  we're	
  afraid	
  of	
  walking	
  through	
  the	
  gate	
  they've	
  entered.

So	
  that's	
  where	
  I	
  am.	
  My	
  surgery	
  will	
  be	
  done	
  at	
  UCSD	
  Thornton	
  Hospital.	
  I	
  don't	
  know	
  how	
  long	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  there	
  
but	
  I	
  may	
  need	
  some	
  help	
  gebng	
  home.	
  I'm	
  guessing	
  I	
  will	
  get	
  out	
  somewhere	
  between	
  Sunday	
  and	
  Tues.	
  I	
  will	
  
be	
  laid	
  up	
  for	
  a	
  while	
  and	
  taking	
  visitors.	
  All	
  are	
  welcomed.	
  The	
  phone	
  line	
  is	
  open.	
  

Keep	
  me	
  in	
  your	
  prayers,	
  

with	
  Loving	
  kindness



Kevin	
  



June	
  2007

This	
  email	
  list	
  is	
  directed	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  people	
  that	
  are	
  local	
  that	
  I	
  feel	
  I	
  can	
  count	
  on	
  for	
  support.	
  It's	
  such	
  a	
  long	
  list	
  
that	
  I	
  am	
  both	
  humbled	
  and	
  grateful.	
  There	
  are	
  lots	
  of	
  folks	
  not	
  on	
  the	
  list	
  but	
  I	
  didn't	
  have	
  their	
  emails	
  or	
  I	
  just	
  
missed	
  them	
  as	
  I	
  browsed	
  through	
  my	
  directory.	
  It's	
  not	
  personal	
  so	
  please	
  apologize	
  to	
  anyone	
  that	
  feels	
  
slighted.

This	
  has	
  been	
  without	
  a	
  doubt	
  the	
  hardest	
  month	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  won't	
  go	
  into	
  all	
  the	
  details	
  but	
  health	
  issues	
  are	
  
only	
  part	
  of	
  it.

There's	
  a	
  pracIcal	
  side	
  of	
  this	
  email	
  beyond	
  just	
  whining	
  about	
  the	
  state	
  of	
  my	
  affairs.	
  I'm	
  having	
  my	
  final	
  
reconnecIon	
  surgery	
  on	
  July	
  2	
  in	
  UCSD	
  Hillcrest.	
  There's	
  a	
  map	
  included.	
  My	
  kids	
  are	
  commiVed	
  to	
  helping	
  me	
  
through	
  this.	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  in	
  the	
  hospital	
  for	
  one	
  day	
  only.	
  I	
  will	
  be
released	
  someIme	
  on	
  July	
  3.	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  home	
  during	
  the	
  recovery	
  Ime.	
  Soon	
  a\er	
  that	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  go	
  in	
  for	
  a	
  biopsy	
  
on	
  my	
  lungs.	
  Some	
  of	
  you	
  don't	
  know	
  about	
  that.	
  A	
  CAT	
  Scan	
  concluded	
  that	
  my	
  cancer	
  has	
  spread	
  to	
  my	
  lung.	
  A	
  
subsequent	
  PET	
  Scan	
  found	
  no	
  sign	
  of	
  cancer.	
  The	
  biopsy	
  is	
  the	
  final	
  word.	
  That	
  procedure	
  will	
  be	
  done	
  in	
  mid	
  
July.	
  How	
  that	
  turns	
  out	
  will	
  have	
  a	
  major	
  impact	
  on	
  my	
  life.

So	
  this	
  email	
  is	
  just	
  to	
  ask	
  you	
  for	
  support.	
  If	
  you	
  have	
  Ime	
  during	
  my	
  short	
  stay	
  in	
  the	
  hospital	
  or	
  if	
  you	
  can	
  stop	
  
by	
  my	
  home	
  during	
  my	
  recovery	
  I	
  would	
  appreciate	
  it.
                                                                                                     3
My	
  new	
  address	
  is:	
  4314	
  Mount	
  Foster	
  Ave	
  San	
  Diego	
  CA	
  92117.	
  It's	
  off	
  the
North	
  side	
  of	
  Balboa	
  Ave	
  between	
  Clairemont	
  Dr	
  and	
  Genesee.	
  Turn	
  onto	
  Mt
Culebra	
  from	
  Balboa	
  Ave,	
  Le\	
  on	
  Mt	
  Davis,	
  Right	
  on	
  Mt	
  Foster,	
  third	
  house
on	
  the	
  le\.

Thank	
  you	
  my	
  dear	
  friends
Kevin	
  Riley

July	
  2007

I	
  just	
  wanted	
  to	
  bring	
  everyone	
  up	
  to	
  date.	
  Some	
  of	
  you	
  weren't	
  on	
  previous	
  emails.	
  I	
  don't	
  want	
  to	
  go	
  into	
  all	
  of	
  
it	
  again.	
  I'll	
  summarize:	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  CT	
  Scan	
  in	
  February	
  that	
  showed	
  a	
  spot	
  on	
  my	
  lung.	
  A	
  follow	
  up	
  in	
  May	
  revealed	
  
that	
  the	
  spot	
  had	
  grown	
  and	
  there	
  were	
  two	
  more.	
  A	
  follow	
  up	
  PET	
  
Scan	
  showed	
  up	
  negaIve	
  for	
  cancer.	
  The	
  doctor	
  said	
  it's	
  encouraging	
  but	
  not	
  conclusive.	
  I	
  would	
  need	
  a	
  biopsy	
  
to	
  tell	
  the	
  tale.	
  That	
  was	
  to	
  be	
  scheduled	
  for	
  next	
  week.	
  In	
  the	
  meanIme	
  I	
  had	
  surgery	
  on	
  July	
  2	
  to	
  reconnect	
  my	
  
buV.

New	
  news:

My	
  buV	
  is	
  working	
  great!

The	
  people	
  that	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  biopsy	
  said	
  the	
  lesions	
  are	
  too	
  small	
  to	
  get	
  so	
  we'll	
  have	
  to	
  wait.	
  I	
  will	
  get	
  a	
  follow	
  
up	
  CT	
  Scan	
  in	
  early	
  August.

That's	
  the	
  news.	
  As	
  I	
  said	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  there	
  are	
  three	
  levels	
  of	
  news:	
  Good	
  News,	
  No	
  News	
  and	
  Bad	
  News.	
  This	
  is	
  
no	
  news	
  and	
  that's	
  beVer	
  than	
  bad	
  news.

Keep	
  me	
  in	
  your	
  thoughts	
  and	
  prayers

Love
Kevin

August	
  2007

Monday	
  was	
  a	
  major	
  shi\	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  A\er	
  four	
  months	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  work.	
  I'm	
  feeling	
  emoIonally	
  weak	
  on	
  the	
  
personal	
  side	
  and	
  physically	
  exhausted	
  from	
  all	
  that's	
  gone	
  on	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  several	
  months.	
  These	
  have	
  been	
  
without	
  a	
  doubt	
  the	
  hardest	
  Imes	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  

There's	
  so	
  much	
  going	
  on	
  at	
  work	
  it's	
  like	
  trying	
  to	
  jump	
  on	
  a	
  fast	
  moving	
  merry	
  go	
  round.	
  So	
  far	
  I've	
  opted	
  to	
  
just	
  watching	
  it	
  go	
  round	
  and	
  round.	
  

I	
  also	
  went	
  in	
  for	
  a	
  CT	
  Scan	
  on	
  Monday.	
  I've	
  been	
  sweaIng	
  it	
  out	
  all	
  week.	
  There	
  were	
  several	
  outcomes	
  that	
  
were	
  possible.	
  I	
  started	
  having	
  that	
  sinking	
  feeling	
  when	
  no	
  one	
  was	
  gebng	
  in	
  touch	
  with	
  me.	
  I've	
  learned	
  that	
  
bad	
  news	
  travels	
  slow.	
  I	
  emailed	
  my	
  oncologist	
  yesterday	
  and	
  called	
  his	
  assistant	
  today.	
  He	
  said,	
  "The	
  doctor	
  will	
  
call	
  you	
  with	
  your	
  health	
  opIons."	
  That	
  really	
  scared	
  me.	
  I've	
  talked	
  to	
  a	
  few	
  assistants	
  since	
  being	
  diagnosed.	
  I	
  
know	
  they	
  know	
  but	
  they	
  can't	
  tell	
  me.	
  So	
  all	
  day	
  today	
  I	
  was	
  preparing	
  for	
  the	
  worse	
  outcome.
                                                                                                  4
Dr.	
  Millard	
  called	
  me	
  around	
  5:30	
  PM.	
  He	
  asked,	
  "What	
  can	
  I	
  do	
  for	
  you?"	
  I	
  was	
  a	
  bit	
  surprised	
  but	
  I	
  said,	
  "I	
  want	
  
to	
  know	
  about	
  the	
  CT	
  Scan".	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  real	
  change	
  since	
  May.	
  He	
  seemed	
  encouraged	
  by	
  that.	
  He	
  
even	
  named	
  an	
  possible	
  benign	
  condiIon	
  it	
  could	
  be.	
  I	
  forget	
  what	
  it	
  was.	
  It	
  started	
  with	
  globo	
  and	
  ended	
  with	
  
something	
  that	
  sounded	
  like	
  olickiIckiIIs.	
  I	
  said	
  I	
  was	
  hoping	
  he	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  tell	
  me	
  they	
  disappeared.	
  He	
  said	
  
that	
  would	
  have	
  bothered	
  him	
  more.	
  I	
  really	
  don't	
  understand	
  oncology.

Since	
  the	
  spots	
  (I	
  have	
  demoted	
  them	
  from	
  lesions)	
  were	
  the	
  same	
  size	
  they	
  would	
  sIll	
  not	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  be	
  
biopsied	
  with	
  the	
  non	
  invasive	
  needle	
  thing.	
  I	
  could	
  go	
  for	
  a	
  more	
  invasive	
  procedure	
  called	
  something	
  that	
  
started	
  with	
  thorax	
  and	
  ended	
  with	
  something	
  that	
  sounded	
  like	
  olocapocatotomy.	
  It's	
  under	
  anesthesia	
  and	
  
could	
  have	
  complicaIons.	
  The	
  other	
  opIon	
  is	
  to	
  wait	
  three	
  more	
  months	
  and	
  see	
  what	
  happens.	
  He	
  was	
  
concerned	
  if	
  I	
  could	
  wait	
  with	
  not	
  knowing	
  that	
  long.	
  If	
  it	
  is	
  cancer	
  it's	
  very	
  slow	
  growing	
  so	
  there's	
  not	
  much	
  
risk.	
  With	
  my	
  philosophy	
  of	
  "no	
  news	
  is	
  beVer	
  than	
  bad	
  news",	
  I	
  agreed.	
  I	
  told	
  the	
  doctor	
  that	
  I	
  always	
  feel	
  
beVer	
  a\er	
  I	
  talk	
  to	
  him.	
  

So	
  now	
  I'm	
  in	
  another	
  waiIng	
  period.	
  It's	
  a	
  relief	
  in	
  some	
  way.	
  I'm	
  going	
  to	
  get	
  back	
  into	
  life	
  with	
  exercise,	
  
working,	
  Zen	
  pracIce,	
  therapy	
  and	
  maybe	
  even	
  a	
  bit	
  more	
  sleep.	
  It	
  feels	
  like	
  God	
  has	
  me	
  on	
  a	
  short	
  leash.	
  

I	
  want	
  to	
  thank	
  all	
  of	
  my	
  support	
  network.	
  It	
  was	
  so	
  graIfying	
  to	
  know	
  how	
  many	
  people	
  there	
  are	
  in	
  my	
  life	
  that	
  
not	
  only	
  listen	
  to	
  my	
  whining	
  and	
  grieving	
  but	
  will	
  actually	
  call	
  and	
  visit	
  me	
  again	
  and	
  again	
  for	
  more.	
  That's	
  my	
  
true	
  blessing.	
  Please	
  know	
  that	
  I	
  will	
  always	
  do	
  the	
  same	
  for	
  you.

Love	
  (It's	
  all	
  you	
  need)

Kevin	
  Riley



November	
  2007

Last	
  Thursday	
  I	
  took	
  another	
  CT	
  scan.	
  Today	
  I	
  spoke	
  to	
  my	
  oncologist	
  and	
  he	
  said	
  the	
  spots	
  on	
  my	
  lung	
  have	
  
grown	
  sufficiently	
  to	
  rule	
  out	
  anything	
  but	
  cancer.	
  I	
  have	
  an	
  appointment	
  with	
  him	
  on	
  Monday	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  
treatment	
  opIons.	
  

I	
  feel	
  ready	
  to	
  accept	
  this	
  challenge.	
  This	
  is	
  round	
  three	
  and	
  I’m	
  just	
  warming	
  up	
  for	
  the	
  fight.	
  The	
  first	
  Ime	
  I	
  
heard	
  about	
  the	
  “spot”	
  was	
  in	
  February.	
  In	
  May	
  I	
  got	
  the	
  news	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  metastasis	
  in	
  the	
  lung.	
  From	
  June	
  to	
  
now	
  I	
  was	
  given	
  a	
  ray	
  of	
  hope	
  with	
  a	
  good	
  PET	
  scan	
  and	
  a	
  follow	
  on	
  CT	
  scan.	
  During	
  this	
  five	
  month	
  respite	
  my	
  
life	
  has	
  changed	
  dramaIcally.	
  I	
  moved	
  into	
  my	
  new	
  home	
  at	
  the	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center	
  a\er	
  a	
  difficult	
  break	
  up	
  
from	
  the	
  woman	
  I	
  love	
  with	
  all	
  my	
  heart.	
  Ever	
  since	
  then	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  in	
  such	
  emoIonal	
  pain	
  that	
  the	
  cancer	
  took	
  
a	
  back	
  seat.	
  I	
  started	
  an	
  alternaIve	
  medical	
  treatment	
  regimen.	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  therapy	
  and	
  finally	
  went	
  on	
  anI-­‐
depressants.	
  That	
  was	
  difficult	
  for	
  me.	
  I’ve	
  always	
  been	
  strong	
  and	
  felt	
  I	
  could	
  withstand	
  anything	
  like	
  a	
  boxer	
  
whose	
  only	
  claim	
  to	
  fame	
  is	
  that	
  he	
  never	
  hit	
  the	
  mat.	
  It	
  was	
  with	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  good	
  friends	
  that	
  convinced	
  me	
  it	
  
was	
  Ime	
  to	
  surrender.	
  Good	
  friends	
  are	
  a	
  great	
  blessing.	
  

I	
  got	
  back	
  to	
  work	
  in	
  August.	
  Everyone	
  on	
  the	
  job	
  has	
  been	
  very	
  supporIve.	
  That’s	
  a	
  tremendous	
  help	
  that	
  I	
  
don’t	
  have	
  to	
  worry	
  about	
  my	
  livelihood.	
  The	
  medical	
  insurance	
  has	
  been	
  excellent.	
  I	
  feel	
  well	
  taken	
  care	
  of.	
  A	
  
good	
  job	
  in	
  a	
  good	
  company	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  blessing

                                                                                               5
My	
  Zen	
  community	
  is	
  a	
  small	
  group	
  of	
  very	
  supporIve	
  and	
  loving	
  people.	
  Every	
  Wednesday	
  we	
  have	
  “council”	
  
where	
  we	
  come	
  together	
  and	
  share	
  our	
  lives.	
  They	
  all	
  expressed	
  their	
  commitment	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  through	
  this.	
  A	
  
good	
  home	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  blessing.

It’s	
  a	
  day	
  off	
  for	
  me	
  just	
  before	
  the	
  Thanksgiving	
  break.	
  A	
  group	
  of	
  friends	
  and	
  family	
  will	
  come	
  together	
  at	
  my	
  
dear	
  friend	
  Cathy’s	
  house.	
  This	
  group	
  has	
  been	
  celebraIng	
  Thanksgiving	
  for	
  over	
  twenty	
  years.	
  There	
  are	
  always	
  
new	
  faces	
  and	
  old	
  Imers	
  in	
  the	
  group.	
  It’s	
  my	
  favorite	
  holiday.	
  There’s	
  not	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  fanfare.	
  It	
  never	
  whips	
  up	
  
religious	
  or	
  naIonalist	
  fervor.	
  There	
  isn’t	
  a	
  liberal	
  or	
  conservaIve	
  way	
  to	
  celebrate.	
  It’s	
  just	
  a	
  quiet	
  day	
  to	
  be	
  with	
  
people	
  you	
  love.	
  One	
  day	
  dedicated	
  to	
  graItude.	
  How	
  great	
  is	
  that?	
  Thanksgiving	
  is	
  a	
  great	
  blessing.

What	
  does	
  it	
  mean	
  to	
  be	
  grateful?	
  The	
  years	
  2006	
  and	
  2007	
  took	
  everything	
  apart	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  stone	
  
unturned	
  and	
  no	
  where	
  to	
  hide.	
  In	
  a	
  Ime	
  when	
  it	
  feels	
  that	
  God	
  has	
  turned	
  away	
  from	
  me,	
  I	
  realize	
  that	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  
walk	
  alone	
  now.	
  How	
  do	
  you	
  help	
  the	
  one	
  that	
  walks	
  alone?	
  God	
  lives	
  in	
  that	
  quesIon.	
  Being	
  in	
  my	
  circle	
  you	
  
have	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  live	
  that	
  quesIon.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  do	
  this.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  what	
  I’ll	
  need,	
  how	
  I’ll	
  feel	
  
or	
  how	
  long	
  I’ll	
  live.	
  I’m	
  unwibngly	
  poinIng	
  the	
  way	
  home.	
  I	
  know	
  there	
  will	
  be	
  Imes	
  I	
  feel	
  alone	
  and	
  helpless.	
  
At	
  other	
  Imes	
  I	
  will	
  feel	
  loved	
  and	
  cared	
  for.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  rich	
  Ime	
  and	
  a	
  great	
  blessing	
  for	
  us	
  all.

I’ll	
  intend	
  to	
  keep	
  you	
  posted	
  throughout	
  the	
  process.	
  If	
  you	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  be	
  included	
  please	
  let	
  me	
  know.	
  Feel	
  
free	
  to	
  forward	
  this	
  on	
  to	
  anyone	
  I	
  inadvertently	
  missed.	
  

With	
  great	
  blessings



Kevin	
  Riley

December	
  2007
I	
  saw	
  my	
  oncologist	
  on	
  Monday.	
  He	
  said	
  he	
  was	
  convinced	
  enough	
  that	
  the	
  spots	
  were	
  cancer	
  that	
  he	
  would	
  sign	
  
off	
  on	
  the	
  treatment	
  plan	
  without	
  further	
  invesIgaIon.	
  My	
  experience	
  of	
  misdiagnosis	
  and	
  poor	
  treatment	
  at	
  
Scripps	
  led	
  me	
  to	
  ask	
  for	
  further	
  verificaIon.	
  Next	
  Tuesday	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  gebng	
  another	
  PET	
  Scan.	
  If	
  that's	
  negaIve	
  
we	
  will	
  follow	
  it	
  up	
  with	
  a	
  biopsy.	
  

Conceding	
  that	
  the	
  odds	
  are	
  that	
  my	
  doctor	
  is	
  correct	
  in	
  his	
  diagnosis,	
  I	
  will	
  undergo	
  chemotherapy	
  for	
  six	
  
months.	
  The	
  recommended	
  treatment	
  is	
  for	
  a	
  chemo	
  cocktail	
  called	
  FOLFOX.	
  It	
  will	
  be	
  administered	
  every	
  two	
  
weeks.	
  I	
  will	
  follow	
  that	
  up	
  with	
  a	
  chemo	
  pump	
  for	
  two	
  days.	
  The	
  expected	
  effects	
  on	
  my	
  physical	
  well	
  being	
  are	
  
the	
  usual	
  chemo	
  stuff;	
  thinning	
  hair,	
  nausea	
  etc.	
  These	
  may	
  be	
  mild	
  or	
  severe	
  depending	
  on	
  the	
  individual.	
  I	
  
expect	
  to	
  work	
  through	
  the	
  treatment,	
  however,	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  all	
  dependent	
  on	
  my	
  symptoms.

The	
  expected	
  prognosis	
  is	
  that	
  if	
  I	
  did	
  nothing	
  the	
  cancer	
  would	
  take	
  a	
  year	
  or	
  two	
  to	
  do	
  its	
  job,	
  maybe	
  a	
  bit	
  
longer.	
  With	
  moderate	
  success	
  the	
  treatment	
  could	
  be	
  expected	
  to	
  improve	
  my	
  life	
  expectancy	
  by	
  five	
  to	
  ten	
  
years.	
  By	
  then	
  I'm	
  sure	
  alien	
  beings	
  will	
  finally	
  descend	
  upon	
  the	
  earth	
  and	
  cure	
  all	
  diseases	
  known	
  to	
  
humankind.

I	
  will	
  be	
  sending	
  my	
  medical	
  records	
  for	
  a	
  second	
  look	
  to	
  a	
  NYC	
  doctor	
  friend	
  of	
  my	
  sister	
  Pat's	
  and	
  a	
  cancer	
  clinic	
  
in	
  Florida	
  where	
  my	
  sister	
  in	
  law	
  Millie	
  works.	
  I	
  appreciate	
  everyone's	
  efforts	
  to	
  help	
  me.	
  I	
  am	
  open	
  to	
  
suggesIons	
  but	
  be	
  assured	
  I've	
  researched	
  many	
  alternaIve	
  therapies.	
  Seldom	
  do	
  any	
  of	
  them	
  have	
  real	
  data	
  to	
  
back	
  up	
  their	
  claims	
  and	
  there's	
  a	
  million	
  to	
  choose	
  from.	
  I'm	
  asking	
  for	
  support,	
  not	
  a	
  cure.	
  If	
  you	
  have	
  
personally	
  cured	
  many	
  who	
  have	
  had	
  my	
  disease	
  then	
  by	
  all	
  means	
  let	
  me	
  know.	
  Otherwise,	
  I	
  will	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  it	
  
                                                                                               6
in	
  my	
  own	
  way.	
  

For	
  now	
  I	
  will	
  focus	
  on	
  enjoying	
  this	
  life.	
  I	
  am	
  not	
  afraid	
  nor	
  do	
  I	
  feel	
  any	
  anxiety.	
  I'm	
  ready	
  for	
  this.	
  I	
  have	
  
received	
  so	
  much	
  warmth	
  and	
  love	
  since	
  the	
  last	
  update	
  that	
  I	
  can	
  clearly	
  see	
  I've	
  had	
  a	
  wonderful	
  life.	
  That's	
  all	
  
I	
  ever	
  wanted.

Love	
  (it's	
  all	
  you	
  need),
Kevin	
  Riley


First	
  Treatment
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Sunday,	
  January	
  13,	
  2008

A\er	
  gebng	
  my	
  first	
  treatment	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  what	
  the	
  effects	
  would	
  be.	
  It	
  hasn't	
  been	
  terrible.	
  I	
  thought	
  it	
  
would	
  be	
  beVer.	
  Each	
  day	
  was	
  unique.	
  If	
  Karma	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  believed,	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  a	
  real	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  ass	
  in	
  past	
  lives.	
  
All	
  the	
  chemo	
  went	
  right	
  to	
  my	
  ass.	
  Today	
  it	
  finally	
  let	
  up.	
  I	
  want	
  you	
  all	
  to	
  learn	
  from	
  this.	
  How	
  many	
  of	
  you	
  
woke	
  up	
  today	
  and	
  thanked	
  your	
  ass	
  for	
  just	
  doing	
  its	
  job	
  reasonably	
  well?	
  When	
  I	
  get	
  the	
  all	
  clear	
  the	
  first	
  thing	
  
I'm	
  going	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  lobby	
  for	
  "Thank	
  You	
  Ass	
  Day."	
  It	
  may	
  never	
  reach	
  the	
  status	
  of	
  Mother's	
  Day	
  but	
  watch	
  out	
  
Father's	
  Day.	
  Hallmark	
  Cards	
  get	
  ready.

The	
  other	
  complicaIon	
  is	
  my	
  blood	
  pressure.	
  It's	
  way	
  out	
  of	
  whack.	
  I'm	
  taking	
  a	
  magic	
  pill	
  that	
  raised	
  my	
  blood	
  
pressure.	
  The	
  doctor	
  doubled	
  my	
  blood	
  pressure	
  medicaIon	
  and	
  halved	
  my	
  magic	
  pills.	
  It's	
  not	
  working	
  well.	
  I	
  
really	
  want	
  my	
  magic	
  pills	
  and	
  I’m	
  concerned	
  that	
  my	
  blood	
  pressure	
  will	
  stop	
  my	
  treatment.	
  What	
  a	
  choice,	
  take	
  
my	
  chances	
  either	
  way.	
  

My	
  second	
  treatment	
  is	
  this	
  Thursday.	
  Keep	
  in	
  touch,	
  post	
  a	
  message,	
  enjoy	
  your	
  life.	
  There's	
  really	
  nothing	
  to	
  
worry	
  about.	
  Love....it's	
  all	
  you	
  need




Second	
  Treatment
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Friday,	
  January	
  18,	
  2008


I	
  went	
  in	
  yesterday	
  for	
  my	
  second	
  treatment.	
  	
  The	
  last	
  few	
  days	
  were	
  preVy	
  normal.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  up	
  and	
  down	
  during	
  
the	
  whole	
  Ime	
  with	
  some	
  good	
  days	
  and	
  bad	
  days.	
  	
  There's	
  an	
  old	
  Zen	
  saying	
  "Every	
  day	
  a	
  good	
  day."	
  	
  I	
  know	
  
this	
  is	
  true	
  but	
  let's	
  face	
  it	
  there	
  are	
  some	
  good	
  days	
  that	
  suck	
  more	
  than	
  others.

The	
  staff	
  at	
  UCSD	
  are	
  really	
  nice	
  and	
  the	
  surroundings	
  are	
  pleasant.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  work	
  from	
  my	
  chemo	
  chair	
  with	
  my	
  
blackberry	
  and	
  wired	
  laptop.	
  	
  It's	
  a	
  great	
  new	
  age.	
  	
  The	
  pump	
  is	
  on	
  Ill	
  tomorrow.	
  	
  I've	
  decided	
  I	
  won't	
  shower	
  
"Pump	
  Day",	
  so	
  be	
  forewarned	
  if	
  come	
  for	
  a	
  visit.	
  	
  I	
  work	
  at	
  home	
  today.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  veg	
  out	
  listening	
  to	
  the	
  sound	
  of	
  
the	
  pump	
  go	
  off	
  every	
  30	
  seconds	
  or	
  so.	
  	
  My	
  appeIte	
  is	
  fine	
  so	
  far.	
  	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  side	
  effects	
  from	
  OxaplaIn	
  is	
  a	
  
Ingling	
  in	
  my	
  fingers	
  and	
  mouth	
  that	
  makes	
  it	
  hard	
  to	
  touch	
  cold	
  things	
  and	
  eat.	
  	
  It's	
  not	
  enough	
  to	
  stop	
  this	
  die	
  
hard	
  gluVon.	
  	
  Tomorrow	
  I	
  get	
  the	
  pump	
  off.	
  	
  The	
  last	
  Ime	
  I	
  le\	
  with	
  a	
  sick	
  feeling	
  like	
  a	
  low	
  grade	
  cold	
  or	
  flu.	
  	
  I	
  
expect	
  this	
  weekend	
  to	
  be	
  very	
  low	
  key.

                                                                                                     7
	
  I	
  appreciate	
  all	
  of	
  you	
  joining	
  the	
  site.	
  	
  Please	
  post	
  notes	
  or	
  schedule	
  a	
  visit	
  if	
  you	
  have	
  the	
  Ime.	
  	
  I'm	
  not	
  feeling	
  
all	
  that	
  social	
  but	
  I	
  do	
  like	
  to	
  know	
  that	
  you're	
  thinking	
  of	
  me	
  from	
  Ime	
  to	
  Ime.	
  	
  

Love	
  (it's	
  all	
  you	
  need)

Kevin


Happy	
  MLK	
  Day
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  January	
  21,	
  2008


It	
  was	
  not	
  easy	
  gebng	
  to	
  work	
  today.	
  I	
  felt	
  sick	
  and	
  Ired.	
  I	
  slept	
  virtually	
  all	
  day	
  Saturday.	
  Sunday	
  I	
  got	
  up	
  to	
  join	
  
my	
  Zen	
  service	
  and	
  went	
  right	
  back	
  inside.	
  Herb	
  and	
  David	
  came	
  over	
  to	
  watch	
  the	
  Chargers	
  lose	
  and	
  the	
  Giants	
  
win.	
  I	
  couldn't	
  sleep	
  all	
  that	
  well	
  last	
  night.	
  The	
  feeling	
  is	
  just	
  being	
  worn	
  out.	
  It's	
  not	
  dramaIcally	
  bad	
  but	
  
enough	
  to	
  know	
  I	
  feel	
  sick.	
  I'll	
  see	
  how	
  the	
  day	
  goes	
  and	
  if	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  go	
  home	
  I	
  will.	
  The	
  Ingling	
  in	
  my	
  hands	
  was	
  
difficult	
  all	
  weekend.	
  I	
  used	
  that	
  as	
  an	
  excuse	
  not	
  to	
  wash	
  my	
  dishes.	
  They	
  were	
  really	
  piling	
  up	
  and	
  Herb	
  and	
  
David	
  aVacked	
  them.	
  That	
  is	
  really	
  appreciated.	
  My	
  blood	
  pressure	
  is	
  high.	
  I	
  can't	
  take	
  my	
  experimental	
  magic	
  
pills	
  Ill	
  it	
  comes	
  down.	
  It	
  seems	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  pill	
  for	
  every	
  occasion,	
  every	
  symptom.	
  

Hanging	
  on	
  for	
  the	
  ride
Kevin




Postponed	
  again
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Thursday,	
  February	
  7,	
  2008


I	
  once	
  again	
  went	
  into	
  the	
  infusion	
  room.	
  I	
  got	
  all	
  hooked	
  up	
  and	
  they	
  tested	
  my	
  blood.	
  My	
  white	
  blood	
  cell	
  
count	
  was	
  lower	
  than	
  the	
  last	
  Ime.	
  I'm	
  told	
  my	
  oncologist	
  will	
  give	
  me	
  some	
  shots	
  to	
  boost	
  it	
  up.	
  I'll	
  keep	
  you	
  
posted.


Update	
  for	
  the	
  week
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Wednesday,	
  February	
  13,	
  2008


I	
  got	
  the	
  go	
  ahead	
  for	
  my	
  next	
  chemo	
  treatment	
  tomorrow.	
  My	
  white	
  blood	
  cells	
  are	
  back	
  to	
  normal.	
  I'll	
  be	
  
gebng	
  a	
  shot	
  a\er	
  chemo	
  to	
  keep	
  them	
  up.	
  The	
  doctor's	
  statement	
  of	
  note	
  today	
  is:	
  "you	
  have	
  minimal	
  disease.	
  
It's	
  not	
  curaIve	
  and	
  our	
  goal	
  is	
  to	
  send	
  it	
  into	
  remission."

On	
  Sunday	
  I'm	
  going	
  to	
  see	
  a	
  Psychic	
  Surgeon	
  recommended	
  by	
  my	
  Aryuvedic	
  Medicine	
  pracIIoner,	
  Nuva.	
  I	
  
used	
  to	
  study	
  these	
  Shamans	
  in	
  my	
  college	
  anthropology	
  classes.	
  I	
  looked	
  up	
  the	
  pracIce	
  on	
  line.	
  It	
  has	
  a	
  big	
  
following	
  and	
  is	
  mostly	
  pracIced	
  in	
  Brazil	
  and	
  the	
  Philippines.	
  It's	
  really	
  100%	
  cerIfiably	
  fraudulent.	
  I	
  took	
  that	
  
info	
  back	
  to	
  Nuva	
  who	
  nodded	
  his	
  head	
  and	
  said,	
  "not	
  this	
  one".	
  It	
  costs	
  less	
  than	
  $200	
  so	
  I'm	
  in.	
  He	
  sIcks	
  his	
  
hand	
  into	
  the	
  body	
  and	
  pulls	
  out	
  all	
  the	
  tumors	
  and	
  I	
  live	
  happily	
  ever	
  a\er.	
  Sounds	
  great.	
  So	
  send	
  him	
  all	
  you	
  
prayers	
  and	
  voodoo	
  rituals	
  so	
  this	
  Ime	
  he'll	
  get	
  it	
  right.	
  A\er	
  this	
  I'm	
  going	
  to	
  lie	
  naked	
  in	
  the	
  moonlight	
  while	
  
                                                                                                   8
howling	
  under	
  the	
  stars.	
  

Things	
  are	
  going	
  well.	
  I	
  got	
  some	
  closure	
  on	
  old	
  baggage	
  this	
  past	
  week.	
  I	
  feel	
  at	
  peace	
  and	
  ready	
  to	
  fight	
  again.	
  

Love	
  is	
  all	
  you	
  need
Kevin


Update
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Friday,	
  February	
  15,	
  2008

Thanks	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  new	
  technology,	
  I'm	
  working	
  from	
  home	
  hooked	
  up	
  to	
  my	
  chemo	
  pump.	
  I'm	
  doing	
  well	
  today.	
  
The	
  only	
  side	
  effect	
  is	
  the	
  Ingling	
  over	
  all	
  my	
  skin	
  when	
  it	
  contacts	
  the	
  cold.	
  I'm	
  having	
  an	
  ongoing	
  debate	
  with	
  
my	
  chiropractor.	
  He's	
  been	
  adjusIng	
  my	
  neck	
  for	
  three	
  months	
  now.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  sIff	
  neck	
  that	
  won't	
  quit	
  ever	
  since.	
  
I	
  say	
  it's	
  the	
  adjustments.	
  He	
  says	
  it's	
  the	
  toxic	
  chemicals	
  going	
  through	
  my	
  neck.	
  A\er	
  my	
  chemo	
  the	
  sIffness	
  
went	
  away.	
  Now	
  he's	
  planning	
  to	
  recommend	
  alcohol,	
  coffee,	
  junk	
  food	
  and	
  cigareVes	
  to	
  all	
  his	
  paIents.	
  

I	
  can't	
  name	
  all	
  the	
  people	
  that	
  made	
  my	
  ValenIne's	
  Day	
  a	
  special	
  treat.	
  My	
  mailbox	
  was	
  overflowing	
  with	
  cards,	
  
flowers	
  and	
  presents.	
  I	
  felt	
  the	
  love	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  wonderful	
  reminder	
  of	
  how	
  many	
  incredible	
  people	
  surround	
  
me.	
  I	
  am	
  blessed.	
  

I	
  am	
  forever	
  humbled	
  by	
  the	
  spiritual	
  journey	
  that	
  requires	
  me	
  to	
  put	
  love	
  first.	
  That's	
  been	
  a	
  real	
  challenge	
  
lately.	
  I	
  see	
  how	
  easy	
  it	
  is	
  to	
  grasp	
  for	
  something	
  I	
  want,	
  blindly	
  mistaking	
  it	
  for	
  love.	
  In	
  reality,	
  there's	
  nothing	
  
missing	
  from	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  need	
  nothing	
  beyond	
  this	
  old	
  skin	
  bag.	
  The	
  road	
  ahead	
  is	
  clear.	
  What	
  happens	
  in	
  my	
  life	
  is	
  
none	
  of	
  my	
  business.	
  What	
  I	
  create	
  is	
  everything.	
  Thank	
  you	
  all	
  so	
  much	
  for	
  your	
  gi\s,	
  your	
  support	
  and	
  love.	
  
You	
  are	
  all	
  my	
  mirror	
  reminding	
  me	
  how	
  lovable	
  I	
  really	
  am.	
  Don't	
  be	
  afraid...I	
  have	
  everything	
  I	
  need


Update
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  February	
  18,	
  2008

This	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  difficult	
  recovery	
  from	
  the	
  last	
  treatment.	
  I	
  can	
  see	
  that	
  the	
  Ime	
  when	
  I'll	
  start	
  needing	
  help	
  is	
  
closer	
  than	
  I	
  thought.	
  I	
  never	
  thought	
  there	
  were	
  drugs	
  powerful	
  enough	
  to	
  suppress	
  my	
  appeIte.	
  Now	
  I	
  know	
  
beVer.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  refrigerator	
  full	
  of	
  all	
  kinds	
  of	
  food	
  and	
  it's	
  just	
  going	
  to	
  waste.	
  I'm	
  not	
  interested	
  in	
  eaIng	
  it	
  or	
  
cooking	
  it.	
  I'm	
  not	
  sure	
  what	
  to	
  do	
  about	
  it.	
  For	
  two	
  days	
  I	
  just	
  ate	
  breakfast	
  and	
  a	
  piece	
  of	
  fruit	
  at	
  night.	
  The	
  
next	
  morning	
  I	
  was	
  starving.	
  It's	
  uncomfortable	
  to	
  eat	
  or	
  touch	
  anything	
  cold.	
  I	
  put	
  on	
  some	
  extra	
  weight	
  so	
  I	
  
have	
  reserves	
  to	
  use	
  up.	
  

I've	
  been	
  feeling	
  weak	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  really	
  sore	
  calf	
  muscle.	
  All	
  in	
  all	
  I'm	
  preVy	
  miserable.	
  It's	
  been	
  two	
  days	
  since	
  
my	
  pump	
  was	
  removed.	
  I	
  may	
  get	
  some	
  relief	
  soon.	
  Luckily	
  I'm	
  sleeping	
  a	
  lot.	
  That	
  seems	
  to	
  help.	
  I'm	
  not	
  very	
  
good	
  at	
  low	
  energy	
  living.	
  

Love
Kevin

I	
  see	
  the	
  light
                                                                                                 9
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  February	
  19,	
  2008

There	
  comes	
  a	
  day	
  a\er	
  my	
  treatment	
  where	
  I	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  coming	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  misery.	
  Today	
  is	
  that	
  day.	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  
and	
  took	
  a	
  hot	
  bath.	
  My	
  calf	
  has	
  not	
  been	
  sore	
  as	
  yet.	
  I	
  also	
  feel	
  like	
  eaIng	
  again	
  so	
  that's	
  a	
  good	
  thing.	
  

I'm	
  coming	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  Ime	
  when	
  I'll	
  need	
  to	
  reach	
  out	
  for	
  help.	
  I'm	
  not	
  sure	
  how	
  to	
  structure	
  it.	
  The	
  challenge	
  
is	
  food.	
  I	
  have	
  plenty	
  of	
  it	
  but	
  I	
  don't	
  want	
  to	
  eat	
  it.	
  If	
  I	
  had	
  it	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me	
  I	
  would	
  eat	
  but	
  I	
  have	
  no	
  interest	
  in	
  
doing	
  anything	
  to	
  get	
  it.	
  What	
  I	
  do	
  is	
  get	
  up	
  and	
  drive	
  to	
  a	
  fast	
  food	
  take	
  out	
  place	
  rather	
  than	
  go	
  into	
  my	
  kitchen	
  
to	
  prepare	
  something.	
  Asking	
  someone	
  to	
  make	
  food	
  to	
  put	
  in	
  the	
  freezer	
  or	
  refrigerator	
  won't	
  solve	
  the	
  
problem.	
  The	
  problem	
  lasted	
  five	
  days	
  this	
  Ime.	
  The	
  expectaIon	
  is	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  longer	
  with	
  each	
  treatment.	
  Any	
  
suggesIons?

Love	
  (it's	
  all	
  you	
  need)
Kevin


ER
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Wednesday,	
  February	
  20,	
  2008

I	
  went	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  Doppler	
  Ultrasound	
  at	
  5PM	
  on	
  Tuesday.	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  pain.	
  They	
  took	
  me	
  in	
  quickly	
  a\er	
  I	
  
arrived.	
  I	
  immediately	
  asked	
  for	
  pain	
  medicaIon.	
  I	
  couldn't	
  get	
  it	
  Ill	
  a\er	
  the	
  test.	
  The	
  test	
  revealed	
  a	
  blood	
  clot	
  
in	
  my	
  calf.	
  I	
  suspected	
  that.	
  I	
  even	
  thought	
  of	
  Richard	
  Nixon.	
  He	
  had	
  phlebiIs	
  at	
  one	
  point.	
  It's	
  a	
  blood	
  clot	
  in	
  the	
  
leg.	
  I	
  was	
  surprised	
  how	
  many	
  people	
  remembered	
  that.	
  The	
  problem	
  with	
  blood	
  clots	
  is	
  that	
  they	
  can	
  break	
  free	
  
and	
  travel	
  around	
  the	
  body	
  and	
  do	
  bad	
  things.	
  

I	
  was	
  admiVed	
  to	
  the	
  Emergency	
  Room.	
  Soon	
  a\er	
  Jessica	
  and	
  Lin	
  showed	
  up.	
  It	
  was	
  great	
  to	
  have	
  their	
  
company.	
  It	
  seemed	
  to	
  take	
  forever	
  to	
  get	
  my	
  pain	
  medicaIon.	
  Finally	
  they	
  got	
  to	
  it	
  and	
  my	
  pain	
  was	
  relieved.	
  
A\er	
  that	
  they	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
  blood	
  thinner.	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  stay	
  the	
  night.	
  The	
  main	
  reason	
  was	
  logisIcs.	
  However,	
  the	
  
hospital	
  had	
  other	
  plans.	
  Jess	
  and	
  Lin	
  got	
  me	
  home	
  around	
  midnight	
  and	
  tucked	
  me	
  in.	
  

I	
  stayed	
  home	
  today	
  and	
  rested	
  my	
  leg.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  the	
  Pharmacy	
  to	
  get	
  my	
  prescripIon	
  ordered.	
  That	
  trip	
  was 	
  
enough	
  to	
  start	
  the	
  pain	
  all	
  over	
  again.	
  I'll	
  be	
  hanging	
  around	
  Ill	
  this	
  heals.	
  My	
  job	
  keeps	
  me	
  busy.	
  I'm	
  gebng	
  
good	
  at	
  being	
  alone.

I	
  am	
  now	
  resIng	
  on	
  my	
  couch,	
  appreciaIng	
  the	
  absence	
  of	
  pain.

Love,	
  Kevin




One	
  extra	
  day
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Friday,	
  February	
  29,	
  2008

Today	
  is	
  the	
  added	
  day	
  of	
  the	
  year.	
  I	
  heard	
  today	
  that	
  Leap	
  Year	
  goes	
  back	
  to	
  Egypt.	
  I	
  never	
  got	
  it	
  but	
  it	
  makes	
  no	
  
sense	
  to	
  resist	
  it.	
  

It's	
  been	
  well	
  over	
  a	
  week	
  since	
  my	
  blood	
  clot	
  was	
  diagnosed.	
  Yesterday	
  was	
  my	
  first	
  day	
  back	
  to	
  work.	
  It	
  went	
  
                                                                                                           10
well.	
  I	
  look	
  really	
  patheIc	
  limping	
  around.	
  I	
  skipped	
  from	
  middle	
  age	
  to	
  old	
  age	
  in	
  a	
  flash.	
  Ever	
  since	
  the	
  ER	
  I've	
  
been	
  home	
  bound	
  taking	
  serious	
  painkillers.	
  There's	
  really	
  no	
  choice.	
  I	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  compassion	
  for	
  people	
  in	
  
chronic	
  pain.	
  It's	
  unimaginable	
  to	
  be	
  in	
  that	
  state	
  and	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  it's	
  not	
  uncommon.	
  

Being	
  bound	
  to	
  my	
  couch	
  wasn't	
  all	
  that	
  bad.	
  I	
  had	
  lots	
  of	
  help	
  from	
  people	
  bringing	
  me	
  food	
  and	
  keeping	
  me	
  
company.	
  I	
  was	
  happy	
  to	
  spend	
  days	
  with	
  nowhere	
  to	
  go	
  and	
  nothing	
  to	
  do.	
  I	
  enjoyed	
  working	
  everyday	
  in	
  a	
  job	
  
that	
  just	
  requires	
  my	
  mind	
  and	
  some	
  technological	
  tools	
  to	
  connect	
  me	
  with	
  my	
  world.	
  I	
  don't	
  need	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
people	
  this	
  Ime	
  around.	
  Being	
  alone	
  is	
  suddenly	
  easier.	
  I	
  can't	
  explain	
  that	
  but	
  it's	
  a	
  good	
  thing.	
  There's	
  not	
  
much	
  anxiety	
  these	
  days	
  about	
  the	
  future.	
  For	
  some	
  reason	
  I'm	
  ready	
  to	
  accept	
  the	
  outcome	
  of	
  my	
  disease.	
  With	
  
that	
  spirit	
  I	
  can	
  fight	
  without	
  the	
  slightest	
  desperaIon	
  or	
  clinging	
  to	
  an	
  outcome.	
  People	
  die	
  young.	
  People	
  
escape	
  inevitable	
  outcomes.	
  I'm	
  open	
  to	
  it	
  all.	
  The	
  one	
  thing	
  I	
  ask	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  drug	
  companies	
  double	
  their	
  efforts	
  
to	
  making	
  ever	
  beVer	
  pain	
  management	
  pills.	
  It's	
  a	
  big	
  priority	
  for	
  my	
  sanity.	
  

Monday	
  I	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  chemo	
  schedule.	
  My	
  CAT	
  scan	
  revealed	
  that	
  the	
  tumors	
  are	
  shrinking.	
  That's	
  good	
  news 	
  
and	
  gives	
  me	
  the	
  encouragement	
  to	
  keep	
  fighIng	
  this	
  and	
  pubng	
  up	
  with	
  the	
  side	
  effects	
  of	
  my	
  treatments.	
  It's	
  
not	
  been	
  easy	
  and	
  I	
  understand	
  all	
  those	
  that	
  give	
  up	
  and	
  just	
  let	
  the	
  disease	
  take	
  its	
  course.

I	
  appreciate	
  your	
  parIcipaIon	
  in	
  this	
  website.	
  Many	
  of	
  you	
  have	
  reached	
  out	
  and	
  helped	
  me	
  when	
  I	
  didn't	
  know	
  
what	
  I	
  needed.	
  That's	
  a	
  very	
  high	
  form	
  of	
  compassion.	
  Don't	
  wait	
  to	
  help	
  someone.	
  Sit	
  quietly	
  and	
  listen	
  to	
  
what's	
  needed	
  and	
  then	
  act.	
  

Enjoy	
  your	
  life.	
  Don't	
  waste	
  your	
  Ime	
  on	
  opinions,	
  on	
  being	
  right,	
  on	
  worrying	
  or	
  on	
  what	
  should	
  be	
  or	
  should	
  
have	
  been.	
  It's	
  all	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  your	
  nose.	
  Listen	
  and	
  enjoy.

Love,	
  Kevin


Chemo	
  #	
  4
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  March	
  3,	
  2008


I'm	
  sibng	
  in	
  my	
  chemo	
  chair.	
  I	
  had	
  all	
  the	
  brass	
  around	
  me	
  today.	
  The	
  man	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  and	
  my	
  
oncologist	
  all	
  came	
  by.	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  taking	
  the	
  wrong	
  dose	
  of	
  the	
  study	
  drug.	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  taking	
  the	
  pill	
  three	
  
Imes/day.	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  take	
  three	
  pills	
  twice	
  a	
  day.	
  My	
  oncologist	
  is	
  taking	
  me	
  off	
  AvasIn	
  for	
  one	
  treatment	
  
because	
  of	
  the	
  blood	
  clot.	
  So	
  things	
  change	
  with	
  the	
  circumstances,	
  I	
  roll	
  with	
  the	
  punches	
  and	
  the	
  beat	
  goes	
  on.	
  
Yesterday	
  I	
  was	
  feeling	
  really	
  good.	
  The	
  pain	
  in	
  my	
  leg	
  was	
  being	
  properly	
  controlled	
  and	
  I	
  could	
  walk	
  much	
  
beVer.	
  I	
  had	
  big	
  plans	
  to	
  go	
  shopping	
  and	
  try	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  normal	
  day	
  before	
  my	
  next	
  treatment.	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  lay	
  
down	
  a\er	
  our	
  Sunday	
  Service.	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  at	
  5PM.	
  Rolling	
  with	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  the	
  moment,	
  I	
  thanked	
  me	
  for	
  taking	
  
such	
  care	
  of	
  myself.	
  I'm	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  chiropractor,	
  I'll	
  do	
  some	
  acupuncture	
  later	
  in	
  the	
  week	
  and	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  taking	
  a	
  
couple	
  of	
  days	
  off	
  to	
  spend	
  with	
  my	
  family.	
  Today	
  is	
  Jessica's	
  (my	
  first	
  born)	
  30th	
  Birthday.	
  It's	
  a	
  big	
  one	
  in	
  
anybody's	
  life.	
  I'm	
  very	
  proud	
  of	
  her.	
  She's	
  come	
  through	
  all	
  that	
  life	
  put	
  on	
  her	
  plate.	
  She's	
  a	
  kind,	
  thoughXul,	
  
sensiIve,	
  bright,	
  smart,	
  beauIful	
  and	
  posiIve	
  person.	
  I	
  am	
  very	
  happy	
  these	
  days.	
  My	
  two	
  children	
  have	
  become	
  
people	
  that	
  I	
  admire	
  and	
  like	
  to	
  be	
  with.	
  They	
  are	
  a	
  wonderful	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  So	
  now	
  it's	
  right	
  now	
  in	
  your	
  life.	
  
What	
  are	
  you	
  doing?	
  How	
  are	
  you	
  feeling?	
  Take	
  this	
  moment	
  and	
  be	
  vastly	
  grateful	
  for	
  this	
  one	
  breath.	
  All	
  done?	
  
                                                                                                 11
ConInue	
  on......




The	
  Short	
  List
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Thursday,	
  March	
  13,	
  2008


It’s	
  Tuesday	
  and	
  I’m	
  feeling	
  much	
  beVer.	
  There’s	
  a	
  Ingling	
  in	
  the	
  fingers	
  that’s	
  aggravated	
  by	
  touching	
  anything	
  
cold.	
  I	
  can	
  almost	
  drink	
  something	
  cold	
  without	
  discomfort.	
  I’m	
  not	
  as	
  Ired	
  today	
  as	
  I’ve	
  been.	
  That’s	
  a	
  big	
  relief.	
  
It’s	
  so	
  hard	
  to	
  try	
  to	
  be	
  enthusiasIc	
  about	
  anything	
  when	
  the	
  smallest	
  exerIon	
  just	
  knocks	
  me	
  out.	
  I	
  now	
  have	
  
six	
  days	
  to	
  enjoy	
  a	
  normal	
  life	
  before	
  my	
  next	
  treatment.

My	
  blood	
  clot	
  passed	
  last	
  Tuesday	
  just	
  in	
  Ime	
  to	
  be	
  with	
  my	
  brothers.	
  My	
  sister	
  Anne	
  also	
  stopped	
  over	
  on	
  her	
  
way	
  to	
  Maui	
  with	
  her	
  husband,	
  Don.	
  He	
  volunteered	
  to	
  cook	
  his	
  specialty,	
  shrimp	
  scampi	
  in	
  honor	
  of	
  Jessica’s	
  
30th	
  birthday.	
  We	
  all	
  had	
  a	
  great	
  Ime.	
  I	
  could	
  walk	
  finally	
  but	
  I	
  was	
  simply	
  drained	
  of	
  all	
  life.	
  This	
  isn’t	
  like	
  being	
  
the	
  sick	
  one	
  in	
  the	
  corner.	
  I’m	
  the	
  one	
  on	
  the	
  short	
  list.	
  How	
  many	
  Imes	
  have	
  I	
  been	
  in	
  the	
  crowd	
  knowing	
  
there’s	
  someone	
  on	
  the	
  short	
  list	
  with	
  us.	
  We	
  pay	
  tribute,	
  give	
  a	
  look	
  of	
  concern	
  and	
  encouragement.	
  But	
  no	
  one	
  
can	
  share	
  my	
  world.	
  It’s	
  the	
  one	
  place	
  where	
  I	
  am	
  alone.	
  That’s	
  not	
  scary	
  anymore.	
  I	
  accept	
  that	
  place	
  in	
  life.	
  If	
  I	
  
should	
  be	
  blessed	
  with	
  more	
  years	
  than	
  is	
  predicted,	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  hope	
  to	
  support	
  everyone	
  on	
  the	
  short	
  list.	
  I’ve	
  
tried	
  my	
  best	
  in	
  the	
  past.	
  I	
  honored	
  my	
  father	
  as	
  best	
  I	
  could.	
  I	
  stood	
  by	
  my	
  best	
  friend	
  Bob’s	
  side	
  as	
  he	
  
journeyed	
  on	
  the	
  short	
  list.	
  I	
  visited	
  my	
  good	
  friend	
  Bill	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  I	
  could.	
  On	
  the	
  other	
  side	
  of	
  the	
  short	
  list	
  I	
  
know	
  my	
  limitaIons.	
  Now	
  that	
  I’m	
  a	
  member,	
  may	
  I	
  walk	
  with	
  strength,	
  arm	
  in	
  arm	
  with	
  my	
  brothers	
  and	
  sisters	
  
on	
  the	
  list.	
  

I	
  asked	
  my	
  doctors	
  if	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  alright	
  to	
  go	
  on	
  a	
  business	
  trip	
  to	
  Minnesota.	
  I	
  was	
  tenderly	
  discouraged	
  by	
  my	
  
supervisors.	
  They	
  were	
  generally	
  concerned	
  for	
  my	
  well	
  being.	
  I’m	
  so	
  blessed.	
  For	
  some	
  internal	
  mysterious	
  
reason	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  go.	
  Perhaps	
  I	
  just	
  need	
  to	
  feel	
  normal	
  again.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  working	
  from	
  home	
  almost	
  exclusively	
  
since	
  the	
  blood	
  clot.	
  Sibng	
  on	
  a	
  plane	
  with	
  my	
  compromised	
  immune	
  system	
  doesn’t	
  seem	
  all	
  that	
  wise.	
  
However,	
  it’s	
  good	
  to	
  get	
  out	
  for	
  a	
  bit.	
  The	
  sickness	
  of	
  chemo	
  is	
  not	
  violent,	
  it’s	
  demoralizing.	
  I	
  don’t	
  need	
  a	
  
nurse	
  or	
  a	
  companion	
  to	
  sit	
  by	
  my	
  side	
  and	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  my	
  every	
  need.	
  I	
  just	
  need	
  a	
  booster	
  shot	
  for	
  my	
  spirit	
  
and	
  my	
  life	
  force.	
  Chemo	
  takes	
  that	
  all	
  away.	
  The	
  road	
  ahead	
  seems	
  so	
  dreary	
  with	
  the	
  only	
  hope	
  that	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  
I	
  get	
  good	
  news	
  and	
  some	
  Ime	
  to	
  rebuild	
  what’s	
  le\	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  The	
  look	
  ahead	
  is	
  so	
  unclear	
  and	
  the	
  past	
  is	
  so	
  
full	
  of	
  a	
  challenged	
  life	
  struggling	
  to	
  understand	
  why	
  we	
  need	
  to	
  do	
  this	
  at	
  all.	
  There’s	
  no	
  great	
  love	
  ahead	
  to	
  
comfort	
  me	
  worthy	
  of	
  my	
  fantasy.	
  There’s	
  no	
  healing	
  past	
  wounds	
  beyond	
  the	
  work	
  of	
  Ime.	
  The	
  clarity	
  of	
  the	
  
present	
  sustains	
  me	
  now	
  like	
  never	
  before.	
  Sit	
  with	
  this,	
  dear	
  one.	
  There’s	
  absolutely	
  no	
  where	
  to	
  go	
  anymore.	
  
It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  rest	
  where	
  you	
  are.	
  The	
  work	
  is	
  done	
  for	
  now.	
  Let	
  life	
  just	
  take	
  you	
  wherever	
  it	
  goes.	
  Let	
  God	
  do	
  what	
  
God	
  does.	
  

Oh	
  glorious	
  health!	
  It’s	
  so	
  miraculous	
  to	
  feel	
  good	
  again.	
  Be	
  ever	
  thankful	
  for	
  the	
  day	
  you	
  wake	
  up	
  with	
  energy.	
  
Give	
  up	
  on	
  your	
  laughable	
  “bad	
  days”	
  because	
  your	
  cable	
  guy	
  never	
  showed	
  up	
  or	
  your	
  family,	
  co	
  workers	
  or	
  
friends	
  are	
  being	
  a	
  pain	
  the	
  ass.	
  Whatever	
  the	
  reason,	
  celebrate	
  your	
  wonderful	
  life!	
  Tomorrow	
  won’t	
  do.	
  Kiss	
  
and	
  hug	
  anyone	
  just	
  to	
  share	
  your	
  good	
  fortune.	
  You	
  don’t	
  need	
  anything	
  else.	
  Wake	
  up	
  to	
  what’s	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  
your	
  nose.	
  Don’t	
  wait,	
  we	
  all	
  get	
  on	
  the	
  short	
  list.


The	
  Silent	
  Man
                                                                                               12
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  March	
  17,	
  2008


Moving	
  into	
  the	
  second	
  third	
  of	
  the	
  treatment	
  was	
  very	
  hard.	
  The	
  blood	
  clot	
  took	
  a	
  lot	
  out	
  of	
  me.	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  
Minneapolis	
  thinking	
  I	
  would	
  recover	
  as	
  I	
  did	
  in	
  the	
  first	
  few	
  treatments.	
  That	
  wasn’t	
  the	
  case.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  horrible	
  
but	
  everything	
  was	
  exhausIng.	
  The	
  meeIng	
  was	
  important	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  aVend	
  so	
  I	
  don’t	
  regret	
  it.	
  The	
  lesson	
  didn’t	
  
include	
  any	
  ER’s	
  or	
  panic	
  moments.	
  It	
  was	
  just	
  hard	
  to	
  be	
  me.	
  I	
  got	
  home	
  on	
  Friday.	
  Saturday	
  and	
  Sunday	
  I	
  felt	
  
about	
  as	
  normal	
  as	
  could	
  expected.	
  I	
  really	
  enjoy	
  normal.

Today	
  it	
  wasn’t	
  easy	
  to	
  get	
  up	
  and	
  do	
  it	
  again.	
  Trading	
  in	
  my	
  health	
  for	
  another	
  round	
  of	
  this	
  treatment	
  tests	
  my	
  
commitment	
  to	
  mainstream	
  medicine.	
  I	
  understand	
  so	
  much	
  beVer	
  my	
  father’s	
  decision	
  to	
  just	
  let	
  his	
  cancer	
  
take	
  its	
  course	
  and	
  punt	
  for	
  some	
  miracle	
  voodoo.	
  The	
  choice	
  of	
  the	
  cure	
  and	
  disease	
  is	
  a	
  toss	
  up	
  for	
  me	
  
someImes.	
  My	
  doctor	
  put	
  like	
  this,	
  “I’m	
  trying	
  to	
  kill	
  the	
  disease	
  without	
  killing	
  you.”	
  That’s	
  no	
  guarantee.	
  

I	
  want	
  to	
  tell	
  you	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  wonderful	
  stories	
  I’ve	
  heard	
  in	
  my	
  Zen	
  pracIce.	
  It	
  relates	
  well	
  to	
  my	
  caregivers.	
  
This	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  frustraIng	
  experience	
  for	
  all	
  of	
  you	
  in	
  that	
  I	
  don’t	
  need	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  help.	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  know	
  what	
  I	
  
need.	
  What	
  do	
  you	
  do	
  with	
  that?	
  

I	
  aVended	
  the	
  InternaIonal	
  Zen	
  InsItute	
  of	
  Florida	
  (www.izif.org)	
  in	
  Coconut	
  Grove.	
  It's	
  led	
  by	
  a	
  wonderful	
  
couple	
  in	
  a	
  small	
  house.	
  Every	
  Friday	
  we	
  would	
  sit	
  for	
  two	
  periods	
  and	
  then	
  gather	
  around	
  the	
  table	
  for	
  
socializing.	
  Maryanne	
  would	
  bring	
  out	
  some	
  fresh	
  tropical	
  fruit	
  from	
  her	
  many	
  trees	
  and	
  prepare	
  some	
  tea	
  for	
  all	
  
of	
  us.	
  

As	
  usual	
  there	
  were	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  newcomers.	
  I	
  introduced	
  myself	
  to	
  a	
  man	
  and	
  asked	
  what	
  brought	
  him	
  here.	
  He	
  
said	
  his	
  girlfriend	
  in	
  Venezuela	
  told	
  him	
  he	
  had	
  to	
  come	
  and	
  get	
  an	
  answer	
  to	
  his	
  dilemma.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  
important	
  thing	
  in	
  his	
  life.	
  He	
  was	
  an	
  RN	
  pracIcing	
  home	
  nursing	
  for	
  incapacitated	
  paIents.	
  His	
  new	
  client	
  had	
  
advanced	
  ALS,	
  “Lou	
  Gehrig’s	
  Disease”.	
  He	
  had	
  no	
  muscular	
  ability	
  whatsoever.	
  His	
  eyes	
  were	
  sown	
  so	
  close	
  
together.	
  He	
  couldn't	
  even	
  blink.	
  They	
  allowed	
  just	
  a	
  slit	
  of	
  vision	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  preserve	
  enough	
  moisture	
  to	
  allow	
  
him	
  to	
  see	
  at	
  all.	
  The	
  help	
  hired	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  his	
  hygiene	
  and	
  household	
  needs	
  watched	
  TV	
  all	
  day	
  and	
  basically	
  did	
  
the	
  minimum	
  required.	
  He	
  just	
  didn’t	
  know	
  what	
  to	
  do.	
  Everyone	
  at	
  the	
  dharma	
  house	
  had	
  suggesIons.	
  Play	
  
soothing	
  classical	
  music.	
  Give	
  him	
  a	
  tender	
  massage.	
  Talk	
  to	
  him,	
  read	
  to	
  him,	
  sing	
  to	
  him.	
  I	
  just	
  listened	
  as	
  I	
  had	
  
no	
  suggesIon	
  of	
  my	
  own.	
  Then	
  I	
  realized	
  the	
  fault	
  of	
  all	
  this	
  advice.	
  He	
  could	
  be	
  a	
  homophobic	
  and	
  a	
  massage	
  
would	
  be	
  very	
  frightening.	
  Perhaps	
  he	
  hated	
  classical	
  music	
  and	
  loved	
  the	
  sound	
  of	
  the	
  TV.	
  Reading,	
  talking	
  and	
  
singing	
  could	
  drive	
  him	
  nuts.	
  So	
  what	
  could	
  this	
  compassionate	
  nurse	
  do	
  in	
  this	
  situaIon?	
  I’ve	
  been	
  working	
  at	
  
this	
  story	
  in	
  my	
  pracIce	
  ever	
  since.	
  The	
  fact	
  is	
  that	
  no	
  one	
  knows	
  what	
  to	
  do.	
  We	
  take	
  in	
  all	
  the	
  possibiliIes	
  from	
  
our	
  own	
  experience	
  and	
  project	
  that	
  on	
  to	
  any	
  given	
  problem.	
  The	
  common	
  strategy	
  is	
  to	
  do	
  unto	
  others	
  what	
  
we	
  think	
  we’d	
  want	
  for	
  ourselves	
  and	
  expect	
  that’s	
  good	
  for	
  everyone.	
  There	
  is	
  another	
  way.	
  Just	
  sit	
  in	
  “not	
  
knowing”.	
  It’s	
  a	
  profound	
  pracIce	
  that	
  doesn’t	
  let	
  the	
  past	
  dictate	
  to	
  the	
  present.	
  Be	
  totally	
  open	
  to	
  what’s	
  right	
  
there	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  you	
  paIently	
  lebng	
  reality	
  reveal	
  itself.	
  Deeply	
  listen	
  to	
  what	
  reality	
  is	
  telling	
  you.	
  Only	
  then	
  can	
  
a	
  path	
  open	
  for	
  healing.	
  

Don’t	
  worry	
  about	
  helping	
  me.	
  Just	
  help	
  with	
  the	
  spirit	
  of	
  not	
  knowing.	
  I’m	
  pracIcing	
  that	
  with	
  my	
  all	
  my	
  heart	
  
these	
  days.	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  fix	
  with	
  this	
  disease.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  listen	
  deeply	
  to	
  what	
  it’s	
  teaching	
  me.	
  Healing	
  is	
  
happening	
  without	
  any	
  idea	
  of	
  an	
  outcome.	
  Let	
  your	
  relaIonship	
  to	
  my	
  reality	
  teach	
  you.	
  You	
  can’t	
  do	
  anything	
  
wrong.	
  Just	
  help	
  as	
  the	
  path	
  is	
  revealed.	
  It’s	
  all	
  quite	
  simple


                                                                                              13
HalGime
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  March	
  31,	
  2008


Today	
  was	
  the	
  sixth	
  of	
  twelve	
  treatments	
  planned	
  for	
  this	
  trial.	
  I’m	
  now	
  thinking	
  ahead	
  of	
  what	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  do	
  
a\erward.	
  Here	
  are	
  some	
  things	
  on	
  my	
  bucket	
  list:

Travel	
  to	
  Ireland,	
  Bali,	
  India,	
  Ethiopia	
  and	
  New	
  Zealand

My	
  business	
  partner	
  Steve	
  and	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  taking	
  a	
  road	
  trip	
  to	
  Cabo	
  San	
  Lucas	
  from	
  San	
  Diego.	
  

I	
  will	
  be	
  signing	
  up	
  for	
  OHI	
  and	
  begin	
  a	
  raw	
  food	
  regimen	
  to	
  prevent	
  another	
  occurrence.	
  This	
  could	
  really	
  
conflict	
  with	
  the	
  travel	
  plans.	
  This	
  one	
  may	
  be	
  on	
  the	
  pre-­‐bucket	
  list.

The	
  past	
  month	
  I’ve	
  taken	
  all	
  the	
  treatment	
  can	
  throw	
  at	
  me.	
  The	
  blood	
  clot	
  was	
  very	
  painful	
  and	
  debilitaIng.	
  I	
  
got	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  strong	
  days	
  before	
  the	
  next	
  treatment.	
  I	
  enjoyed	
  them	
  without	
  having	
  to	
  do	
  anything	
  but	
  feel	
  my	
  
pain	
  free	
  body.	
  Right	
  a\er	
  the	
  next	
  treatment	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  cold	
  that	
  just	
  put	
  me	
  down.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  go	
  into	
  work	
  as	
  I	
  had	
  
visitors	
  travelling	
  to	
  see	
  me.	
  It	
  was	
  not	
  easy.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  walk	
  up	
  a	
  flight	
  of	
  stairs	
  without	
  sibng	
  down	
  for	
  fi\een	
  
minutes	
  to	
  recover.	
  It’s	
  not	
  just	
  my	
  body	
  that	
  suffers.	
  My	
  mind	
  gets	
  weak	
  as	
  well.	
  I	
  called	
  my	
  love	
  and	
  begged	
  her	
  
to	
  care	
  for	
  me.	
  I	
  needed	
  the	
  touch	
  that	
  only	
  she	
  could	
  offer.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  meant	
  to	
  be.	
  When	
  the	
  pain	
  li\ed	
  I	
  realized	
  
my	
  moIvaIon	
  was	
  selfish.	
  I	
  wanted	
  her	
  regardless	
  of	
  what	
  she	
  wanted	
  for	
  her	
  life.	
  She	
  was	
  willing	
  to	
  jeopardize	
  
that	
  for	
  me.	
  How	
  could	
  I	
  do	
  that	
  and	
  call	
  it	
  love?	
  That	
  isn’t	
  love,	
  that’s	
  greed.

My	
  illness	
  lightened	
  up	
  around	
  last	
  Thursday.	
  I	
  sIll	
  had	
  a	
  cough	
  and	
  my	
  diarrhea	
  just	
  can’t	
  bear	
  to	
  leave	
  me	
  
alone.	
  An	
  old	
  friend,	
  Barry	
  Harrow,	
  visited	
  me	
  for	
  the	
  weekend.	
  I	
  hadn’t	
  seen	
  him	
  in	
  over	
  30	
  years.	
  Thankfully	
  I	
  
had	
  the	
  energy	
  to	
  keep	
  up	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  acIviIes.	
  We	
  visited	
  mutual	
  friends	
  and	
  went	
  to	
  my	
  friend	
  Flow’s	
  birthday	
  
party.	
  We	
  had	
  a	
  great	
  Ime.	
  I	
  hit	
  the	
  wall	
  around	
  11PM	
  and	
  had	
  to	
  leave.	
  I	
  collapsed	
  in	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  pain	
  and	
  slept	
  Ill	
  it	
  
was	
  Ime	
  to	
  drop	
  Barry	
  off	
  at	
  the	
  airport.	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  back	
  I	
  stopped	
  at	
  a	
  breakfast	
  place.	
  It	
  was	
  an	
  old-­‐Ime	
  diner	
  
struggling	
  against	
  the	
  Imes.	
  They	
  had	
  great	
  coffee,	
  decent	
  food	
  and	
  a	
  Sunday	
  newspaper.	
  The	
  proprietor	
  was	
  a	
  
long	
  Ime	
  Greek	
  immigrant.	
  We	
  didn’t	
  say	
  much	
  unIl	
  I	
  was	
  just	
  about	
  to	
  go.	
  Then	
  we	
  struck	
  up	
  a	
  nice	
  
conversaIon	
  about	
  life’s	
  liVle	
  things.	
  I	
  love	
  connecIon	
  and	
  heart.	
  People	
  really	
  do	
  love	
  each	
  other.	
  All	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  
do	
  is	
  be	
  open.	
  Create	
  a	
  space	
  to	
  welcome	
  everyone.	
  Just	
  sit	
  and	
  let	
  life	
  pour	
  out.	
  Later	
  that	
  day	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  to	
  
Yokoji	
  Zen	
  Mountain	
  Center	
  for	
  a	
  memorial	
  service	
  for	
  my	
  teacher’s	
  father.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  wonderful	
  man	
  from	
  
England.	
  He	
  fought	
  in	
  WWII.	
  We	
  all	
  miss	
  him.	
  The	
  gathering	
  was	
  filled	
  with	
  old	
  friends	
  and	
  Zen	
  teachers	
  from	
  the	
  
area.	
  My	
  Swiss	
  friend,	
  Kokyo,	
  joined	
  me	
  on	
  the	
  ride.	
  It	
  was	
  so	
  beauIful	
  all	
  the	
  way.	
  The	
  sun	
  was	
  shining	
  and	
  the	
  
flowers	
  were	
  everywhere.	
  All	
  the	
  rain	
  turned	
  Southern	
  California	
  into	
  a	
  spring	
  wonderland.	
  

I	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  to	
  be	
  thankful	
  for.	
  Wherever	
  I	
  go	
  I	
  fall	
  in	
  love	
  with	
  everything	
  in	
  my	
  life.


Tragedy
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  April	
  21,	
  2008


I	
  went	
  in	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  oncologist	
  on	
  Monday.	
  We	
  discussed	
  all	
  the	
  side	
  effects	
  I’ve	
  been	
  experiencing.	
  The	
  diarrhea	
  
is	
  the	
  most	
  troublesome	
  as	
  it	
  could	
  lead	
  to	
  an	
  “inflamed	
  bowel”.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  that	
  really	
  means	
  and	
  I	
  don’t	
  want	
  
to	
  find	
  out.	
  The	
  pain	
  from	
  the	
  soreness	
  is	
  so	
  unrelenIng	
  that	
  the	
  word	
  inflamed	
  is	
  an	
  understatement.	
  I	
  just	
  keep	
  
thinking	
  that	
  I	
  could	
  end	
  up	
  with	
  colostomy	
  again.	
  No	
  maVer	
  how	
  painful	
  my	
  buV	
  is,	
  it’s	
  beVer	
  than	
  the	
  
                                                                                                   14
alternaIve.	
  We	
  reviewed	
  my	
  latest	
  CT	
  scan.	
  It	
  showed	
  that	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  five	
  tumors	
  is	
  gone.	
  One	
  down	
  four	
  to	
  go.	
  
The	
  others	
  are	
  significantly	
  reduced	
  in	
  size.	
  That’s	
  good	
  progress	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  every	
  reason	
  to	
  believe	
  that	
  I	
  will	
  win	
  
this	
  round.	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  went	
  in	
  for	
  my	
  seventh	
  of	
  twelve	
  treatments.	
  The	
  day	
  before	
  was	
  quite	
  painful.	
  I	
  felt	
  a	
  bit	
  cheated	
  
that	
  I	
  didn’t	
  get	
  the	
  good	
  days	
  I	
  deserve.	
  I	
  haven’t	
  been	
  sleeping	
  as	
  the	
  diarrhea	
  just	
  kept	
  me	
  up	
  and	
  down	
  at	
  
night.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  wait	
  for	
  my	
  doctor	
  to	
  review	
  the	
  blood	
  tests	
  before	
  they	
  start	
  the	
  treatment.	
  My	
  potassium	
  was	
  
low	
  as	
  one	
  could	
  expect	
  with	
  these	
  symptoms.	
  I	
  am	
  starIng	
  a	
  regimen	
  of	
  supplements	
  to	
  get	
  that	
  up.	
  They	
  first	
  
give	
  me	
  some	
  Tylenol	
  followed	
  intravenous	
  Benadryl.	
  I	
  feel	
  asleep	
  for	
  the	
  whole	
  treatment.	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  in	
  the	
  best	
  
of	
  moods	
  and	
  just	
  kept	
  quiet	
  the	
  whole	
  Ime.	
  I	
  usually	
  have	
  fun	
  with	
  the	
  staff	
  but	
  this	
  day	
  I	
  was	
  subdued.	
  When	
  
it	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  go	
  I	
  packed	
  up	
  my	
  stuff	
  and	
  walked	
  out	
  the	
  door	
  quietly.	
  I	
  felt	
  deeply	
  humbled	
  and	
  penitent.	
  As	
  I	
  
opened	
  the	
  door	
  to	
  the	
  outside	
  I	
  was	
  struck	
  by	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  tragedy.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  fear	
  or	
  despair,	
  just	
  an	
  honest	
  
awareness	
  of	
  this	
  man	
  walking	
  to	
  his	
  car	
  all	
  alone	
  to	
  get	
  on	
  with	
  his	
  day,	
  hooked	
  up	
  to	
  a	
  portable	
  chemo	
  pump	
  
trying	
  to	
  stay	
  alive	
  while	
  at	
  the	
  mercy	
  of	
  this	
  most	
  dread	
  disease.	
  

My	
  symptoms	
  seem	
  to	
  get	
  more	
  varied	
  with	
  each	
  treatment.	
  My	
  diarrhea	
  went	
  away	
  which	
  leads	
  me	
  to	
  believe	
  
that	
  my	
  bowels	
  are	
  addicted	
  to	
  chemo.	
  That	
  could	
  be	
  a	
  problem.	
  The	
  Ingling	
  in	
  my	
  nerves	
  is	
  the	
  worst	
  of	
  it	
  right	
  
now.	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  shop	
  in	
  Whole	
  Foods	
  and	
  had	
  to	
  creaIvely	
  figure	
  out	
  how	
  to	
  get	
  my	
  groceries	
  into	
  my	
  cart	
  
without	
  sebng	
  off	
  the	
  numbness	
  in	
  my	
  hands.	
  By	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  trip	
  my	
  right	
  hand	
  curled	
  up	
  into	
  a	
  paralyzed	
  
ball.	
  I	
  just	
  watched	
  my	
  beauIful	
  hand	
  become	
  useless.	
  I	
  depend	
  so	
  much	
  on	
  it.	
  I	
  could	
  never	
  imagine	
  it	
  would	
  
just	
  quit	
  on	
  me.	
  My	
  body	
  is	
  slowly	
  deterioraIng	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  take	
  saIsfacIon	
  that	
  the	
  enemy	
  is	
  deterioraIng	
  
faster.	
  Slowly	
  my	
  hand	
  came	
  back	
  to	
  life	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  checkout.	
  For	
  the	
  first	
  Ime	
  I	
  asked	
  for	
  assistance	
  to	
  
the	
  car.	
  I	
  got	
  into	
  my	
  car	
  and	
  cried.	
  It	
  was	
  really	
  good	
  to	
  acknowledge	
  the	
  tragedy,	
  even	
  to	
  honor	
  it	
  as	
  I	
  baVle	
  my	
  
way	
  through.	
  I’m	
  ready	
  to	
  die,	
  I’m	
  ready	
  to	
  live,	
  and	
  I’m	
  determined	
  to	
  do	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  open	
  my	
  heart	
  widely	
  in	
  
this	
  state	
  of	
  tragedy.	
  

My	
  sangha	
  met	
  for	
  our	
  Wednesday	
  council.	
  We	
  sit	
  in	
  meditaIon	
  for	
  a	
  half	
  hour	
  and	
  then	
  join	
  together	
  to	
  talk	
  
about	
  where	
  we	
  are.	
  The	
  two	
  topics	
  the	
  abbot	
  introduced	
  were	
  spiritual	
  arrogance	
  and	
  form	
  (the	
  ritual	
  of	
  our	
  
Zen	
  pracIce).	
  My	
  sharing	
  was	
  a	
  tearful	
  telling	
  of	
  my	
  experience	
  of	
  tragedy	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  two	
  days.	
  I	
  recalled	
  my	
  
childhood	
  relaIonship	
  with	
  the	
  Catholic	
  form	
  and	
  how	
  it	
  nurtured	
  me	
  as	
  a	
  small	
  boy.	
  I	
  love	
  aVenIon	
  to	
  form.	
  I	
  
started	
  my	
  Zen	
  pracIce	
  at	
  Yokoji	
  in	
  the	
  remote	
  mountains.	
  I	
  was	
  greeted	
  by	
  the	
  bells	
  and	
  calls	
  to	
  meditaIon	
  that	
  
sounded	
  endlessly	
  through	
  the	
  silent	
  valley.	
  The	
  sangha	
  was	
  so	
  well	
  trained	
  in	
  the	
  form	
  that	
  it	
  just	
  invited	
  me	
  sit	
  
and	
  be	
  inImate	
  with	
  my	
  life,	
  with	
  all	
  life.	
  When	
  I	
  moved	
  to	
  Miami	
  and	
  joined	
  the	
  Moon	
  heart	
  Sangha	
  in	
  Coconut	
  
Grove	
  the	
  form	
  was	
  simple	
  but	
  diligently	
  followed.	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  blessed	
  to	
  be	
  there	
  and	
  parIcipate	
  in	
  its	
  gentle	
  call	
  
to	
  mindfulness.	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  describe.	
  I	
  remember	
  my	
  early	
  days	
  of	
  mindfulness	
  and	
  meditaIon.	
  It	
  seemed	
  so	
  
simple	
  that	
  my	
  skepIcal	
  mind	
  would	
  just	
  pass	
  it	
  off	
  as	
  new	
  age	
  imaginaIon.	
  Over	
  the	
  years	
  of	
  this	
  pracIce	
  I’ve	
  
come	
  to	
  appreciate	
  its	
  power.

This	
  past	
  Friday	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  to	
  my	
  Unitarian	
  Camp	
  in	
  the	
  San	
  Bernardino	
  Mountains,	
  DeBenneville	
  Pines.	
  Every	
  
year	
  the	
  UU	
  Men’s	
  Fellowship	
  meets	
  up	
  there.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  going	
  for	
  twenty	
  years.	
  I	
  really	
  didn’t	
  think	
  I’d	
  make	
  it	
  
this	
  year	
  with	
  it	
  being	
  so	
  close	
  to	
  my	
  treatment	
  and	
  how	
  I’d	
  been	
  feeling	
  a\erwards.	
  My	
  chiropractor,	
  Dr	
  Marc	
  
GoVlieb,	
  had	
  a	
  video	
  in	
  his	
  office	
  touIng	
  the	
  health	
  benefits	
  of	
  yogurt.	
  It	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  those,	
  “I	
  could	
  have	
  had	
  V8”	
  
moments.	
  I	
  had	
  ignored	
  my	
  intesInal	
  flora.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  no	
  brainer	
  I	
  should	
  have	
  known.	
  I	
  went	
  out	
  and	
  bought	
  a	
  
bunch	
  of	
  it	
  with	
  some	
  super	
  bug	
  filled	
  pills.	
  The	
  result	
  was	
  amazing.	
  My	
  digesIve	
  system	
  is	
  90%	
  beVer	
  and	
  that	
  
was	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  problem.	
  So	
  off	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  mountains	
  with	
  by	
  sangha	
  brother,	
  Larry	
  Spencer.	
  He	
  was	
  the	
  man	
  
that	
  introduced	
  me	
  to	
  Zen	
  when	
  I	
  lived	
  in	
  Riverside	
  County.	
  He	
  moved	
  down	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  shortly	
  therea\er.	
  I	
  
went	
  on	
  to	
  diligently	
  pracIce	
  Zen.	
  Here	
  I	
  am	
  a\er	
  ten	
  years	
  pracIcing	
  with	
  him	
  once	
  again.	
  He	
  has	
  a	
  habit	
  of	
  
                                                                                               15
showing	
  up	
  when	
  I	
  need	
  him	
  most.	
  We	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  we	
  affect	
  each	
  other’s	
  lives.	
  Larry	
  just	
  led	
  a	
  small	
  sangha	
  
and	
  meditated	
  with	
  whoever	
  showed	
  up.	
  He	
  unknowingly	
  had	
  a	
  deep	
  impact	
  on	
  my	
  life.	
  We	
  truly	
  know	
  not	
  what	
  
we	
  do.

There	
  were	
  almost	
  90	
  men	
  at	
  the	
  weekend.	
  I	
  was	
  having	
  my	
  neuropathy	
  side	
  effect	
  where	
  my	
  hands,	
  feet	
  and	
  
mouth	
  turn	
  into	
  a	
  bundle	
  of	
  nerves	
  at	
  the	
  touch	
  of	
  anything	
  cold.	
  It	
  didn’t	
  dramaIcally	
  affect	
  my	
  walking	
  as	
  it	
  
had	
  done	
  the	
  past	
  few	
  treatments.	
  I	
  would	
  Ire	
  out	
  easily	
  and	
  would	
  sit	
  or	
  lie	
  down	
  o\en	
  a\er	
  a	
  short	
  walk	
  to	
  my	
  
cabin.	
  Everyone	
  was	
  so	
  beauIful	
  to	
  me.	
  We	
  love	
  each	
  other	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  men	
  rarely	
  do.	
  There	
  is	
  so	
  much	
  power	
  in	
  
this	
  group	
  of	
  men	
  all	
  coming	
  together	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  each	
  other.	
  

On	
  Saturday	
  we	
  told	
  our	
  stories.	
  We	
  were	
  skillfully	
  guided	
  with	
  some	
  quesIons.	
  This	
  was	
  disIlled	
  into	
  a	
  story.	
  I	
  
recalled	
  my	
  boyhood	
  days	
  in	
  Northport	
  NY.	
  I	
  had	
  so	
  much	
  fun	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  kids	
  that	
  surrounded	
  my	
  
neighborhood.	
  It	
  seemed	
  like	
  an	
  endless	
  life	
  of	
  play	
  and	
  friendship.	
  My	
  family	
  was	
  surrounded	
  in	
  tragedy.	
  We	
  
suffered	
  the	
  loss	
  of	
  our	
  mother	
  and	
  my	
  father’s	
  inability	
  to	
  cope	
  with	
  seven	
  children	
  alone.	
  I	
  told	
  the	
  story	
  of	
  the	
  
Mahoney’s.	
  They	
  were	
  a	
  neighborhood	
  family	
  similar	
  to	
  ours	
  with	
  eight	
  children	
  to	
  our	
  seven.	
  Larry	
  and	
  Regina	
  
took	
  us	
  under	
  their	
  wing	
  for	
  no	
  apparent	
  reason.	
  We	
  would	
  all	
  pile	
  into	
  his	
  big	
  Land	
  Rover	
  and	
  go	
  water	
  skiing,	
  to	
  
LiVle	
  League	
  and	
  just	
  about	
  anywhere.	
  At	
  least	
  two	
  summers	
  they	
  took	
  us	
  on	
  their	
  vacaIon	
  to	
  Cape	
  Cod.	
  It	
  was	
  
just	
  the	
  best	
  Ime	
  I	
  could	
  have	
  imagined.	
  They	
  just	
  loved	
  us	
  in	
  a	
  Ime	
  when	
  we	
  felt	
  abandoned.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  realize	
  it	
  
then	
  but	
  they	
  were	
  an	
  unexplainable	
  force	
  of	
  compassion	
  made	
  real	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  us.	
  They	
  didn’t	
  have	
  to.	
  Their	
  life	
  
would	
  have	
  been	
  easier	
  if	
  they	
  hadn’t.	
  The	
  impact	
  of	
  what	
  they	
  did	
  is	
  unknowable.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  believe	
  it	
  made	
  all	
  
the	
  difference.

That	
  Saturday	
  night	
  we	
  got	
  together	
  in	
  a	
  sacred	
  circle.	
  We	
  formed	
  a	
  procession	
  to	
  look	
  into	
  each	
  man’s	
  eyes.	
  It	
  
sounds	
  so	
  simple.	
  By	
  the	
  end	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  grateful	
  tears	
  as	
  my	
  eyes	
  met	
  these	
  men	
  I’ve	
  loved	
  for	
  so	
  long.	
  The	
  energy	
  
just	
  heated	
  up	
  my	
  whole	
  body	
  unIl	
  all	
  the	
  neuropathy	
  was	
  banished.	
  I	
  felt	
  so	
  alive	
  and	
  connected	
  to	
  all	
  love,	
  to	
  
all	
  of	
  God’s	
  grace	
  that	
  flowed	
  like	
  a	
  mighty	
  river.	
  It	
  was	
  as	
  though	
  my	
  small	
  mind	
  was	
  pried	
  open	
  to	
  let	
  the	
  flood	
  
come	
  in.

Sunday	
  we	
  have	
  our	
  Quaker	
  style	
  service	
  where	
  men	
  get	
  up	
  as	
  they	
  are	
  called	
  to	
  say	
  what	
  they	
  want	
  to	
  say	
  as	
  we	
  
listen	
  openly	
  without	
  judgment.	
  So	
  many	
  men	
  honored	
  me	
  with	
  how	
  I’ve	
  touched	
  their	
  lives	
  with	
  simple	
  things	
  
I’ve	
  done	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  I	
  was	
  once	
  again	
  humbled	
  by	
  how	
  we	
  affect	
  each	
  other.	
  

I	
  now	
  know	
  with	
  such	
  certainty	
  that	
  this	
  world	
  can	
  be	
  healed	
  with	
  the	
  simple	
  act	
  of	
  blessing	
  everyone	
  that	
  
enters	
  our	
  life.	
  Jesus	
  said	
  anyone	
  can	
  love	
  their	
  friends	
  and	
  family.	
  He	
  challenged	
  us	
  to	
  love	
  our	
  enemies.	
  Buddha	
  
said	
  hate	
  never	
  dispels	
  hate.	
  Only	
  Love	
  dispels	
  Hate.	
  Please	
  don’t	
  wait	
  too	
  long	
  to	
  bless	
  everyone	
  you	
  see.	
  We	
  
don’t	
  have	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  Ime.	
  

I	
  bless	
  you	
  all	
  for	
  the	
  simple	
  things	
  you	
  do	
  for	
  me.	
  

Kevin


Joyful	
  swamp
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Saturday,	
  May	
  10,	
  2008
Every	
  Wednesday	
  we	
  close	
  our	
  council	
  with	
  this	
  chant:

May	
  we	
  exist	
  in	
  muddy	
  water
                                                                                             16
with	
  purity	
  like	
  the	
  lotus

Thus	
  we	
  bow	
  to	
  Buddha

I’ve	
  been	
  receiving	
  some	
  feedback	
  from	
  people	
  that	
  I	
  sound	
  like	
  I’m	
  in	
  real	
  trouble.	
  They	
  are	
  very	
  concerned.	
  I	
  
reassure	
  them	
  that’s	
  not	
  the	
  case.	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  focusing	
  on	
  difficulIes	
  and	
  how	
  I	
  process	
  them.	
  The	
  last	
  posIng	
  
dealt	
  with	
  the	
  sense	
  of	
  tragedy	
  I	
  felt	
  upon	
  leaving	
  the	
  hospital	
  all	
  alone	
  a\er	
  my	
  treatment.	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  deep	
  
experience	
  for	
  me.	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  mean	
  that’s	
  how	
  I	
  feel	
  all	
  the	
  Ime.	
  I’m	
  trying	
  to	
  convey	
  what	
  this	
  chemo	
  life	
  is	
  
about.	
  If	
  you	
  have	
  any	
  doubts,	
  let	
  me	
  clear	
  them	
  up.	
  Chemo	
  sucks,	
  cancer	
  sucks,	
  suffering	
  sucks.	
  There	
  are	
  no	
  
redeeming	
  qualiIes,	
  it	
  just	
  plain	
  ol’	
  sucks.	
  The	
  key	
  success	
  factor	
  in	
  chemo	
  is	
  to	
  kill	
  the	
  cancer	
  a	
  few	
  weeks	
  
before	
  the	
  chemo	
  kills	
  me.	
  So	
  if	
  you	
  expect	
  wriIngs	
  that	
  have	
  me	
  dancing	
  around	
  and	
  transcending	
  my	
  situaIon,	
  
you’re	
  reading	
  the	
  wrong	
  cancer	
  paIent’s	
  blog.	
  I’m	
  going	
  to	
  tell	
  it	
  as	
  I	
  experience	
  it.	
  SomeImes	
  the	
  most	
  
profound	
  experience	
  comes	
  at	
  a	
  moment	
  of	
  suffering.	
  That	
  doesn’t	
  in	
  any	
  way	
  alter	
  the	
  fact	
  that	
  suffering	
  sucks.

These	
  past	
  two	
  weeks	
  have	
  been	
  difficult.	
  The	
  treatment	
  hit	
  my	
  hands	
  and	
  feet	
  very	
  hard.	
  My	
  skin	
  hardened	
  and	
  
it’s	
  now	
  peeling.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  touch	
  anything	
  with	
  any	
  pressure.	
  That	
  made	
  preparing	
  even	
  the	
  simplest	
  food	
  
impossible.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  Ime	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  use	
  my	
  blog	
  to	
  ask	
  for	
  help.	
  My	
  Zen	
  Community	
  all	
  stopped	
  by	
  during	
  
the	
  day	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  and	
  I	
  didn’t	
  need	
  any	
  outside	
  help.	
  I	
  spent	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  Ime	
  responding	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  offers	
  of	
  help.	
  
I’m	
  glad	
  I	
  was	
  sIll	
  able	
  to	
  type.	
  The	
  worst	
  of	
  this	
  side	
  effect	
  subsided	
  a\er	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  days.

My	
  sister	
  Anne	
  came	
  to	
  visit	
  me	
  for	
  a	
  week.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  beauIful	
  visit.	
  We	
  determined	
  to	
  watch	
  the	
  ten	
  part	
  
series	
  of	
  Oprah’s	
  online	
  workshop	
  with	
  Eckert	
  Tolle.	
  We	
  made	
  it	
  through	
  three.	
  I	
  recommend	
  this	
  to	
  anyone	
  
that’s	
  considering	
  starIng	
  a	
  pracIce	
  of	
  meditaIon	
  and	
  awakening.	
  He’s	
  an	
  excellent	
  and	
  accessible	
  teacher.	
  I	
  was	
  
really	
  surprised	
  by	
  Oprah’s	
  grasp	
  of	
  the	
  subject	
  maVer.	
  Here’s	
  the	
  website	
  to	
  view	
  the	
  enIre	
  series:	
  hVp://
www.oprah.com/obc_classic/webcast/archive/archive_download.jsp.	
  This	
  message	
  has	
  reached	
  50	
  million	
  
people.	
  It’s	
  a	
  hopeful	
  sign	
  for	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  our	
  planet.

Anne	
  did	
  a	
  great	
  job	
  fibng	
  into	
  the	
  meditaIon	
  pracIce.	
  She	
  was	
  a	
  big	
  hit	
  here.	
  Everyone	
  loved	
  her	
  and	
  
wondered	
  how	
  I	
  came	
  from	
  the	
  same	
  seed.	
  GeneIcs	
  is	
  a	
  tricky	
  business.	
  She	
  took	
  wonderful	
  care	
  of	
  me.	
  It’s	
  
great	
  to	
  be	
  pampered.	
  I	
  did	
  all	
  I	
  could	
  to	
  not	
  appear	
  too	
  well.	
  I’m	
  good	
  at	
  making	
  subtle	
  noises	
  that	
  sound	
  really	
  
patheIc.	
  Anne’s	
  like	
  puVy	
  in	
  my	
  hands	
  once	
  I	
  turn	
  on	
  the	
  suffering	
  brother	
  shIck.	
  We	
  managed	
  to	
  do	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  
fun	
  things	
  while	
  she	
  was	
  here.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  Balboa	
  Park	
  and	
  a	
  road	
  trip	
  to	
  Julian.

Pat	
  is	
  the	
  next	
  one	
  coming	
  out	
  in	
  late	
  May.	
  She’s	
  a	
  lot	
  trickier.	
  If	
  I	
  get	
  sick	
  she	
  orders	
  take	
  out.	
  It’s	
  her	
  cure	
  all.	
  
Oddly,	
  it	
  works	
  more	
  o\en	
  than	
  not.	
  She	
  should	
  write	
  a	
  book.	
  “Let’s	
  see….sore	
  hands	
  and	
  feet…let’s	
  order	
  Kung	
  
Pao	
  chicken	
  and	
  some	
  pot	
  sIckers.	
  That	
  should	
  do	
  it.”

The	
  more	
  lasIng	
  side	
  effect	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  sore	
  tongue	
  and	
  sore	
  ass.	
  That’s	
  a	
  karmic	
  combinaIon	
  I’m	
  sIll	
  working	
  
through.	
  My	
  tongue	
  feels	
  like	
  I	
  ate	
  a	
  piping	
  hot	
  pizza	
  in	
  10	
  minutes.	
  It’s	
  really	
  hard	
  to	
  eat	
  and	
  my	
  taste	
  buds	
  are	
  
shot.	
  I	
  was	
  really	
  worried	
  that	
  it	
  could	
  become	
  permanent.	
  That	
  happens	
  someImes	
  with	
  this	
  neuropathy.	
  Last	
  
Thursday	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  my	
  acupuncturist	
  and	
  told	
  him	
  about	
  all	
  my	
  symptoms.	
  A\er	
  the	
  treatment	
  life	
  started	
  to	
  
return	
  to	
  my	
  tongue.	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  to	
  see	
  if	
  could	
  improve	
  on	
  it.	
  Now	
  it’s	
  about	
  70%	
  beVer.	
  My	
  ass	
  is	
  
gebng	
  beVer	
  as	
  well.	
  I	
  can’t	
  believe	
  that	
  sIcking	
  pins	
  in	
  me	
  has	
  such	
  an	
  effect	
  but	
  it	
  can’t	
  be	
  denied.
                                                                                                      17
About	
  the	
  quote	
  at	
  the	
  top	
  of	
  this	
  posIng.	
  It’s	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  favorites.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  pracIcing	
  Buddhism	
  since	
  I	
  was	
  20.	
  I	
  
was	
  taught	
  about	
  the	
  lotus	
  flower	
  back	
  then	
  and	
  it	
  never	
  loses	
  its	
  relevance.	
  This	
  flower	
  is	
  a	
  symbol	
  for	
  this	
  
spiritual	
  tradiIon.	
  It’s	
  the	
  only	
  plant	
  that	
  has	
  both	
  flower	
  and	
  seed	
  simultaneously.	
  If	
  there	
  are	
  any	
  biologists	
  
reading	
  this	
  and	
  you	
  find	
  this	
  is	
  not	
  true,	
  keep	
  it	
  to	
  yourself.	
  The	
  analogy	
  has	
  sustained	
  me	
  all	
  these	
  years	
  and	
  the	
  
truth	
  won’t	
  set	
  me	
  free	
  this	
  Ime.	
  The	
  other	
  aspect	
  of	
  the	
  lotus	
  plant	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  thrives	
  in	
  muddy	
  waters	
  like	
  
swamps	
  and	
  wetlands.	
  So	
  you	
  say,	
  what’s	
  the	
  big	
  deal	
  with	
  a	
  strange	
  flower?	
  This	
  is	
  whole	
  point	
  of	
  our	
  lives.	
  We	
  
all	
  exist	
  in	
  the	
  muddy	
  water	
  of	
  our	
  lives.	
  It	
  ain’t	
  always	
  preVy	
  and	
  mistakes,	
  shame,	
  guilt,	
  sadness	
  all	
  are	
  part	
  of	
  
living	
  right	
  along	
  with	
  happiness,	
  joy,	
  love,	
  compassion,	
  curiosity,	
  passion	
  and	
  all	
  the	
  rest.	
  That’s	
  the	
  muddy	
  
swamp	
  we	
  live	
  in.	
  From	
  this	
  swamp	
  we	
  can	
  emerge	
  with	
  purity	
  like	
  a	
  lotus.	
  We	
  are	
  this	
  beauIful	
  flower.	
  It’s	
  our	
  
job	
  in	
  this	
  life	
  to	
  see	
  it.	
  The	
  simultaneous	
  emergence	
  of	
  the	
  seed	
  and	
  flower	
  teach	
  us	
  that	
  our	
  every	
  acIon	
  has	
  
contained	
  in	
  it	
  a	
  consequence.	
  The	
  Ime	
  lag	
  between	
  the	
  cause	
  and	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  our	
  acIon	
  is	
  really	
  
inconsequenIal.	
  Our	
  acIons	
  can	
  be	
  negaIve,	
  neutral	
  or	
  posiIve	
  but	
  the	
  effects	
  are	
  inevitable.	
  Those	
  seeds	
  grow	
  
within	
  us	
  and	
  manifest	
  into	
  our	
  sense	
  of	
  self.	
  We	
  may	
  become	
  biVer,	
  harsh,	
  angry	
  or	
  loving,	
  compassionate	
  and	
  
friendly.	
  Most	
  likely	
  we	
  exist	
  in	
  a	
  muddy	
  swamp	
  of	
  it	
  all.	
  The	
  pracIce	
  of	
  meditaIon	
  is	
  meant	
  to	
  free	
  us	
  from	
  this	
  
cycle	
  by	
  simply	
  becoming	
  aware	
  of	
  it.	
  Awareness	
  is	
  the	
  key	
  to	
  emerging	
  from	
  the	
  swamp	
  with	
  purity	
  like	
  a	
  lotus.	
  
Becoming	
  aware	
  of	
  this	
  cycle	
  of	
  cause	
  and	
  effect	
  leads	
  us	
  to	
  a	
  deeper	
  appreciaIon	
  of	
  our	
  life.	
  We	
  are	
  not	
  small	
  
creatures	
  mindlessly	
  going	
  through	
  life.	
  Our	
  true	
  nature	
  is	
  Buddha.	
  Buddha	
  is	
  our	
  awakened	
  self.	
  It’s	
  who	
  we	
  
really	
  are,	
  always	
  were	
  and	
  always	
  will	
  be.	
  Once	
  that	
  awakening	
  develops	
  we	
  see	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  totally	
  connected	
  
to	
  everything	
  and	
  separate	
  from	
  nothing.	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  realizaIon	
  of	
  God	
  within	
  us.	
  All	
  the	
  great	
  masters	
  realize	
  
this.	
  Read	
  closely	
  the	
  words	
  of	
  Jesus	
  without	
  bringing	
  into	
  it	
  what	
  you’ve	
  been	
  taught	
  to	
  believe	
  and	
  you’ll	
  see	
  it	
  
for	
  yourself.	
  When	
  we	
  bow	
  to	
  Buddha	
  we	
  bow	
  to	
  our	
  sacred	
  infinite	
  nature.	
  This	
  develops	
  into	
  freedom	
  to	
  move	
  
about	
  this	
  world	
  without	
  the	
  hindrance	
  of	
  our	
  fears.

Sorry	
  for	
  the	
  sermon	
  but	
  it	
  just	
  came	
  out	
  and	
  you’re	
  stuck	
  with	
  it.	
  This	
  pracIce	
  has	
  been	
  an	
  important	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  
life.	
  It	
  hasn’t	
  stopped	
  me	
  from	
  making	
  every	
  mistake	
  in	
  the	
  book.	
  It	
  has	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  my	
  knees	
  in	
  appreciaIon	
  
for	
  the	
  freedom	
  of	
  the	
  present	
  moment.	
  I	
  feel	
  blessed	
  in	
  the	
  midst	
  of	
  this	
  very	
  ordinary	
  experience	
  of	
  sickness.	
  
It’s	
  truly	
  something	
  we	
  all	
  will	
  face.	
  When	
  I	
  write	
  about	
  my	
  experience	
  of	
  suffering,	
  don’t	
  assume	
  I	
  always	
  suffer.	
  
There	
  is	
  so	
  much	
  more	
  to	
  my	
  life	
  on	
  a	
  moment	
  by	
  moment	
  basis.	
  One	
  of	
  my	
  favorite	
  Zen	
  sayings	
  is	
  “Every	
  day	
  a	
  
good	
  day.”	
  I	
  someImes	
  joke	
  that	
  some	
  good	
  days	
  suck	
  more	
  than	
  others.	
  However,	
  there	
  is	
  never	
  a	
  day	
  without	
  
happiness,	
  joy	
  and	
  genuine	
  appreciaIon	
  for	
  my	
  life	
  just	
  as	
  it	
  is.	
  That’s	
  a	
  blessing.

My	
  favorite	
  ChrisIan	
  saying	
  is	
  from	
  St	
  Francis	
  of	
  Assisi,	
  “It	
  is	
  in	
  dying	
  to	
  self,	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  born	
  to	
  eternal	
  life.”	
  That	
  
says	
  it	
  all	
  for	
  me.	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  fear.	
  Dying	
  to	
  self	
  is	
  to	
  become	
  aware	
  of	
  who	
  you	
  are	
  and	
  allowing	
  life	
  to	
  
teach	
  you.	
  We	
  are	
  simply	
  Love.	
  Open	
  to	
  that	
  reality	
  now.	
  There’s	
  no	
  Ime	
  to	
  waste.

Thank	
  you	
  all	
  for	
  your	
  concern,	
  prayers	
  and	
  friendship.	
  You	
  are	
  all	
  my	
  most	
  precious	
  gi\.

Kevin


Time	
  for	
  Health
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  May	
  20,	
  2008


                                                                                                 18
I	
  went	
  into	
  my	
  chemo	
  treatment	
  last	
  Monday	
  with	
  such	
  a	
  Ired	
  mind.	
  It’s	
  now	
  been	
  over	
  four	
  months	
  now	
  and	
  
my	
  body	
  is	
  just	
  so	
  exhausted.	
  When	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  work	
  I	
  could	
  barely	
  get	
  up	
  the	
  flight	
  of	
  stairs.	
  I	
  was	
  huffing	
  and	
  
puffing	
  like	
  an	
  old	
  man	
  with	
  emphysema.	
  The	
  mirror	
  shows	
  a	
  man	
  aging	
  with	
  each	
  treatment.	
  Before	
  chemo	
  I	
  
would	
  ride	
  my	
  bike	
  endlessly	
  and	
  feel	
  so	
  full	
  of	
  life.	
  Now	
  I’m	
  a	
  dying	
  shell	
  trying	
  to	
  beat	
  an	
  enemy	
  with	
  human	
  
wave	
  tacIcs.	
  Just	
  throw	
  it	
  all	
  at	
  them	
  and	
  we’ll	
  clean	
  up	
  later.	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  I	
  can’t	
  do	
  this	
  for	
  much	
  longer	
  and	
  I	
  
don’t	
  see	
  myself	
  doing	
  it	
  again.	
  The	
  doctor	
  acknowledged	
  that	
  there’s	
  a	
  point	
  on	
  the	
  cost/benefit	
  scale	
  where	
  
the	
  cost	
  of	
  the	
  treatment	
  exceeds	
  the	
  paIent’s	
  willingness	
  to	
  conInue.	
  I’m	
  there	
  now.	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  CT	
  scan	
  last	
  
Thursday.	
  The	
  results	
  showed	
  that	
  everything	
  was	
  “stable”.	
  The	
  tumors	
  did	
  not	
  grow.	
  The	
  previous	
  CT	
  Scan	
  
showed	
  significant	
  reducIon	
  in	
  tumor	
  size.	
  This	
  to	
  me	
  was	
  a	
  setback.	
  My	
  wonderful	
  nurse,	
  Marianne,	
  said	
  that	
  
it’s	
  a	
  good	
  thing.	
  However,	
  to	
  me	
  it	
  seems	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  accept	
  permanent	
  treatment	
  to	
  maintain	
  stability.	
  I	
  truly	
  
don’t	
  want	
  to	
  live	
  like	
  this.	
  I	
  would	
  rather	
  live	
  a	
  few	
  healthy	
  years	
  than	
  a	
  dozen	
  on	
  and	
  off	
  of	
  chemo.

I’m	
  officially	
  on	
  Short	
  Term	
  Disability	
  Leave	
  as	
  of	
  Friday.	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  work	
  on	
  Thursday.	
  Everyone	
  knew	
  what	
  was	
  
going	
  on.	
  One	
  of	
  my	
  co-­‐workers	
  that	
  lost	
  her	
  father	
  to	
  cancer	
  came	
  in	
  to	
  say	
  good-­‐bye.	
  We	
  both	
  broke	
  down	
  just	
  
at	
  the	
  site	
  of	
  each	
  other.	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  hold	
  onto	
  emoIon	
  when	
  I	
  am	
  with	
  someone	
  who	
  so	
  deeply	
  feels	
  the	
  
sadness	
  of	
  this	
  condiIon.	
  All	
  I	
  could	
  do	
  is	
  give	
  her	
  a	
  big	
  hug	
  and	
  tell	
  her	
  to	
  trust	
  in	
  God	
  and	
  don’t	
  worry.	
  She	
  
looked	
  at	
  me	
  and	
  said	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
  I’m	
  with	
  father	
  again.	
  We	
  shared	
  a	
  great	
  pain	
  and	
  felt	
  reality	
  as	
  it	
  is.	
  This	
  deep	
  
sense	
  of	
  loss	
  can	
  only	
  be	
  covered	
  by	
  Ime.	
  It’s	
  always	
  just	
  below	
  the	
  surface.

The	
  announcement	
  of	
  my	
  leave	
  was	
  made	
  on	
  Tuesday.	
  I	
  loved	
  the	
  line	
  my	
  boss,	
  Wendy	
  added:	
  Our	
  sincere	
  
thanks	
  to	
  Kevin	
  for	
  his	
  excellent	
  efforts	
  in	
  leading	
  our	
  IT	
  organiza:on	
  and	
  for	
  his	
  contagious	
  posi:ve	
  a<tude	
  
about	
  all	
  that	
  is	
  important.	
  There’s	
  not	
  much	
  more	
  I	
  could	
  have	
  asked	
  for.	
  I	
  tried	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  love	
  everyone	
  that	
  
worked	
  with	
  me	
  and	
  for	
  me.	
  I	
  o\en	
  failed	
  but	
  I	
  always	
  looked	
  deeply	
  at	
  each	
  failure.	
  I	
  leave	
  behind	
  so	
  many	
  
wonderful	
  friends.	
  It’s	
  so	
  easy	
  to	
  just	
  care	
  for	
  each	
  other.	
  It’s	
  our	
  job	
  in	
  this	
  life.

My	
  daughter	
  Jessica	
  came	
  by	
  to	
  visit	
  on	
  Sunday.	
  I	
  need	
  help	
  with	
  my	
  laundry	
  and	
  other	
  chores.	
  We	
  always	
  start	
  
off	
  with	
  a	
  hearXelt	
  conversaIon	
  of	
  how	
  she’s	
  doing.	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  avoid	
  the	
  tears	
  as	
  she	
  contemplates	
  a	
  life	
  
without	
  her	
  Dad.	
  It	
  brings	
  me	
  to	
  tears	
  only	
  in	
  that	
  she’s	
  sad.	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  fight	
  reality.	
  I’ve	
  lost	
  my	
  parents	
  
and	
  that	
  loss	
  is	
  with	
  me	
  forever.	
  My	
  Mom	
  died	
  when	
  I	
  was	
  very	
  young	
  and	
  that	
  became	
  a	
  foundaIon,	
  a	
  
cornerstone	
  for	
  my	
  experience	
  of	
  this	
  life.	
  My	
  father’s	
  death	
  came	
  at	
  a	
  natural	
  Ime.	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  my	
  late	
  forIes.	
  I	
  was	
  
ready	
  to	
  complete	
  our	
  relaIonship.	
  We	
  got	
  closer	
  throughout	
  his	
  dying.	
  I	
  let	
  him	
  go	
  just	
  the	
  way	
  I	
  wanted.	
  We	
  all	
  
have	
  our	
  parents	
  inside	
  our	
  head.	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  the	
  man	
  inside	
  my	
  head	
  was	
  not	
  the	
  man	
  dying	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me.	
  
That	
  opened	
  me	
  up	
  to	
  who	
  he	
  really	
  was.	
  Lebng	
  go	
  of	
  that	
  man	
  inside	
  my	
  head	
  allowed	
  me	
  to	
  be	
  
compassionate	
  in	
  his	
  hour	
  of	
  need.	
  I	
  also	
  realized	
  how	
  that	
  man	
  inside	
  my	
  head	
  was	
  a	
  lie.	
  That	
  realizaIon	
  
opened	
  a	
  path	
  to	
  look	
  at	
  everyone	
  in	
  my	
  life	
  with	
  new	
  eyes.	
  It’s	
  a	
  much	
  easier	
  way	
  to	
  live.	
  Look	
  at	
  all	
  the	
  people	
  
in	
  your	
  life	
  with	
  a	
  spirit	
  of	
  not-­‐knowing.	
  Greet	
  everyone	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  Ime.	
  They	
  are	
  not	
  who	
  they	
  were,	
  you	
  are	
  
not	
  who	
  you	
  were.	
  Strip	
  yourself	
  down	
  to	
  see	
  what’s	
  really	
  there	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  you.	
  Open	
  the	
  door	
  of	
  forgiveness.	
  It	
  
is	
  the	
  key	
  to	
  awakening.

Monday	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  RJ	
  Donovan	
  State	
  Prison.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  volunteering	
  there	
  for	
  the	
  past	
  6	
  months	
  or	
  so.	
  We	
  had	
  
a	
  big	
  group,	
  about	
  a	
  dozen	
  men.	
  It	
  is	
  incredible	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  group	
  forming	
  a	
  sangha	
  dedicated	
  to	
  relieving	
  their	
  
suffering	
  by	
  seeing	
  their	
  life	
  as	
  it	
  is.	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  take	
  much	
  to	
  provide	
  a	
  space	
  for	
  this	
  awakening.	
  And	
  what	
  is	
  it	
  but	
  

                                                                                                  19
pubng	
  their	
  whole	
  lives	
  into	
  it?	
  I	
  could	
  barely	
  make	
  the	
  walk	
  to	
  the	
  prison	
  yard.	
  I	
  thought	
  of	
  skipping	
  it.	
  But	
  this	
  
is	
  one	
  acIvity	
  I	
  truly	
  enjoy.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  stop	
  to	
  sit	
  down	
  whenever	
  I	
  found	
  a	
  place	
  to	
  sit.	
  My	
  team	
  mate,	
  Kristen	
  
offered	
  to	
  get	
  the	
  car	
  and	
  let	
  me	
  sit.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  bench	
  so	
  I	
  sat	
  on	
  the	
  ground.	
  Everyone	
  that	
  passed	
  by	
  offered	
  
their	
  help.	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  place	
  I’ve	
  seen	
  so	
  many	
  people	
  suffer	
  through.	
  I	
  was	
  all	
  spent;	
  I	
  could	
  do	
  nothing	
  but	
  sit	
  on	
  
the	
  sidewalk	
  and	
  wait	
  for	
  help.	
  This	
  place	
  where	
  I	
  am	
  has	
  opened	
  me	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  suffering.	
  How	
  many	
  
people	
  right	
  now	
  are	
  sibng	
  all	
  alone	
  with	
  no	
  one	
  to	
  help	
  them	
  at	
  all?	
  When	
  I	
  was	
  healthy	
  I	
  did	
  what	
  I	
  could	
  but	
  
the	
  truth	
  is	
  I	
  didn’t	
  really	
  understand.	
  My	
  theories	
  were	
  all	
  wrong	
  when	
  seen	
  from	
  the	
  other	
  side.	
  I'm	
  very	
  aware	
  
of	
  how	
  liVle	
  I	
  know	
  of	
  things	
  I	
  haven't	
  experiences.	
  It’s	
  easy	
  to	
  think	
  I	
  know	
  but	
  when	
  I	
  experience	
  something	
  for	
  
myself	
  I’m	
  humbled	
  by	
  how	
  limited	
  my	
  percepIons	
  were.

Now	
  I’ve	
  come	
  to	
  the	
  realizaIon	
  of	
  my	
  path	
  with	
  this	
  disease.	
  I’m	
  done	
  with	
  chemo	
  and	
  will	
  focus	
  on	
  building	
  my	
  
health.	
  I’ll	
  be	
  going	
  to	
  a	
  health	
  spa	
  this	
  summer	
  that	
  specializes	
  in	
  healing	
  the	
  body	
  mind	
  and	
  soul.	
  The	
  diet	
  is	
  
raw	
  food.	
  I	
  have	
  no	
  illusions	
  about	
  what	
  will	
  happen	
  to	
  me.	
  My	
  body	
  has	
  spoken	
  loud	
  and	
  clear.	
  No	
  more	
  harsh	
  
treatments.	
  I’ll	
  go	
  gently	
  when	
  God	
  wants	
  me.	
  UnIl	
  then	
  I’ll	
  do	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  pracIce	
  all	
  that	
  I’ve	
  learned.	
  Life	
  is	
  a	
  
wonderful	
  gi\.	
  Squandering	
  it	
  on	
  greed,	
  anger	
  and	
  ignorance	
  is	
  simply	
  not	
  an	
  opIon	
  for	
  me	
  or	
  for	
  you.	
  God	
  is	
  
Love.	
  There’s	
  no	
  point	
  in	
  separaIng	
  yourself	
  from	
  that.	
  In	
  the	
  end,	
  the	
  only	
  one	
  I	
  am	
  angry	
  with	
  is	
  me.	
  The	
  greed	
  
of	
  withholding	
  separates	
  us	
  from	
  the	
  whole	
  world.	
  The	
  ignorance	
  we	
  bring	
  into	
  every	
  moment	
  is	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  
lifelong	
  condiIoning.	
  Our	
  opinions,	
  likes	
  and	
  dislikes	
  keep	
  us	
  from	
  embracing	
  life	
  as	
  it	
  is.	
  Be	
  aware,	
  awaken.

I’ll	
  leave	
  you	
  with	
  a	
  Zen	
  quote	
  that	
  I	
  learned	
  at	
  the	
  Moon	
  heart	
  Sangha	
  in	
  Miami:

Listen	
  carefully	
  everyone

Great	
  is	
  the	
  maCer	
  of	
  life	
  and	
  death

Time	
  passes	
  swiEly	
  and	
  opportunity	
  is	
  lost

Awaken!	
  Awaken!

Don’t	
  waste	
  your	
  life.

With	
  Loving	
  Kindness

Kevin

LOSS
6/3/8
A	
  year	
  ago	
  a	
  CT	
  Scan	
  found	
  that	
  my	
  cancer	
  had	
  spread	
  to	
  my	
  lungs.	
  A\er	
  two	
  weeks	
  of	
  waiIng	
  I	
  rode	
  my	
  bicycle	
  
to	
  the	
  clinic.	
  The	
  secretary	
  of	
  the	
  oncology	
  department	
  reluctantly	
  gave	
  me	
  the	
  news.	
  She	
  handed	
  me	
  an	
  
envelope	
  and	
  walked	
  away.	
  I	
  read	
  the	
  report	
  and	
  my	
  heart	
  sank.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  have	
  a	
  doctor	
  to	
  explain	
  it	
  to	
  me.	
  The	
  
only	
  words	
  I	
  had	
  were	
  what	
  my	
  oncologist	
  told	
  me	
  a\er	
  the	
  iniIal	
  operaIon	
  some	
  8	
  months	
  earlier.	
  He	
  said	
  I	
  
was	
  Stage	
  2	
  and	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  an	
  85%	
  chance	
  of	
  survival.	
  If	
  it	
  came	
  back	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  he	
  could	
  do	
  for	
  me.	
  With	
  
that	
  informaIon	
  and	
  my	
  report,	
  I	
  lived	
  the	
  next	
  two	
  weeks	
  processing	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  my	
  short	
  life.


                                                                                                20
Soon	
  a\er	
  that	
  I	
  lost	
  everything	
  I	
  loved.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  believe	
  where	
  my	
  life	
  had	
  gone.	
  The	
  day	
  a\er	
  she	
  le\	
  me,	
  I	
  
was	
  told	
  of	
  a	
  coVage	
  that	
  was	
  available	
  in	
  the	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center.	
  I	
  had	
  nothing	
  le\.	
  Every	
  door	
  was	
  closed	
  
and	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  door	
  open.	
  I	
  was	
  sibng	
  in	
  the	
  darkest	
  place	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  been	
  in.	
  I	
  realized	
  then	
  that	
  I’m	
  not	
  a	
  
suicide	
  risk.	
  I’m	
  way	
  too	
  interested	
  in	
  life.	
  In	
  dark	
  Imes	
  faith	
  is	
  all	
  I	
  have.	
  This	
  faith	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  belief.	
  It’s	
  my	
  home.	
  I	
  
know	
  that	
  all	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  conInue	
  to	
  be.	
  There’s	
  no	
  plan,	
  no	
  goal,	
  no	
  way	
  out	
  that	
  my	
  mind	
  can	
  see.	
  I	
  simply	
  
raise	
  my	
  arms	
  to	
  heaven	
  and	
  say,	
  “ Thy	
  will	
  be	
  done”.	
  Reality	
  is	
  all	
  there	
  is.	
  Be	
  with	
  it	
  just	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  and	
  let	
  God	
  do	
  
what	
  God	
  does.	
  My	
  mind	
  spins	
  a	
  tale	
  of	
  what	
  should	
  have	
  been,	
  what	
  should	
  be	
  and	
  how	
  it	
  will	
  all	
  work	
  out.	
  The	
  
pracIce	
  of	
  meditaIon	
  is	
  to	
  let	
  the	
  mind	
  do	
  what	
  the	
  mind	
  does.	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  to	
  take	
  it	
  seriously,	
  but	
  in	
  the	
  dark	
  
places,	
  I	
  listen	
  to	
  my	
  mind	
  all	
  too	
  much.

One	
  year	
  later,	
  the	
  door	
  that	
  closed	
  is	
  sIll	
  closed.	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  back.	
  New	
  doors	
  have	
  opened	
  for	
  me.	
  I	
  
surrender	
  my	
  disease	
  to	
  God.	
  I	
  have	
  nothing	
  more	
  to	
  do	
  with	
  it.	
  It’s	
  none	
  of	
  my	
  business	
  when	
  I	
  die.	
  My	
  focus	
  
now	
  is	
  on	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  The	
  move	
  to	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center	
  was	
  a	
  gi\	
  that	
  enabled	
  me	
  to	
  take	
  refuge.	
  I	
  
have	
  found	
  over	
  the	
  years	
  that	
  love	
  and	
  compassion	
  are	
  everywhere	
  all	
  the	
  Ime.	
  The	
  trick	
  is	
  to	
  stay	
  open	
  at	
  all	
  
Imes.	
  In	
  that	
  way	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  take	
  refuge	
  when	
  the	
  refuge	
  appeared.	
  In	
  our	
  Zen	
  community	
  we	
  pracIce	
  
meditaIon,	
  communal	
  sharing	
  in	
  council,	
  dedicaIon	
  to	
  understanding	
  reality	
  and	
  challenging	
  our	
  concepts	
  
about	
  it.	
  This	
  has	
  opened	
  doors	
  and	
  helped	
  me	
  to	
  walk	
  through	
  them.

So	
  what	
  then	
  is	
  losing?	
  A	
  year	
  ago	
  I	
  felt	
  the	
  pain	
  of	
  being	
  a	
  lonely	
  loser	
  with	
  nothing	
  to	
  show	
  for	
  my	
  life.	
  All	
  the	
  
good	
  was	
  obscured	
  by	
  this	
  view.	
  I	
  saw	
  my	
  life	
  as	
  moving	
  from	
  one	
  trauma	
  to	
  the	
  next.	
  My	
  cancer	
  and	
  shortened	
  
lifespan	
  was	
  a	
  fibng	
  conclusion	
  to	
  a	
  life	
  of	
  conInuous	
  loss.	
  The	
  door	
  that	
  has	
  opened	
  has	
  revealed	
  to	
  me	
  that	
  
loss	
  is	
  reality	
  and	
  gain	
  is	
  an	
  illusion.	
  There	
  are	
  many	
  ways	
  to	
  experience	
  life.	
  I	
  see	
  our	
  ancient	
  twisted	
  karma	
  at	
  
play	
  in	
  everything	
  we	
  do.	
  We	
  raIonalize	
  our	
  life	
  based	
  on	
  success	
  or	
  failure.	
  A	
  good	
  life	
  has	
  certain	
  culturally	
  
defined	
  parameters.	
  He	
  made	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  money.	
  His	
  children	
  are	
  successful.	
  He	
  has	
  a	
  good	
  partnership	
  in	
  a	
  loving	
  
home.	
  This	
  is	
  how	
  we	
  measure	
  the	
  worth	
  of	
  our	
  life.

Look	
  back	
  as	
  far	
  as	
  you	
  can	
  into	
  your	
  family	
  history.	
  I	
  can	
  recall	
  my	
  grandparents	
  and	
  I’ve	
  spent	
  considerable	
  Ime	
  
analyzing	
  the	
  success	
  or	
  failure	
  of	
  their	
  lives	
  and	
  how	
  they	
  impacted	
  my	
  parent’s	
  lives.	
  That	
  in	
  turn	
  influenced	
  my	
  
life.	
  My	
  great	
  grand	
  parents	
  are	
  just	
  imaginary	
  figures.	
  There’s	
  folklore	
  about	
  them	
  but	
  there’s	
  absolutely	
  no	
  
inImacy	
  with	
  them.	
  Our	
  significance	
  to	
  the	
  living	
  gradually	
  fades	
  in	
  about	
  50	
  years	
  a\er	
  our	
  death.	
  We	
  are	
  
reduced	
  to	
  old	
  photos.	
  I	
  suppose	
  in	
  the	
  near	
  future	
  everyone	
  will	
  have	
  a	
  web	
  based	
  memorial	
  site	
  where	
  all	
  the	
  
generaIons	
  can	
  visit	
  and	
  laugh	
  at	
  how	
  quaint	
  we	
  were	
  back	
  then.	
  Our	
  most	
  lasIng	
  legacy	
  is	
  to	
  the	
  ancient	
  
twisted	
  karma	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  people	
  we’ve	
  touched	
  for	
  beVer	
  or	
  worse.	
  The	
  truth	
  is	
  simply	
  that	
  our	
  meat	
  suits	
  don’t	
  
last.	
  We’ll	
  soon	
  fade	
  just	
  as	
  fall	
  leaves	
  turn	
  to	
  soil.	
  What	
  do	
  we	
  gain	
  or	
  lose,	
  how	
  do	
  we	
  really	
  succeed	
  or	
  fail?	
  
When	
  I	
  look	
  deeply	
  into	
  the	
  heart	
  of	
  it,	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  such	
  thing.

One	
  of	
  the	
  doors	
  that	
  opened	
  for	
  me	
  this	
  year	
  is	
  my	
  prison	
  work.	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  blessed	
  with	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  
teach	
  meditaIon	
  to	
  people	
  we	
  have	
  imprisoned	
  to	
  protect	
  us.	
  They	
  have	
  been	
  convicted	
  of	
  crimes	
  and	
  sent	
  to	
  
prison	
  as	
  punishment.	
  All	
  the	
  prisoners	
  in	
  the	
  two	
  groups	
  I’ve	
  come	
  to	
  know	
  have	
  owned	
  up	
  to	
  their	
  past.	
  We	
  
are	
  teaching	
  them	
  about	
  who	
  they	
  are	
  really.	
  They	
  are	
  not	
  criminals;	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  a	
  danger	
  to	
  society.	
  They	
  are	
  
children	
  of	
  God.	
  They	
  are	
  infinitely	
  beauIful.	
  They	
  are	
  worthy	
  of	
  all	
  good	
  things	
  life	
  has	
  to	
  offer.	
  We	
  sit	
  with	
  them	
  
and	
  teach	
  them	
  how	
  to	
  be	
  silent	
  and	
  listen.	
  They	
  are	
  opening	
  to	
  this	
  truth.	
  Some	
  will	
  spend	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  their	
  lives	
  

                                                                                                      21
in	
  prison.	
  Some	
  are	
  looking	
  forward	
  to	
  their	
  release.	
  There’s	
  fear	
  in	
  going	
  out	
  in	
  a	
  world	
  that’s	
  never	
  been	
  kind	
  to	
  
them.	
  Prison	
  seems	
  almost	
  like	
  a	
  safe	
  haven.

In	
  the	
  past	
  two	
  weeks	
  we	
  had	
  our	
  first	
  all	
  day	
  retreats	
  in	
  two	
  of	
  the	
  yards.	
  Each	
  yard	
  is	
  a	
  separate	
  universe	
  in	
  the	
  
prison.	
  They	
  have	
  their	
  own	
  security	
  level	
  and	
  house	
  different	
  classificaIons	
  of	
  prisoners.	
  The	
  first	
  retreat,	
  I	
  was	
  
struck	
  immediately	
  by	
  one	
  prisoner.	
  He	
  had	
  a	
  muIlated	
  mouth	
  caused	
  by	
  a	
  knife	
  wound.	
  His	
  lip	
  had	
  been	
  ripped	
  
open	
  and	
  healed	
  leaving	
  a	
  wider	
  mouth	
  that	
  made	
  it	
  difficult	
  to	
  speak	
  and	
  disfigured	
  his	
  face.	
  We	
  started	
  the	
  
retreat	
  with	
  an	
  opening	
  council	
  where	
  each	
  man	
  was	
  asked	
  to	
  express	
  his	
  intenIon	
  for	
  the	
  day.	
  He	
  said,	
  “I’m	
  
going	
  to	
  enjoy	
  myself	
  today.”	
  What	
  a	
  wonderfully	
  simple	
  expression	
  of	
  intent.	
  I	
  made	
  it	
  my	
  intenIon	
  as	
  well.	
  We	
  
pracIced	
  three	
  forms	
  of	
  Buddhist	
  meditaIon	
  that	
  day.	
  We	
  chanted	
  and	
  sat	
  in	
  silence.	
  We	
  did	
  walking	
  
meditaIon,	
  eaIng	
  meditaIon	
  and	
  council.	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  impressed	
  how	
  they	
  just	
  fell	
  into	
  it.	
  At	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  day	
  we	
  
all	
  were	
  one	
  sangha	
  (spiritual	
  community)	
  just	
  as	
  the	
  Buddha	
  taught	
  2,500	
  years	
  ago.	
  It	
  was	
  apparent	
  that	
  they	
  
all	
  opened	
  their	
  lives	
  to	
  what	
  has	
  always	
  been	
  hidden	
  by	
  their	
  ancient	
  twisted	
  karma.	
  They	
  are	
  on	
  the	
  path	
  of	
  
liberaIon.	
  No	
  prison	
  can	
  hold	
  them,	
  they	
  are	
  free.	
  I	
  felt	
  so	
  blessed	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  this.

The	
  second	
  retreat	
  was	
  as	
  wonderful	
  as	
  the	
  first.	
  One	
  said	
  he	
  felt	
  free	
  in	
  the	
  prison.	
  There	
  were	
  no	
  bills	
  to	
  pay,	
  
no	
  clothes	
  to	
  buy,	
  we	
  are	
  fed	
  and	
  taken	
  care	
  of.	
  He	
  saw	
  the	
  incredible	
  opportunity	
  he	
  had	
  to	
  focus	
  on	
  his	
  life.	
  A	
  
door	
  had	
  opened	
  up	
  to	
  him	
  in	
  the	
  darkest	
  place.	
  We	
  ended	
  both	
  days	
  with	
  a	
  sangha	
  ceremony.	
  We	
  all	
  held	
  onto	
  
a	
  piece	
  of	
  yarn.	
  Then	
  we	
  cut	
  it	
  between	
  each	
  man.	
  This	
  was	
  no	
  small	
  feat.	
  For	
  obvious	
  reasons	
  we	
  could	
  have	
  
nothing	
  to	
  cut	
  with	
  in	
  the	
  prison.	
  We	
  found	
  teeth	
  were	
  about	
  the	
  only	
  thing	
  that	
  worked.	
  A\er	
  we	
  cut	
  all	
  the	
  
pieces,	
  we	
  Ied	
  the	
  yarn	
  to	
  our	
  wrist.	
  It	
  became	
  the	
  symbol	
  of	
  our	
  spiritual	
  community.	
  They	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
  
wonderful	
  gi\.	
  I	
  sIll	
  long	
  for	
  what	
  I’ve	
  lost	
  but	
  I’m	
  now	
  firmly	
  on	
  a	
  path	
  I	
  could	
  never	
  have	
  walked	
  without	
  losing	
  
everything.

We	
  have	
  nothing	
  to	
  lose,	
  ever.	
  Those	
  things	
  we	
  cherish	
  and	
  are	
  afraid	
  to	
  lose	
  mean	
  nothing.	
  Stay	
  open,	
  pay	
  
aVenIon	
  and	
  every	
  morning	
  ask	
  yourself,	
  “What	
  is	
  my	
  intenIon	
  for	
  this	
  day?”	
  The	
  rest	
  is	
  none	
  of	
  your	
  business.

My	
  news	
  is	
  that	
  my	
  chemo	
  was	
  postponed	
  for	
  a	
  week	
  due	
  to	
  low	
  blood	
  platelets.	
  My	
  doctor	
  and	
  nurse	
  wanted	
  
me	
  to	
  take	
  a	
  break	
  but	
  I	
  just	
  want	
  to	
  get	
  the	
  chemo	
  over	
  with.	
  I	
  welcomed	
  the	
  break.	
  My	
  body	
  has	
  been	
  healing	
  
very	
  slowly.	
  Tomorrow	
  I	
  go	
  in	
  for	
  treatment	
  number	
  10	
  of	
  12.	
  It’s	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  salt	
  mines.	
  It’s	
  almost	
  over.	
  I’m	
  
looking	
  forward	
  to	
  gebng	
  my	
  health	
  back.

I	
  want	
  to	
  thank	
  all	
  the	
  people	
  who	
  have	
  been	
  so	
  kind	
  to	
  me.	
  So	
  many	
  of	
  you	
  have	
  come	
  to	
  spend	
  Ime	
  with	
  me.	
  
Many	
  of	
  you	
  are	
  too	
  far	
  away	
  and	
  simply	
  call	
  and	
  express	
  your	
  support.	
  I	
  appreciate	
  all	
  of	
  your	
  efforts.

Love	
  (it’s	
  all	
  you	
  need)	
  Kevin

WALKING
By	
  Kevin	
  Riley
6/8/8

My	
  brother	
  Tommy	
  le\	
  for	
  NY	
  today	
  a\er	
  a	
  5	
  day	
  visit.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  big	
  hit	
  here.	
  The	
  community	
  started	
  a	
  90	
  day	
  
intensive	
  pracIce	
  period	
  just	
  as	
  he	
  arrived.	
  This	
  custom	
  dates	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  Ime	
  of	
  the	
  Buddha,	
  2500	
  years	
  ago.	
  At	
  
that	
  Ime	
  during	
  the	
  dry	
  season,	
  the	
  monks	
  would	
  spread	
  out	
  across	
  the	
  countryside	
  establishing	
  sangha	
  
                                                                                               22
(spiritual	
  community)	
  and	
  teaching.	
  They	
  would	
  live	
  by	
  begging	
  for	
  food	
  and	
  eaIng	
  only	
  what	
  was	
  given.	
  When	
  
the	
  monsoon	
  season	
  came	
  the	
  monks	
  returned	
  to	
  the	
  monastery	
  for	
  intensive	
  meditaIon	
  pracIce	
  and	
  to	
  receive	
  
the	
  teachings	
  of	
  the	
  Buddha.	
  Today	
  there	
  are	
  Buddhist	
  monasteries	
  and	
  training	
  centers	
  all	
  over	
  the	
  country	
  and	
  
the	
  world	
  that	
  follow	
  this	
  pracIce.	
  Tommy	
  joined	
  right	
  into	
  the	
  hours	
  of	
  meditaIon.	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  get	
  him	
  to	
  sit	
  on	
  a	
  
chair	
  but	
  he	
  insisted	
  on	
  sibng	
  with	
  just	
  a	
  small	
  cushion.	
  The	
  whole	
  community	
  felt	
  his	
  warmth	
  and	
  gentle	
  spirit.	
  

Today	
  I	
  am	
  back	
  by	
  myself.	
  The	
  feelings	
  of	
  isolaIon	
  and	
  sickness	
  quickly	
  came	
  to	
  the	
  forefront.	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  service	
  
this	
  morning	
  and	
  then	
  slept	
  all	
  a\ernoon.	
  I	
  have	
  liVle	
  energy.	
  The	
  pain	
  level	
  is	
  not	
  severe.	
  I’m	
  thankful	
  for	
  that.	
  
There’s	
  nothing	
  more	
  to	
  do	
  now	
  that	
  I’m	
  on	
  disability.	
  I	
  can’t	
  believe	
  I	
  held	
  down	
  a	
  full-­‐Ime	
  job	
  just	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  
weeks	
  ago.	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  walk	
  to	
  the	
  nearest	
  supermarket	
  just	
  now	
  and	
  didn’t	
  make	
  it.	
  Being	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  neighborhood	
  
was	
  pleasant.	
  Passing	
  people	
  sibng	
  on	
  their	
  porch	
  or	
  tending	
  their	
  small	
  yards	
  was	
  a	
  welcome	
  break	
  from	
  sleep	
  
and	
  TV.	
  I	
  passed	
  an	
  abundant	
  apricot	
  tree.	
  There	
  were	
  hundreds	
  of	
  the	
  beauIful	
  fruits	
  on	
  this	
  very	
  small	
  tree.	
  I	
  
had	
  to	
  comment	
  to	
  the	
  man	
  that	
  was	
  watering	
  his	
  yard	
  about	
  how	
  magnificent	
  his	
  tree	
  was.	
  He	
  smiled	
  and	
  
thanked	
  me.	
  There	
  is	
  a	
  small	
  fruit	
  store	
  that	
  just	
  opened	
  up	
  around	
  the	
  corner	
  from	
  me.	
  Seisen	
  noIced	
  it	
  and	
  
showed	
  me	
  where	
  it	
  was.	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  spend	
  money	
  there	
  so	
  they	
  thrive.	
  I	
  have	
  plenty	
  of	
  fruit	
  but	
  I	
  stopped	
  in	
  
anyway.	
  Outside	
  there	
  were	
  young	
  men	
  helping	
  out	
  with	
  the	
  loading	
  and	
  unloading.	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  a	
  disheveled	
  
store	
  with	
  fruit	
  boxes	
  everywhere.	
  There	
  were	
  four	
  women	
  around	
  a	
  small	
  table	
  talking	
  and	
  enjoying	
  
themselves.	
  They	
  were	
  delighted	
  to	
  see	
  a	
  customer.	
  A\er	
  perusing	
  the	
  goods	
  I	
  didn’t	
  see	
  anything	
  I	
  wanted.	
  I	
  felt	
  
a	
  need	
  to	
  support	
  the	
  cause.	
  There	
  were	
  two	
  big	
  jugs	
  of	
  drinks	
  with	
  fruit	
  in	
  them.	
  She	
  explained	
  that	
  one	
  was	
  
(&#(@(^$^$.	
  The	
  other	
  was	
  lemonade.	
  Since	
  I	
  didn’t	
  understand	
  what	
  the	
  first	
  one	
  was	
  I	
  asked	
  for	
  the	
  
lemonade.	
  She	
  wanted	
  me	
  to	
  try	
  the	
  other.	
  I	
  finally	
  got	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  cantaloupe	
  drink.	
  She	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
  sample.	
  It	
  
was	
  delicious.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  sugar,	
  just	
  the	
  sweet	
  taste	
  of	
  melon.	
  I	
  asked	
  how	
  much	
  and	
  she	
  said,	
  “For	
  you,	
  $2.”	
  I	
  
replied,	
  “How	
  much	
  for	
  everyone	
  else?”	
  Very	
  smartly	
  she	
  said	
  “$2.50”.	
  I	
  said	
  good-­‐bye	
  and	
  walked	
  halfway	
  to	
  the	
  
grocery	
  store.	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  back	
  I	
  was	
  very	
  grateful	
  for	
  this	
  short	
  Ime	
  of	
  slowly	
  walking.	
  I	
  have	
  no	
  other	
  way	
  to	
  do	
  
it.	
  It	
  gives	
  me	
  the	
  space	
  to	
  noIce	
  and	
  appreciate	
  a	
  beauIful	
  tree.	
  With	
  nothing	
  to	
  accomplish	
  and	
  nothing	
  to	
  
gain,	
  a	
  pleasant	
  walk	
  is	
  just	
  the	
  break	
  I	
  needed.	
  I	
  was	
  Ired	
  by	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  my	
  walk.	
  I	
  appreciated	
  gebng	
  to	
  my	
  
wooden	
  gate	
  and	
  opening	
  it	
  up	
  to	
  my	
  home.	
  When	
  I	
  opened	
  the	
  door	
  the	
  house	
  was	
  warm	
  and	
  waiIng	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  
come	
  in,	
  lie	
  down	
  and	
  relax.

Cleaning	
  House
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  June	
  23,	
  2008

it’s	
  now	
  down	
  the	
  wire.	
  My	
  last	
  treatment	
  is	
  scheduled	
  for	
  July	
  2.	
  I’m	
  feeling	
  beVer	
  right	
  now.	
  I’m	
  closing	
  in	
  on	
  
my	
  High	
  School	
  weight.	
  Now,	
  where	
  did	
  I	
  stash	
  those	
  bell	
  boVoms	
  and	
  that	
  polka	
  dot	
  shirt	
  with	
  the	
  white	
  collar?	
  

Charmaine	
  works	
  for	
  my	
  sister	
  Pat	
  in	
  NYC.	
  She	
  volunteered	
  to	
  come	
  and	
  help	
  me	
  this	
  week.	
  We	
  are	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  
intensive	
  Zen	
  training	
  period	
  in	
  my	
  community.	
  From	
  last	
  Tuesday	
  to	
  Saturday	
  we	
  meditate	
  six	
  hours	
  a	
  day.	
  I	
  
made	
  a	
  commitment	
  to	
  do	
  it	
  and	
  felt	
  some	
  remorse	
  when	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  to	
  leave	
  Charmaine	
  for	
  
that	
  whole	
  Ime.	
  However,	
  that	
  was	
  not	
  the	
  case.	
  Charmaine	
  went	
  right	
  along	
  with	
  it.	
  Without	
  any	
  training	
  or	
  
experience,	
  she	
  sat	
  all	
  that	
  Ime	
  with	
  us.	
  Everyone	
  was	
  just	
  blown	
  away	
  at	
  how	
  easily	
  she	
  sat	
  and	
  maintained	
  
silence	
  the	
  whole	
  Ime.	
  (OK,	
  we	
  talked	
  in	
  the	
  privacy	
  of	
  my	
  home).	
  

Friday	
  was	
  an	
  especially	
  interesIng	
  day.	
  The	
  house	
  I	
  rented	
  to	
  be	
  with	
  my	
  love	
  is	
  now	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  lease.	
  My	
  
son	
  has	
  been	
  living	
  there	
  all	
  year.	
  Now	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  move	
  on.	
  The	
  grieving	
  I’ve	
  been	
  slogging	
  through	
  is	
  now	
  a	
  year	
  
old.	
  Last	
  June	
  was	
  the	
  most	
  difficult	
  month	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  This	
  June	
  I	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  reliving	
  it	
  all.	
  Sibng	
  in	
  meditaIon	
  all	
  
these	
  hours	
  is	
  a	
  big	
  help.	
  The	
  feelings	
  are	
  just	
  feelings	
  and	
  I	
  simply	
  let	
  them	
  come	
  and	
  go.	
  I	
  talked	
  with	
  Seisen	
  
Roshi,	
  the	
  abbot,	
  about	
  what	
  I	
  was	
  going	
  through.	
  Her	
  advice	
  was	
  that	
  grief	
  takes	
  its	
  own	
  Ime	
  and	
  I	
  can’t	
  wish	
  it	
  
to	
  be	
  gone.	
  It’s	
  best	
  to	
  go	
  with	
  it	
  Ill	
  I	
  get	
  to	
  the	
  boVom.	
  On	
  this	
  day	
  it	
  seems	
  boVomless	
  to	
  me.	
  

I	
  had	
  my	
  chemo	
  pump	
  on	
  that	
  day	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  get	
  it	
  taken	
  off	
  in	
  the	
  a\ernoon.	
  I	
  call	
  it	
  liberaIon	
  day.	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  few	
  
                                                                                                   23
hours	
  so	
  I	
  took	
  Charmaine	
  to	
  Balboa	
  Park.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  Japanese	
  Friendship	
  Garden.	
  We	
  seVled	
  in	
  by	
  the	
  
waterfall	
  and	
  Koi	
  Pond.	
  It	
  was	
  very	
  peaceful.	
  Suddenly	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  my	
  daughter	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  be	
  singing	
  at	
  the	
  
Del	
  Mar	
  Fair	
  in	
  about	
  45	
  minutes.	
  It	
  sparked	
  a	
  memory	
  of	
  the	
  last	
  Ime	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  fair	
  back	
  in	
  1993.	
  Jessica	
  
was	
  dancing	
  with	
  her	
  class	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  expected	
  to	
  be	
  there.	
  I	
  was	
  with	
  some	
  friends	
  at	
  a	
  bar	
  and	
  didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  
leave.	
  Finally	
  I	
  knew	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  but	
  I	
  cut	
  it	
  too	
  short	
  and	
  missed	
  the	
  performance.	
  Fi\een	
  years	
  later	
  and	
  I’m	
  
racing	
  to	
  see	
  her,	
  hoping	
  I	
  could	
  make	
  it.	
  Going	
  from	
  the	
  Garden	
  to	
  the	
  car	
  was	
  like	
  watching	
  a	
  turtle	
  race.	
  My	
  
mind	
  was	
  pushing	
  me	
  to	
  move	
  faster	
  but	
  my	
  body	
  just	
  couldn’t	
  do	
  it.	
  Miraculously,	
  we	
  made	
  it	
  on	
  Ime.	
  Jessica’s	
  
mom,	
  Lin	
  was	
  there	
  with	
  her	
  partner,	
  Tom.	
  Many	
  friends	
  were	
  in	
  the	
  audience.	
  Luckily,	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  sunglasses	
  on	
  
because	
  all	
  I	
  could	
  do	
  is	
  cry	
  during	
  most	
  of	
  it.	
  Seeing	
  my	
  daughter	
  singing	
  so	
  beauIfully	
  reminded	
  me	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  
goodness	
  I’ve	
  experienced.	
  The	
  hard	
  stuff	
  sharpens	
  the	
  knife	
  that	
  cuts	
  through	
  to	
  the	
  core	
  of	
  life.	
  My	
  joy	
  and	
  
sadness	
  were	
  all	
  mixed	
  up	
  together.	
  Remembering	
  the	
  seeds	
  that	
  I	
  planted	
  that	
  destroyed	
  my	
  family	
  brought	
  
me	
  to	
  tears.	
  Seeing	
  everyone	
  healed	
  and	
  enjoying	
  their	
  lives	
  revealed	
  that	
  spring	
  is	
  real	
  and	
  that	
  old	
  compost	
  
brings	
  on	
  new	
  life.	
  Nothing	
  is	
  ever	
  lost,	
  everything	
  is	
  always	
  changing.	
  Grief,	
  joy,	
  love,	
  hardship	
  all	
  play	
  
together	
  in	
  the	
  field	
  of	
  reality.	
  I’ll	
  be	
  what	
  is	
  today	
  without	
  resistance.	
  

It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  put	
  my	
  grief	
  aside,	
  at	
  least	
  for	
  this	
  journal.	
  I’ve	
  bored	
  you	
  all	
  enough	
  with	
  my	
  drama.	
  Thanks	
  for	
  
listening	
  and	
  sending	
  me	
  your	
  warm	
  and	
  loving	
  support	
  through	
  it	
  all.	
  

It’s	
  Monday.	
  I’m	
  feeling	
  a	
  lot	
  beVer.	
  I	
  can	
  walk	
  without	
  pain.	
  My	
  tongue	
  is	
  healing	
  and	
  I	
  can	
  eat	
  almost	
  normally.	
  I	
  
can	
  sIll	
  feel	
  the	
  neuropathy	
  taking	
  its	
  toll	
  on	
  my	
  hands	
  and	
  feet.	
  It’s	
  tolerable.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  CT	
  Scan	
  this	
  Friday.	
  The	
  
last	
  one	
  was	
  a	
  disappointment.	
  It	
  showed	
  “stability”.	
  The	
  tumors	
  were	
  shrinking	
  and	
  now	
  they	
  were	
  just	
  stable.	
  
The	
  news	
  felt	
  tragic	
  and	
  hopeless.	
  The	
  doctor	
  said	
  even	
  though	
  the	
  size	
  hadn’t	
  changed	
  there’s	
  no	
  way	
  of	
  
knowing	
  what’s	
  going	
  on	
  inside	
  the	
  tumors.	
  Perhaps	
  the	
  cells	
  are	
  dying.	
  Hope	
  springs.	
  Whatever	
  the	
  outcome,	
  
my	
  plan	
  has	
  not	
  changed.	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  for	
  healthy	
  living.	
  

I	
  want	
  to	
  thank	
  all	
  those	
  that	
  have	
  come	
  to	
  sit	
  with	
  me.	
  It	
  means	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  me.	
  There’s	
  an	
  understanding	
  that	
  
comes	
  with	
  this	
  disease.	
  I	
  know	
  now	
  what	
  it’s	
  like	
  to	
  be	
  on	
  the	
  receiving	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  sorrowful	
  look.	
  All	
  the	
  
healthy	
  folks	
  are	
  seeing	
  their	
  future	
  in	
  my	
  eyes.	
  Everyone	
  pretends	
  I’m	
  not	
  them.	
  In	
  a	
  quiet	
  Ime	
  though,	
  I	
  think	
  
you	
  know	
  the	
  truth.	
  Sit	
  with	
  me,	
  today,	
  as	
  it	
  is.	
  As	
  we	
  sit,	
  we’ll	
  let	
  the	
  knife	
  cut	
  through	
  to	
  the	
  core	
  of	
  the	
  great	
  
mystery.	
  Nothing	
  here	
  to	
  make	
  us	
  sad.


Good-­‐bye	
  Tony	
  Snow
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Thursday,	
  July	
  17,	
  2008

When	
  I	
  was	
  first	
  diagnosed,	
  the	
  shock	
  was	
  unbelievable.	
  Soon	
  a\er	
  that,	
  Tony	
  Snow	
  announced	
  that	
  he	
  had	
  
colon	
  cancer.	
  We	
  followed	
  a	
  similar	
  path.	
  Both	
  our	
  surgeries	
  were	
  “successful”.	
  It	
  was	
  not	
  expected	
  to	
  reappear.	
  
Both	
  of	
  our	
  prognoses	
  were	
  wrong.	
  I	
  watched	
  Tony	
  Snow	
  more	
  carefully	
  from	
  that	
  point	
  on.	
  A\er	
  his	
  first	
  round	
  
he	
  said	
  that	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  this	
  was	
  the	
  best	
  year	
  of	
  his	
  life.	
  He	
  explained	
  how	
  friends	
  and	
  family	
  supported	
  him	
  and	
  
how	
  loved	
  he	
  felt.	
  I	
  shared	
  that	
  as	
  well.	
  It	
  was	
  beauIful	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  have	
  all	
  the	
  people	
  I	
  love	
  around	
  me.	
  They	
  
seemed	
  to	
  come	
  and	
  go	
  so	
  naturally	
  that	
  I	
  didn’t	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  anything	
  to	
  get	
  the	
  support	
  I	
  needed.

I	
  wonder	
  how	
  Tony	
  fared	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  months	
  of	
  his	
  life.	
  This	
  round	
  feels	
  a	
  lot	
  lonelier	
  than	
  the	
  first.	
  It’s	
  not	
  new	
  
anymore.	
  In	
  fact	
  it’s	
  much	
  more	
  serious.	
  In	
  these	
  later	
  years	
  I’ve	
  realized	
  there	
  are	
  rings	
  that	
  comprise	
  our	
  social	
  
network.	
  When	
  I	
  moved	
  to	
  Miami	
  I	
  noIced	
  whenever	
  I	
  returned	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  that	
  there	
  really	
  very	
  few	
  of	
  my	
  
friends	
  le\.	
  Out	
  of	
  sight	
  out	
  of	
  mind.	
  People	
  I	
  thought	
  were	
  forever	
  friends	
  dri\ed	
  off.	
  I	
  have	
  tons	
  of	
  friends	
  from	
  

                                                                                                   24
all	
  parts	
  of	
  my	
  life.	
  However,	
  there	
  are	
  those	
  in	
  the	
  inner	
  circle	
  that	
  I	
  know	
  I	
  can	
  count	
  on.	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  surprise	
  to	
  
see	
  who’s	
  there	
  willingly	
  and	
  who	
  dri\s	
  off	
  into	
  the	
  outer	
  circle	
  out	
  of	
  fear	
  to	
  watch	
  what	
  we	
  chose	
  to	
  ignore.	
  I	
  
pray	
  that	
  Tony’s	
  inner	
  circle	
  held	
  firm.	
  He	
  seemed	
  to	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  energy	
  and	
  vitality.	
  I	
  loved	
  to	
  hear	
  him	
  take	
  
on	
  John	
  Stewart	
  or	
  Bill	
  Maher.	
  He	
  wasn’t	
  an	
  angry	
  talking	
  head.	
  He	
  was	
  passionate	
  in	
  his	
  beliefs	
  and	
  so	
  opImisIc	
  
that	
  I	
  really	
  looked	
  forward	
  to	
  seeing	
  his	
  appearances.	
  I	
  didn't	
  agree	
  with	
  him	
  on	
  most	
  things	
  but	
  I	
  genuinely	
  
loved	
  his	
  presence.	
  Now	
  he’s	
  gone	
  and	
  I’m	
  following	
  in	
  his	
  path.	
  Mine	
  may	
  be	
  shorter	
  or	
  longer	
  but	
  nonetheless	
  I	
  
will	
  never	
  live	
  with	
  confidence	
  of	
  a	
  long	
  life.	
  That’s	
  a	
  blessing	
  to	
  me.	
  Giving	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  expectaIon	
  of	
  longevity	
  
has	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  reality	
  of	
  death.	
  It’s	
  like	
  meeIng	
  a	
  dragon.	
  Once	
  it’s	
  faced	
  up	
  to,	
  it	
  shrinks	
  down	
  to	
  size.	
  
What	
  can	
  I	
  say?	
  Feel	
  it	
  now	
  and	
  get	
  it	
  over	
  with.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  if	
  that’s	
  possible.	
  I	
  thought	
  I	
  knew	
  death.	
  I	
  sIll	
  have	
  
a	
  ways	
  to	
  go.	
  I	
  can	
  sIll	
  fantasize	
  that	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  the	
  miracle	
  story	
  told	
  thirty	
  years	
  from	
  now.	
  Will	
  I	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  sleep	
  
lulled	
  into	
  the	
  trap	
  of	
  making	
  the	
  impermanent	
  permanent?	
  It’s	
  easy	
  to	
  do.

How	
  do	
  I	
  define	
  that	
  inner	
  circle	
  around	
  me?	
  They	
  will	
  be	
  there	
  no	
  maVer	
  what.	
  If	
  a	
  week	
  or	
  two	
  passes	
  there’s	
  a 	
  
shared	
  need	
  to	
  communicate,	
  to	
  check	
  in	
  and	
  make	
  sure	
  that	
  everything	
  is	
  taken	
  care	
  of.	
  I	
  feel	
  the	
  same	
  way	
  
toward	
  them.	
  I	
  would	
  do	
  anything	
  to	
  help.	
  The	
  next	
  circle	
  is	
  strange.	
  It’s	
  filled	
  with	
  people	
  that	
  maybe	
  once	
  were	
  
in	
  the	
  inner	
  circle	
  but	
  dri\ed	
  off	
  for	
  one	
  reason	
  or	
  another.	
  In	
  my	
  case	
  I	
  think	
  it’s	
  the	
  fear	
  of	
  silence.	
  When	
  
someone	
  is	
  dying	
  it	
  takes	
  a	
  willingness	
  to	
  sit	
  without	
  any	
  expectaIon.	
  Some	
  days	
  I	
  have	
  the	
  energy	
  to	
  
parIcipate.	
  Other	
  days	
  I’m	
  simply	
  too	
  Ired	
  to	
  do	
  anything.	
  I’ve	
  appreciated	
  those	
  that	
  come	
  by	
  on	
  a	
  regular	
  
basis.	
  I	
  expect	
  that	
  from	
  family.	
  It’s	
  an	
  unspoken	
  bond	
  that	
  comes	
  with	
  expectaIons.	
  Friends	
  are	
  the	
  volunteers.	
  
I’m	
  blessed	
  with	
  many	
  of	
  them.	
  They	
  stop	
  by	
  or	
  call	
  regularly.	
  They	
  want	
  to	
  be	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  life	
  no	
  maVer	
  what.	
  I	
  
know	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  with	
  my	
  dear	
  friends	
  Bob	
  Kinninger	
  and	
  Bill	
  Scudder.	
  I	
  spent	
  as	
  much	
  Ime	
  with	
  them	
  as	
  possible	
  
as	
  they	
  were	
  dying.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  sense	
  of	
  obligaIon.	
  It	
  was	
  simply	
  my	
  desire	
  to	
  sit	
  with	
  them	
  and	
  break	
  up	
  their	
  
boredom.	
  I	
  wanted	
  them	
  to	
  know	
  that	
  I	
  loved	
  them.	
  Their	
  wants	
  were	
  small	
  and	
  didn’t	
  take	
  much	
  to	
  fulfill.	
  I	
  just	
  
spent	
  my	
  Ime	
  with	
  them	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  I	
  could.	
  I	
  know	
  they	
  appreciated	
  my	
  visits.	
  It	
  can	
  be	
  so	
  lonely	
  to	
  sit	
  with	
  the	
  
impending	
  reality.	
  There’s	
  lots	
  of	
  Ime	
  with	
  nothing	
  to	
  do.	
  Any	
  distracIon	
  is	
  welcome.	
  I’m	
  sIll	
  acIve	
  and	
  don’t	
  
need	
  round	
  the	
  clock	
  visitaIons	
  to	
  help	
  me.	
  I	
  seem	
  to	
  have	
  all	
  the	
  support	
  I	
  need.	
  I’m	
  also	
  beVer	
  at	
  being	
  alone	
  
than	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  in	
  the	
  past.	
  A\er	
  all,	
  there’s	
  nothing	
  missing	
  in	
  the	
  moment	
  except	
  the	
  things	
  I	
  am	
  aVached	
  to.	
  
Release	
  those	
  and	
  I’m	
  never	
  alone.	
  I’m	
  working	
  at	
  it.

There	
  are	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  next	
  circle	
  that	
  I	
  know	
  want	
  to	
  be	
  in	
  the	
  inner	
  circle	
  but	
  they	
  have	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  terms	
  with	
  
death.	
  It’s	
  not	
  easy	
  to	
  see	
  someone	
  fading.	
  These	
  treatments	
  knocked	
  some	
  sense	
  into	
  me	
  that	
  I	
  hadn’t	
  been	
  
able	
  to	
  get	
  before.	
  I’ve	
  always	
  been	
  an	
  energeIc	
  person.	
  Living	
  with	
  no	
  energy	
  takes	
  paIence.	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  do	
  what	
  
I	
  use	
  to	
  able	
  to	
  do.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  dream	
  of	
  healing	
  and	
  I	
  want	
  it	
  to	
  last	
  a	
  long	
  Ime.	
  My	
  daily	
  prayer	
  is	
  to	
  live	
  a	
  long	
  and	
  
healthy	
  life	
  free	
  of	
  cancer	
  and	
  other	
  diseases.	
  The	
  odds	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  doctors	
  are	
  not	
  promising	
  but	
  it’s	
  sIll	
  
my	
  prayer.

My	
  generaIon	
  is	
  moving	
  rapidly	
  into	
  the	
  home	
  stretch.	
  In	
  my	
  quiet	
  Imes,	
  I	
  wonder	
  why	
  we	
  think	
  so	
  much	
  of	
  
longevity.	
  In	
  reconciling	
  with	
  my	
  mortality,	
  I’ve	
  come	
  to	
  appreciate	
  how	
  we	
  all	
  will	
  face	
  this	
  place.	
  There	
  comes	
  a	
  
Ime	
  when	
  it’s	
  over.	
  Everything	
  you	
  dreamed,	
  wanted,	
  feared,	
  loved	
  or	
  worried	
  over	
  all	
  come	
  an	
  end.	
  Where	
  that	
  
big	
  moment	
  is	
  in	
  Ime	
  is	
  so	
  unimportant.	
  My	
  days	
  are	
  simple	
  now.	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  feel	
  good	
  physically	
  and	
  emoIonally.	
  
I’m	
  doing	
  the	
  spiritual	
  work	
  to	
  see	
  clearly	
  into	
  the	
  place	
  where	
  I	
  stand.	
  What	
  Ime	
  is	
  it?	
  I	
  don’t	
  know.	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  
say	
  don’t	
  waste	
  it.	
  Challenge	
  all	
  your	
  fears.	
  It	
  won’t	
  hurt	
  you	
  nearly	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  ignoring	
  them.	
  PracIce	
  freedom.	
  
                                                                                                        25
Let	
  it	
  all	
  go	
  and	
  be	
  you	
  no	
  maVer	
  what	
  the	
  consequences.	
  The	
  consequence	
  of	
  holding	
  onto	
  wounds	
  only	
  makes	
  
them	
  grow.	
  They	
  won’t	
  hurt	
  you,	
  they’re	
  here	
  to	
  teach	
  you.	
  Forgive,	
  love,	
  be	
  paIent	
  and	
  pracIce	
  loving	
  
kindness.	
  What	
  else	
  maVers?	
  Do	
  I	
  really	
  need	
  what	
  I’m	
  carrying	
  around?

Thanks	
  for	
  taking	
  to	
  Ime	
  to	
  read	
  my	
  liVle	
  diatribes.	
  I	
  enjoy	
  wriIng	
  to	
  you	
  and	
  that’s	
  why	
  I	
  do	
  it.	
  Some	
  have	
  told	
  
me	
  they	
  enjoy	
  it	
  too.	
  If	
  you	
  don’t	
  enjoy	
  it,	
  why	
  are	
  you	
  reading	
  this?	
  I	
  feel	
  a	
  need	
  to	
  describe	
  what	
  I’m	
  going	
  
through.	
  That	
  may	
  be	
  of	
  some	
  interest	
  as	
  someday	
  you	
  will	
  be	
  here.	
  Perhaps	
  you’ve	
  already	
  tasted	
  it	
  and	
  
survived	
  the	
  experience.	
  I	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  be	
  depressing	
  to	
  anyone.	
  There’s	
  another	
  way	
  read	
  this.	
  Maybe	
  as	
  your	
  
day	
  progresses	
  you’ll	
  take	
  a	
  moment	
  to	
  express	
  graItude	
  for	
  your	
  healthy	
  day.	
  Today,	
  look	
  at	
  all	
  that	
  you	
  are	
  
taking	
  for	
  granted.	
  This	
  is	
  your	
  life,	
  don’t	
  miss	
  it.


So	
  much	
  done	
  on	
  my	
  behalf
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Friday,	
  July	
  25,	
  2008

My	
  treatment	
  is	
  officially	
  over	
  today.	
  I	
  take	
  the	
  last	
  of	
  the	
  trial	
  drug.	
  My	
  side	
  effects	
  are	
  sIll	
  with	
  me.	
  My	
  buV	
  is	
  
sore	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  lube	
  it	
  up	
  like	
  an	
  old	
  axle.	
  Diarrhea	
  is	
  my	
  constant	
  companion.	
  Today	
  I	
  physically	
  fell	
  apart	
  with	
  
digesIve	
  turmoil.	
  The	
  neuropathy	
  (numbness	
  due	
  to	
  nerve	
  damage	
  caused	
  by	
  the	
  chemo)	
  is	
  sIll	
  very	
  much	
  
present	
  in	
  my	
  fingers	
  and	
  feet.	
  Thankfully	
  my	
  tongue	
  is	
  healing.	
  I	
  can	
  taste	
  again.	
  A	
  few	
  weeks	
  ago	
  I	
  made	
  a	
  pasta 	
  
primavera	
  sauce.	
  I	
  tried	
  it	
  and	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  eat	
  it.	
  I	
  gave	
  it	
  away	
  to	
  a	
  young	
  man,	
  David,	
  who	
  lives	
  in	
  my	
  Zen	
  
community.	
  I	
  remember	
  being	
  his	
  age	
  and	
  taking	
  whatever	
  was	
  given	
  gratefully.	
  He	
  really	
  loved	
  it	
  and	
  asked	
  for	
  
the	
  recipe.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  believe	
  it.	
  It	
  tasted	
  like	
  crap	
  when	
  I	
  ate	
  it.	
  How’s	
  that	
  for	
  a	
  generous	
  gi\?	
  “I	
  made	
  this	
  
crappy	
  sauce,	
  you	
  want	
  it?”	
  Hey,	
  what	
  do	
  you	
  know,	
  Mikey	
  likes	
  it!	
  Now	
  my	
  taste	
  buds	
  are	
  coming	
  back	
  and	
  I’m	
  
enjoying	
  some	
  foods	
  again.

I’ve	
  been	
  wriIng	
  on	
  this	
  site	
  for	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  now.	
  I	
  look	
  at	
  the	
  well	
  wishes	
  and	
  I’ve	
  been	
  disappointed	
  at	
  how	
  few	
  
there	
  were.	
  My	
  sister,	
  Anne,	
  said	
  “wasn’t	
  that	
  nice	
  of	
  Joe	
  to	
  offer	
  a	
  paragliding	
  ride.”	
  I	
  never	
  saw	
  that	
  at	
  all.	
  I	
  
looked	
  again	
  at	
  the	
  well	
  wishes	
  secIon	
  and	
  there	
  was	
  nothing.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  short	
  term	
  roommate	
  for	
  the	
  Zen	
  retreat,	
  
Tina,	
  and	
  told	
  her	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
  I’m	
  missing	
  something.	
  She	
  said,	
  “Do	
  you	
  review	
  the	
  comments?”	
  I	
  didn’t	
  know	
  what	
  
she	
  was	
  talking	
  about.	
  Then	
  I	
  saw	
  at	
  the	
  boVom	
  of	
  my	
  posIngs	
  there’s	
  a	
  “view	
  comment”	
  link	
  I	
  just	
  skipped	
  right	
  
over.	
  I	
  opened	
  them	
  all	
  up	
  and	
  was	
  so	
  moved	
  by	
  all	
  your	
  posIngs.	
  What	
  a	
  wonderful	
  teaching.	
  Here	
  are	
  all	
  these	
  
hearXelt	
  expressions	
  of	
  love	
  right	
  under	
  my	
  nose	
  and	
  I	
  never	
  saw	
  them.	
  Thank	
  you	
  for	
  all	
  of	
  your	
  kind	
  words.	
  
They	
  just	
  reached	
  down	
  from	
  heaven	
  and	
  li\ed	
  me	
  up.	
  You	
  are	
  all	
  so	
  generous	
  with	
  me.

Today	
  is	
  our	
  monthly	
  Day	
  of	
  ReflecIon.	
  We	
  take	
  a	
  Buddhist	
  precept	
  and	
  delve	
  into	
  it.	
  This	
  month	
  we	
  focused	
  on	
  
one	
  that	
  says:	
  Realize	
  self	
  and	
  other	
  as	
  one;	
  Do	
  not	
  elevate	
  the	
  self	
  and	
  blame	
  others.	
  We	
  started	
  an	
  intensive	
  
Zen	
  retreat	
  on	
  Tuesday.	
  It	
  ends	
  this	
  Sunday.	
  We	
  vow	
  to	
  maintain	
  silence	
  and	
  follow	
  the	
  schedule	
  that	
  includes	
  six	
  
hours	
  of	
  meditaIon	
  a	
  day.	
  No	
  sooner	
  had	
  it	
  started	
  than	
  I	
  opened	
  my	
  email	
  to	
  see	
  if	
  anything	
  “important”	
  was	
  
there.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  write	
  an	
  email	
  to	
  my	
  insurance	
  agent	
  who	
  owed	
  me	
  a	
  check.	
  There,	
  that’s	
  a	
  good	
  reason	
  to	
  break	
  
my	
  vow.	
  I	
  sent	
  it	
  off	
  and	
  within	
  one	
  second	
  I	
  received	
  an	
  email	
  saying	
  it	
  has	
  all	
  been	
  resolved.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  need	
  
to	
  get	
  into	
  my	
  email	
  at	
  all.	
  But	
  did	
  I	
  stop	
  there?	
  Of	
  course	
  not.	
  I	
  opened	
  an	
  email	
  from	
  a	
  friend	
  of	
  mine.	
  He	
  put	
  
out	
  this	
  anI	
  global	
  warming	
  missive	
  that’s	
  been	
  going	
  around	
  the	
  internet.	
  Well	
  this	
  was	
  a	
  perfect	
  opportunity	
  to	
  
elevate	
  myself	
  if	
  I	
  ever	
  saw	
  one.	
  I	
  could	
  even	
  blame	
  others	
  in	
  a	
  self	
  righteous	
  flurry	
  of	
  logic	
  and	
  passion.	
  Off	
  I	
  
went	
  with	
  my	
  very	
  important	
  opinions	
  that	
  would	
  surely	
  change	
  everyone’s	
  minds.	
  The	
  back	
  and	
  forth	
  went	
  on	
  

                                                                                                  26
for	
  a	
  day	
  or	
  two	
  and	
  then	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  stop.	
  My	
  mind	
  was	
  anywhere	
  but	
  on	
  my	
  true	
  nature.	
  Instead	
  I	
  was	
  dreaming	
  
up	
  the	
  perfect	
  rebuVal	
  to	
  bring	
  those	
  I	
  blamed	
  to	
  their	
  knees.	
  Of	
  course,	
  that	
  never	
  happens.	
  Instead,	
  it’s	
  just	
  
another	
  way	
  to	
  separate	
  myself	
  from	
  others.	
  In	
  this	
  case	
  it	
  was	
  people	
  I	
  consider	
  friends.	
  Once	
  I	
  let	
  it	
  go	
  I	
  could	
  
see	
  the	
  damage	
  I	
  had	
  done.	
  It	
  was	
  not	
  necessarily	
  to	
  anyone	
  I	
  wrote	
  to.	
  They	
  may	
  have	
  been	
  hurt	
  or	
  insulted,	
  I	
  
don’t	
  know.	
  I	
  do	
  know	
  what	
  it	
  did	
  to	
  me.	
  My	
  mind	
  was	
  full	
  of	
  passion	
  and	
  righteousness.	
  All	
  this	
  serves	
  is	
  to	
  take	
  
me	
  away	
  from	
  me.	
  The	
  best	
  thing	
  about	
  a	
  meditaIon	
  retreat	
  is	
  that	
  there’s	
  no	
  escape	
  from	
  reality.	
  I	
  could	
  
witness	
  myself	
  doing	
  this	
  damage.	
  Delving	
  into	
  self	
  examinaIon	
  I	
  could	
  see	
  the	
  moIvaIon	
  behind	
  my	
  acIon.	
  I	
  
realized	
  there	
  was	
  just	
  one	
  thing	
  to	
  do.	
  Stop!	
  So	
  I	
  did.	
  I	
  returned	
  to	
  my	
  breath	
  and	
  listened	
  to	
  my	
  heart.	
  My	
  life	
  
slowed	
  down	
  again	
  and	
  I	
  resumed	
  my	
  spiritual	
  pracIce.	
  Forgive	
  me;	
  I	
  know	
  not	
  what	
  I	
  do.	
  The	
  wonderful	
  thing	
  
about	
  all	
  this	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  only	
  thing	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  remember	
  when	
  we	
  do	
  our	
  liVle	
  insaniIes	
  is	
  to	
  stop	
  and	
  return	
  to	
  
our	
  breath.	
  We	
  live	
  on	
  a	
  Iny	
  island	
  surrounded	
  by	
  a	
  vast	
  ocean	
  of	
  grace.	
  All	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  see	
  where	
  we	
  are.	
  
The	
  rest	
  is	
  taken	
  care	
  of.	
  The	
  quesIon	
  is	
  do	
  we	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  stop.	
  I	
  am	
  deeply	
  grateful	
  for	
  my	
  spiritual	
  pracIce.	
  
I’m	
  just	
  as	
  nuts	
  as	
  I	
  ever	
  was	
  but	
  I	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  stop.	
  I	
  have	
  created	
  a	
  refuge	
  within	
  me	
  to	
  access	
  this	
  ocean	
  that	
  
surrounds	
  us	
  all.	
  It	
  is,	
  a\er	
  all,	
  all	
  of	
  us.	
  How	
  blind	
  can	
  we	
  be	
  not	
  to	
  see	
  it?	
  When	
  I’m	
  all	
  wrapped	
  up	
  in	
  my	
  pain	
  
and	
  drama,	
  my	
  Iny	
  island	
  appears	
  like	
  the	
  whole	
  world	
  to	
  me.	
  I	
  eventually	
  find	
  my	
  refuge.	
  I	
  stop	
  dead	
  in	
  my	
  
tracks,	
  return	
  to	
  my	
  breath	
  and	
  realize	
  who	
  I	
  am.	
  All	
  that	
  bothers	
  me	
  comes	
  and	
  goes.	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  to	
  be	
  it.	
  What	
  
a	
  treasure!

Every	
  Sunday	
  morning	
  we	
  do	
  a	
  ritual	
  service	
  called	
  “the	
  Gate	
  of	
  Sweet	
  Nectar”.	
  I	
  get	
  choked	
  up	
  every	
  Ime	
  we	
  
come	
  to	
  the	
  ending	
  that	
  my	
  voice	
  cracks.	
  We	
  recite	
  “By	
  this	
  prac:ce	
  I	
  sincerely	
  wish	
  to	
  extend	
  all	
  my	
  love	
  to	
  my	
  
own	
  being,	
  friends,	
  enemies,	
  family	
  and	
  community,	
  and	
  to	
  all	
  crea:ons	
  for	
  so	
  much	
  done	
  on	
  my	
  behalf.”	
  The	
  
emoIon	
  I	
  feel	
  is	
  recogniIon	
  of	
  everyone	
  that	
  has	
  helped	
  me	
  through	
  this	
  and	
  my	
  enIre	
  life.	
  I	
  feel	
  so	
  blessed.	
  To	
  
be	
  truthful,	
  I	
  grew	
  up	
  harshly	
  and	
  thought	
  the	
  world	
  was	
  anything	
  but	
  kind.	
  I	
  believed	
  that	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  survive	
  I	
  
had	
  to	
  be	
  careful	
  with	
  other	
  people.	
  Some	
  were	
  trusted	
  friends	
  but	
  many	
  were	
  threatening	
  to	
  me.	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  
anxious	
  that	
  things	
  would	
  not	
  work	
  out.	
  I	
  was	
  afraid	
  of	
  failure	
  and	
  humiliaIon.	
  I	
  worked	
  extra	
  hard	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  
that	
  didn’t	
  happen.	
  I	
  treated	
  some	
  people	
  favorably	
  that	
  I	
  thought	
  could	
  help	
  my	
  success	
  even	
  though	
  I	
  didn’t	
  
really	
  like	
  them.

A\er	
  two	
  years	
  of	
  my	
  health	
  struggle	
  I’ve	
  come	
  to	
  learn	
  the	
  world	
  is	
  kind.	
  There	
  is	
  so	
  much	
  done	
  on	
  my	
  behalf,	
  
all	
  the	
  Ime.	
  It	
  was	
  always	
  there.	
  At	
  Imes	
  I	
  appreciated	
  my	
  life	
  and	
  those	
  that	
  helped	
  me.	
  However,	
  I	
  always	
  
feared	
  it	
  could	
  be	
  taken	
  away.	
  Over	
  this	
  year	
  I’ve	
  learned	
  to	
  trust	
  the	
  world.	
  Ironic	
  isn’t	
  it?	
  Just	
  as	
  it’s	
  about	
  to	
  
end,	
  I	
  get	
  it.	
  My	
  teacher	
  at	
  Yokoji,	
  Tenshin,	
  always	
  told	
  me,	
  “ Trust	
  the	
  Dharma.”	
  The	
  dharma	
  is	
  true	
  reality,	
  just	
  as	
  
it	
  is.	
  Trust	
  that	
  reality.	
  Open	
  to	
  it.	
  Don’t	
  resist	
  it.	
  Let	
  it	
  teach	
  you.	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  fear	
  in	
  its	
  warm	
  embrace.	
  Of	
  
course	
  he	
  usually	
  said	
  that	
  when	
  I	
  didn’t	
  trust	
  the	
  Dharma	
  and	
  was	
  walking	
  around	
  in	
  the	
  paradise	
  of	
  this	
  
wonderful	
  mountain	
  retreat	
  with	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  impending	
  doom.	
  All	
  around	
  me	
  was	
  the	
  splendor	
  of	
  nature	
  and	
  I	
  
was	
  worried	
  about	
  going	
  broke	
  or	
  losing	
  in	
  some	
  way.	
  Trust	
  the	
  Dharma	
  right	
  where	
  you	
  are.	
  Take	
  one	
  step	
  at	
  a	
  
Ime	
  and	
  the	
  whole	
  world	
  is	
  yours.	
  At	
  this	
  Ime	
  when	
  most	
  people	
  look	
  at	
  me	
  as	
  being	
  in	
  crisis,	
  I’m	
  in	
  heaven.	
  I’m	
  
in	
  heaven	
  even	
  in	
  my	
  pain,	
  emoIonal	
  or	
  physical.	
  I	
  see	
  it	
  can’t	
  hurt	
  me	
  really.	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  hurt	
  myself	
  by	
  taking	
  it	
  
too	
  seriously,	
  believing	
  it’s	
  all	
  permanent	
  and	
  unchangeable.	
  Everything	
  changes	
  and	
  all	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  watch	
  it.	
  
SomeImes	
  I	
  feel	
  no	
  pain	
  and	
  then	
  there	
  is	
  pain.	
  SomeImes	
  I	
  cry	
  for	
  my	
  love	
  long	
  gone,	
  then	
  that	
  goes	
  away.	
  The	
  
next	
  moment	
  I’m	
  in	
  incredible	
  joy	
  over	
  something	
  beauIful	
  I’ve	
  noIced.	
  Then	
  it	
  changes	
  again.	
  In	
  and	
  out	
  it	
  
goes.	
  SIll	
  I	
  walk	
  one	
  foot	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  the	
  other.	
  Each	
  moment	
  I	
  breathe	
  in	
  and	
  then	
  I	
  breathe	
  out.	
  It’s	
  all	
  very	
  
                                                                                                    27
simple.

	
  I’ll	
  leave	
  you	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  favorite	
  Zen	
  quotes	
  from	
  Shih-­‐shu	
  in	
  the	
  17th	
  Century.

Study	
  the	
  Way	
  and	
  never	
  grow	
  old

Distrust	
  emo:ons;	
  truth	
  will	
  emerge

Sweep	
  away	
  your	
  worries,	
  set	
  even	
  your	
  body	
  aside

Autumn	
  drives	
  off	
  the	
  yellow	
  leaves

Yet	
  spring	
  renews	
  every	
  green	
  bud

Quietly	
  contemplate	
  the	
  paCern	
  of	
  things

Nothing	
  here	
  to	
  make	
  us	
  sad.

Please	
  appreciate	
  your	
  life,	
  one	
  step	
  at	
  a	
  Ime.

I	
  love	
  you	
  all,	
  Kevin

The	
  Jewel
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  September	
  9,	
  2008

The	
  ninety	
  day	
  training	
  period	
  at	
  the	
  Zen	
  Center	
  ended	
  the	
  day	
  I	
  entered	
  the	
  OpImum	
  Health	
  InsItute	
  (OHI).	
  	
  
The	
  training	
  period	
  culminated	
  in	
  an	
  elaborate	
  ceremony.	
  	
  The	
  Head	
  Trainee	
  who	
  led	
  us	
  throughout	
  the	
  ninety	
  
days	
  had	
  to	
  face	
  the	
  sangha	
  (congregaIon)	
  in	
  “Dharma	
  Combat”.	
  	
  During	
  the	
  ceremony	
  he	
  has	
  to	
  answer	
  
quesIons	
  from	
  the	
  audience	
  about	
  a	
  koan	
  he	
  has	
  studied.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  an	
  old	
  Japanese	
  tradiIon	
  and	
  everyone	
  had	
  a	
  
great	
  Ime.	
  	
  A\er	
  this	
  long	
  period	
  of	
  intensive	
  meditaIon	
  I	
  was	
  struck	
  with	
  an	
  odd	
  mix	
  of	
  relief	
  and	
  sadness.	
  	
  I	
  
enjoyed	
  the	
  structure	
  and	
  consistency	
  of	
  the	
  daily	
  rouIne.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  Ime	
  I	
  had	
  the	
  opportunity	
  to	
  just	
  sit	
  
with	
  myself	
  for	
  a	
  long	
  period	
  without	
  any	
  worries.	
  	
  That’s	
  a	
  strange	
  comment	
  given	
  that	
  most	
  of	
  it	
  was	
  done	
  
under	
  chemo.	
  	
  I	
  suffered	
  through	
  the	
  side	
  effects	
  but	
  I	
  was	
  never	
  worried.	
  	
  How	
  amazing	
  is	
  that?
	
  
I’ve	
  been	
  on	
  a	
  food	
  vacaIon	
  since	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  my	
  chemo.	
  	
  My	
  tongue	
  came	
  back	
  to	
  life	
  and	
  I	
  intended	
  to	
  use	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  
ate	
  what	
  I	
  wanted	
  when	
  I	
  wanted.	
  	
  As	
  the	
  Ime	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  OHI	
  drew	
  near	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  pack	
  in	
  every	
  treat	
  I	
  could	
  
imagine.	
  	
  My	
  final	
  stop	
  was	
  the	
  best	
  taco	
  shop	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  eaten	
  in,	
  Taco	
  el	
  Gordo.	
  They	
  were	
  the	
  real	
  thing.	
  	
  At	
  OHI	
  
they	
  call	
  that	
  “ The	
  Last	
  Supper	
  Syndrome”.	
  	
  This	
  transiIon	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  be	
  hard.	
  	
  	
  	
  
	
  
I’ve	
  just	
  completed	
  my	
  second	
  week	
  at	
  OHI.	
  	
  The	
  program	
  is	
  a	
  deep	
  immersion	
  into	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  healing	
  body,	
  
mind	
  and	
  spirit.	
  	
  They	
  teach	
  how	
  to	
  maintain	
  a	
  raw	
  food	
  diet	
  for	
  the	
  body,	
  posiIve	
  thought	
  paVerns	
  for	
  the	
  mind	
  
and	
  various	
  means	
  of	
  meditaIon	
  and	
  prayer	
  for	
  the	
  spirit.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  incredible.	
  	
  The	
  path	
  to	
  this	
  place	
  has	
  been	
  a 	
  
long	
  one.	
  	
  I	
  know	
  from	
  my	
  heart	
  that	
  I	
  am	
  on	
  the	
  road	
  to	
  healing.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  necessarily	
  physical	
  healing;	
  it’s	
  
                                                                                                  28
coming	
  to	
  peace	
  with	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  	
  I	
  would	
  love	
  nothing	
  more	
  than	
  to	
  add	
  my	
  name	
  to	
  the	
  long	
  list	
  of	
  miraculous	
  
healings	
  experienced	
  by	
  pracIcing	
  this	
  method.	
  	
  However,	
  my	
  single	
  minded	
  intenIon	
  is	
  to	
  live	
  each	
  moment	
  as	
  
a	
  healer	
  and	
  let	
  God	
  figure	
  out	
  the	
  rest.	
  	
  It’s	
  truly	
  none	
  of	
  my	
  business	
  what	
  happens	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  What	
  I	
  do	
  with	
  
what	
  happens	
  in	
  my	
  life	
  is	
  ALL	
  of	
  my	
  business.
	
  
Seisen	
  (the	
  abbot	
  of	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center	
  and	
  veteran	
  of	
  OHI)	
  warned	
  me	
  about	
  how	
  difficult	
  the	
  diet	
  was	
  in	
  
the	
  beginning.	
  	
  	
  She	
  lowered	
  my	
  expectaIons	
  so	
  much	
  that	
  now	
  that	
  I’m	
  here	
  I	
  found	
  it	
  much	
  easier	
  than	
  she	
  let	
  
on.	
  	
  She’s	
  very	
  skillful.	
  	
  To	
  my	
  surprise	
  I’ve	
  goVen	
  used	
  to	
  the	
  food	
  and	
  now	
  even	
  look	
  forward	
  to	
  it.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  all	
  so	
  
fresh	
  and	
  creaIvely	
  prepared.	
  	
  The	
  nutriIon	
  program	
  was	
  only	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  it.	
  	
  The	
  mind	
  and	
  spirit	
  healing	
  created	
  
an	
  atmosphere	
  of	
  fellowship,	
  mutual	
  support	
  and	
  inImacy	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  guests.	
  	
  We	
  became	
  a	
  close	
  knit	
  
community	
  of	
  posiIve	
  energy	
  that	
  was	
  someImes	
  overwhelming.	
  
	
  
Like	
  never	
  before	
  I	
  feel	
  awakened	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  toxicity	
  in	
  our	
  food,	
  our	
  environment,	
  our	
  thinking,	
  our	
  
entertainment	
  and	
  you	
  name	
  it.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  a	
  choice	
  to	
  turn	
  that	
  around	
  but	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  commitment	
  to	
  
that	
  change.	
  	
  Once	
  we	
  make	
  it,	
  a	
  world	
  of	
  healing	
  energy	
  is	
  waiIng	
  there	
  for	
  us.	
  	
  This	
  energy	
  can	
  heal	
  our	
  lives,	
  
our	
  family,	
  and	
  our	
  world.
	
  It	
  reminds	
  me	
  of	
  a	
  story	
  in	
  the	
  Lotus	
  Sutra.	
  	
  There	
  once	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  wealthy	
  man.	
  	
  His	
  best	
  friend	
  in	
  the	
  en:re	
  
world	
  was	
  very	
  poor.	
  He	
  travelled	
  around	
  with	
  only	
  the	
  clothes	
  on	
  his	
  back.	
  	
  The	
  wealthy	
  man	
  could	
  easily	
  have	
  
taken	
  him	
  under	
  his	
  wing	
  and	
  supported	
  him	
  in	
  a	
  grand	
  lifestyle.	
  	
  	
  However,	
  the	
  poor	
  man	
  was	
  too	
  proud	
  to	
  
accept	
  such	
  an	
  offer.	
  	
  The	
  poor	
  man	
  was	
  about	
  to	
  go	
  on	
  a	
  journey	
  in	
  search	
  of	
  work.	
  	
  The	
  night	
  before	
  he	
  leE	
  he	
  
stayed	
  with	
  his	
  rich	
  friend.	
  	
  The	
  wealthy	
  man	
  was	
  beside	
  himself	
  with	
  pain	
  seeing	
  his	
  best	
  friend	
  suffer	
  from	
  
poverty.	
  	
  He	
  felt	
  helpless.	
  	
  Then	
  he	
  came	
  on	
  an	
  idea.	
  	
  He	
  took	
  a	
  large,	
  precious	
  jewel	
  from	
  his	
  collec:on	
  and	
  
sowed	
  it	
  into	
  a	
  nice	
  new	
  robe	
  to	
  conceal	
  it.	
  	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  he	
  gave	
  the	
  robe	
  to	
  his	
  friend	
  as	
  a	
  going	
  away	
  giE.	
  	
  He	
  
figured	
  that	
  aEer	
  he	
  was	
  well	
  on	
  his	
  way	
  he	
  was	
  sure	
  to	
  discover	
  the	
  jewel	
  and	
  would	
  use	
  it	
  to	
  provide	
  for	
  all	
  his	
  
needs.	
  	
  With	
  that	
  done,	
  the	
  wealthy	
  man	
  was	
  content	
  that	
  he	
  had	
  taken	
  good	
  care	
  of	
  his	
  friend.	
  	
  	
  Years	
  went	
  by	
  
before	
  his	
  friend	
  returned.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  wearing	
  the	
  same	
  robe	
  he	
  received	
  when	
  he	
  leE	
  but	
  it	
  was	
  now	
  old	
  and	
  
taCered.	
  	
  The	
  wealthy	
  man	
  was	
  so	
  shocked	
  to	
  see	
  his	
  old	
  friend	
  s:ll	
  poor.	
  	
  He	
  asked	
  him,	
  “didn’t	
  you	
  find	
  the	
  
jewel	
  in	
  your	
  robe?”	
  	
  It	
  was	
  s:ll	
  there	
  hidden	
  just	
  where	
  his	
  friend	
  had	
  hidden	
  it.	
  	
  
Our	
  life	
  is	
  that	
  jewel.	
  	
  A	
  narrow	
  mind	
  keeps	
  us	
  from	
  finding	
  what	
  is	
  hidden	
  under	
  the	
  thin	
  cloth	
  of	
  the	
  robe.	
  	
  
There	
  were	
  many	
  Imes	
  when	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  that	
  poor	
  man,	
  given	
  a	
  precious	
  gi\	
  but	
  unable	
  to	
  find	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  mean	
  to	
  
sound	
  negaIve.	
  I	
  appreciate	
  my	
  life	
  so	
  much.	
  	
  As	
  we	
  all	
  struggle	
  to	
  find	
  our	
  true	
  selves,	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  God	
  within,	
  
we	
  have	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  illusion	
  of	
  everything	
  we	
  fear.	
  	
  Our	
  anger,	
  clinging,	
  judgments	
  of	
  others,	
  sInginess,	
  negaIve	
  
thoughts	
  all	
  must	
  be	
  illuminated	
  to	
  stay	
  on	
  the	
  path.	
  	
  Without	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  blindly	
  following	
  our	
  ancient	
  twisted	
  
karma.	
  	
  We	
  react	
  from	
  what	
  our	
  culture,	
  friends,	
  parents,	
  siblings	
  have	
  unconsciously	
  taught	
  us.	
  	
  It	
  leads	
  us	
  like	
  
zombies	
  to	
  react	
  without	
  thinking.
	
  
The	
  second	
  week	
  at	
  OHI	
  a	
  whole	
  new	
  batch	
  of	
  people	
  arrives	
  and	
  I	
  became	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  in	
  the	
  know.	
  	
  I	
  did	
  my	
  
                                                                                                     29
best	
  to	
  greet	
  as	
  many	
  people	
  as	
  possible.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  one	
  man	
  that	
  looked	
  like	
  he	
  had	
  a	
  cloud	
  over	
  his	
  head.	
  	
  
Everything	
  about	
  him	
  had	
  this	
  air	
  of	
  negaIvity.	
  	
  I	
  introduced	
  myself	
  and	
  was	
  courteous.	
  	
  However,	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  
drawn	
  to	
  engage	
  him.	
  	
  In	
  every	
  encounter	
  with	
  him	
  during	
  the	
  week	
  he	
  was	
  criIcal	
  of	
  something.	
  	
  On	
  Friday	
  
night	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  talent	
  show.	
  	
  I	
  volunteered	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  MC.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  an	
  incredibly	
  upli\ing	
  experience.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  with	
  
my	
  humor,	
  the	
  acts	
  were	
  just	
  superb	
  and	
  the	
  audience	
  had	
  a	
  blast!	
  	
  Everyone	
  was	
  so	
  complimentary	
  I	
  was	
  awash	
  
in	
  false	
  modesty.	
  	
  In	
  other	
  words,	
  I	
  was	
  soaking	
  it	
  up.	
  	
  As	
  I	
  was	
  perusing	
  the	
  grounds	
  this	
  man	
  called	
  me	
  over	
  to	
  
tell	
  me	
  how	
  bad	
  the	
  show	
  was.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  too	
  long;	
  we	
  should	
  have	
  had	
  an	
  intermission.	
  It	
  was	
  torture	
  for	
  him.	
  	
  He	
  
just	
  sucked	
  the	
  life	
  out	
  of	
  me.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  so	
  long	
  since	
  I’ve	
  been	
  around	
  this	
  energy.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  lunchIme	
  and	
  I	
  knew	
  I	
  
had	
  to	
  take	
  it	
  out	
  to	
  the	
  garden	
  and	
  “just	
  eat”.	
  	
  Alone	
  I	
  ate	
  while	
  my	
  mind	
  swirling	
  around	
  the	
  experience	
  of	
  this	
  
man.	
  	
  In	
  my	
  head	
  I	
  know	
  that	
  hate	
  never	
  dispels	
  hate	
  but	
  there	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  hatred.	
  	
  I’m	
  so	
  glad	
  I	
  was	
  alone.	
  	
  Slowly	
  
eaIng	
  and	
  being	
  around	
  the	
  plants	
  and	
  the	
  bugs	
  I	
  munched	
  on	
  a	
  very	
  good	
  lunch.	
  	
  My	
  mind	
  quieted.	
  	
  At	
  the	
  end	
  
there	
  were	
  two	
  flies	
  sibng	
  on	
  the	
  table.	
  	
  I	
  loved	
  them.
	
  
With	
  a	
  calm	
  mind	
  I	
  went	
  upstairs.	
  	
  On	
  my	
  way	
  I	
  stopped	
  to	
  sign	
  up	
  for	
  a	
  chiropracIc	
  appointment.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  
disappointed	
  to	
  see	
  his	
  name	
  on	
  next	
  week’s	
  schedule.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  to	
  deal	
  with	
  him	
  all	
  next	
  week.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  see	
  
a	
  friend	
  about	
  coming	
  with	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  concert	
  that	
  evening.	
  	
  Of	
  course	
  he	
  and	
  his	
  family	
  were	
  all	
  sibng	
  with	
  this	
  
man.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  over	
  and	
  interrupted	
  him	
  and	
  we	
  walked	
  off	
  to	
  discuss	
  our	
  plans.	
  	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  how	
  impressed	
  he	
  
was	
  with	
  my	
  nemesis	
  and	
  how	
  I	
  should	
  get	
  to	
  know	
  him.	
  	
  Against	
  my	
  commitment	
  to	
  keep	
  this	
  negaIve	
  thought	
  
to	
  myself	
  I	
  shared	
  my	
  opinion	
  of	
  him.	
  	
  Then	
  we	
  sat	
  down	
  inside	
  and	
  conInued	
  our	
  conversaIon.	
  	
  Five	
  minutes	
  
later	
  my	
  friend’s	
  daughter	
  came	
  in,	
  visibly	
  upset.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  this	
  sweet	
  20	
  something	
  flower.	
  She	
  got	
  into	
  an	
  
argument	
  with	
  him	
  and	
  he	
  insulted	
  her	
  unIl	
  she	
  had	
  to	
  leave.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  there	
  to	
  validate	
  her	
  experience	
  with	
  mine.	
  	
  
There	
  was	
  an	
  opportunity	
  for	
  compassion	
  even	
  in	
  this	
  moment	
  of	
  confusion.	
  	
  I	
  realized	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  the	
  capacity	
  
as	
  yet	
  to	
  process	
  his	
  energy	
  in	
  a	
  posiIve	
  way.	
  	
  The	
  only	
  thing	
  I	
  can	
  do	
  is	
  avoid	
  him.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  help	
  him	
  
and	
  I	
  know	
  he	
  can	
  hurt	
  me.	
  	
  My	
  thoughts	
  are	
  telling	
  me	
  to	
  be	
  mean	
  right	
  back	
  but	
  that	
  would	
  accomplish	
  
nothing.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  realized	
  how	
  protected	
  I’ve	
  been	
  from	
  negaIve	
  energy.	
  	
  My	
  Zen	
  community	
  is	
  very	
  posiIve	
  and	
  
healing.	
  	
  OHI	
  is	
  like	
  a	
  cocoon	
  of	
  posiIve	
  energy.	
  	
  In	
  years	
  past	
  I	
  always	
  had	
  to	
  fight	
  with	
  this	
  negaIvity	
  both	
  
within	
  and	
  without.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  normal	
  part	
  of	
  daily	
  life.	
  	
  This	
  one	
  man	
  showed	
  me	
  how	
  different	
  life	
  is	
  for	
  me	
  now.	
  	
  
	
  
On	
  Sunday	
  everyone	
  starts	
  to	
  leave	
  and	
  new	
  people	
  arrive.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  anIcipaIng	
  visitors	
  coming	
  to	
  see	
  me	
  so	
  I	
  
stayed	
  around.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  very	
  slow	
  day	
  with	
  nothing	
  to	
  do.	
  	
  The	
  weather	
  was	
  exquisite.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  since	
  
I’ve	
  enjoyed	
  just	
  reading	
  in	
  the	
  shade;	
  slowly	
  walking	
  from	
  place	
  to	
  place	
  and	
  gentle	
  conversaIon.	
  	
  As	
  I	
  was	
  
walking	
  from	
  my	
  room,	
  my	
  nemesis	
  came	
  in	
  my	
  direcIon	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  avoid	
  him.	
  	
  We	
  started	
  talking.	
  	
  He	
  
is	
  a	
  radical	
  le\ist.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  simply	
  agreed	
  with	
  him	
  and	
  didn’t	
  engage	
  in	
  any	
  debate.	
  	
  It	
  went	
  fine.	
  I	
  felt	
  good	
  about	
  
it.	
  	
  Later	
  that	
  evening	
  I	
  had	
  an	
  email	
  exchange	
  around	
  global	
  warming	
  that	
  got	
  heated	
  and	
  spun	
  me	
  up	
  again.	
  	
  
The	
  path	
  is	
  now	
  very	
  clear	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  dedicated	
  effort	
  to	
  avoid	
  these	
  situaIons.	
  	
  I’m	
  in	
  a	
  good	
  place	
  
to	
  do	
  that.	
  	
  I’m	
  like	
  a	
  recovering	
  alcoholic	
  who	
  must	
  stay	
  away	
  from	
  his	
  favorite	
  bars.	
  	
  I	
  need	
  all	
  the	
  help	
  of	
  my	
  
support	
  circle.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  three	
  choices	
  as	
  I	
  see	
  it:	
  ignore	
  me,	
  support	
  and	
  nurture	
  me	
  or	
  kill	
  me.	
  	
  To	
  kill	
  me	
  is	
  to	
  
                                                                                                    30
engage	
  me	
  in	
  poliIcal	
  arguments,	
  gossip,	
  verbal	
  violence,	
  depression	
  and	
  just	
  all	
  around	
  negaIvity.	
  	
  I’m	
  feeling	
  
really	
  good	
  now	
  and	
  I	
  think	
  I	
  can	
  take	
  on	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  The	
  truth	
  is	
  I’m	
  dancing	
  on	
  a	
  precipice.	
  	
  Appearances	
  are	
  
deceiving.	
  	
  I	
  know	
  all	
  of	
  you	
  want	
  the	
  best	
  for	
  me	
  or	
  you	
  wouldn’t	
  take	
  the	
  Ime	
  to	
  read	
  this.	
  	
  So	
  please	
  be	
  
careful	
  for	
  my	
  sake.	
  	
  It’s	
  good	
  pracIce	
  and	
  there’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  lose.
	
  
I	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  class	
  this	
  week	
  at	
  OHI.	
  	
  The	
  teaching	
  was	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  not	
  responsible	
  for	
  the	
  sImulus	
  that	
  triggers	
  our	
  
negaIve	
  thoughts	
  and	
  acIons.	
  	
  We	
  can’t	
  control	
  other	
  people	
  or	
  circumstances.	
  	
  However,	
  we	
  can	
  control	
  our	
  
response.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  easy.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  to	
  create	
  space	
  between	
  thought	
  and	
  acIon.	
  	
  That	
  takes	
  a	
  calm	
  spirit	
  brought	
  
about	
  by	
  meditaIon,	
  prayer	
  and	
  mindful	
  living.	
  	
  That	
  will	
  lead	
  us	
  to	
  surrender,	
  forgiveness,	
  acceptance,	
  
generosity	
  and	
  kindness.	
  	
  	
  We	
  have	
  the	
  capacity	
  to	
  love	
  in	
  every	
  moment.	
  	
  Let’s	
  not	
  waste	
  any	
  more	
  Ime.	
  	
  The	
  
world	
  needs	
  healers.

Healing	
  Energy
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Friday,	
  October	
  24,	
  2008

Let’s	
  deal	
  with	
  the	
  health	
  news	
  first.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  another	
  CT	
  Scan	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  weeks	
  ago.	
  	
  It	
  showed	
  once	
  again	
  that	
  
the	
  tumors	
  are	
  “stable”.	
  	
  There’s	
  been	
  no	
  change	
  for	
  six	
  months.	
  	
  One	
  of	
  them	
  grew	
  2mm	
  that	
  my	
  oncologist	
  said	
  
could	
  be	
  the	
  angle	
  of	
  the	
  measurement.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  more	
  concerned	
  than	
  that	
  given	
  that	
  any	
  growth	
  indicates	
  
acIvity.	
  	
  In	
  my	
  mind	
  any	
  acIvity	
  is	
  bad.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  sure	
  how	
  to	
  read	
  my	
  oncologist	
  in	
  this	
  regard.	
  	
  Our	
  perspecIve	
  is 	
  
different	
  on	
  a	
  key	
  point.	
  	
  I’m	
  looking	
  for	
  the	
  miracle	
  cure	
  and	
  he	
  doesn’t	
  believe	
  that’s	
  possible.	
  	
  I	
  bought	
  into	
  his	
  
perspecIve	
  during	
  chemo	
  but	
  that’s	
  all	
  changed	
  now.	
  	
  It’s	
  possible	
  that	
  the	
  body	
  could	
  heal	
  with	
  the	
  right	
  
support.	
  	
  The	
  OpImum	
  Health	
  InsItute	
  (OHI)	
  filled	
  me	
  with	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  opImism	
  that	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  
treatment	
  before.	
  	
  Now	
  it’s	
  a	
  significant	
  factor.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  prone	
  to	
  being	
  unrealisIc.	
  	
  To	
  be	
  honest	
  I’m	
  OK	
  with	
  the	
  
paradox.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  believe	
  that	
  my	
  body,	
  mind	
  and	
  spirit	
  in	
  harmony	
  with	
  all	
  life	
  can	
  heal	
  this	
  disease	
  while	
  at	
  the	
  
same	
  Ime	
  sibng	
  with	
  impermanence	
  and	
  non-­‐aVachment.	
  	
  This	
  not-­‐knowing	
  state	
  allows	
  me	
  to	
  be	
  opImisIc,	
  
present	
  and	
  realisIc.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  clinging	
  to	
  a	
  long	
  life	
  yet	
  I	
  will	
  put	
  up	
  the	
  good	
  fight	
  to	
  achieve	
  it.	
  
	
  
I	
  love	
  all	
  my	
  healers	
  for	
  their	
  hearXelt	
  and	
  selfless	
  dedicaIon.	
  	
  Being	
  in	
  their	
  presence	
  is	
  a	
  joyful	
  Ime	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  
They’ve	
  run	
  the	
  gamut	
  from	
  tradiIonal	
  medicine	
  to	
  a	
  psychic	
  surgeon	
  who	
  pulls	
  out	
  tumors	
  with	
  his	
  bare	
  hands.	
  	
  
I’ve	
  had	
  Amma	
  Oriental	
  Therapy,	
  Oneness	
  Blessings,	
  TherapeuIc	
  Touch,	
  ChiropracIc,	
  Acupuncture,	
  	
  Reiki,	
  Theta	
  
Healing,	
  Aryuvedic	
  and	
  Tibetan	
  medicine.	
  	
  I’m	
  sure	
  I’ve	
  le\	
  out	
  a	
  few.	
  	
  Then	
  there	
  are	
  the	
  prayers	
  of	
  so	
  many	
  
people.	
  	
  I’m	
  on	
  the	
  prayer	
  list	
  at	
  a	
  Hindu	
  Temple,	
  a	
  Mosque,	
  several	
  ChrisIan	
  Churches,	
  Synagogues,	
  and	
  
Buddhist	
  Sanghas.	
  	
  One	
  unifying	
  theme	
  is	
  the	
  belief	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  supporIng	
  my	
  healing	
  process.	
  	
  For	
  me	
  it	
  is	
  like	
  
a	
  net,	
  a	
  fabric	
  of	
  simple	
  loving	
  kindness	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  in	
  my	
  Ime	
  of	
  need.	
  	
  All	
  by	
  itself	
  this	
  kindness	
  weaves	
  
together	
  a	
  supporIng	
  refuge.	
  
	
  
During	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  Theta	
  Healings	
  we	
  got	
  in	
  touch	
  with	
  the	
  energy	
  of	
  my	
  long	
  deceased	
  mother.	
  	
  Her	
  passing	
  was	
  
a	
  transformaIonal	
  event	
  for	
  my	
  family.	
  	
  It	
  set	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  our	
  lives	
  on	
  a	
  path	
  of	
  trauma,	
  healing	
  and	
  
redempIon.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  now	
  all	
  over	
  fi\y	
  and	
  under	
  seventy.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  called	
  to	
  bring	
  everyone	
  together.	
  	
  My	
  brother	
  
John	
  has	
  a	
  beauIful	
  home	
  in	
  Brewster	
  NY	
  and	
  we	
  all	
  agreed	
  to	
  meet	
  there	
  this	
  past	
  weekend.	
  	
  It	
  coincided	
  with	
  
                                                                                                    31
the	
  49th	
  anniversary	
  of	
  my	
  mother’s	
  passing.	
  	
  The	
  Iming	
  was	
  perfect	
  for	
  the	
  fall	
  foliage	
  in	
  that	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  
I	
  was	
  really	
  excited	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  my	
  childhood	
  home	
  at	
  that	
  Ime	
  of	
  year.	
  	
  Travelling	
  and	
  eaIng	
  raw	
  food	
  is	
  a	
  real	
  
challenge.	
  	
  My	
  sister	
  Anne	
  volunteered	
  to	
  make	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  weird	
  food	
  I	
  eat	
  and	
  can’t	
  bring	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  	
  She	
  made	
  
Rejuvalac	
  that	
  is	
  fermented	
  grains.	
  	
  I	
  drink	
  that	
  every	
  day.	
  	
  It’s	
  also	
  used	
  to	
  make	
  Seed	
  Cheese.	
  	
  These	
  are	
  very	
  
hard	
  things	
  to	
  master	
  with	
  only	
  a	
  person	
  on	
  the	
  phone	
  to	
  help.	
  	
  She	
  did	
  a	
  heroic	
  job	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  well	
  fed.	
  	
  
	
  
I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  airport	
  with	
  a	
  giant	
  bag	
  of	
  food.	
  	
  TSA	
  tried	
  to	
  stop	
  me	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  pull	
  out	
  the	
  cancer	
  card	
  on	
  more	
  
than	
  one	
  occasion.	
  	
  I	
  try	
  to	
  use	
  it	
  sparingly.	
  	
  Saying,	
  “I	
  have	
  cancer”	
  does	
  not	
  support	
  healing.	
  	
  	
  However,	
  once	
  
said,	
  people	
  listen.	
  	
  They	
  transform	
  from	
  sIff	
  officers	
  doing	
  their	
  jobs	
  to	
  kind,	
  compassionate	
  healers	
  right	
  before	
  
my	
  eyes.	
  	
  Try	
  it	
  someIme;	
  you	
  can	
  get	
  away	
  with	
  anything.
	
  
The	
  weather	
  was	
  perfect.	
  	
  It	
  reached	
  into	
  the	
  70’s	
  every	
  day	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  Long	
  Island.	
  	
  I	
  walked	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  beauIful	
  
sunset	
  on	
  Jones	
  Beach.	
  	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  country	
  hike	
  at	
  CaumseV	
  Park	
  on	
  Lloyd’s	
  Neck	
  on	
  the	
  North	
  Shore.	
  	
  Virtually	
  
everyone	
  I	
  knew,	
  family	
  and	
  friends	
  came	
  to	
  see	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  relaxed	
  into	
  my	
  refuge	
  and	
  felt	
  the	
  warm	
  extension	
  of	
  
God’s	
  hands	
  gently	
  stroking	
  my	
  enIre	
  life.	
  	
  	
  You	
  are	
  loved,	
  dear	
  one.	
  	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  fear,	
  I	
  am	
  always	
  with	
  
you.
	
  
On	
  Friday	
  I	
  drove	
  up	
  to	
  Brewster	
  alone.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  great	
  ride	
  through	
  Queens	
  and	
  the	
  Bronx.	
  	
  Gradually	
  the	
  scene	
  
was	
  transformed	
  into	
  brightly	
  colored	
  trees	
  and	
  rolling	
  hills.	
  	
  I	
  arrived	
  to	
  our	
  meeIng	
  house.	
  	
  Anne	
  and	
  John	
  
were	
  there.	
  	
  I’ve	
  done	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  weekend	
  retreats	
  and	
  I	
  love	
  being	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  first	
  to	
  arrive.	
  	
  It	
  gives	
  me	
  Ime	
  to	
  
relax	
  with	
  the	
  early	
  comers.	
  	
  	
  Then	
  we	
  get	
  to	
  greet	
  everyone	
  as	
  they	
  arrive.	
  	
  You	
  can	
  feel	
  the	
  change	
  of	
  energy	
  as	
  
each	
  person	
  is	
  added	
  to	
  the	
  mix.	
  	
  Pat	
  was	
  the	
  last	
  to	
  arrive.	
  	
  We	
  seVled	
  into	
  a	
  warm	
  family	
  gathering,	
  eaIng	
  and	
  
telling	
  our	
  stories.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  love	
  for	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  plan	
  for	
  the	
  weekend.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  employ	
  
some	
  of	
  the	
  skills	
  I	
  had	
  learned	
  over	
  the	
  years	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  sacred	
  circle.	
  	
  My	
  sister	
  Beth	
  contributed	
  with	
  her	
  
healing	
  Amma	
  Treatments.	
  	
  We	
  each	
  received	
  one.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  masterful.	
  
	
  
I	
  asked	
  that	
  we	
  sit	
  in	
  council	
  on	
  Friday	
  evening.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  doing	
  this	
  with	
  my	
  Men’s	
  Support	
  group	
  for	
  almost	
  
20	
  years.	
  	
  My	
  siblings	
  that	
  came	
  to	
  visit	
  me	
  during	
  my	
  chemo	
  experienced	
  Council	
  pracIce	
  at	
  the	
  Zen	
  center.	
  	
  
Seisen	
  calls	
  it	
  a	
  “reality	
  pracIce”.	
  	
  The	
  process	
  is	
  simple.	
  	
  We	
  sit	
  in	
  a	
  circle,	
  light	
  a	
  candle	
  and	
  offer	
  a	
  dedicaIon.	
  	
  
We	
  determine	
  to	
  speak	
  from	
  the	
  heart,	
  share	
  in	
  confidence,	
  and	
  listen	
  non-­‐judgmentally	
  with	
  an	
  open	
  heart,	
  
without	
  cross	
  talk	
  so	
  that	
  everyone	
  can	
  be	
  heard.	
  	
  Friday	
  evening	
  was	
  difficult	
  as	
  we	
  expressed	
  our	
  grief	
  over	
  the	
  
loss	
  of	
  our	
  mother.	
  	
  This	
  grief	
  never	
  really	
  heals.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  like	
  any	
  other.	
  	
  For	
  some	
  reason	
  I	
  thought	
  perhaps	
  it	
  
would	
  be	
  so\ened	
  by	
  now	
  but	
  that’s	
  not	
  how	
  it	
  works.	
  	
  It	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  aired	
  out	
  every	
  so	
  o\en.	
  	
  It	
  gets	
  harder	
  to	
  
access	
  as	
  our	
  lives	
  move	
  further	
  away	
  from	
  it.	
  	
  But	
  in	
  this	
  circle	
  there’s	
  no	
  escape.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  went	
  deep	
  into	
  our	
  
hearts	
  and	
  pulled	
  out	
  the	
  memories.	
  	
  Each	
  of	
  us	
  processed	
  this	
  in	
  our	
  own	
  way.	
  	
  When	
  she	
  died	
  the	
  youngest	
  
was	
  3	
  and	
  the	
  oldest	
  was	
  17.	
  	
  For	
  some	
  reason	
  we	
  always	
  envision	
  our	
  mother	
  surrounded	
  in	
  roses.	
  	
  We	
  each	
  
have	
  an	
  experience	
  around	
  it.	
  	
  SomeImes	
  it’s	
  a	
  vivid	
  dream,	
  or	
  a	
  strange	
  circumstance.	
  	
  Tears	
  flowed	
  through	
  
                                                                                                    32
the	
  armor	
  we’ve	
  accumulated.	
  	
  The	
  circle	
  was	
  consecrated.	
  We	
  were	
  all	
  deeply	
  grateful	
  for	
  each	
  other.
	
  
The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  early	
  and	
  meditated	
  while	
  everyone	
  slept.	
  	
  Brian	
  and	
  Beth	
  were	
  the	
  first	
  to	
  get	
  up	
  so	
  we	
  
went	
  out	
  for	
  a	
  walk	
  in	
  the	
  woods.	
  	
  We	
  followed	
  a	
  well	
  marked	
  path.	
  	
  There	
  in	
  the	
  forest	
  was	
  a	
  home	
  made	
  see	
  
saw.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  on	
  it	
  and	
  invited	
  Beth	
  to	
  join	
  me.	
  	
  Brian	
  felt	
  it	
  was	
  unsafe	
  and	
  Beth	
  wouldn’t	
  do	
  it.	
  	
  See	
  saw	
  is	
  
definitely	
  a	
  team	
  sport.	
  	
  I	
  thought	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  spent	
  on	
  them	
  in	
  my	
  hometown	
  park.	
  	
  	
  On	
  we	
  went	
  through	
  
the	
  crisp	
  leaves.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  where	
  we	
  were	
  going.	
  	
  When	
  we	
  finally	
  hit	
  a	
  road	
  we	
  were	
  a	
  good	
  mile	
  from	
  
the	
  house.	
  	
  As	
  we	
  were	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  our	
  bearings	
  we	
  thought	
  of	
  calling	
  my	
  brother.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  the	
  only	
  one	
  that	
  
brought	
  a	
  cell	
  phone.	
  	
  I	
  reached	
  for	
  it	
  and	
  realized	
  that	
  it	
  had	
  fallen	
  off	
  somewhere	
  in	
  the	
  woods.	
  	
  That	
  really	
  
changes	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  I’ve	
  become	
  so	
  dependent	
  on	
  the	
  thing.	
  	
  I	
  wouldn’t	
  even	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  hold	
  of	
  my	
  own	
  
children	
  without	
  it.	
  	
  We	
  got	
  home	
  and	
  formed	
  a	
  posse.	
  	
  Pat,	
  Tom	
  and	
  I	
  ventured	
  off	
  to	
  retrace	
  the	
  hike	
  with	
  cell	
  
phones	
  callings	
  my	
  number	
  constantly.	
  	
  A\er	
  an	
  hour	
  we	
  had	
  no	
  luck.	
  	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  able	
  to	
  exactly	
  follow	
  our	
  tracks	
  
because	
  we	
  weren’t	
  always	
  on	
  a	
  trail.	
  	
  I	
  missed	
  the	
  see-­‐saw.	
  
	
  
I	
  had	
  retained	
  the	
  services	
  of	
  a	
  Theta	
  Healer	
  from	
  ManhaVan	
  to	
  join	
  us	
  for	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  He	
  had	
  arrived	
  while	
  were	
  
just	
  compleIng	
  our	
  search.	
  	
  At	
  the	
  house	
  he	
  introduced	
  himself	
  and	
  presented	
  his	
  offerings.	
  	
  Following	
  that	
  each	
  
of	
  us	
  received	
  an	
  individual	
  session.	
  	
  While	
  Tom	
  went	
  in,	
  Brian,	
  Anne	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  on	
  another	
  trek	
  in	
  search	
  of	
  the	
  
cell	
  phone.	
  	
  Brian	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  locate	
  the	
  see-­‐saw.	
  	
  	
  My	
  ringing	
  cell	
  phone	
  greeted	
  us,	
  hidden	
  by	
  the	
  fallen	
  leaves.	
  	
  
Like	
  a	
  child	
  I	
  shuffled	
  through	
  the	
  leaves	
  excitedly	
  searching	
  for	
  my	
  lost	
  friend,	
  knowing	
  it	
  was	
  found.	
  	
  How	
  
wonderful!
	
  
We	
  came	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  house	
  and	
  received	
  our	
  sessions.	
  	
  He	
  ended	
  the	
  day	
  with	
  a	
  group	
  meditaIon.	
  	
  The	
  feeling	
  
at	
  the	
  house	
  was	
  so	
  sacred	
  and	
  quietly	
  reverent.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  all	
  come	
  to	
  our	
  hearts,	
  individually	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  family.	
  	
  We	
  
were	
  one	
  and	
  we	
  were	
  many	
  in	
  harmony.	
  	
  That’s	
  my	
  life’s	
  work	
  pure	
  and	
  simple.	
  	
  I	
  always	
  seek	
  out	
  sacred	
  circles.	
  	
  
They	
  are	
  authenIc,	
  caring	
  and	
  warm	
  places	
  for	
  the	
  heart	
  to	
  rest	
  in	
  sIllness.	
  	
  SIllness	
  fosters	
  openness	
  and	
  
awareness.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  arrived.
	
  
That	
  evening	
  Brian	
  made	
  one	
  of	
  his	
  signature	
  meals	
  I	
  could	
  appreciate	
  with	
  my	
  eyes	
  and	
  nose	
  only.	
  	
  I	
  ate	
  my	
  
veggies	
  and	
  seed	
  cheese	
  in	
  strained	
  graItude.	
  	
  It	
  all	
  looked	
  magnificent.	
  	
  	
  Sunday	
  morning	
  was	
  beauIful.	
  	
  The	
  
weather	
  turned	
  cold	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  ready	
  to	
  go	
  home.	
  	
  We	
  ate	
  breakfast,	
  got	
  all	
  packed	
  up	
  to	
  go.	
  	
  We	
  ended	
  with	
  a	
  
closing	
  council.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  my	
  favorite.	
  	
  We	
  spoke	
  of	
  what	
  is	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  our	
  noses.	
  	
  We	
  shared	
  the	
  Awareness	
  of	
  
things	
  hidden	
  beneath	
  the	
  surface.	
  	
  With	
  wounds	
  aired	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  breeze,	
  fresh	
  air	
  blew	
  through	
  the	
  room.
	
  
On	
  the	
  way	
  out	
  we	
  wanted	
  to	
  take	
  a	
  group	
  photo.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  camera	
  but	
  never	
  used	
  the	
  Ime	
  delay	
  feature.	
  	
  I	
  tried	
  
and	
  tried	
  but	
  could	
  not	
  get	
  it	
  to	
  work.	
  	
  It	
  seemed	
  simple	
  but	
  something	
  was	
  missing.	
  	
  No	
  one	
  could	
  do	
  it.	
  	
  Tom	
  
walked	
  outside	
  the	
  gate.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  neighbor	
  walking	
  outside.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  an	
  elderly	
  woman	
  about	
  the	
  age	
  our	
  
mother	
  would	
  be.	
  	
  Her	
  name	
  was	
  Rose.	
  	
  She	
  took	
  our	
  picture.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  le\	
  for	
  home.
                                                                                                        33
	
  
Leaves	
  brilliant	
  farewell
Crisp	
  winds	
  strip	
  the	
  trees	
  bare
Long	
  gone	
  the	
  summer

Reality	
  Bites
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Sunday,	
  January	
  11,	
  2009

I	
  had	
  a	
  wonderful	
  holiday	
  season.	
  	
  Thanksgiving	
  was	
  just	
  a	
  great	
  occasion	
  with	
  over	
  30	
  people	
  and	
  lots	
  of	
  good	
  
fun.	
  	
  I	
  travelled	
  to	
  NY	
  to	
  visit	
  family	
  in	
  early	
  December	
  and	
  even	
  got	
  snowed	
  on	
  before	
  I	
  le\.	
  	
  Christmas	
  was	
  a	
  
slow	
  day.	
  	
  My	
  son,	
  Conor,	
  got	
  sick	
  and	
  had	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  the	
  ER.	
  	
  He’s	
  fine	
  now	
  but	
  needs	
  further	
  tesIng	
  for	
  a	
  
recurring,	
  mysterious	
  digesIve	
  ailment.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  to	
  Yokoji	
  Zen	
  Mountain	
  Center	
  for	
  my	
  annual	
  New	
  Year’s	
  
retreat.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  bringing	
  in	
  the	
  New	
  Year	
  there	
  since	
  1999/2000.	
  	
  It’s	
  always	
  a	
  special	
  Ime	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  Now	
  the	
  
holidays	
  are	
  over	
  and	
  it’s	
  back	
  to	
  “normal”.
	
  
I	
  saw	
  my	
  doctor	
  a\er	
  my	
  quarterly	
  scan.	
  	
  I	
  call	
  it	
  drum	
  roll	
  week.	
  	
  The	
  last	
  few	
  have	
  been	
  humdrum	
  in	
  that	
  
everything	
  was	
  “stable”.	
  	
  A\er	
  four	
  months	
  of	
  a	
  raw	
  food	
  diet	
  and	
  enough	
  wheat	
  grass	
  juice	
  to	
  turn	
  my	
  eyes	
  
green,	
  I	
  was	
  opImisIc	
  that	
  the	
  news	
  would	
  be	
  posiIve.	
  	
  I	
  can’t	
  explain	
  how	
  good	
  I	
  feel.	
  	
  I’m	
  down	
  to	
  my	
  high	
  
school	
  weight,	
  my	
  blood	
  pressure	
  is	
  just	
  incredible	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  great	
  energy.	
  	
  However,	
  on	
  the	
  day	
  of	
  my	
  
appointment	
  I	
  was	
  filled	
  with	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  foreboding,	
  a	
  somber	
  awareness	
  of	
  the	
  seriousness	
  of	
  my	
  situaIon.	
  	
  I	
  
have	
  lived	
  so	
  long	
  with	
  this	
  death	
  sentence	
  over	
  my	
  head.	
  	
  Going	
  to	
  the	
  OpImum	
  Health	
  InsItute	
  (OHI)	
  filled	
  me	
  
with	
  opImism	
  and	
  hope.	
  	
  I	
  hadn’t	
  felt	
  that	
  for	
  a	
  long	
  Ime.	
  	
  Before	
  OHI	
  I	
  had	
  accepted	
  the	
  premise	
  that,	
  absent	
  a	
  
miracle,	
  my	
  disease	
  was	
  terminal.	
  	
  The	
  last	
  four	
  months	
  were	
  a	
  welcomed	
  change.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  alive	
  again.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  
great	
  refuge.
	
  
As	
  I	
  walked	
  into	
  the	
  doctor’s	
  office	
  I	
  became	
  aware	
  that	
  my	
  world	
  was	
  about	
  to	
  change.	
  	
  Would	
  I	
  be	
  giving	
  a	
  
great	
  tesImony	
  at	
  OHI	
  next	
  week	
  or	
  would	
  I	
  be	
  the	
  bearer	
  of	
  bad	
  news	
  to	
  my	
  friends	
  and	
  family?	
  	
  Soon	
  I	
  would	
  
be	
  leaving	
  the	
  office	
  with	
  the	
  verdict.	
  	
  My	
  oncologist	
  abruptly	
  ended	
  my	
  opImism.	
  	
  The	
  tumors	
  are	
  on	
  the	
  move,	
  
growing	
  ever	
  so	
  slowly.	
  	
  	
  We	
  talked	
  about	
  outcomes.	
  	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  pin	
  down	
  Imeframes	
  as	
  cancer	
  is	
  rather	
  
unpredictable.	
  	
  If	
  it	
  grows	
  in	
  a	
  linear	
  way	
  it	
  could	
  take	
  2-­‐3	
  years	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  job.	
  	
  However,	
  it	
  frequently	
  is	
  not	
  linear	
  
and	
  has	
  growth	
  spurts	
  or	
  new	
  tumors	
  show	
  up	
  that	
  alter	
  the	
  Imeline.	
  	
  It	
  could	
  of	
  course	
  get	
  beVer.	
  	
  He	
  said,	
  “It	
  
happens,	
  but	
  not	
  as	
  frequently.”	
  	
  I	
  was	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  certain	
  death.	
  	
  Please	
  don’t	
  say	
  we	
  all	
  face	
  certain	
  
death.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  hot	
  buVon	
  for	
  me.	
  Dying	
  is	
  not	
  your	
  reality.	
  	
  It’s	
  the	
  truth	
  but	
  it’s	
  not	
  your	
  reality.	
  	
  It’s	
  sIll	
  a	
  theory	
  
that	
  you	
  like	
  to	
  play	
  with	
  and	
  pretend	
  you	
  understand.	
  	
  Trust	
  me;	
  unIl	
  you’re	
  here,	
  you	
  have	
  no	
  real	
  
understanding.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  club	
  you	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  join	
  but	
  I	
  know	
  a	
  member	
  when	
  I	
  meet	
  one.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  present	
  with	
  
humility	
  and	
  support,	
  without	
  philosophy.	
  	
  Philosophy	
  dies	
  quickly	
  through	
  this	
  doorway.	
  	
  Don’t	
  take	
  it	
  
personally,	
  I	
  know	
  you	
  mean	
  well.	
  	
  I	
  remember	
  how	
  awkward	
  I	
  was	
  with	
  the	
  dying	
  before	
  I	
  joined	
  the	
  club.
	
  

                                                                                                       34
Going	
  back	
  to	
  OHI	
  was	
  a	
  different	
  experience.	
  	
  Here	
  there	
  are	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  people	
  doing	
  their	
  best	
  to	
  heal	
  themselves.	
  	
  
What	
  do	
  I	
  say?	
  	
  “Stop,	
  it	
  didn’t	
  work	
  for	
  me,	
  it’s	
  a	
  sham!”	
  	
  I	
  drank	
  some	
  wheatgrass	
  juice	
  and	
  went	
  to	
  work	
  in	
  the	
  
greenhouse.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  here	
  before,	
  back	
  on	
  life’s	
  layoff	
  list.	
  
	
  
In	
  Zen	
  pracIce	
  there	
  are	
  three	
  condiIons	
  necessary	
  for	
  awakening:	
  Great	
  Faith,	
  Great	
  Doubt	
  and	
  Great	
  
DeterminaIon.	
  	
  I	
  am	
  now	
  in	
  Great	
  Doubt.	
  	
  Since	
  my	
  diagnosis	
  I’ve	
  concocted	
  a	
  story	
  of	
  how	
  God	
  is	
  leading	
  me	
  by	
  
the	
  nose	
  to	
  heal	
  me	
  with	
  very	
  difficult	
  lessons.	
  	
  My	
  disease	
  very	
  painfully	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  integrity.	
  	
  	
  Part	
  of	
  that	
  
process	
  was	
  the	
  resoluIon/dissoluIon	
  a	
  long	
  term	
  relaIonship	
  that	
  oddly	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  live	
  at	
  the	
  Sweetwater	
  
Zen	
  Center	
  (SWZC)	
  and	
  dive	
  more	
  deeply	
  into	
  meditaIon	
  pracIce.	
  	
  That’s	
  where	
  I	
  made	
  the	
  connecIon	
  to	
  OHI	
  
and	
  the	
  healing	
  energy	
  I’ve	
  been	
  living	
  in	
  for	
  the	
  past	
  four	
  months.	
  	
  As	
  I	
  projected	
  the	
  story	
  into	
  the	
  future	
  all	
  my	
  
efforts	
  would	
  pay	
  off	
  with	
  remission/redempIon	
  and	
  I	
  would	
  go	
  on	
  from	
  there	
  ever	
  more	
  commiVed	
  to	
  my	
  
spiritual	
  path	
  and	
  live	
  a	
  long	
  and	
  happy	
  life.	
  	
  Cancer	
  would	
  be	
  a	
  great	
  chapter	
  in	
  that	
  story;	
  one	
  of	
  heroic	
  
struggle.	
  	
  That	
  story	
  died	
  yesterday	
  and	
  well	
  it	
  should.	
  	
  It	
  all	
  simply	
  happened	
  the	
  way	
  it	
  did	
  and	
  I	
  learned	
  from	
  it	
  
all	
  that	
  I	
  could	
  given	
  my	
  ability	
  and	
  willingness	
  to	
  see	
  into	
  true	
  reality	
  (Dharma).	
  	
  Why	
  things	
  happen	
  and	
  what	
  it	
  
means	
  is	
  beyond	
  my	
  comprehension.	
  	
  My	
  aVachment	
  to	
  the	
  story	
  was	
  like	
  a	
  pain	
  killer	
  that	
  helped	
  me	
  to	
  get	
  
through	
  a	
  dark	
  night.	
  	
  Great	
  Doubt	
  fosters	
  a	
  deeper	
  understanding	
  by	
  forcing	
  me	
  to	
  examine	
  my	
  assumpIons	
  
and	
  cast	
  off	
  what	
  doesn’t	
  fit.	
  	
  It’s	
  like	
  a	
  stone	
  that	
  sharpens	
  the	
  sword	
  of	
  faith.
	
  
A\er	
  I	
  finished	
  my	
  work	
  in	
  the	
  Greenhouse,	
  I	
  closed	
  up	
  the	
  place	
  and	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  chapel	
  for	
  meditaIon.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  
wonderfully	
  quiet	
  place.	
  	
  I	
  read	
  the	
  Bible	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  minutes.	
  	
  Jesus	
  was	
  teaching	
  his	
  disciples	
  to	
  go	
  into	
  the	
  city	
  
and	
  if	
  welcomed,	
  heal	
  them.	
  	
  I	
  didn’t	
  quite	
  understand	
  the	
  passage.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  hoping	
  for	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  perfect	
  
passages	
  to	
  give	
  me	
  the	
  sense	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  alone,	
  an	
  excuse	
  to	
  start	
  rebuilding	
  my	
  story.	
  	
  A\er	
  meditaIon	
  it	
  
was	
  Ime	
  for	
  dinner.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  pizza	
  night.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  raw	
  concocIon	
  that	
  ain’t	
  nothing	
  like	
  the	
  real	
  thing.	
  	
  However,	
  it’s	
  
good	
  and	
  we	
  all	
  look	
  forward	
  to	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  sat	
  alone	
  not	
  for	
  any	
  parIcular	
  reason.	
  	
  A	
  guest	
  that	
  lives	
  not	
  too	
  far	
  from	
  
where	
  I	
  grew	
  up	
  came	
  to	
  sit	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  We	
  talked	
  through	
  some	
  small	
  life	
  stories	
  for	
  almost	
  an	
  hour.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  Ime	
  
to	
  go.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  why	
  but	
  I	
  felt	
  beVer	
  a\er	
  our	
  conversaIon.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  nothing	
  special	
  about	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  didn’t	
  
menIon	
  my	
  news.	
  	
  Somehow	
  the	
  small	
  talk	
  centered	
  me.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  normal	
  evening.	
  	
  Life	
  conInues	
  on.	
  	
  She	
  sat	
  
down	
  and	
  I	
  welcomed	
  her.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  healing.	
  	
  Without	
  knowing	
  it	
  she	
  made	
  a	
  big	
  difference	
  in	
  my	
  day.	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  
begin	
  anew,	
  get	
  up	
  and	
  keep	
  walking.
	
  
My	
  near	
  term	
  plans	
  won’t	
  change	
  much.	
  	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  spending	
  March,	
  April	
  and	
  May	
  in	
  Yokoji	
  Zen	
  Mountain	
  Center	
  
to	
  parIcipate	
  in	
  the	
  ninety	
  day	
  intensive	
  training	
  program	
  called	
  Ango.	
  	
  From	
  there	
  I	
  may	
  do	
  some	
  internaIonal	
  
travel.	
  	
  My	
  current	
  thinking	
  is	
  to	
  just	
  take	
  some	
  short	
  trips	
  to	
  places	
  I’ve	
  always	
  wanted	
  to	
  see.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  few	
  
months	
  le\	
  to	
  plan.
	
  
What	
  is	
  le\	
  to	
  say	
  about	
  all	
  this?	
  	
  When	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  Miami	
  I	
  would	
  meditate	
  at	
  the	
  InternaIonal	
  Zen	
  InsItute	
  of	
  
Florida	
  (IZIF).	
  	
  The	
  teacher,	
  Soan	
  Poor	
  would	
  end	
  every	
  meditaIon	
  by	
  reciIng:
                                                                                                  35
	
  
Listen	
  carefully	
  everyone
Great	
  is	
  the	
  maVer	
  of	
  life	
  and	
  death
Time	
  passes	
  swi\ly	
  and	
  opportunity	
  is	
  lost
Awaken!	
  	
  Awaken!
Don’t	
  waste	
  your	
  life.
	
  
Can	
  you	
  pierce	
  the	
  veil	
  of	
  your	
  philosophy	
  and	
  hear	
  the	
  quiet	
  voice	
  within	
  yourself	
  calling	
  you?	
  	
  I’m	
  doing	
  my	
  
best	
  to	
  listen	
  to	
  that	
  voice	
  now.	
  	
  What	
  else	
  can	
  I	
  do	
  but	
  take	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  have	
  le\	
  to	
  awaken?	
  	
  I	
  am	
  grateful	
  for	
  my	
  
seeking	
  spirit.	
  	
  It’s	
  always	
  been	
  with	
  me	
  from	
  my	
  earliest	
  memory.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  Great	
  Faith	
  that	
  I	
  am	
  returning	
  home	
  
again.	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  let	
  go	
  of	
  Kevin’s	
  wonderful	
  story.	
  	
  With	
  Great	
  DeterminaIon	
  I	
  will	
  clear	
  the	
  path	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me	
  
and	
  be	
  welcomed	
  wherever	
  it	
  is	
  I	
  go.
	
  
Endless	
  Ime	
  since	
  gone
Faint	
  shadows	
  emerge	
  in	
  sleep
PoinIng	
  the	
  way	
  home


May	
  this	
  cup	
  pass
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Wednesday,	
  March	
  11,	
  2009

My	
  health	
  update	
  is	
  that	
  I	
  am	
  just	
  finishing	
  up	
  on	
  my	
  ablaIon	
  therapy.	
  I	
  was	
  surprised	
  by	
  the	
  treatment.	
  I	
  
thought	
  they	
  went	
  in	
  with	
  a	
  needle	
  and	
  zapped	
  the	
  tumors.	
  However,	
  it’s	
  a	
  high	
  dose	
  radiaIon	
  beam	
  without	
  
any	
  needle	
  at	
  all.	
  The	
  good	
  news	
  is	
  that	
  it’s	
  easier	
  for	
  me.	
  The	
  bad	
  news	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  radiaIon	
  is	
  hibng	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
stuff	
  to	
  get	
  there.	
  Oh	
  well,	
  it’s	
  almost	
  done	
  now.	
  

I	
  chose	
  this	
  therapy	
  because	
  there	
  are	
  two	
  tumors	
  in	
  the	
  lung	
  that	
  are	
  around	
  2cms.	
  This	
  therapy	
  can’t	
  be	
  done	
  
a\er	
  they	
  exceed	
  3cms.	
  The	
  silver	
  lining	
  in	
  the	
  cloud	
  I	
  described	
  in	
  my	
  last	
  update	
  is	
  that	
  I’ve	
  not	
  produced	
  any	
  
new	
  tumors	
  since	
  Nov	
  2007.	
  My	
  oncologist	
  didn’t	
  want	
  me	
  to	
  get	
  this	
  therapy.	
  He	
  would	
  rather	
  I	
  conInue	
  with	
  
some	
  version	
  of	
  chemo.	
  His	
  raIonale	
  is	
  valid.	
  The	
  normal	
  course	
  of	
  my	
  disease	
  is	
  for	
  my	
  body	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  tumor	
  
factory.	
  AblaIng	
  tumors	
  is	
  like	
  playing	
  whack	
  a	
  mole.	
  The	
  end	
  result	
  is	
  that	
  I	
  die	
  of	
  having	
  a	
  million	
  holes	
  in	
  my	
  
body.	
  Chemo	
  treats	
  (or	
  destroys)	
  the	
  whole	
  body.	
  I	
  gave	
  up	
  on	
  chemo.	
  I	
  should	
  say	
  my	
  body	
  told	
  me	
  never	
  to	
  do	
  
that	
  again.	
  Instead	
  I’m	
  focusing	
  my	
  aVenIon	
  elsewhere.	
  

I	
  have	
  applied	
  unsuccessfully	
  to	
  parIcipate	
  in	
  some	
  immunological	
  trials	
  that	
  are	
  now	
  underway.	
  The	
  Lance	
  
Armstrong	
  foundaIon	
  is	
  feeding	
  me	
  info	
  on	
  new	
  trials	
  as	
  they	
  come	
  up.	
  I	
  am	
  also	
  following	
  alternaIve	
  paths	
  to	
  
keep	
  my	
  body	
  strong	
  enough	
  to	
  slow	
  the	
  disease	
  and	
  keep	
  me	
  alive	
  as	
  long	
  as	
  possible.	
  I	
  enjoy	
  what	
  I’m	
  doing.	
  
I’m	
  learning	
  a	
  lot	
  about	
  my	
  body.	
  More	
  importantly,	
  I’m	
  listening	
  to	
  my	
  body.	
  I	
  am	
  doing	
  chiropracIc	
  and	
  
acupuncture.	
  I’m	
  taking	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  supplements	
  known	
  to	
  help	
  the	
  body	
  in	
  its	
  fight.	
  I’m	
  keeping	
  to	
  a	
  mostly	
  raw/
vegan	
  diet	
  and	
  drinking	
  lots	
  of	
  alkaline	
  kangen	
  water.	
  My	
  body	
  is	
  in	
  an	
  alkaline	
  state.	
  In	
  the	
  alternaIve	
  medical	
  
world	
  that’s	
  criIcal	
  to	
  maintain	
  a	
  healthy	
  body.	
  I	
  asked	
  my	
  radiaIon	
  oncologist	
  if	
  he	
  agreed	
  with	
  that	
  theory.	
  He	
  
didn’t	
  know	
  if	
  it’s	
  true.	
  However,	
  that’s	
  a	
  theory	
  I’m	
  going	
  with	
  because	
  it’s	
  something	
  I	
  can	
  measure	
  and	
  
maintain.	
  Perhaps	
  in	
  this	
  healthy	
  state	
  my	
  body	
  can	
  fend	
  off	
  new	
  tumor	
  development	
  but	
  not	
  reverse	
  exisIng	
  
                                                                                                    36
tumors.	
  When	
  I	
  relayed	
  this	
  bit	
  of	
  medical	
  wisdom	
  to	
  my	
  team	
  they	
  didn’t	
  laugh	
  out	
  loud.	
  They	
  are	
  a	
  serious	
  
bunch	
  and	
  they	
  know	
  people	
  like	
  me	
  are	
  always	
  IlIng	
  at	
  windmills	
  anyway.	
  So	
  they	
  will	
  do	
  whatever	
  I	
  want.	
  I’ve	
  
chosen	
  to	
  zap	
  the	
  most	
  threatening	
  tumors	
  and	
  see	
  what	
  happens	
  in	
  six	
  months.	
  If	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  new	
  tumors	
  
we’ll	
  zap	
  a	
  few	
  more.	
  

A\er	
  my	
  second	
  ablaIon	
  treatment	
  I	
  saw	
  my	
  radiaIon	
  oncologist.	
  We	
  discussed	
  the	
  situaIon	
  in	
  my	
  lungs.	
  I	
  
asked	
  him	
  what	
  we	
  could	
  do	
  about	
  the	
  tumors	
  in	
  my	
  pelvis.	
  He	
  looked	
  confused	
  and	
  opened	
  my	
  file.	
  He	
  said,	
  
“the	
  pelvis?”	
  “the	
  PET	
  Scan	
  doesn’t	
  show	
  any	
  acIvity	
  in	
  the	
  pelvis.”	
  That	
  was	
  interesIng	
  in	
  that	
  the	
  CT	
  Scan	
  
showed	
  the	
  two	
  tumors	
  in	
  the	
  pelvis	
  were	
  not	
  only	
  sIll	
  there	
  but	
  actually	
  growing.	
  The	
  CT	
  Scan	
  shows	
  that	
  
something	
  is	
  there;	
  the	
  PET	
  Scan	
  detects	
  cancer.	
  They	
  showed	
  up	
  on	
  my	
  previous	
  PET	
  Scan.	
  This	
  could	
  either	
  
mean	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  acIve	
  or	
  the	
  chemo	
  shrunk	
  them	
  down	
  to	
  a	
  size	
  that	
  can	
  not	
  be	
  detected	
  by	
  a	
  PET	
  Scan.	
  
Either	
  way,	
  I	
  found	
  it	
  encouraging.	
  The	
  PET	
  Scan	
  also	
  confirmed	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  other	
  acIvity	
  besides	
  these	
  historical	
  
tumors.	
  

I	
  feel	
  great	
  and	
  I’m	
  doing	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  inner	
  work	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  process	
  the	
  reality	
  I’m	
  in.	
  I	
  started	
  my	
  commitment	
  at	
  
the	
  monastery.	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  living	
  there	
  unIl	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  May.	
  It’s	
  a	
  beauIful	
  place	
  at	
  over	
  5,000	
  \	
  above	
  sea	
  level.	
  
The	
  mountains	
  are	
  beauIful	
  and	
  the	
  place	
  is	
  incredibly	
  quiet	
  and	
  serene.	
  My	
  teacher,	
  Tenshin	
  Roshi,	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
  
great	
  cabin.	
  It	
  has	
  two	
  bedrooms,	
  a	
  living	
  room	
  with	
  a	
  wood	
  burning	
  stove	
  and	
  a	
  full	
  bath.	
  I	
  was	
  expecIng	
  a	
  
small	
  closet	
  size	
  room.	
  I	
  feel	
  very	
  blessed.	
  When	
  I	
  first	
  arrived	
  it	
  was	
  very	
  cold	
  and	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  feeling	
  all	
  that	
  great.	
  I 	
  
hadn’t	
  felt	
  any	
  resistance	
  to	
  my	
  decision	
  unIl	
  I	
  got	
  there.	
  Then	
  my	
  mind	
  started	
  to	
  misbehave	
  and	
  began	
  working	
  
on	
  a	
  way	
  out.	
  Perhaps	
  staging	
  a	
  medical	
  emergency	
  would	
  be	
  an	
  honorable	
  exit.	
  I	
  came	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  what’s	
  
called	
  sesshin.	
  It’s	
  an	
  intensive	
  Zen	
  retreat	
  where	
  the	
  whole	
  week	
  is	
  spent	
  in	
  silence.	
  We	
  meditate	
  about	
  6-­‐7	
  
hours	
  during	
  the	
  day.	
  We	
  do	
  some	
  work	
  around	
  the	
  monastery	
  and	
  eat	
  our	
  meals.	
  Everything	
  is	
  communicated	
  
by	
  bells	
  and	
  knocks.	
  We	
  know	
  when	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  gather	
  for	
  meditaIon,	
  for	
  work,	
  for	
  meals	
  and	
  for	
  rest.	
  It	
  took	
  a	
  
day	
  to	
  feel	
  at	
  home.	
  A	
  shi\	
  happened	
  on	
  Sunday	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  retreat.	
  What	
  is	
  it	
  I’m	
  giving	
  up?	
  All	
  the	
  noise	
  
of	
  my	
  busy	
  life	
  that	
  keeps	
  my	
  mind	
  spinning	
  it’s	
  rouIne	
  to	
  distract	
  me	
  from	
  what’s	
  really	
  happening.	
  No,	
  not	
  this	
  
Ime.	
  I	
  could	
  think	
  of	
  a	
  dozen	
  things	
  to	
  do	
  from	
  my	
  bucket	
  list.	
  How	
  important	
  is	
  it	
  to	
  complete	
  all	
  that?	
  I	
  could	
  
see	
  some	
  things	
  I	
  hadn’t	
  seen	
  and	
  could	
  write	
  another	
  story	
  about	
  some	
  adventure	
  or	
  other.	
  Who	
  would	
  care	
  or	
  
listen	
  even	
  five	
  years	
  a\er	
  I’m	
  gone?	
  Not	
  this	
  Ime.	
  Instead	
  I’ll	
  sit	
  with	
  one	
  thing	
  in	
  a	
  place	
  that	
  honors	
  one	
  thing.	
  
The	
  sound	
  of	
  the	
  wind	
  blowing	
  over	
  the	
  mountain	
  through	
  the	
  trees	
  honors	
  this	
  one	
  thing.	
  There	
  may	
  come	
  a	
  
Ime	
  for	
  the	
  bucket	
  list	
  or	
  just	
  let	
  the	
  list	
  float	
  down	
  the	
  river	
  with	
  me.	
  Let	
  go	
  of	
  Ime.	
  I’ve	
  had	
  plenty.

I	
  relate	
  to	
  the	
  gospel	
  according	
  to	
  Mark	
  more	
  than	
  the	
  rest.	
  He	
  tells	
  of	
  a	
  human	
  Jesus.	
  In	
  a	
  quiet	
  space	
  just	
  
before	
  his	
  execuIon,	
  Jesus	
  asked;	
  “Father,	
  all	
  things	
  are	
  possible	
  unto	
  thee;	
  take	
  away	
  this	
  cup	
  from	
  me;	
  
nevertheless	
  not	
  what	
  I	
  will,	
  but	
  what	
  thou	
  wilt.”	
  Nothing	
  more,	
  nothing	
  less	
  need	
  be	
  said.	
  Everyday	
  I	
  pray	
  for	
  a	
  
long	
  and	
  healthy	
  life	
  free	
  of	
  cancer	
  and	
  other	
  diseases.	
  I	
  pray	
  for	
  this	
  cup	
  to	
  be	
  taken	
  away.	
  This	
  disease	
  process	
  
has	
  been	
  incredibly	
  transformaIve.	
  How	
  I	
  would	
  love	
  to	
  know	
  all	
  this	
  and	
  move	
  on	
  with	
  my	
  life.	
  It’s	
  just	
  another	
  
fantasy.	
  Not	
  my	
  will,	
  but	
  thy	
  will.	
  I’m	
  grateful	
  to	
  be	
  as	
  present	
  for	
  it	
  as	
  I	
  am.	
  

I	
  live	
  far	
  off	
  in	
  the	
  wild
Where	
  moss	
  and	
  woods
are	
  thick	
  and	
  plants	
  perfumed
I	
  can	
  see	
  mountains	
  rain	
  or	
  shine
and	
  never	
  hear	
  market	
  noise
I	
  light	
  a	
  few	
  leaves	
  in	
  my	
  stove	
  to	
  heat	
  tea
To	
  patch	
  my	
  robe	
  I	
  cut	
  off	
  a	
  cloud
LifeImes	
  seldom	
  fill	
  a	
  hundred	
  years
                                                                                                37
Why	
  suffer	
  for	
  profit	
  and	
  fame?
-­‐	
  Stonehouse




Take	
  this	
  way	
  for	
  now
Fortune	
  does	
  not	
  bend	
  or	
  sway
But	
  loves	
  the	
  blind	
  road
Yokoji
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  March	
  23,	
  2009

I’ve	
  just	
  completed	
  my	
  first	
  full	
  week	
  at	
  Yokoji	
  Zen	
  Mountain	
  Center.	
  I’m	
  here	
  for	
  Ango	
  (training	
  period).	
  So	
  far	
  it’s 	
  
going	
  really	
  well.	
  I’m	
  enjoying	
  the	
  slower	
  pace	
  of	
  my	
  life	
  here.	
  It’s	
  a	
  simple	
  way	
  to	
  live.	
  There’s	
  a	
  schedule	
  to	
  
follow	
  and	
  I	
  just	
  do	
  it.	
  If	
  I	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  do	
  it,	
  I	
  do	
  it	
  anyway.	
  Knowing	
  that	
  is	
  what	
  I’ll	
  do	
  no	
  maVer	
  how	
  loud	
  that	
  
persistent	
  inner	
  voice	
  tries	
  to	
  stop	
  me	
  is	
  a	
  wonderful	
  training.	
  I	
  can	
  clearly	
  hear	
  the	
  voice	
  but	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  to	
  
follow	
  it.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  choice.	
  I	
  choose	
  to	
  do	
  what’s	
  on	
  the	
  schedule.	
  That’s	
  more	
  important	
  to	
  me.	
  As	
  I	
  sit	
  in	
  
meditaIon	
  my	
  mind	
  can	
  travel	
  anywhere	
  it	
  wants	
  but	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  to	
  follow	
  it.	
  I	
  someImes	
  follow	
  it	
  but	
  
eventually	
  I	
  realize	
  I’ve	
  wandered	
  off	
  and	
  simply	
  return	
  to	
  my	
  breath.	
  We	
  sit	
  in	
  meditaIon	
  just	
  over	
  four	
  hours	
  
per	
  day.	
  We	
  also	
  do	
  several	
  services	
  each	
  day.	
  At	
  service	
  we	
  chant,	
  bow	
  and	
  offer	
  incense	
  in	
  accordance	
  with	
  an	
  
old	
  tradiIon.	
  We	
  eat	
  and	
  we	
  work.	
  Each	
  thing	
  has	
  its	
  Ime	
  and	
  I	
  do	
  what’s	
  needed	
  of	
  me	
  during	
  these	
  Imes.	
  

When	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  work	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  parIcular	
  duty.	
  It’s	
  called	
  Chiden.	
  My	
  job	
  is	
  to	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  the	
  altars.	
  There	
  are	
  
seven	
  of	
  them	
  in	
  the	
  monastery.	
  There’s	
  the	
  main	
  one	
  in	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall,	
  there’s	
  one	
  behind	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall	
  
called	
  the	
  Founders	
  Room.	
  The	
  Kitchen,	
  Study	
  Hall,	
  Office	
  and	
  Dining	
  Room	
  all	
  have	
  altars.	
  There’s	
  one	
  more	
  
where	
  the	
  teacher	
  interviews	
  students.	
  Each	
  altar	
  is	
  used	
  as	
  a	
  way	
  to	
  start	
  the	
  acIvity	
  in	
  that	
  space.	
  When	
  the	
  
cook	
  starts	
  to	
  prepare	
  the	
  meal	
  he	
  lights	
  an	
  oil	
  lamp,	
  a	
  sIck	
  of	
  incense	
  and	
  recites	
  a	
  chant	
  perInent	
  to	
  meal	
  
preparaIon.	
  He	
  bows	
  and	
  goes	
  on	
  with	
  his	
  duIes.	
  Each	
  event	
  is	
  blessed.	
  Perhaps	
  that’s	
  the	
  one	
  thing	
  all	
  
monasteries	
  share.	
  They	
  all	
  seem	
  to	
  bless	
  everything	
  they	
  do.	
  My	
  liVle	
  inner	
  voice	
  sees	
  this	
  as	
  a	
  mindless	
  series	
  
of	
  insufferable,	
  exasperaIng	
  rituals	
  that	
  get	
  in	
  the	
  way	
  of	
  what	
  I	
  should	
  be	
  doing;	
  gebng	
  stuff,	
  thrilling	
  the	
  
senses	
  and	
  being	
  more	
  comfortable.	
  However,	
  as	
  I	
  sink	
  into	
  this	
  ritualized	
  way	
  of	
  life,	
  there’s	
  a	
  quiet	
  beauty	
  that	
  
is	
  created	
  by	
  all	
  of	
  us.	
  

Preparing	
  the	
  altars	
  involves	
  making	
  sure	
  the	
  flowers	
  are	
  fresh	
  and	
  look	
  nice.	
  I	
  see	
  to	
  it	
  there’s	
  enough	
  incense,	
  
matches,	
  oil	
  in	
  the	
  lamps	
  and	
  the	
  various	
  incense	
  burners	
  are	
  prepared	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  service.	
  This	
  last	
  item	
  is	
  the	
  
most	
  demanding,	
  go	
  figure.	
  The	
  ash	
  bed	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  as	
  smooth	
  as	
  possible.	
  First	
  I	
  use	
  medical	
  tweezers	
  to	
  
remove	
  the	
  stubs	
  of	
  the	
  used	
  incense	
  sIcks.	
  Next	
  I	
  si\	
  out	
  the	
  powder	
  of	
  the	
  ashes	
  from	
  the	
  last	
  service.	
  The	
  
si\ed	
  powder	
  is	
  put	
  back	
  in	
  the	
  burner.	
  Finally	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  set	
  of	
  tools	
  to	
  smooth	
  out	
  the	
  ashes.	
  None	
  of	
  them	
  work.	
  
I	
  use	
  them,	
  one	
  a\er	
  another,	
  all	
  the	
  Ime	
  listening	
  to	
  my	
  liVle	
  inner	
  voice	
  saying,	
  “this	
  is	
  stupid,	
  who	
  cares	
  about	
  
this,	
  let’s	
  take	
  a	
  nap,	
  what	
  sadisIc	
  samurai	
  thought	
  up	
  this	
  liVle	
  gem	
  of	
  a	
  job?”.	
  As	
  I	
  press	
  down	
  on	
  the	
  ash	
  to	
  
smooth	
  out	
  the	
  ridges	
  made	
  by	
  the	
  last	
  tool,	
  this	
  one	
  is	
  making	
  its	
  own	
  ridges.	
  Just	
  as	
  it	
  gets	
  frustraIng,	
  voila,	
  it’s	
  
good	
  enough.	
  I	
  replace	
  the	
  incense	
  burner	
  and	
  go	
  on	
  to	
  the	
  next	
  one.	
  

Last	
  week	
  a\er	
  a	
  long	
  spell	
  of	
  very	
  cold	
  weather,	
  it	
  finally	
  warmed	
  up.	
  Spring	
  blossomed,	
  the	
  worst	
  was	
  over.	
  I’ve	
  
turned	
  into	
  quite	
  the	
  weather	
  wimp	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  I’ve	
  lost	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  weight	
  on	
  my	
  raw	
  food	
  diet.	
  I	
  now	
  
understand	
  the	
  divine	
  funcIon	
  of	
  body	
  fat.	
  “You	
  don’t	
  know	
  what	
  you’ve	
  got	
  Ill	
  it’s	
  gone”	
  –	
  Joni	
  Mitchell.	
  All	
  
that	
  insulaIon	
  served	
  a	
  purpose	
  I	
  didn’t	
  appreciate.	
  

                                                                                                    38
Yesterday	
  however,	
  we	
  returned	
  to	
  winter.	
  A\er	
  several	
  beauIful	
  spring	
  days	
  a	
  storm	
  hit.	
  I	
  remembered	
  back	
  to	
  
when	
  I	
  lived	
  in	
  NY.	
  How	
  heartbreaking	
  March	
  can	
  be!	
  We	
  are	
  dependent	
  on	
  solar	
  power	
  and	
  a	
  temperamental	
  
generator	
  for	
  our	
  electricity.	
  We	
  do	
  really	
  well	
  when	
  the	
  sun	
  is	
  shining.	
  The	
  baVeries	
  hold	
  up	
  preVy	
  well	
  and	
  
generally	
  keep	
  us	
  going	
  Ill	
  the	
  morning.	
  The	
  last	
  couple	
  of	
  days	
  they	
  weren’t	
  gebng	
  fully	
  charged	
  and	
  the	
  
generator	
  couldn’t	
  fill	
  the	
  gap.	
  There’s	
  plenty	
  of	
  propane	
  and	
  wood	
  so	
  we	
  can	
  heat	
  our	
  living	
  quarters	
  and	
  cook	
  
just	
  fine.	
  Candles	
  and	
  oil	
  lamps	
  are	
  used	
  when	
  needed.	
  It’s	
  all	
  livable	
  and	
  for	
  now	
  the	
  novelty	
  of	
  gebng	
  ready	
  for	
  
bed	
  by	
  candlelight	
  is	
  quaint.	
  Let’s	
  see	
  how	
  long	
  that	
  lasts.

Today	
  as	
  I’m	
  wriIng	
  this	
  it’s	
  our	
  day	
  off.	
  We	
  get	
  to	
  relax.	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  challenging	
  Ime	
  for	
  me.	
  There’s	
  not	
  
much	
  to	
  do.	
  I	
  did	
  my	
  laundry	
  and	
  made	
  some	
  phone	
  calls.	
  There’s	
  no	
  TV	
  or	
  radio	
  to	
  take	
  my	
  mind	
  off	
  of	
  just	
  
being	
  with	
  me.	
  I	
  don’t	
  do	
  nothing	
  very	
  well,	
  if	
  that	
  makes	
  any	
  sense.	
  My	
  liVle	
  voice	
  wants	
  me	
  to	
  feed	
  it	
  
something;	
  a	
  liVle	
  news;	
  lunch	
  with	
  a	
  friend;	
  shopping;	
  gebng	
  in	
  the	
  car	
  to	
  run	
  endless	
  liVle	
  errands	
  to	
  fill	
  up	
  
the	
  day.	
  I’m	
  very	
  aware	
  now	
  of	
  how	
  distracted	
  I’ve	
  been	
  throughout	
  my	
  life.

We’ve	
  been	
  training	
  for	
  the	
  past	
  week	
  to	
  perform	
  the	
  most	
  ornate	
  ceremony	
  I’ve	
  encountered	
  in	
  my	
  10	
  years	
  of	
  
Zen.	
  It’s	
  called	
  Shuso	
  Hossen.	
  A	
  couple	
  from	
  England,	
  Ian	
  and	
  Tina,	
  have	
  been	
  the	
  “Head	
  Trainees”	
  or	
  Shuso	
  for	
  
the	
  past	
  month.	
  Their	
  job	
  as	
  I	
  see	
  it	
  is	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  everyone	
  is	
  living	
  up	
  to	
  their	
  commitments	
  and	
  maintaining	
  
the	
  rules	
  of	
  the	
  temple.	
  Those	
  rules	
  in	
  general	
  are	
  to	
  fully	
  parIcipate	
  in	
  the	
  Ango	
  (training	
  period)	
  schedule	
  and	
  
to	
  be	
  sure	
  that	
  all	
  the	
  work	
  gets	
  done	
  around	
  the	
  monastery.	
  The	
  ceremony	
  is	
  like	
  a	
  graduaIon.	
  They	
  officially	
  
become	
  senior	
  students	
  a\er	
  they	
  go	
  through	
  their	
  Shuso	
  Hossen.	
  

There	
  are	
  two	
  buildings	
  where	
  the	
  ceremony	
  takes	
  place.	
  One	
  is	
  called	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall.	
  This	
  is	
  normally	
  used	
  for	
  
sibng	
  meditaIon	
  and	
  services.	
  The	
  other	
  building	
  is	
  called	
  the	
  Zendo.	
  This	
  is	
  used	
  for	
  sibng	
  meditaIon	
  when	
  
there	
  are	
  larger	
  groups	
  and	
  to	
  perform	
  certain	
  ceremonies.	
  

We	
  start	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  Zendo	
  where	
  we	
  sit	
  in	
  meditaIon	
  unIl	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  proceed	
  to	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall.	
  In	
  the	
  Buddha 	
  
Hall	
  my	
  teacher,	
  Tenshin	
  Roshi	
  is	
  waiIng	
  there,	
  all	
  decked	
  out	
  in	
  special	
  robes.	
  Each	
  Shuso	
  (Head	
  Trainee)	
  is	
  
ritually	
  given	
  a	
  fan.	
  Then	
  we	
  line	
  up	
  outside	
  for	
  the	
  procession	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  Zendo.	
  It	
  started	
  raining,	
  hailing	
  and	
  
snowing.	
  We	
  carried	
  on	
  as	
  if	
  it	
  didn’t	
  maVer.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  soaking	
  kind	
  of	
  precipitaIon.	
  The	
  procession	
  is	
  
accompanied	
  by	
  bells,	
  drums	
  and	
  clacking	
  of	
  wood	
  pieces.	
  We	
  march	
  into	
  the	
  Zendo	
  where	
  guests	
  and	
  sangha	
  
(congregaIon)	
  members	
  are	
  waiIng.	
  We	
  all	
  take	
  our	
  seat	
  on	
  our	
  cushions.	
  My	
  job	
  is	
  to	
  be	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  Shuso’s	
  
assistant.	
  My	
  most	
  challenging	
  task	
  as	
  assistant	
  it	
  to	
  sIck	
  the	
  Shuso’s	
  cushion	
  under	
  his	
  ass	
  as	
  he	
  sits	
  and	
  to	
  hold	
  
his	
  sIck	
  while	
  he’s	
  doing	
  more	
  important	
  things.	
  Not	
  very	
  glamorous	
  but	
  apparently	
  someone	
  has	
  been	
  doing	
  
this	
  for	
  centuries.	
  

Each	
  Shuso	
  has	
  memorized	
  a	
  koan	
  (a	
  Zen	
  teaching	
  story)	
  to	
  present	
  to	
  the	
  sangha	
  and	
  the	
  teacher.	
  They	
  receive	
  
the	
  book	
  where	
  the	
  koan	
  is	
  handwriVen	
  out	
  for	
  them.	
  The	
  Shuso	
  reads	
  his	
  koan	
  and	
  gives	
  a	
  talk	
  about	
  his	
  
understanding	
  of	
  it.	
  Next	
  they	
  bow	
  to	
  everyone	
  several	
  Imes.	
  They	
  approach	
  the	
  Roshi	
  to	
  receive	
  the	
  shippei	
  (a	
  
long	
  wooden	
  staff).	
  This	
  staff	
  represents	
  the	
  great	
  power	
  of	
  the	
  dharma	
  (true	
  reality)	
  about	
  to	
  be	
  revealed	
  (my	
  
interpretaIon).	
  Then	
  he	
  opens	
  the	
  floor	
  to	
  quesIons.	
  This	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  ceremony	
  is	
  called	
  dharma	
  combat.	
  I’m	
  
sure	
  in	
  the	
  old	
  days	
  it	
  was	
  more	
  contenIous	
  but	
  today	
  it	
  seems	
  rather	
  tame.	
  People	
  in	
  the	
  audience	
  pepper	
  the	
  
Shuso	
  with	
  quesIons	
  about	
  the	
  koan	
  meant	
  to	
  test	
  their	
  understanding.	
  When	
  it’s	
  done	
  they	
  get	
  congratulated	
  
and	
  finally	
  they	
  ritually	
  return	
  the	
  staff	
  to	
  Roshi.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  say	
  that	
  for	
  my	
  part	
  I	
  never	
  dropped	
  the	
  staff	
  and	
  my	
  
Shuso’s	
  ass	
  always	
  had	
  a	
  cushion	
  to	
  sit	
  on.	
  Both	
  Shuso(s)	
  did	
  a	
  fine	
  job.	
  Soon	
  a\er	
  the	
  event	
  they	
  le\	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  
England.	
  

Now	
  it’s	
  my	
  turn	
  to	
  be	
  Shuso.	
  I	
  feel	
  ready	
  to	
  do	
  it.	
  My	
  Shuso	
  Hossen	
  will	
  be	
  on	
  May	
  10th	
  and	
  you	
  are	
  all	
  invited.	
  
                                                                                                 39
You	
  can	
  even	
  sign	
  up	
  to	
  ask	
  me	
  a	
  quesIon	
  in	
  Dharma	
  Combat.	
  “Bring	
  it	
  on”	
  –	
  GW	
  Bush.	
  I	
  would	
  be	
  honored	
  if	
  
you	
  could	
  make	
  it.	
  Please	
  go	
  to	
  www.zmc.org	
  for	
  more	
  details.	
  If	
  you	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  spend	
  the	
  night	
  here	
  please	
  
call	
  ahead.	
  There	
  are	
  very	
  comfortable	
  but	
  simple	
  accommodaIons	
  available	
  here	
  at	
  Yokoji.	
  The	
  town	
  of	
  Idyllwild	
  
is	
  about	
  20	
  minutes	
  away.	
  It’s	
  a	
  very	
  nice	
  small	
  town	
  surrounded	
  by	
  beauIful	
  mountains.	
  It’s	
  a	
  popular	
  weekend	
  
getaway	
  in	
  Southern	
  California.	
  There	
  are	
  plenty	
  of	
  B&B’s	
  available.	
  Please	
  let	
  me	
  know	
  if	
  you’re	
  planning	
  to	
  
make	
  the	
  trip	
  so	
  we	
  can	
  plan	
  accordingly.	
  Everyone	
  is	
  guaranteed	
  to	
  aVain	
  enlightenment	
  and	
  you’ll	
  get	
  a	
  good	
  
lunch	
  a\erwards.	
  

Changing	
  things	
  around
Rearrange	
  the	
  color	
  scheme
Where	
  is	
  my	
  old	
  hat?

One	
  step	
  then	
  another
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  May	
  25,	
  2009

It’s	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  training	
  period.	
  I’m	
  in	
  San	
  Diego	
  doing	
  all	
  my	
  medical	
  tests	
  and	
  doctor	
  visits	
  that	
  I’ve	
  been	
  
pubng	
  off	
  for	
  a	
  month	
  or	
  so.	
  I	
  feel	
  really	
  good	
  physically.	
  The	
  tests	
  show	
  that	
  my	
  tumors	
  are	
  growing	
  surely	
  but	
  
slowly.	
  The	
  day	
  of	
  the	
  tests	
  brings	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  very	
  quiet	
  place.	
  I	
  hope	
  against	
  hope	
  for	
  good	
  news	
  that	
  would	
  signify	
  
the	
  intercession	
  of	
  some	
  heavenly	
  force	
  to	
  whom	
  I’ve	
  paid	
  too	
  liVle	
  aVenIon	
  to	
  deserve	
  the	
  favor.	
  There’s	
  
always	
  the	
  possibility,	
  perhaps	
  even	
  the	
  inevitability,	
  that	
  the	
  result	
  will	
  bring	
  the	
  worst	
  case.	
  Tumors	
  show	
  up	
  in	
  
many	
  organs	
  and	
  the	
  old	
  ones	
  are	
  picking	
  up	
  steam.	
  Get	
  your	
  affairs	
  in	
  order.	
  The	
  Ime	
  has	
  come.	
  In	
  between	
  
tests	
  I	
  can	
  relax	
  knowing	
  I’ll	
  probably	
  be	
  ok	
  unIl	
  the	
  next	
  test.	
  I	
  passed	
  another	
  test.	
  I	
  can	
  relax	
  now..	
  

Many	
  things	
  have	
  changed	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  three	
  months.	
  The	
  path	
  has	
  clarified.	
  I	
  now	
  trust	
  that	
  the	
  next	
  step	
  is	
  
always	
  there	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me.	
  Soon	
  a\er	
  I	
  arrived	
  at	
  the	
  monastery	
  in	
  early	
  March	
  my	
  teacher	
  somehow	
  got	
  the	
  
impression	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  moving	
  up	
  to	
  Yokoji.	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  that	
  I	
  intended	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  when	
  the	
  training	
  
period	
  was	
  over	
  in	
  May.	
  He	
  was	
  fine	
  with	
  that	
  but	
  I	
  felt	
  some	
  disappointment.

Another	
  visiIng	
  Zen	
  teacher,	
  Eishu,	
  is	
  a	
  naturopath	
  and	
  oriental	
  medicine	
  pracIIoner	
  from	
  Hawaii.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  
looking	
  for	
  someone	
  to	
  guide	
  my	
  alternaIve	
  healing	
  strategy.	
  He	
  seemed	
  like	
  a	
  good	
  choice.	
  A\er	
  he	
  returned	
  
home	
  we	
  corresponded	
  and	
  developed	
  a	
  plan.	
  He	
  asked	
  me	
  to	
  write	
  my	
  noble	
  goals	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  five	
  and	
  ten	
  
years.	
  It	
  felt	
  like	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  career	
  form	
  quesIons.	
  I	
  thought	
  about	
  it	
  and	
  wrote	
  out	
  a	
  few	
  sentences	
  of	
  what	
  I	
  
saw	
  ahead	
  for	
  me.	
  The	
  next	
  Ime	
  we	
  spoke	
  he	
  clarified	
  what	
  he	
  was	
  looking	
  for.	
  Noble	
  goals	
  are	
  the	
  reason	
  for	
  
me	
  to	
  be	
  alive.	
  Why	
  not	
  die	
  now?	
  What	
  purpose	
  is	
  being	
  served?	
  What	
  good	
  would	
  come	
  out	
  of	
  it?	
  Obviously	
  I	
  
needed	
  to	
  do	
  more	
  work.

One	
  of	
  my	
  fellow	
  trainees	
  was	
  Taido.	
  He	
  is	
  a	
  late	
  forIes	
  guy	
  from	
  the	
  East	
  Coast.	
  He	
  recently	
  received	
  
transmission	
  from	
  his	
  teacher	
  and	
  is	
  a	
  newly	
  appointed	
  sensei	
  (teacher).	
  I’ve	
  come	
  to	
  deeply	
  respect	
  that	
  
accomplishment.	
  It’s	
  a	
  long	
  arduous	
  process.	
  When	
  I	
  looked	
  at	
  how	
  far	
  I’ve	
  come	
  in	
  my	
  training,	
  I	
  should	
  become	
  
a	
  teacher	
  early	
  in	
  the	
  next	
  century.	
  Taido’s	
  teacher,	
  Genpo,	
  told	
  him	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  move	
  from	
  his	
  comfortable	
  
home	
  and	
  make	
  himself	
  useful.	
  He	
  was	
  training	
  at	
  Yokoji	
  before	
  heading	
  off	
  to	
  SeaVle	
  to	
  start	
  teaching	
  there.	
  I’ve	
  
enjoyed	
  my	
  interviews	
  with	
  Taido.	
  He’s	
  not	
  that	
  far	
  removed	
  from	
  the	
  frustraIons	
  of	
  koan	
  study.	
  His	
  advice	
  was	
  
always	
  helpful	
  in	
  preparing	
  me	
  for	
  my	
  meeIngs	
  with	
  Tenshin	
  Roshi,	
  my	
  teacher.	
  At	
  one	
  point	
  he	
  asked	
  where	
  am	
  
I	
  needed?	
  

Something	
  was	
  afoot.	
  Here	
  I	
  was	
  doing	
  this	
  draconian	
  training	
  for	
  three	
  months.	
  I	
  was	
  feeling	
  like	
  “Hey,	
  I’m	
  
sacrificing	
  here!	
  I’ve	
  got	
  real	
  issues	
  I’m	
  dealing	
  with	
  here!	
  What’s	
  all	
  this	
  about	
  goals	
  and	
  being	
  needed?”	
  As	
  I	
  sat	
  
                                                                                            40
day	
  a\er	
  day	
  the	
  barriers	
  came	
  down	
  and	
  reality	
  came	
  forward.	
  Two	
  years	
  earlier	
  I	
  moved	
  to	
  Sweetwater	
  and	
  
studied	
  under	
  Seisen	
  Roshi.	
  I	
  went	
  there	
  broken	
  and	
  in	
  despair.	
  My	
  life	
  was	
  all	
  darkness.	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  tomb	
  
with	
  no	
  door.	
  Over	
  these	
  two	
  years	
  the	
  healing	
  power	
  of	
  the	
  sangha	
  and	
  the	
  firm,	
  caring	
  guidance	
  of	
  the	
  teacher	
  
brought	
  me	
  back	
  to	
  health.	
  I	
  was	
  strong	
  again.	
  Now	
  it	
  was	
  my	
  Ime	
  to	
  leave	
  and	
  be	
  useful.	
  Everyday	
  I	
  sat	
  I	
  felt	
  the	
  
choices	
  narrowing	
  unIl	
  there	
  was	
  only	
  a	
  single	
  choice.	
  It	
  was	
  early	
  morning.	
  We	
  start	
  our	
  first	
  sibng	
  at	
  5:10AM.	
  I 	
  
lit	
  the	
  incense	
  and	
  sat	
  down	
  at	
  my	
  seat.	
  In	
  the	
  quiet	
  morning	
  the	
  mind	
  has	
  barely	
  awakened	
  to	
  start	
  its	
  mischief.	
  
I	
  came	
  to	
  realize	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  needed	
  right	
  where	
  I	
  was.	
  Yokoji	
  is	
  my	
  home.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  coming	
  here	
  for	
  over	
  ten	
  
years.	
  The	
  truth	
  about	
  where	
  I	
  was	
  needed	
  and	
  my	
  noble	
  goals	
  became	
  undeniable.	
  One	
  step	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  the	
  
other,	
  just	
  that.	
  The	
  path	
  was	
  clear.	
  I	
  was	
  moving	
  to	
  Yokoji.	
  Every	
  morning	
  I	
  meet	
  with	
  my	
  teacher,	
  Tenshin.	
  This	
  
morning	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  take	
  up	
  residency.	
  He	
  agreed.	
  We	
  haven’t	
  built	
  anything	
  here	
  in	
  a	
  long	
  Ime.	
  
My	
  teacher	
  built	
  this	
  place	
  and	
  now	
  it’s	
  finished.	
  I	
  asked	
  him	
  to	
  build	
  a	
  storage	
  unit	
  rather	
  than	
  pay	
  a	
  storage	
  
company.	
  His	
  eyes	
  lit	
  up.	
  He	
  was	
  back	
  in	
  business.	
  With	
  all	
  the	
  trainees	
  he	
  built	
  a	
  great	
  storage	
  unit	
  for	
  me	
  in	
  a	
  
maVer	
  of	
  ten	
  days.

A	
  few	
  of	
  us	
  went	
  down	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  and	
  loaded	
  up	
  a	
  truck	
  with	
  all	
  my	
  dwindling	
  possessions.	
  We	
  stayed	
  at	
  a	
  
condo	
  where	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  trainees	
  parents	
  live.	
  He’s	
  a	
  young	
  man	
  and	
  his	
  parents	
  are	
  my	
  age.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  nice	
  condo	
  
on	
  Mission	
  Bay.	
  I	
  was	
  reminded	
  of	
  how	
  different	
  my	
  path	
  has	
  been.	
  A	
  truckload	
  of	
  stuff	
  was	
  all	
  that	
  was	
  le\.	
  
There	
  were	
  only	
  two	
  things	
  I	
  valued.	
  The	
  first	
  was	
  the	
  Nichiren	
  scroll	
  called	
  the	
  Gohonzon.	
  I	
  received	
  it	
  in	
  June	
  of	
  
1971.	
  It	
  signified	
  my	
  conversion	
  to	
  Buddhism.	
  I	
  vowed	
  to	
  protect	
  this	
  all	
  my	
  life.	
  The	
  other	
  thing	
  was	
  a	
  hummel	
  of	
  
a	
  child	
  on	
  a	
  fence	
  looking	
  at	
  a	
  bluebird.	
  It	
  belonged	
  to	
  my	
  mother’s	
  father.	
  When	
  he	
  bought	
  it	
  he	
  said	
  it	
  
reminded	
  him	
  of	
  me.	
  I	
  loved	
  my	
  grandfather.	
  I	
  would	
  visit	
  with	
  him	
  in	
  his	
  declining	
  days.	
  I	
  would	
  sit	
  with	
  him	
  and	
  
I	
  always	
  felt	
  loved	
  by	
  him.	
  He	
  was	
  very	
  special	
  to	
  me.	
  When	
  I	
  receive	
  that	
  hummel	
  I	
  knew	
  he	
  felt	
  the	
  same	
  about	
  
me.	
  

This	
  step	
  is	
  complete.	
  I	
  live	
  in	
  a	
  place	
  where	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  contend	
  with	
  four	
  seasons.	
  I	
  thought	
  I	
  le\	
  that	
  behind	
  
when	
  I	
  moved	
  to	
  San	
  Diego.	
  This	
  place	
  is	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  mile	
  long	
  dirt	
  road,	
  five	
  miles	
  from	
  the	
  main	
  road.	
  We	
  are	
  
dependent	
  on	
  the	
  sun	
  and	
  generator	
  for	
  electricity.	
  When	
  it	
  snows	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  plow	
  the	
  road	
  and	
  shovel	
  the	
  
place	
  clean.	
  Thank	
  God	
  for	
  May.	
  However,	
  it’s	
  a	
  quiet	
  place	
  and	
  you	
  have	
  to	
  make	
  an	
  effort	
  to	
  distract	
  yourself.	
  
Make	
  no	
  mistake,	
  I	
  give	
  it	
  my	
  all.	
  There’s	
  a	
  slow	
  internet	
  connecIon,	
  no	
  cell	
  phone,	
  no	
  microwave,	
  no	
  radio	
  or	
  
TV.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  take	
  a	
  long	
  walk	
  to	
  the	
  kitchen	
  if	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  eat.	
  The	
  result	
  of	
  being	
  here	
  for	
  these	
  three	
  months	
  has	
  
been	
  wonderful.	
  The	
  training	
  consists	
  of	
  gebng	
  up	
  early,	
  doing	
  our	
  sibng	
  and	
  walking	
  meditaIon,	
  eat,	
  work	
  and	
  
do	
  it	
  over	
  again	
  and	
  again.	
  That’s	
  the	
  training	
  in	
  a	
  nutshell.	
  DistracIons	
  are	
  not	
  easily	
  accessible.	
  I	
  have	
  the	
  
determinaIon	
  to	
  do	
  everything	
  on	
  the	
  schedule.	
  That	
  doesn’t	
  leave	
  enough	
  Ime	
  for	
  distracIons.	
  A\er	
  some	
  
Ime,	
  the	
  mind	
  stops	
  looking	
  for	
  them	
  so	
  persistently.	
  I	
  seVled	
  into	
  a	
  slow,	
  peaceful	
  pace	
  of	
  life.	
  

Some	
  Ime	
  ago	
  my	
  sister	
  Pat	
  sent	
  me	
  an	
  email	
  about	
  a	
  medical	
  trial	
  going	
  on	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  I’ve	
  goVen	
  many	
  leads	
  
and	
  most	
  of	
  them	
  are	
  dead	
  ends.	
  She	
  contacted	
  the	
  researchers	
  and	
  struck	
  up	
  a	
  cyber	
  relaIonship	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  
the	
  invesIgators.	
  The	
  pace	
  of	
  trials	
  are	
  laboriously	
  slow.	
  The	
  test	
  drug	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  during	
  my	
  chemo	
  was	
  the	
  hot	
  
topic	
  ten	
  years	
  before	
  when	
  my	
  father’s	
  cancer	
  emerged.	
  The	
  goal	
  of	
  the	
  Singapore	
  trial	
  is	
  to	
  develop	
  a	
  vaccine	
  
for	
  my	
  cancer.	
  I	
  really	
  liked	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  it.	
  They	
  take	
  the	
  paIents	
  blood	
  and	
  segregate	
  the	
  dendrites	
  (immune	
  cells	
  
of	
  some	
  sort)	
  and	
  sensiIze	
  them	
  to	
  a	
  marker	
  of	
  the	
  cancer.	
  Cancer	
  cells	
  are	
  masters	
  at	
  hiding	
  from	
  the	
  immune	
  
system.	
  

About	
  six	
  months	
  ago	
  in	
  one	
  email	
  exchange,	
  our	
  friend	
  in	
  Singapore	
  said	
  the	
  government	
  had	
  authorized	
  a	
  
compassionate	
  use	
  program.	
  In	
  the	
  US	
  that	
  would	
  mean	
  the	
  results	
  of	
  the	
  trial	
  were	
  posiIve	
  enough	
  that	
  it	
  
would	
  be	
  inhumane	
  to	
  hold	
  it	
  back	
  from	
  otherwise	
  terminal	
  paIents	
  (that	
  would	
  be	
  me).	
  I	
  applied	
  for	
  it	
  and	
  no	
  
sooner	
  had	
  we	
  started	
  the	
  process	
  that	
  the	
  Singapore	
  government	
  cancelled	
  the	
  program.	
  I	
  took	
  that	
  in	
  stride	
  
                                                                                                41
and	
  determined	
  to	
  follow	
  up	
  every	
  few	
  months	
  to	
  try	
  to	
  get	
  on	
  their	
  next	
  trial.	
  A	
  few	
  weeks	
  ago,	
  a\er	
  I	
  decided	
  
to	
  move	
  to	
  Yokoji,	
  I	
  emailed	
  them.	
  Just	
  two	
  days	
  earlier	
  the	
  government	
  reinstated	
  the	
  program.	
  I	
  applied	
  and	
  
was	
  accepted.	
  Just	
  like	
  that	
  I’m	
  off	
  to	
  Singapore	
  for	
  five	
  months.	
  

I	
  realize	
  that	
  this	
  is	
  most	
  likely	
  my	
  last	
  stand.	
  It’s	
  a	
  long	
  shot.	
  I	
  showed	
  the	
  trial	
  descripIon	
  and	
  consent	
  form	
  to	
  
my	
  oncological	
  team	
  during	
  my	
  visit	
  last	
  week.	
  A	
  young	
  doctor	
  was	
  first	
  to	
  review	
  it.	
  He	
  said	
  it	
  was	
  bad	
  science	
  
that	
  could	
  kill	
  me.	
  He	
  pulled	
  out	
  all	
  the	
  stops	
  to	
  convince	
  me	
  that	
  this	
  was	
  a	
  bad	
  idea.	
  It	
  was	
  starIng	
  to	
  work.	
  He	
  
called	
  in	
  my	
  oncologist	
  who’s	
  been	
  in	
  the	
  business	
  a	
  good	
  long	
  Ime.	
  I	
  trusted	
  his	
  opinion	
  as	
  a	
  doctor	
  and	
  a	
  
friend.	
  Thankfully	
  he	
  was	
  more	
  posiIve.	
  He	
  poked	
  holes	
  in	
  the	
  young	
  doctor’s	
  concerns.	
  He	
  assured	
  me	
  that	
  the	
  
NaIonal	
  Cancer	
  Center	
  of	
  Singapore	
  would	
  not	
  do	
  bad	
  science.	
  They	
  are	
  a	
  highly	
  regarded	
  insItuIon	
  in	
  the	
  
small	
  world	
  of	
  cancer	
  research.	
  He	
  even	
  worked	
  closely	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  their	
  researchers,	
  Dr	
  Toh.	
  They	
  struck	
  up	
  a	
  
friendship.	
  As	
  the	
  small	
  world	
  turns,	
  he’s	
  the	
  doctor	
  that’s	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  my	
  treatment.	
  One	
  step	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  the	
  
other.	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  fear.

On	
  June	
  9th,	
  I	
  fly	
  to	
  Singapore.	
  I’ll	
  be	
  there	
  Ill	
  some	
  Ime	
  in	
  November.	
  Some	
  of	
  my	
  friends	
  and	
  family	
  have	
  
expressed	
  concern	
  about	
  being	
  there	
  all	
  alone.	
  I	
  never	
  really	
  thought	
  about	
  it.	
  I’ve	
  always	
  been	
  anxious	
  about	
  
loneliness.	
  When	
  I	
  lived	
  in	
  Miami	
  I	
  took	
  as	
  a	
  life	
  koan	
  “Be	
  at	
  home	
  in	
  my	
  own	
  skin.”	
  That	
  was	
  six	
  years	
  ago.	
  I’ve	
  
completed	
  that	
  koan.	
  I	
  am	
  at	
  home	
  in	
  my	
  own	
  skin.	
  I’ll	
  walk	
  one	
  step	
  at	
  a	
  Ime	
  on	
  Singapore	
  sidewalks;	
  I’ll	
  sit	
  on	
  
a	
  cushion	
  in	
  Singapore;	
  eat	
  food	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  I’ll	
  laugh,	
  cry,	
  sleep	
  and	
  wake	
  up	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  All	
  in	
  my	
  own	
  skin,	
  
one	
  step	
  at	
  a	
  Ime.

Only	
  carry	
  on
the	
  so\	
  weight	
  of	
  a	
  feather
landing	
  with	
  the	
  wind

PS:	
  If	
  you	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  Shuso	
  Hossen	
  ceremony,	
  it’s	
  posted	
  in	
  six	
  segments	
  on	
  YouTube.	
  Go	
  to	
  
www.youtube.com.	
  Type	
  in	
  the	
  search	
  box:	
  Shuso	
  Hossen.

Singapore
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Saturday,	
  June	
  13,	
  2009

A\er	
  my	
  Shuso	
  Hossen	
  things	
  calmed	
  down	
  at	
  Yokoji.	
  We	
  finished	
  the	
  training	
  period	
  with	
  a	
  seven	
  day	
  sesshin.	
  
I’ve	
  come	
  to	
  love	
  sesshin	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  The	
  first	
  one	
  I	
  did	
  was	
  for	
  New	
  Years	
  1999/2000.	
  I	
  touched	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  me	
  I	
  
never	
  knew.	
  Since	
  then	
  I’ve	
  done	
  these	
  retreats	
  to	
  the	
  extent	
  they	
  would	
  fit	
  into	
  a	
  busy	
  life.	
  In	
  the	
  years	
  since	
  
then,	
  I’ve	
  spent	
  only	
  a	
  dozen	
  days	
  out	
  of	
  365	
  in	
  sesshin,	
  they	
  brought	
  a	
  new	
  awareness	
  into	
  my	
  everyday.	
  

When	
  I	
  was	
  a	
  young	
  boy	
  growing	
  up	
  in	
  Northport	
  there	
  were	
  woods	
  all	
  around	
  my	
  neighborhood,	
  long	
  since	
  
covered	
  up	
  by	
  housing.	
  These	
  woods	
  were	
  inhabited	
  by	
  bands	
  of	
  cowboys	
  and	
  Indians,	
  cops	
  and	
  robbers,	
  pirates	
  
and	
  anything	
  my	
  gang	
  of	
  friends	
  could	
  dream	
  up.	
  It	
  was	
  our	
  world	
  created	
  out	
  of	
  imaginaIon.	
  Yet	
  these	
  were	
  
just	
  woods;	
  plants,	
  trees,	
  land,	
  birds	
  and	
  squirrels.	
  SomeImes	
  I	
  found	
  secret	
  hiding	
  places	
  where	
  no	
  one	
  could	
  
find	
  me.	
  These	
  were	
  all	
  mine	
  to	
  be	
  alone.	
  With	
  a	
  big	
  family	
  in	
  a	
  small	
  house	
  there	
  wasn’t	
  much	
  alone	
  Ime.	
  I	
  
could	
  take	
  a	
  break	
  where	
  no	
  one	
  could	
  find	
  me.	
  It	
  was	
  my	
  own	
  treasure	
  house.	
  Sesshin	
  is	
  like	
  that	
  for	
  me	
  now.	
  A	
  
place	
  to	
  sit	
  with	
  just	
  me;	
  my	
  home	
  in	
  the	
  woods.

As	
  Shuso	
  I	
  read	
  the	
  guidelines,	
  or	
  precauIons,	
  to	
  the	
  sesshin	
  parIcipants	
  at	
  the	
  opening.	
  We	
  are	
  to	
  be	
  silent,	
  to	
  
ourselves	
  and	
  do	
  everything	
  on	
  the	
  schedule,	
  without	
  excepIon.	
  Sesshin	
  is	
  called	
  the	
  “Way	
  Seeking	
  Mind”.	
  
That’s	
  how	
  I	
  feel	
  every	
  Ime	
  I	
  start	
  my	
  sesshin.	
  I	
  am	
  finding	
  that	
  secret	
  path	
  in	
  the	
  woods	
  through	
  all	
  the	
  twisted	
  
                                                                                               42
karma	
  of	
  my	
  living.	
  Once	
  it	
  opens	
  all	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  walk	
  one	
  step	
  at	
  a	
  Ime.	
  It’s	
  so	
  simple	
  that	
  it	
  makes	
  me	
  cry	
  
that	
  I	
  don’t	
  see	
  it	
  everyday.

The	
  sesshin	
  ended	
  and	
  all	
  my	
  friends	
  that	
  shared	
  this	
  training	
  period	
  le\.	
  We’d	
  been	
  together	
  since	
  March,	
  
working,	
  sibng,	
  eaIng	
  and	
  doing	
  this	
  simple	
  life	
  under	
  the	
  watchful	
  eyes	
  of	
  ancient	
  mountains.	
  Toan,	
  Taido,	
  
Bryan	
  and	
  Gearhardt	
  all	
  went	
  on	
  their	
  way.	
  Yugen,	
  Simon	
  and	
  I	
  stayed	
  on	
  to	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  Yokoji.	
  The	
  next	
  phase	
  of	
  
life	
  here	
  is	
  called	
  “the	
  interim	
  period”.	
  The	
  schedule	
  is	
  lighter.	
  We	
  sit	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  hours	
  a	
  day	
  with	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  
days	
  off	
  each	
  week.	
  There	
  were	
  a	
  few	
  yoga	
  groups	
  that	
  came	
  up.	
  We	
  transiIon	
  into	
  hotel	
  staff	
  and	
  kitchen	
  help.	
  
It’s	
  an	
  interesIng	
  Ime.	
  We	
  don’t	
  maintain	
  silence	
  except	
  when	
  we’re	
  in	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall	
  doing	
  our	
  pracIce.	
  A	
  
couple	
  of	
  people	
  came	
  up	
  to	
  join	
  us	
  for	
  a	
  Ime.	
  Eton	
  came	
  from	
  his	
  travels	
  around	
  India.	
  He’s	
  an	
  Israeli.	
  He	
  loves	
  
to	
  pick	
  wild	
  plants	
  and	
  make	
  tea.	
  We	
  all	
  watch	
  him	
  for	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  days	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  he	
  survives	
  before	
  we	
  
accept	
  his	
  offer	
  of	
  tea.	
  My	
  young	
  friend	
  from	
  OHI,	
  Laura,	
  came	
  up	
  for	
  the	
  last	
  day	
  of	
  sesshin.	
  She	
  had	
  never	
  done	
  
one	
  before	
  but	
  was	
  taken	
  by	
  it	
  and	
  decided	
  to	
  move	
  up	
  here	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  weeks	
  before	
  her	
  trip	
  to	
  Peru.	
  That’s	
  how	
  
it	
  is	
  here.	
  People	
  come	
  and	
  go.	
  Some	
  stay	
  for	
  years,	
  others	
  for	
  months.	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  end	
  in	
  mind.	
  Now	
  my	
  trip	
  to	
  
Singapore	
  permeated	
  my	
  stay	
  here.	
  I	
  had	
  determined	
  to	
  end	
  all	
  the	
  mischief	
  and	
  stay	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  mountains,	
  
maybe	
  forever.	
  Life	
  happened	
  another	
  way.

The	
  day	
  to	
  leave	
  came	
  by	
  in	
  its	
  own	
  Ime.	
  Simon	
  drove	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  airport.	
  We	
  decided	
  to	
  spend	
  a	
  night	
  at	
  my	
  
friend	
  Cathy’s	
  house.	
  She	
  opens	
  the	
  door	
  wide	
  for	
  me	
  and	
  I	
  feel	
  so	
  grateful	
  for	
  her	
  kindness.	
  Simon	
  is	
  our	
  cook	
  at	
  
Yokoji.	
  TradiIonally	
  this	
  posiIon,	
  called	
  the	
  Tenzo,	
  is	
  the	
  second	
  highest	
  in	
  the	
  temple.	
  We	
  eat	
  simply	
  and	
  very	
  
healthy.	
  However,	
  when	
  we	
  come	
  down	
  the	
  mountain	
  we’re	
  like	
  Jekyll	
  and	
  Hyde.	
  We	
  pig	
  out	
  on	
  all	
  the	
  crazy	
  food	
  
we	
  can.	
  Our	
  last	
  meal	
  was	
  at	
  Krispy	
  Crème.	
  I’ve	
  come	
  a	
  long	
  way	
  from	
  OHI.

The	
  trip	
  was	
  long.	
  Singapore	
  Airlines	
  takes	
  good	
  care	
  of	
  its	
  customers.	
  I	
  arrived	
  at	
  1AM.	
  It	
  was	
  another	
  day	
  back	
  
home.	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  room	
  at	
  the	
  MarrioV	
  Hotel	
  in	
  the	
  center	
  of	
  the	
  city	
  called	
  Orchard	
  Rd.	
  The	
  jetlag	
  is	
  sIll	
  with	
  me.	
  
I’m	
  slowly	
  crawling	
  my	
  way	
  to	
  this	
  Ime	
  zone.	
  When	
  I	
  first	
  arrived	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  sleep	
  so	
  I	
  went	
  downstairs	
  to	
  the	
  
lobby.	
  There	
  is	
  a	
  night	
  club	
  with	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  young	
  people	
  with	
  the	
  drive	
  and	
  energy	
  I	
  vaguely	
  remember.	
  I	
  walked	
  in	
  
to	
  soak	
  it	
  up.	
  There	
  were	
  all	
  these	
  young	
  bodies	
  dancing	
  and	
  carousing	
  with	
  each	
  other.	
  Watch	
  out,	
  here	
  comes	
  
Grandpa!	
  As	
  I	
  walked	
  by	
  all	
  these	
  young,	
  very	
  sexy	
  Asian	
  women,	
  I	
  noIced	
  there	
  were	
  many	
  of	
  them	
  that	
  
seemed	
  overly	
  friendly.	
  I	
  felt	
  I	
  was	
  miraculously	
  transformed	
  into	
  the	
  aVracIve	
  suave	
  man	
  I	
  always	
  knew	
  was	
  
hiding	
  under	
  this	
  old	
  bag	
  of	
  wrinkles	
  and	
  balding	
  crown.	
  It	
  didn’t	
  take	
  long	
  to	
  realize	
  that	
  what	
  they	
  saw	
  was	
  
money	
  under	
  this	
  old	
  bag	
  of	
  wrinkles	
  and	
  balding	
  crown.	
  Oh	
  well,	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  room	
  with	
  my	
  old	
  friend,	
  
reality.

Before	
  I	
  le\	
  I	
  started	
  looking	
  for	
  a	
  place	
  to	
  rent	
  here	
  for	
  my	
  stay.	
  Craigslist	
  has	
  become	
  the	
  worldwide	
  standard	
  
for	
  classified	
  ads.	
  It	
  didn’t	
  take	
  long	
  before	
  I	
  was	
  perusing	
  the	
  personal	
  ads.	
  I	
  wrote	
  to	
  several	
  women	
  and	
  
introduced	
  myself.	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  few	
  replies	
  and	
  this	
  has	
  dominated	
  my	
  experience	
  here.	
  I’ve	
  only	
  been	
  here	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  
days	
  but	
  I’ve	
  been	
  on	
  a	
  whirlwind	
  tour	
  of	
  Singapore	
  ever	
  since	
  I	
  arrived	
  with	
  different	
  ladies.	
  Each	
  one	
  has	
  
brought	
  their	
  own	
  gi\	
  to	
  me	
  and	
  I’m	
  not	
  sure	
  what	
  to	
  do	
  with	
  it.	
  I’m	
  very	
  grateful	
  but	
  so	
  concerned	
  that	
  Kevin	
  is	
  
up	
  to	
  his	
  old	
  mischief.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  do	
  this	
  without	
  hurIng	
  someone	
  and	
  yet	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  get	
  off	
  
the	
  train.

In	
  the	
  last	
  three	
  days	
  I’ve	
  met	
  three	
  women	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  one	
  more	
  I’m	
  meeIng	
  today.	
  Almost	
  immediately	
  each	
  
one	
  of	
  them	
  asked	
  why	
  I	
  was	
  here.	
  I	
  found	
  it	
  hard	
  to	
  dodge	
  the	
  quesIon.	
  Why	
  would	
  anyone	
  be	
  in	
  Singapore	
  for	
  
five	
  months?	
  I	
  used	
  to	
  be	
  such	
  a	
  good	
  liar.	
  So	
  each	
  one	
  knows	
  my	
  situaIon	
  and	
  they	
  met	
  with	
  me	
  anyway.	
  Would	
  
I	
  do	
  the	
  same?	
  

                                                                                                    43
I	
  first	
  met	
  Ling.	
  She	
  has	
  helped	
  me	
  so	
  much.	
  She	
  got	
  me	
  started	
  with	
  a	
  real	
  estate	
  broker	
  looking	
  for	
  an	
  
apartment.	
  She	
  made	
  contact	
  with	
  a	
  bank	
  to	
  transfer	
  funds	
  here.	
  It	
  was	
  amazing	
  how	
  fast	
  she	
  took	
  charge	
  of	
  my	
  
situaIon.	
  She	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  her	
  favorite	
  Chinese	
  places.	
  I	
  saw	
  Chinatown	
  from	
  the	
  inside	
  out.	
  We	
  had	
  claypot	
  
chicken.	
  This	
  was	
  her	
  favorite.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  mine	
  but	
  I	
  politely	
  lied	
  and	
  said	
  it	
  was.	
  We	
  had	
  dumplings	
  at	
  another	
  
place.	
  I	
  liked	
  them.	
  She	
  invited	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  Korean	
  BBQ	
  with	
  her	
  friend	
  but	
  I	
  didn’t	
  have	
  the	
  Ime.	
  In	
  our	
  last	
  meeIng	
  
she	
  shared	
  some	
  challenges	
  in	
  her	
  life.	
  I	
  tend	
  to	
  bring	
  that	
  out	
  with	
  friends.	
  Perhaps	
  that’s	
  what	
  friends	
  are	
  for.	
  I	
  
know	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  be	
  her	
  friend	
  and	
  I’m	
  concerned	
  about	
  what	
  vision	
  she	
  has	
  in	
  her	
  head.	
  I’m	
  doing	
  my	
  best	
  not	
  to	
  
be	
  responsible	
  for	
  all	
  that.	
  

Yesterday	
  I	
  got	
  up	
  early	
  and	
  went	
  out	
  for	
  breakfast.	
  There	
  was	
  nothing	
  open	
  except	
  that	
  world	
  wide	
  treat,	
  
McDonalds.	
  It’s	
  very	
  big	
  here.	
  Watch	
  out	
  for	
  McCafe.	
  They	
  are	
  taking	
  on	
  Starbucks.	
  It’s	
  coming,	
  don’t	
  say	
  I	
  didn’t	
  
warn	
  you.	
  I	
  indulged	
  in	
  an	
  early	
  breakfast	
  sandwich	
  that	
  almost	
  tasted	
  like	
  the	
  ones	
  at	
  home.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  what	
  
they	
  use	
  for	
  sausage.	
  With	
  Hindus	
  and	
  Muslims	
  everywhere	
  what	
  poor	
  animal	
  is	
  le\?	
  

In	
  these	
  past	
  couple	
  of	
  days	
  I’ve	
  realized	
  that	
  Singapore	
  is	
  a	
  lot	
  like	
  an	
  Asian	
  Miami.	
  The	
  only	
  difference	
  is	
  that	
  
more	
  people	
  speak	
  English	
  here.	
  It’s	
  the	
  same	
  climate	
  and	
  a	
  busy	
  hub	
  of	
  all	
  the	
  cultures	
  that	
  surround	
  it.	
  It	
  all	
  
seems	
  like	
  a	
  strange	
  variaIon	
  of	
  home.	
  

I	
  waited	
  for	
  Anna.	
  We	
  missed	
  each	
  other	
  the	
  day	
  before.	
  She	
  didn’t	
  show	
  up	
  again	
  so	
  I	
  gave	
  up	
  on	
  her	
  and	
  went	
  
out	
  to	
  lunch	
  by	
  myself.	
  There	
  are	
  malls	
  everywhere	
  with	
  deep	
  catacombs	
  of	
  small	
  shops	
  and	
  underground	
  
passageways.	
  I	
  get	
  lost	
  in	
  every	
  one	
  of	
  them.	
  It’s	
  total	
  shopping	
  madness.	
  I’m	
  told	
  it’s	
  the	
  naIonal	
  past	
  Ime	
  of	
  
Singapore.	
  I	
  found	
  an	
  Asian	
  food	
  court.	
  It’s	
  very	
  busy	
  and	
  simple.	
  I	
  had	
  Indonesian	
  rice.	
  It	
  was	
  good	
  but	
  oddly	
  
cold.	
  So	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  eat	
  some	
  more	
  at	
  the	
  Indian	
  stall	
  and	
  had	
  some	
  naan	
  and	
  soupy	
  Indian	
  stuff.	
  He	
  baked	
  the	
  
naan	
  right	
  there	
  and	
  it	
  came	
  out	
  hot	
  and	
  fresh.	
  It	
  was	
  very	
  good.	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  room.	
  Anna	
  le\	
  a	
  note	
  for	
  
me	
  to	
  call	
  her.	
  We	
  finally	
  met	
  up.	
  She	
  asked	
  me	
  if	
  I	
  was	
  hungry.	
  I	
  told	
  her	
  I	
  just	
  ate	
  two	
  lunches.	
  She	
  heard	
  that	
  I	
  
was	
  hungry	
  and	
  took	
  me	
  for	
  some	
  Chinese	
  steamed	
  Chicken	
  and	
  rice.	
  It	
  was	
  good.	
  I	
  was	
  now	
  way	
  beyond	
  full.	
  
She	
  is	
  a	
  lovely	
  Chinese	
  woman	
  who	
  is	
  home	
  on	
  vacaIon	
  from	
  her	
  educaIon	
  in	
  San	
  Francisco.	
  She’s	
  studying	
  
graphic	
  design.	
  I	
  am	
  always	
  humbled	
  by	
  mundane	
  courage.	
  She	
  grew	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  heart	
  of	
  China	
  just	
  as	
  things	
  were	
  
rapidly	
  changing.	
  In	
  her	
  twenIes	
  (using	
  my	
  own	
  fuzzy	
  math)	
  she	
  picked	
  up	
  and	
  moved	
  to	
  Singapore	
  with	
  her	
  
younger	
  sister.	
  I’m	
  not	
  sure	
  how	
  but	
  she’s	
  managed	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  life	
  for	
  herself	
  here	
  and	
  is	
  sIll	
  invesIng	
  in	
  her	
  
educaIon.	
  She	
  came	
  to	
  the	
  US	
  without	
  speaking	
  English.	
  She	
  took	
  refuge	
  in	
  the	
  Chinese	
  community	
  for	
  most	
  of	
  
her	
  last	
  twenty	
  years	
  in	
  Singapore	
  and	
  never	
  learned	
  the	
  unofficial	
  official	
  language.	
  For	
  the	
  past	
  five	
  years	
  she	
  
studied	
  English	
  and	
  she	
  does	
  remarkably	
  well	
  (except	
  for	
  that	
  food	
  thing).	
  I	
  like	
  her	
  a	
  lot.	
  There’s	
  a	
  24	
  hour	
  
fitness	
  center	
  near	
  my	
  hotel	
  and	
  we’re	
  planning	
  to	
  go	
  together.	
  If	
  I	
  keep	
  eaIng	
  like	
  this	
  I’ll	
  need	
  to	
  spend	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
Ime	
  at	
  the	
  gym.	
  

Right	
  a\er	
  I	
  le\	
  Anna,	
  I	
  met	
  with	
  Sheryl.	
  She’s	
  something	
  out	
  of	
  a	
  Bollywood	
  script.	
  She	
  invited	
  me	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  
her	
  birthday	
  party	
  the	
  night	
  before	
  but	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  decline.	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  quite	
  up	
  to	
  that	
  yet.	
  I	
  feel	
  swept	
  up	
  in	
  her	
  
energy.	
  She’s	
  not	
  my	
  type	
  for	
  a	
  romanIc	
  relaIonship	
  but	
  I	
  feel	
  she’s	
  already	
  making	
  wedding	
  plans.	
  If	
  I’m	
  not	
  
careful	
  I	
  could	
  find	
  myself	
  any	
  day	
  at	
  a	
  Hindu	
  temple	
  all	
  dressed	
  in	
  strange	
  garb	
  with	
  a	
  cab	
  waiIng	
  to	
  whisk	
  us	
  off	
  
to	
  our	
  honeymoon.	
  We	
  went	
  out	
  with	
  her	
  friend	
  to	
  meet	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  expats	
  from	
  Finland	
  and	
  Sweden.	
  It	
  was	
  
party	
  Ime!	
  A\er	
  a	
  few	
  New	
  Zealand	
  beers	
  (very	
  good,	
  called	
  Harry’s)	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  another	
  bar	
  to	
  meet	
  up	
  with	
  
Marco’s	
  (the	
  Finnish	
  guy	
  and	
  boyfriend	
  of	
  Sheryl’s	
  friend)	
  hockey	
  mates.	
  They	
  were	
  mostly	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  drunken	
  
Canadians	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  living	
  in	
  Singapore	
  for	
  years.	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  few	
  Sapporos	
  (it	
  was	
  the	
  2	
  for	
  1	
  Happy	
  hour	
  beer)	
  
and	
  then	
  realized	
  this	
  was	
  not	
  what	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  doing	
  for	
  my	
  health.	
  Next	
  the	
  four	
  of	
  us	
  (Sheryl	
  and	
  friend,	
  
Marco	
  and	
  I)	
  went	
  to	
  LiVle	
  India	
  for	
  a	
  bite	
  to	
  eat.	
  The	
  restaurant	
  was	
  humble.	
  It	
  was	
  packed	
  with	
  Indians.	
  We	
  sat	
  
at	
  the	
  table	
  and	
  they	
  spread	
  out	
  banana	
  leaves.	
  On	
  top	
  of	
  that	
  came	
  rice	
  with	
  bowls	
  of	
  chicken,	
  muVon,	
  fish	
  roe	
  
                                                                                                  44
and	
  some	
  other	
  stuff.	
  We	
  ate	
  with	
  our	
  fingers	
  and	
  only	
  with	
  our	
  right	
  hand.	
  I	
  broke	
  off	
  some	
  bread	
  with	
  my	
  le\	
  
hand	
  and	
  dipped	
  it	
  into	
  some	
  sauces.	
  That	
  was	
  not	
  proper	
  Indian	
  manners.	
  Overlooking	
  that	
  Sheryl	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  
I	
  ate	
  with	
  my	
  fingers	
  like	
  a	
  naIve.	
  LiVle	
  did	
  she	
  know	
  I’ve	
  been	
  doing	
  it	
  for	
  years	
  when	
  no	
  one	
  was	
  looking.	
  We	
  
went	
  to	
  a	
  Nepalese	
  restaurant	
  for	
  tea.	
  We	
  had	
  a	
  good	
  conversaIon	
  about	
  Tibetan	
  Bardo	
  study.	
  Sheryl’s	
  friend	
  
aVends	
  a	
  Tibetan	
  temple	
  and	
  wants	
  to	
  take	
  me	
  there.	
  A	
  voice	
  in	
  my	
  head	
  is	
  telling	
  me	
  to	
  go	
  there	
  and	
  don’t	
  
come	
  out	
  unIl	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  leave.	
  We	
  finished	
  and	
  she	
  drove	
  me	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  hotel.	
  I’m	
  not	
  quite	
  over	
  the	
  jetlag.	
  I	
  
woke	
  up	
  at	
  3:30	
  and	
  decided	
  to	
  journal.

Today	
  I’ll	
  meet	
  with	
  Trixie.	
  God	
  help	
  me.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  here	
  less	
  than	
  three	
  days	
  and	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
  I’ve	
  been	
  swept	
  away	
  
by	
  events	
  of	
  my	
  own	
  choosing.	
  I’m	
  truly	
  going	
  with	
  the	
  flow	
  but	
  it’s	
  more	
  like	
  hanging	
  on	
  to	
  a	
  log	
  through	
  some	
  
unknown	
  rapids.	
  

I	
  remember	
  being	
  so	
  concerned	
  about	
  isolaIng	
  myself	
  here	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  I	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  focus	
  on	
  being	
  alone	
  
with	
  myself	
  and	
  my	
  way	
  seeking	
  mind.	
  What	
  the	
  hell	
  happened	
  to	
  that?

I’ve	
  made	
  contact	
  with	
  a	
  Zen	
  teacher.	
  I	
  won’t	
  see	
  her	
  unIl	
  the	
  24th.	
  I’ll	
  sort	
  all	
  this	
  out	
  by	
  then.	
  On	
  Tuesday	
  I	
  
have	
  my	
  first	
  medical	
  appointment.	
  Oh	
  yeah,	
  that’s	
  why	
  I’m	
  here.	
  I	
  remember	
  now.

Stranger	
  in	
  the	
  land
familiar	
  new,	
  nearly	
  friends
just	
  outside	
  their	
  home


India
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  July	
  13,	
  2009

A\er	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  weeks	
  living	
  out	
  of	
  a	
  suitcase	
  in	
  a	
  hotel	
  room	
  in	
  the	
  heart	
  of	
  Singapore's	
  busiest	
  street,	
  I	
  was	
  all	
  
set	
  to	
  take	
  an	
  apartment	
  for	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  was	
  here.	
  Ling	
  and	
  her	
  real	
  estate	
  agent	
  friend,	
  Angeline,	
  found	
  the	
  place	
  
for	
  me.	
  It	
  was	
  expensive	
  but	
  I	
  really	
  needed	
  a	
  home.	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  happy	
  with	
  the	
  terms	
  of	
  the	
  deal.	
  They	
  wanted	
  all	
  
five	
  months	
  paid	
  up	
  front	
  because	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  short	
  term	
  rental.	
  The	
  agent	
  charged	
  a	
  fee	
  to	
  me	
  that	
  I	
  found	
  out	
  was	
  
not	
  typical.	
  My	
  antennas	
  were	
  up	
  high.	
  

I	
  made	
  plans	
  to	
  meet	
  another	
  woman	
  for	
  coffee,	
  Larraine	
  Parry.	
  She	
  said	
  she	
  might	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  with	
  a	
  
place	
  to	
  live.	
  We	
  met	
  at	
  an	
  old	
  landmark,	
  the	
  Raffles	
  Hotel.	
  Raffles	
  was	
  the	
  man	
  that	
  bought	
  Singapore	
  from	
  
Malaysia	
  and	
  claimed	
  it	
  for	
  the	
  BriIsh.	
  Who	
  could	
  deny	
  a	
  man	
  named	
  Raffles?	
  I	
  imagine	
  he	
  came	
  with	
  big	
  shoes	
  
and	
  a	
  red	
  nose.	
  I	
  learned	
  that	
  he	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  beVer	
  examples	
  of	
  colonial	
  governance,	
  if	
  there	
  is	
  such	
  a	
  thing.	
  
He	
  respected	
  the	
  people	
  and	
  was	
  genuinely	
  interested	
  in	
  their	
  culture	
  and	
  welfare.	
  That	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  well	
  researched	
  
opinion	
  so	
  if	
  you	
  find	
  some	
  dirt	
  feel	
  free	
  to	
  pass	
  it	
  on	
  and	
  straighten	
  me	
  out.	
  Larraine	
  seemed	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  very	
  proper	
  
BriIsh	
  sounding	
  woman	
  who	
  grew	
  up	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  She	
  knew	
  a	
  friend	
  that	
  needed	
  a	
  roommate	
  to	
  share	
  the	
  cost	
  
of	
  her	
  apartment.	
  It	
  sounded	
  like	
  a	
  good	
  situaIon.	
  I	
  told	
  her	
  I	
  was	
  about	
  to	
  sign	
  this	
  deal	
  on	
  the	
  apartment	
  so	
  I	
  
wanted	
  to	
  meet	
  this	
  person	
  right	
  away.	
  She	
  finally	
  confessed	
  it	
  was	
  her	
  a\er	
  she	
  failed	
  to	
  uncover	
  my	
  inner	
  
madman.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  her	
  place.	
  It's	
  quite	
  nice	
  and	
  I	
  didn't	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  anything.	
  It's	
  less	
  than	
  half	
  the	
  cost	
  of	
  
what	
  I	
  was	
  about	
  to	
  do.	
  So	
  I	
  moved	
  in,	
  simple	
  as	
  that.	
  So	
  far	
  we've	
  goVen	
  along	
  very	
  well.	
  She	
  was	
  born	
  here	
  and	
  
remembers	
  a	
  Singapore	
  long	
  gone.	
  She's	
  Eurasian	
  but	
  looks	
  nothing	
  but	
  BriIsh	
  to	
  me.	
  As	
  we've	
  goVen	
  to	
  know	
  
each	
  other	
  she's	
  revealed	
  her	
  story.	
  It's	
  a	
  full	
  life	
  so	
  we	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  share.	
  There's	
  nothing	
  going	
  on	
  between	
  us	
  
beyond	
  roommates	
  and	
  I	
  wouldn't	
  imagine	
  it	
  going	
  much	
  further.	
  However,	
  it's	
  a	
  good	
  situaIon	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  friend	
  
around.	
  The	
  only	
  way	
  to	
  get	
  to	
  my	
  place	
  is	
  by	
  bus	
  so	
  I've	
  had	
  to	
  venture	
  out	
  beyond	
  the	
  subway.	
  The	
  main	
  
                                                                                                45
difference	
  between	
  them	
  is	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  be	
  aVenIve	
  and	
  know	
  where	
  I	
  am	
  by	
  sight	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  get	
  off	
  (or	
  alight	
  as	
  
they	
  say	
  here)	
  at	
  the	
  proper	
  stop.	
  That's	
  challenged	
  me	
  to	
  learn	
  more	
  about	
  the	
  place.	
  I'm	
  gebng	
  good	
  at	
  it.	
  

I've	
  aVended	
  several	
  Buddhist	
  groups.	
  The	
  first	
  was	
  a	
  Korean	
  Zen	
  group.	
  It	
  wasn't	
  easy	
  to	
  find.	
  They	
  pracIce	
  in	
  a	
  
second	
  floor	
  apartment.	
  I	
  walked	
  up	
  and	
  looked	
  in	
  to	
  see	
  about	
  15	
  people	
  doing	
  sazen.	
  I	
  didn't	
  want	
  to	
  disturb	
  
anyone	
  so	
  I	
  took	
  whatever	
  informaIon	
  I	
  could	
  find.	
  That	
  evening	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  their	
  regular	
  meeIng.	
  There	
  was	
  only	
  
a	
  couple	
  of	
  people	
  there	
  I	
  assume	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  a\ernoon	
  event.	
  They	
  have	
  a	
  remote	
  center	
  in	
  Malaysia	
  just	
  a	
  
half	
  hour	
  boat	
  ride	
  from	
  Singapore.	
  I	
  thought	
  that	
  maybe	
  that's	
  where	
  I	
  could	
  live	
  at	
  some	
  point.	
  It	
  would	
  be	
  
more	
  like	
  Yokoji.	
  I'll	
  check	
  it	
  out	
  soon.

I	
  then	
  aVended	
  a	
  Zen	
  group	
  in	
  the	
  Soto	
  Zen	
  tradiIon.	
  The	
  teacher,	
  Vivian,	
  holds	
  meeIngs	
  in	
  her	
  home.	
  She	
  
asked	
  me	
  to	
  come	
  early	
  so	
  I	
  planned	
  my	
  day	
  around	
  it.	
  It's	
  near	
  a	
  metro	
  staIon	
  so	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  cab	
  from	
  there.	
  I	
  was	
  
only	
  15	
  minutes	
  early	
  when	
  I	
  got	
  there.	
  It	
  took	
  some	
  Ime	
  to	
  find	
  the	
  elevator.	
  I	
  reached	
  for	
  my	
  cell	
  phone	
  and	
  
realized	
  I	
  had	
  le\	
  it	
  in	
  the	
  cab.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  security	
  desk	
  by	
  the	
  elevator	
  and	
  he	
  offered	
  me	
  the	
  phone.	
  I	
  called	
  
the	
  phone	
  and	
  the	
  driver	
  offered	
  to	
  come	
  back.	
  Now	
  I	
  was	
  just	
  on	
  Ime,	
  Singapore	
  style	
  (10	
  minutes	
  late).	
  Vivian	
  
took	
  me	
  into	
  a	
  room	
  to	
  chat.	
  I	
  told	
  her	
  my	
  history	
  with	
  Zen	
  and	
  she	
  invited	
  me	
  to	
  start	
  pracIcing	
  with	
  her.	
  The	
  
next	
  Sunday	
  they	
  sat	
  sazen	
  at	
  5:45	
  AM.	
  I	
  was	
  determined	
  to	
  get	
  there.	
  In	
  the	
  intervening	
  Ime	
  I	
  realized	
  there	
  
was	
  a	
  bus	
  that	
  went	
  from	
  my	
  home	
  and	
  stopped	
  at	
  Vivian's	
  home.	
  I	
  got	
  on	
  the	
  bus	
  and	
  made	
  it	
  on	
  Ime.	
  We	
  sat	
  
facing	
  the	
  wall.	
  Zen	
  is	
  similar	
  everywhere	
  I’ve	
  been.	
  It's	
  just	
  a	
  maVer	
  of	
  gebng	
  used	
  to	
  how	
  they	
  announce	
  the	
  
start	
  and	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  meditaIon	
  period;	
  how	
  they	
  bow	
  when	
  sibng	
  down	
  on	
  the	
  cushion;	
  gebng	
  up	
  from	
  the	
  
cushion;	
  do	
  their	
  walking	
  meditaIon	
  (kinhin);	
  how	
  they	
  chant;	
  how	
  they	
  announce	
  changes	
  with	
  the	
  bells,	
  how	
  
they	
  bow;	
  how	
  they	
  address	
  the	
  teacher	
  in	
  dokusan	
  (interview	
  with	
  the	
  student).	
  It	
  sounds	
  like	
  a	
  lot	
  but	
  it	
  only	
  
takes	
  a	
  short	
  while	
  to	
  master	
  it.	
  I	
  received	
  dokusan.	
  Vivian	
  is	
  a	
  good	
  teacher.	
  My	
  teacher,	
  Tenshin,	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  
when	
  I	
  met	
  her	
  I	
  should	
  start	
  with	
  a	
  compilaIon	
  of	
  Koans	
  called	
  the	
  Mumonkon.	
  Vivian	
  agreed	
  to	
  do	
  that	
  and	
  to	
  
my	
  disappointment	
  this	
  volume	
  starts	
  with	
  my	
  very	
  first	
  koan,	
  mu.	
  I	
  spent	
  six	
  years	
  with	
  this	
  koan.	
  Now	
  here	
  I	
  
was	
  back	
  at	
  it.	
  But	
  a\er	
  all	
  this	
  Ime	
  I	
  should	
  be	
  an	
  old	
  pro.	
  It	
  wasn't	
  that	
  way	
  at	
  all.	
  It	
  seems	
  as	
  though	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  
do	
  it	
  all	
  over	
  again	
  just	
  like	
  a	
  beginner.	
  The	
  koan	
  goes	
  like	
  this;	
  "A	
  student	
  asks	
  Joshua,	
  "Do	
  dogs	
  have	
  Buddha	
  
Nature?".	
  Joshua	
  replied,	
  "Mu!"	
  That’s	
  it.	
  So...what	
  is	
  mu.	
  I'm	
  sure	
  you	
  all	
  have	
  the	
  correct	
  answer	
  and	
  I'm	
  just	
  a	
  
Zen	
  luddite.	
  She	
  was	
  a	
  bit	
  stern	
  when	
  I	
  gave	
  her	
  my	
  answer.	
  All	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  spent	
  with	
  Tenshin	
  trying	
  to	
  answer	
  
this	
  gateway	
  koan	
  came	
  back	
  full	
  circle.	
  Once	
  I	
  got	
  over	
  the	
  iniIal	
  disappointment	
  at	
  not	
  being	
  a	
  Zen	
  superstar,	
  I	
  
seVled	
  into	
  the	
  pracIce	
  and	
  loving	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  get	
  to	
  spend	
  with	
  myself	
  being	
  myself.	
  Zen	
  pracIce,	
  there's	
  nothing	
  
like	
  it.

Right	
  a\er	
  the	
  early	
  Sunday	
  sibng	
  everyone	
  went	
  around	
  the	
  table	
  for	
  coffee	
  and	
  toast.	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  problem	
  here	
  in	
  
Singapore.	
  I	
  can't	
  understand	
  a	
  word	
  anyone	
  is	
  saying,	
  especially	
  in	
  a	
  group.	
  They	
  speak	
  a	
  language	
  that	
  has	
  been	
  
dubbed	
  "Singlish".	
  It's	
  a	
  Chinese	
  variaIon	
  and	
  the	
  accent	
  makes	
  it	
  hard	
  to	
  hear.	
  As	
  many	
  of	
  you	
  know	
  I	
  got	
  
hearing	
  aids	
  this	
  year	
  and	
  they	
  help	
  a	
  liVle.	
  Everyone	
  was	
  talking	
  and	
  laughing	
  and	
  I	
  just	
  sat	
  there	
  with	
  a	
  pasted	
  
grin	
  on	
  my	
  face.	
  Every	
  so	
  o\en	
  someone	
  asked	
  me	
  a	
  quesIon	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  slow	
  the	
  words	
  down	
  to	
  get	
  what	
  
they	
  were	
  saying.	
  It	
  was	
  frustraIng	
  but	
  I'm	
  sure	
  by	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  leave	
  I'll	
  be	
  beVer	
  at	
  it.	
  

My	
  next	
  stop	
  was	
  a	
  Nichiren	
  Buddhist	
  sect	
  called	
  Nichiren	
  Shu.	
  I	
  started	
  my	
  Buddhist	
  pracIce	
  in	
  1971	
  with	
  a	
  sect	
  
Nichiren	
  Shoshu.	
  "Sho"	
  means	
  true.	
  So	
  shoshu	
  means	
  true	
  sect.	
  Therefore,	
  Nichiren	
  Shu	
  is	
  Nichiren	
  Sect.	
  
Nichiren	
  Shoshu	
  means	
  Nichiren	
  True	
  Sect.	
  The	
  difference	
  is	
  significant.	
  If	
  you	
  call	
  yourself	
  true	
  than	
  others	
  are	
  
usually	
  less	
  than	
  true.	
  Nichiren	
  is	
  a	
  thirteenth	
  century	
  Buddhist	
  priest.	
  He	
  believed	
  that	
  the	
  highest	
  teaching	
  in	
  
Buddhism	
  is	
  the	
  Lotus	
  Sutra.	
  He	
  spent	
  his	
  life	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  Japan	
  to	
  realize	
  this.	
  He	
  was	
  persecuted	
  and	
  they	
  
aVempted	
  to	
  execute	
  him	
  for	
  criIcizing	
  the	
  government.	
  Eventually	
  he	
  reIred	
  and	
  a	
  few	
  disciples	
  carried	
  on	
  
a\er	
  that.	
  I	
  know	
  of	
  these	
  two	
  sects.	
  The	
  group	
  in	
  Singapore	
  was	
  mostly	
  Chinese	
  with	
  a	
  new	
  young	
  Japanese	
  
                                                                                                    46
priest.	
  They	
  welcomed	
  me	
  as	
  the	
  strange	
  white	
  guy	
  in	
  the	
  group.	
  Everyone	
  was	
  interested	
  in	
  what	
  I	
  was	
  doing	
  
there.	
  Finally	
  we	
  started	
  the	
  service.	
  I	
  was	
  impressed	
  how	
  their	
  pracIce	
  is	
  so	
  much	
  closer	
  to	
  Zen.	
  I	
  enjoyed	
  it	
  a	
  
lot.	
  A\er	
  the	
  service	
  the	
  young	
  priest	
  gave	
  a	
  sermon	
  in	
  English	
  with	
  a	
  Chinese	
  interpreter	
  for	
  many	
  of	
  the	
  
congregants.	
  His	
  accent	
  was	
  hard	
  to	
  follow	
  and	
  his	
  message	
  was	
  hard	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  grasp.	
  He	
  finished	
  his	
  talk	
  too	
  
early	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  asked	
  to	
  speak	
  to	
  them.	
  Being	
  the	
  shy	
  type,	
  I	
  took	
  the	
  microphone	
  and	
  told	
  everyone	
  my	
  whole	
  
story.	
  They	
  all	
  came	
  up	
  to	
  me	
  and	
  offered	
  their	
  support	
  to	
  me.	
  They	
  served	
  a	
  pot	
  luck	
  lunch	
  of	
  homemade	
  
Chinese	
  food	
  that	
  was	
  followed	
  by	
  an	
  hour	
  of	
  chanIng	
  the	
  daimoku:	
  "Namu	
  myoho	
  renge	
  kyo".	
  This	
  is	
  the	
  heart	
  
of	
  the	
  teaching.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  whiteboard	
  with	
  both	
  English	
  and	
  Chinese	
  on	
  it.	
  It	
  said,	
  "Daimoku	
  objecIve	
  for	
  
today:	
  Kevin	
  Riley's	
  health	
  and	
  speedy	
  recovery."	
  I	
  couldn't	
  just	
  leave	
  so	
  I	
  stayed	
  and	
  joined	
  in	
  the	
  chanIng.	
  A\er	
  
all	
  that,	
  a	
  man	
  came	
  up	
  and	
  offered	
  me	
  some	
  Chinese	
  medicine	
  for	
  my	
  condiIon.	
  He	
  went	
  home	
  to	
  get	
  it	
  and	
  
another	
  man,	
  Alvin,	
  drove	
  me	
  to	
  pick	
  it	
  up.	
  As	
  we	
  drove	
  I	
  took	
  out	
  my	
  map	
  to	
  keep	
  track	
  of	
  where	
  I	
  was	
  going.	
  I	
  
quickly	
  realized	
  that	
  I	
  knew	
  where	
  I	
  was	
  but	
  my	
  new	
  friend	
  didn't.	
  He	
  was	
  pushing	
  seventy	
  and	
  grew	
  up	
  in	
  
Singapore.	
  However,	
  he	
  got	
  lost	
  several	
  Imes.	
  Finally	
  we	
  arrived	
  and	
  the	
  man	
  handed	
  me	
  a	
  plasIc	
  jar	
  of	
  white	
  
powder.	
  I	
  was	
  to	
  keep	
  it	
  refrigerated.	
  I	
  was	
  to	
  mix	
  one	
  scoop	
  in	
  cold	
  water	
  and	
  add	
  an	
  equal	
  amount	
  of	
  hot	
  water	
  
and	
  take	
  it	
  twice	
  a	
  day	
  for	
  three	
  days	
  and	
  take	
  three	
  days	
  off.	
  I	
  had	
  enough	
  for	
  two	
  months.	
  He	
  then	
  said	
  "No	
  
sexual	
  acIvity	
  while	
  on	
  this."	
  If	
  ever	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  Ime	
  for	
  this	
  medicine	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  now.	
  I	
  started	
  taking	
  it	
  and	
  
Larraine	
  cauIoned	
  me	
  about	
  Chinese	
  medicine.	
  He	
  didn't	
  charge	
  me	
  for	
  it	
  and	
  I	
  am	
  accepIng	
  all	
  the	
  help	
  I	
  can	
  
get.	
  It	
  wasn't	
  too	
  bad	
  as	
  far	
  as	
  Chinese	
  herbs	
  go.	
  Some	
  of	
  them	
  are	
  truly	
  awful.	
  This	
  was	
  just	
  "not	
  good	
  but	
  
tolerable".	
  The	
  problem	
  is	
  keeping	
  it	
  cool	
  while	
  travelling.	
  I	
  just	
  did	
  my	
  best.	
  

My	
  friend	
  of	
  35	
  years,	
  Babu	
  Shankar,	
  grew	
  up	
  in	
  Chennai	
  and	
  moved	
  to	
  the	
  US	
  in	
  his	
  late	
  teens.	
  He	
  aVended	
  
college	
  here	
  and	
  married	
  a	
  friend	
  of	
  mine,	
  Anne	
  Orlando,	
  a	
  fellow	
  pracIIoner	
  of	
  Nichiren	
  Shoshu.	
  They	
  lived	
  in	
  
New	
  Jersey	
  and	
  I	
  lived	
  on	
  Long	
  Island.	
  We	
  were	
  about	
  two	
  hours	
  from	
  each	
  other.	
  I	
  saw	
  his	
  son	
  in	
  the	
  maternity	
  
ward.	
  He's	
  now	
  30	
  years	
  old.	
  A	
  few	
  years	
  later	
  he	
  accepted	
  an	
  offer	
  to	
  move	
  to	
  LA.	
  It	
  looked	
  as	
  though	
  I	
  would	
  
lose	
  some	
  dear	
  friends	
  unIl	
  a	
  few	
  weeks	
  later	
  I	
  accepted	
  an	
  offer	
  to	
  move	
  to	
  San	
  Diego.	
  We	
  both	
  now	
  live	
  on	
  the	
  
opposite	
  coast	
  the	
  same	
  distance	
  away	
  from	
  each	
  other.	
  Every	
  year	
  we	
  get	
  together	
  for	
  Thanksgiving	
  and	
  keep	
  in	
  
touch	
  the	
  way	
  good	
  friends	
  with	
  busy	
  lives	
  do.	
  We	
  always	
  planned	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  trip	
  to	
  his	
  homeland,	
  India,	
  but	
  
never	
  had	
  the	
  Ime,	
  as	
  busy	
  friends	
  don't.	
  He	
  travels	
  to	
  Asia	
  a	
  lot	
  on	
  business	
  and	
  happened	
  to	
  be	
  going	
  home	
  to	
  
visit	
  his	
  family.	
  He	
  invited	
  me	
  to	
  come	
  along.	
  He	
  would	
  be	
  in	
  Chennai	
  (Madras)	
  on	
  June	
  30th,	
  the	
  day	
  of	
  my	
  first	
  
treatment.	
  Our	
  iInerary	
  included	
  Chennai,	
  Delhi,	
  Hyderabad	
  and	
  Bangalore.	
  I	
  agreed	
  to	
  meet	
  up	
  with	
  him	
  in	
  
Chennai	
  a\er	
  my	
  treatment.	
  I	
  realized	
  a	
  liVle	
  too	
  late	
  that	
  you	
  needed	
  a	
  visa	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  India	
  and	
  that	
  it	
  takes	
  more	
  
Ime	
  than	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  get	
  one.	
  The	
  Friday	
  before	
  my	
  Tuesday	
  departure	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  Indian	
  Embassy	
  to	
  plead	
  my	
  
case.	
  It	
  didn't	
  seem	
  like	
  too	
  big	
  a	
  deal,	
  so	
  I	
  le\	
  feeling	
  that	
  this	
  would	
  all	
  work	
  out.	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  Embassy	
  on	
  
Monday	
  just	
  in	
  case	
  it	
  was	
  ready.	
  I	
  was	
  told	
  that	
  the	
  paperwork	
  is	
  stuck	
  in	
  San	
  Francisco	
  and	
  if	
  they	
  don't	
  send	
  it	
  
back	
  I	
  will	
  not	
  get	
  my	
  visa.	
  Now	
  the	
  plot	
  thickens.	
  I	
  was	
  scheduled	
  to	
  leave	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  and	
  the	
  only	
  Ime	
  I	
  could	
  
call	
  San	
  Francisco	
  is	
  late	
  at	
  night.	
  I	
  stayed	
  up	
  Ill	
  2AM	
  and	
  tried	
  to	
  get	
  through	
  but	
  no	
  one	
  answered.	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  
their	
  website	
  and	
  they	
  showed	
  a	
  company	
  to	
  whom	
  they	
  outsource	
  local	
  visa	
  processing.	
  I	
  called	
  them	
  and	
  got	
  a	
  
person	
  on	
  the	
  phone.	
  He	
  simply	
  said;	
  "You're	
  screwed.	
  The	
  Indian	
  government	
  only	
  moves	
  for	
  life	
  or	
  death	
  
maVers.	
  No	
  one	
  will	
  answer	
  your	
  call	
  and	
  no	
  one	
  will	
  help	
  you.	
  Give	
  up	
  now	
  and	
  get	
  some	
  sleep."	
  Well,	
  I	
  wrote	
  
an	
  email	
  to	
  the	
  person	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  these	
  maVers,	
  went	
  to	
  sleep	
  and	
  hoped	
  for	
  the	
  best.	
  I	
  got	
  up	
  early	
  and	
  
realized	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  only	
  4PM	
  in	
  San	
  Francisco	
  so	
  I	
  gave	
  it	
  one	
  more	
  try.	
  I	
  got	
  an	
  answer!	
  The	
  person	
  heard	
  my	
  
story,	
  looked	
  me	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  computer.	
  She	
  said	
  the	
  paperwork	
  had	
  been	
  processed	
  on	
  Friday	
  and	
  sent	
  back	
  to	
  
Singapore.	
  I	
  also	
  got	
  an	
  answer	
  from	
  my	
  email	
  saying	
  the	
  same	
  thing.	
  So	
  much	
  for	
  listening	
  to	
  cynics.	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  
the	
  Indian	
  Embassy	
  that	
  morning	
  and	
  got	
  my	
  visa	
  promptly.	
  What's	
  all	
  the	
  worry	
  about?	
  

Right	
  a\er	
  that	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  my	
  first	
  treatment.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  wait	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  and	
  was	
  gebng	
  concerned	
  about	
  my	
  flight.	
  
I	
  had	
  plenty	
  of	
  Ime	
  but	
  for	
  some	
  reason	
  airports	
  and	
  flight	
  schedules	
  make	
  me	
  anxious.	
  They	
  always	
  did,	
  
                                                                                                  47
perhaps	
  they	
  always	
  will.	
  Dr	
  Toh	
  reviewed	
  the	
  procedure	
  with	
  me.	
  He	
  said	
  my	
  dendrites	
  were	
  "fantasIc!"	
  Those	
  
are	
  the	
  cells	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  supercharged	
  to	
  aVack	
  my	
  cancer	
  cells.	
  He	
  was	
  very	
  excited	
  about	
  this.	
  I’ve	
  known	
  
for	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  that	
  people	
  love	
  my	
  for	
  my	
  dendrites.	
  I’ve	
  o\en	
  wondered	
  if	
  I	
  had	
  sick	
  liVle	
  girlie	
  dendrites	
  if	
  you	
  
would	
  all	
  sIll	
  love	
  me.	
  I’ll	
  never	
  know.	
  My	
  doctor	
  thinks	
  this	
  is	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  healthy	
  things	
  I	
  do.	
  If	
  so,	
  I'm	
  sIll	
  
riding	
  on	
  my	
  OHI	
  detox.	
  I	
  haven't	
  been	
  all	
  that	
  good	
  since	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  Singapore.	
  I've	
  been	
  vegetarian	
  ever	
  since	
  the	
  
last	
  visit	
  but	
  I	
  can't	
  be	
  sure	
  how	
  healthy	
  it	
  all	
  is.	
  I'm	
  starIng	
  to	
  cook	
  for	
  myself	
  more.	
  However,	
  a	
  nice	
  vegetarian	
  
Chinese	
  or	
  Indian	
  lunch	
  always	
  seems	
  like	
  a	
  good	
  idea.	
  Be	
  that	
  as	
  it	
  may,	
  my	
  dendrites	
  are	
  ass	
  kicking	
  good.	
  A\er	
  
the	
  visit	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  a	
  room	
  where	
  a	
  technician	
  had	
  a	
  thin	
  syringe	
  of	
  the	
  vaccine	
  ready	
  to	
  go.	
  She	
  poked	
  into	
  my	
  
inner	
  thigh	
  just	
  under	
  the	
  skin.	
  It	
  reminded	
  me	
  of	
  the	
  TB	
  vaccines	
  of	
  old.	
  She	
  poked	
  me	
  four	
  Imes	
  and	
  le\	
  a	
  liVle	
  
raised	
  puff	
  of	
  skin.	
  It	
  went	
  down	
  by	
  the	
  next	
  day.	
  So	
  we're	
  off	
  and	
  running.	
  Ride	
  like	
  the	
  wind,	
  my	
  trusty	
  
dendrites,	
  and	
  smite	
  the	
  enemy	
  down!

I	
  got	
  back	
  in	
  plenty	
  of	
  Ime	
  for	
  my	
  flight.	
  I	
  live	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  airport.	
  I	
  did	
  my	
  usual	
  checklist	
  and	
  got	
  into	
  a	
  cab.	
  I	
  
went	
  into	
  the	
  terminal	
  and	
  realized	
  I	
  forgot	
  my	
  iInerary.	
  In	
  the	
  days	
  of	
  e-­‐Ickets	
  that's	
  no	
  problem.	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  to	
  
the	
  desk	
  and	
  handed	
  over	
  my	
  passport.	
  The	
  clerk	
  searched	
  away	
  and	
  found	
  nothing.	
  That's	
  not	
  good.	
  A\er	
  a	
  few	
  
minutes	
  of	
  checking	
  every	
  which	
  way	
  I	
  realized	
  I	
  was	
  at	
  the	
  wrong	
  airline.	
  Everything	
  was	
  just	
  fine	
  again.	
  I	
  got	
  
onto	
  my	
  Singapore	
  Air	
  flight	
  with	
  no	
  problems.	
  It's	
  a	
  great	
  airline.	
  Flying	
  economy	
  on	
  this	
  airline	
  is	
  beVer	
  than	
  
first	
  class	
  in	
  the	
  US.	
  The	
  meal	
  is	
  great,	
  the	
  drinks	
  are	
  free,	
  there's	
  a	
  TV	
  on	
  every	
  seat.	
  There's	
  twice	
  the	
  staff	
  of	
  a	
  
US	
  carrier.	
  I	
  can’t	
  imagine	
  what	
  goes	
  on	
  in	
  first	
  class.	
  There	
  must	
  be	
  an	
  orgasmatron	
  in	
  every	
  seat.

When	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  Chennai	
  I	
  was	
  greeted	
  by	
  a	
  driver	
  sent	
  by	
  Babu.	
  His	
  name	
  was	
  Booparthy.	
  He's	
  a	
  family	
  friend	
  as	
  
well	
  as	
  a	
  driver.	
  Driving	
  in	
  Chennai	
  is	
  not	
  for	
  the	
  faint	
  of	
  heart.	
  I	
  would	
  never	
  aVempt	
  it.	
  I	
  would	
  sit	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  
of	
  the	
  road	
  crying	
  for	
  my	
  mommy.	
  It	
  makes	
  NYC	
  look	
  like	
  Mayberry,	
  RFD.	
  The	
  basic	
  rule	
  of	
  the	
  road	
  is	
  get	
  there	
  
faster	
  than	
  anyone	
  else.	
  Red	
  lights	
  mean,	
  "there's	
  appears	
  to	
  be	
  an	
  intersecIon	
  here	
  and	
  that	
  means	
  that	
  if	
  you	
  
stop	
  the	
  cross	
  traffic	
  will	
  block	
  your	
  progress	
  so	
  it's	
  best	
  to	
  keep	
  going	
  to	
  prevent	
  that	
  from	
  happening."	
  Of	
  
course	
  a	
  green	
  light	
  means	
  go	
  and	
  that	
  makes	
  for	
  interesIng	
  negoIaIons.	
  Lane	
  markings	
  and	
  stop	
  signs	
  are	
  
simply	
  decoraIve.	
  They	
  have	
  no	
  meaning	
  whatsoever.	
  It	
  took	
  about	
  a	
  half	
  hour	
  and	
  a	
  few	
  months	
  off	
  my	
  life	
  to	
  
get	
  to	
  Babu's	
  family	
  home.	
  I	
  was	
  enthusiasIcally	
  greeted	
  by	
  everyone	
  upon	
  my	
  arrival.	
  It's	
  a	
  very	
  typical	
  Indian	
  
home.	
  When	
  a	
  woman	
  marries	
  she	
  lives	
  in	
  the	
  home	
  of	
  her	
  husband's	
  family.	
  So	
  in	
  this	
  home	
  is	
  Babu's	
  sister,	
  
Gohwri	
  and	
  her	
  son,	
  Arun.	
  The	
  spelling	
  here	
  is	
  all	
  wrong	
  but	
  it	
  is	
  phoneIcally	
  inaccurate	
  as	
  well.	
  Her	
  brother-­‐in-­‐
law,	
  Jugga,	
  also	
  lives	
  here	
  with	
  his	
  wife,	
  Gita	
  and	
  their	
  son,	
  Gopi.	
  The	
  matron	
  of	
  the	
  house	
  is	
  Mommy	
  that	
  means	
  
AunIe.	
  She's	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  the	
  household	
  and	
  Jugga	
  is	
  the	
  man	
  in	
  charge.	
  Mommy	
  does	
  all	
  the	
  cooking.	
  Gita	
  and	
  
Gohwri	
  help	
  out	
  with	
  the	
  household	
  and	
  kitchen	
  chores.	
  It's	
  a	
  very	
  comfortable	
  home	
  that	
  has	
  everything	
  one	
  
needs.	
  They	
  were	
  all	
  concerned	
  that	
  I	
  couldn't	
  sleep	
  in	
  the	
  heat.	
  It	
  was	
  about	
  150	
  degrees	
  with	
  300%	
  humidity.	
  
However,	
  I	
  told	
  them	
  that	
  I	
  won't	
  have	
  any	
  problem.	
  The	
  reason	
  I	
  said	
  that	
  is	
  because	
  I	
  knew	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  suitcase	
  full	
  
of	
  powerful	
  pharmaceuIcals	
  that	
  could	
  knock	
  out	
  an	
  elephant	
  and	
  I	
  wasn't	
  afraid	
  to	
  use	
  them.	
  They	
  had	
  a	
  ceiling	
  
fan	
  going	
  at	
  full	
  blast	
  and	
  a	
  "cooler"	
  that	
  at	
  least	
  blew	
  air	
  in	
  the	
  opposite	
  direcIon.	
  Basically,	
  I	
  was	
  sleeping	
  in	
  a	
  
hurricane.	
  I	
  did	
  sleep	
  very	
  well	
  but	
  because	
  of	
  the	
  drugs	
  I	
  spent	
  the	
  whole	
  night	
  talking	
  to	
  a	
  very	
  strange	
  group	
  
of	
  monkeys.

The	
  next	
  day	
  everyone	
  conInued	
  waiIng	
  on	
  me	
  hand	
  and	
  foot.	
  They	
  brought	
  me	
  the	
  paper	
  and	
  gave	
  me	
  tea.	
  I	
  
read	
  in	
  peace	
  unIl	
  breakfast	
  was	
  served.	
  All	
  the	
  food	
  was	
  magnificent.	
  They	
  were	
  all	
  concerned	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  too	
  
spicy.	
  However,	
  I	
  didn't	
  find	
  it	
  very	
  hot	
  at	
  all.	
  It's	
  been	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  since	
  I	
  challenged	
  myself	
  with	
  this	
  kind	
  of	
  food.	
  
It	
  actually	
  has	
  helped	
  my	
  digesIve	
  challenges.	
  Go	
  figure.	
  Booparthy	
  picked	
  me	
  up	
  around	
  10	
  AM	
  for	
  a	
  tour	
  of	
  
Chennai.	
  A\er	
  another	
  heart	
  pounding	
  traffic	
  adventure	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  large	
  Hindu	
  temple	
  and	
  received	
  Puja	
  
where	
  the	
  priest	
  prays	
  and	
  chants	
  and	
  put	
  a	
  mark	
  on	
  the	
  "third	
  eye"	
  just	
  between	
  and	
  slightly	
  above	
  the	
  
eyebrows.	
  I	
  thought	
  I	
  knew	
  a	
  bit	
  about	
  Hinduism	
  but	
  it's	
  preVy	
  complicated	
  stuff	
  for	
  the	
  uniniIated.	
  We	
  went	
  on	
  
                                                                                                   48
to	
  see	
  the	
  coastline	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  fishermen.	
  They	
  live	
  on	
  the	
  side	
  of	
  the	
  road	
  in	
  Iny	
  wood	
  huts	
  surrounded	
  by	
  the	
  
city.	
  It's	
  really	
  a	
  slum	
  with	
  good	
  seafood.	
  My	
  heart	
  really	
  went	
  out	
  to	
  these	
  hard	
  working	
  very	
  poor	
  people.	
  
Booparthy	
  assured	
  me	
  that	
  were	
  very	
  accepIng	
  of	
  their	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  world.	
  They	
  live	
  for	
  each	
  day	
  and	
  appreciate	
  
whatever	
  comes	
  into	
  their	
  life.	
  I	
  lower	
  my	
  head	
  in	
  shame	
  when	
  I	
  think	
  of	
  what	
  condiIons	
  I’ve	
  complained	
  about	
  
in	
  my	
  life.
Now	
  we	
  headed	
  for	
  the	
  outskirts	
  of	
  Chennai	
  along	
  the	
  coast.	
  Booparthy	
  said	
  Chennai	
  has	
  the	
  second	
  longest	
  
beach	
  in	
  the	
  world.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  ask	
  where	
  is	
  the	
  first	
  nor	
  what	
  consItutes	
  a	
  conInuous	
  beach.	
  Let’s	
  just	
  accept	
  that	
  
as	
  fact.	
  It’s	
  a	
  long	
  beach.	
  We	
  drove	
  through	
  less	
  populated	
  places.	
  We	
  passed	
  Dizzie	
  World	
  that	
  is	
  a	
  family	
  
amusement	
  park.	
  This	
  was	
  finally	
  a	
  slower	
  pace	
  of	
  life.	
  
We	
  stopped	
  for	
  lunch	
  at	
  a	
  resort	
  that	
  Babu	
  worked	
  on.	
  He	
  called	
  ahead	
  for	
  me	
  so	
  they	
  were	
  waiIng.	
  I	
  invited	
  
Booparthy	
  to	
  have	
  lunch	
  with	
  me.	
  Apparently	
  it	
  was	
  his	
  first	
  Ime	
  anyone	
  invited	
  him.	
  He	
  normally	
  would	
  have	
  
lunch	
  at	
  a	
  roadside	
  stand.	
  To	
  be	
  honest	
  that’s	
  where	
  I	
  would	
  rather	
  have	
  gone.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  nice	
  place	
  on	
  the	
  
water.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  admit	
  that	
  the	
  sound	
  of	
  the	
  water	
  and	
  ice	
  cold	
  beer	
  calmed	
  me	
  down.	
  Relaxed,	
  I	
  realized	
  how	
  
spun	
  up	
  I	
  was	
  zipping	
  around	
  Chennai.	
  I	
  suffer	
  from	
  a	
  strange	
  curse	
  of	
  having	
  been	
  a	
  poliIcal	
  acIvist	
  and	
  hippie	
  
in	
  my	
  college	
  days.	
  Even	
  though	
  I’ve	
  spent	
  most	
  of	
  my	
  life	
  gebng	
  stuff	
  and	
  wanIng	
  to	
  be	
  at	
  the	
  top	
  of	
  food	
  
chain,	
  I	
  am	
  very	
  class	
  conscious.	
  There’s	
  a	
  voice	
  in	
  my	
  head	
  reminding	
  me	
  that	
  people	
  outside	
  these	
  walls	
  are	
  
hungry.	
  The	
  difference	
  between	
  me	
  and	
  them	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  vagina	
  I	
  popped	
  out	
  of	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  US	
  and	
  theirs	
  was	
  in	
  
India.	
  Why	
  that	
  is	
  and	
  how	
  to	
  deal	
  with	
  it	
  occupies	
  at	
  least	
  a	
  long	
  chapter	
  in	
  every	
  holy	
  book	
  and	
  poliIcal	
  
diatribe	
  I	
  know.	
  I	
  thoroughly	
  enjoyed	
  my	
  meal	
  despite	
  the	
  annoying	
  hippie	
  in	
  my	
  head.

It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  return	
  but	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  back,	
  Booparthy	
  wanted	
  me	
  to	
  see	
  some	
  ancient	
  Hindu	
  ruins.	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  he	
  
couldn’t	
  be	
  my	
  guide	
  as	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  union.	
  If	
  I	
  wanted	
  one	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  several	
  offering	
  me	
  their	
  services.	
  I	
  
made	
  two	
  mistakes	
  at	
  this	
  juncture.	
  The	
  first	
  was	
  not	
  having	
  any	
  bill	
  smaller	
  than	
  a	
  500	
  rupees	
  (about	
  $10).	
  The	
  
second	
  was	
  agreeing	
  to	
  hire	
  a	
  guide.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  wealth	
  of	
  informaIon	
  and	
  did	
  his	
  job	
  well.	
  His	
  primary	
  job	
  was	
  not	
  
to	
  be	
  a	
  wealth	
  of	
  informaIon.	
  It	
  was	
  to	
  separate	
  me	
  from	
  my	
  money	
  for	
  the	
  good	
  of	
  the	
  people,	
  with	
  him	
  first	
  in	
  
line.	
  There	
  were	
  vendors	
  and	
  beggars	
  everywhere.	
  The	
  place	
  was	
  fascinaIng.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  huge	
  boulder	
  just	
  
balanced	
  on	
  a	
  rock	
  surface.	
  According	
  to	
  my	
  guide	
  it	
  was	
  put	
  here	
  by	
  the	
  gods	
  and	
  no	
  one	
  could	
  move	
  it.	
  Beyond	
  
that	
  it	
  was	
  one	
  ancient	
  temple	
  a\er	
  another.	
  He	
  showed	
  me	
  all	
  the	
  place	
  had	
  to	
  offer.	
  His	
  English	
  was	
  very	
  good.	
  
I	
  shouldn’t	
  complain.	
  We	
  agreed	
  on	
  Rs500	
  for	
  his	
  work,	
  he	
  probably	
  got	
  Rs800.	
  I	
  was	
  followed	
  by	
  a	
  Iny	
  woman	
  
with	
  a	
  baby	
  in	
  her	
  arms	
  and	
  hand	
  out	
  for	
  a	
  donaIon.	
  Having	
  only	
  Rs500	
  bills	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  do	
  much.	
  Finally	
  I	
  tried	
  
very	
  discretely	
  to	
  put	
  one	
  in	
  her	
  hand.	
  She	
  ran	
  off	
  like	
  a	
  thief	
  in	
  the	
  night.	
  In	
  one	
  minute	
  everyone	
  knew	
  a	
  so\y	
  
had	
  landed	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  zero	
  in.	
  In	
  the	
  end	
  I	
  bought	
  a	
  trinket	
  or	
  two	
  and	
  le\	
  with	
  everything	
  intact	
  and	
  
about	
  $50	
  less	
  than	
  when	
  I	
  started.	
  They	
  did	
  their	
  job	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  glad	
  I	
  did	
  mine.	
  I	
  just	
  don’t	
  like	
  the	
  process.	
  It	
  
would	
  be	
  far	
  beVer	
  if	
  at	
  the	
  entrance	
  they	
  just	
  had	
  a	
  place	
  to	
  cut	
  a	
  deal.	
  Here’s	
  $50,	
  get	
  me	
  a	
  guide,	
  a	
  postcard	
  
and	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  trinkets	
  of	
  my	
  choice.	
  Spread	
  it	
  around	
  and	
  let	
  me	
  see	
  the	
  place	
  in	
  peace.	
  However,	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  
see	
  the	
  condiIon	
  of	
  the	
  people.	
  They	
  need	
  my	
  money	
  to	
  live.	
  What	
  I	
  don’t	
  like	
  is	
  how	
  I	
  treat	
  them.	
  I	
  try	
  my	
  best	
  
to	
  avoid	
  their	
  eyes	
  and	
  move	
  on	
  like	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  they	
  exist.	
  In	
  reality,	
  they	
  exist	
  and	
  these	
  ruins	
  don’t.	
  However,	
  
they	
  have	
  to	
  hound	
  me	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  living.	
  It’s	
  just	
  how	
  it	
  is.	
  Play	
  the	
  part,	
  do	
  the	
  job,	
  Karma.

It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  go	
  home.	
  I	
  had	
  grown	
  accustom	
  to	
  the	
  pace	
  of	
  life.	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  back	
  Booparthy	
  and	
  I	
  talked	
  more	
  
about	
  life	
  in	
  Chennai.	
  He	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  get	
  engaged	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  and	
  married	
  in	
  October.	
  He	
  and	
  his	
  fiancée	
  were	
  
middle	
  class.	
  He	
  said	
  in	
  India	
  everyone	
  accepts	
  their	
  place	
  in	
  society.	
  Between	
  the	
  two	
  of	
  them	
  they	
  will	
  earn	
  
Rest	
  17,000	
  ($340)	
  per	
  month.	
  She	
  would	
  move	
  in	
  with	
  his	
  family.	
  His	
  marriage	
  was	
  arranged	
  by	
  his	
  parents.	
  
They	
  typically	
  use	
  a	
  matchmaker.	
  Either	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  children	
  can	
  object	
  to	
  the	
  selecIon	
  once	
  they	
  meet	
  their	
  
prospecIve	
  spouse.	
  Once	
  married	
  they	
  seldom	
  divorce.	
  Once	
  a	
  woman	
  divorces	
  or	
  her	
  husband	
  dies	
  they	
  rarely	
  
remarry.	
  It’s	
  a	
  good	
  life	
  as	
  long	
  as	
  everyone	
  does	
  what	
  they	
  are	
  expected	
  to	
  do.	
  I	
  could	
  say	
  that	
  for	
  us	
  as	
  well	
  but	
  
the	
  rules	
  are	
  so	
  flexible	
  here	
  we	
  always	
  get	
  to	
  start	
  over	
  if	
  things	
  don’t	
  work	
  out.	
  For	
  that	
  reason	
  I	
  feel	
  we	
  don’t	
  
                                                                                                49
take	
  it	
  as	
  seriously	
  and	
  we	
  might.	
  There’s	
  always	
  something	
  lost	
  and	
  something	
  gained	
  with	
  freedom	
  from	
  social	
  
constraints.	
  

I	
  came	
  at	
  an	
  interesIng	
  Ime	
  in	
  gay	
  rights	
  in	
  India.	
  There	
  were	
  gay	
  pride	
  parades	
  in	
  some	
  ciIes	
  the	
  day	
  I	
  arrived	
  
so	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  discussion	
  in	
  the	
  paper	
  about	
  it.	
  In	
  one	
  picture	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  placard	
  with	
  the	
  number	
  377	
  in	
  
a	
  circle	
  with	
  a	
  line	
  through	
  it.	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  the	
  law	
  that	
  bans	
  homosexual	
  acts.	
  I	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  wonderful	
  
thing	
  that	
  people	
  could	
  have	
  this	
  parade.	
  I	
  had	
  thought	
  they	
  were	
  much	
  farther	
  behind	
  in	
  gay	
  rights.	
  Just	
  two	
  
days	
  later	
  their	
  Supreme	
  Court	
  overturned	
  377	
  and	
  homosexuality	
  was	
  legalized.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  believe	
  it.	
  Then	
  in	
  
just	
  two	
  days	
  there	
  were	
  the	
  first	
  legal	
  gay	
  marriages	
  in	
  India.	
  I	
  came	
  to	
  India	
  in	
  a	
  revoluIon!	
  There	
  was	
  the	
  
familiar	
  debate	
  in	
  the	
  paper.	
  A	
  well	
  known	
  intellectual	
  was	
  saying	
  what	
  a	
  well	
  reasoned	
  decision	
  it	
  was.	
  A	
  very	
  
well	
  known	
  Yoga	
  guru	
  was	
  saying	
  how	
  all	
  homosexuals	
  should	
  be	
  put	
  into	
  mental	
  insItuIons.	
  It	
  felt	
  just	
  like	
  
home.

That	
  evening	
  the	
  family	
  hosted	
  another	
  guest	
  from	
  Malaysia.	
  I	
  forgot	
  her	
  name,	
  I’ll	
  call	
  her	
  Malay.	
  She	
  invited	
  me	
  
to	
  Kuala	
  Lampur	
  anyIme	
  she’s	
  there.	
  That’s	
  a	
  good	
  thing.	
  She	
  was	
  full	
  of	
  life	
  and	
  the	
  family	
  was	
  happy	
  to	
  see	
  her.	
  
The	
  meal	
  was	
  all	
  prepared	
  and	
  we	
  ate	
  like	
  kings.	
  A\er	
  they	
  all	
  tried	
  their	
  best	
  to	
  entertain	
  me	
  in	
  English	
  they	
  all	
  
fell	
  into	
  the	
  fun	
  of	
  their	
  family	
  event.	
  I	
  was	
  endlessly	
  entertained	
  by	
  it	
  all.	
  They	
  would	
  send	
  someone	
  over	
  
periodically	
  to	
  talk	
  to	
  me	
  so	
  I	
  didn’t	
  fall	
  asleep.	
  When	
  Malay	
  le\	
  she	
  bowed	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  Mommy	
  and	
  touched	
  her	
  
feet	
  several	
  Imes.	
  Mommy	
  made	
  some	
  gesture	
  over	
  her.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  very	
  common	
  way	
  of	
  showing	
  respect	
  and	
  love	
  
for	
  someone.	
  I	
  was	
  invited	
  to	
  do	
  the	
  same.	
  It’s	
  a	
  wonderful	
  pracIce.	
  A\er	
  everyone	
  le\	
  we	
  got	
  ready	
  for	
  bed.	
  
Babu	
  had	
  to	
  catch	
  an	
  early	
  flight.	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  was	
  to	
  take	
  another	
  tour.	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  another	
  driver	
  due	
  to	
  
Booparthy’s	
  engagement.

I	
  woke	
  up	
  and	
  Gowrhi	
  brought	
  me	
  the	
  paper	
  and	
  some	
  coffee.	
  I	
  sat	
  there	
  reading	
  the	
  paper	
  unIl	
  breakfast	
  was	
  
ready.	
  I	
  have	
  come	
  to	
  love	
  Indian	
  breakfast.	
  They	
  make	
  these	
  liVle	
  steamed	
  rice	
  cakes	
  called	
  Idly.	
  You	
  break	
  them	
  
off	
  and	
  soak	
  pieces	
  in	
  various	
  sauces.	
  It’s	
  wonderful.	
  A\er	
  breakfast	
  Gowrhi	
  went	
  to	
  have	
  her	
  breakfast.	
  I	
  had	
  an	
  
hour	
  or	
  two	
  before	
  my	
  driver	
  arrived.	
  With	
  nothing	
  to	
  do	
  I	
  sat	
  in	
  sazen.	
  When	
  I	
  finished,	
  Gowrhi	
  and	
  Gita	
  were	
  
standing	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me.	
  My	
  driver	
  was	
  here.	
  They	
  asked	
  for	
  a	
  blessing.	
  Both	
  of	
  them	
  bowed	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me	
  and	
  
touched	
  my	
  feet.	
  I	
  gave	
  them	
  my	
  blessing.	
  I	
  felt	
  their	
  love	
  and	
  heartbeat.	
  Mommy	
  joined	
  us	
  at	
  the	
  front	
  door	
  and	
  
we	
  said	
  our	
  good	
  byes.	
  Before	
  I	
  le\	
  Gowrhi	
  sincerely	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  this	
  was	
  my	
  home	
  and	
  I	
  should	
  return	
  
whenever	
  I	
  wanted.
Babu	
  thought	
  I	
  should	
  go	
  to	
  Higginbotham’s.	
  It’s	
  a	
  colonial	
  era	
  book	
  store.	
  It	
  was	
  interesIng	
  but	
  I	
  came	
  to	
  realize	
  
I’ve	
  seen	
  enough	
  of	
  Chennai.	
  I’m	
  not	
  big	
  on	
  sightseeing.	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  take	
  long	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  get	
  bored	
  with	
  it.	
  I	
  like	
  
meeIng	
  people	
  and	
  understanding	
  how	
  they	
  live	
  and	
  think;	
  what	
  moIvates	
  them,	
  controls	
  them,	
  makes	
  them	
  
laugh	
  and	
  cry.	
  Old	
  buildings	
  and	
  history	
  have	
  their	
  place	
  but	
  it’s	
  not	
  a	
  big	
  place	
  for	
  me.	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  flash	
  
drive	
  so	
  my	
  driver	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  shopping	
  area	
  that	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  liVle	
  electronic	
  shops.	
  They	
  didn’t	
  have	
  what	
  I	
  
wanted	
  so	
  they	
  sent	
  out	
  a	
  runner	
  to	
  find	
  one.	
  Within	
  15	
  minutes	
  I	
  had	
  one.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  lunch	
  at	
  a	
  decent	
  place	
  
that	
  was	
  trying	
  not	
  to	
  be	
  Indian.	
  I	
  had	
  given	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  a\ernoon.	
  My	
  driver	
  insisted	
  I	
  go	
  to	
  a	
  church.	
  I	
  
agreed.	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  glad	
  I	
  did.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  Basilica	
  of	
  St	
  Thomas.	
  I	
  had	
  been	
  interested	
  in	
  St	
  Thomas	
  for	
  my	
  whole	
  life.	
  
He’s	
  called	
  “DoubIng	
  Thomas”	
  because	
  when	
  he	
  was	
  told	
  of	
  Christ’s	
  resurrecIon	
  he	
  didn’t	
  believe	
  it	
  and	
  
wouldn’t	
  unIl	
  he	
  put	
  his	
  hands	
  into	
  the	
  wounds	
  Jesus	
  suffered	
  on	
  the	
  cross.	
  I	
  always	
  loved	
  that	
  story.	
  From	
  the	
  
Ime	
  I	
  was	
  a	
  child	
  I	
  felt	
  a	
  camaraderie	
  with	
  him.	
  A\er	
  his	
  Ime	
  with	
  Jesus	
  he	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  India	
  and	
  preached	
  the	
  
Gospel.	
  He	
  was	
  revered	
  as	
  a	
  holy	
  man	
  by	
  the	
  Hindus.	
  That’s	
  one	
  thing	
  I	
  love	
  about	
  Hindus.	
  They	
  love	
  anyone	
  that	
  
demonstrates	
  awakening.	
  They	
  easily	
  incorporate	
  them	
  into	
  their	
  cosmology.	
  When	
  the	
  Portuguese	
  arrived	
  in	
  
the	
  15th	
  or	
  16th	
  century	
  they	
  found	
  a	
  thriving	
  ChrisIan	
  church	
  with	
  their	
  own	
  Bibles.	
  They	
  did	
  what	
  all	
  good	
  
Catholics	
  did	
  in	
  those	
  days;	
  they	
  confiscated	
  all	
  the	
  books	
  and	
  branded	
  their	
  faith	
  as	
  a	
  hereIcal	
  sect.	
  That	
  was	
  
not	
  good	
  news.	
  A\er	
  establishing	
  their	
  authority	
  they	
  built	
  this	
  Basilica.	
  There	
  are	
  only	
  three	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  that	
  
                                                                                                 50
hold	
  the	
  remains	
  of	
  apostles.	
  James	
  is	
  in	
  Spain	
  and	
  Peter	
  is	
  in	
  Rome.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  beauIful	
  church	
  and	
  was	
  really	
  glad	
  
I	
  got	
  to	
  see	
  it.	
  
Babu’s	
  brother	
  Ramesh,	
  is	
  a	
  follower	
  of	
  ISKCON.	
  That’s	
  the	
  Hare	
  Krishna	
  group	
  we’ve	
  seen	
  for	
  years	
  dancing	
  and	
  
drumming	
  around	
  with	
  bald	
  heads	
  except	
  for	
  a	
  liVle	
  braid	
  of	
  hair	
  sIcking	
  out	
  the	
  back	
  and	
  wearing	
  pink	
  robes.	
  
He’s	
  supervising	
  a	
  huge	
  new	
  temple	
  outside	
  the	
  city.	
  They	
  have	
  a	
  sizable	
  piece	
  of	
  property.	
  It’s	
  scheduled	
  to	
  be	
  
completed	
  next	
  year.	
  He	
  took	
  me	
  into	
  the	
  old	
  temple	
  and	
  watched	
  the	
  blessing	
  of	
  the	
  altars	
  performed	
  by	
  a	
  
Frenchman	
  who’s	
  been	
  there	
  over	
  30	
  years.	
  Then	
  Ramesh,	
  the	
  driver	
  and	
  I	
  chanted	
  “Hare	
  Krishna,	
  Hare	
  Krishna,	
  
Krishna	
  Krishna,	
  Hare	
  Hare,	
  Hare	
  Rama,	
  Hare	
  Rama,	
  Rama	
  Rama,	
  Hare	
  Hare”	
  for	
  about	
  15	
  minutes.	
  He	
  gave	
  us	
  
the	
  lowdown	
  on	
  the	
  religion.	
  I	
  wished	
  him	
  well	
  and	
  we	
  drove	
  off.
A\er	
  a	
  few	
  stops	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  airport	
  to	
  take	
  a	
  flight	
  to	
  Delhi.	
  I	
  met	
  Babu	
  at	
  the	
  airport.	
  We	
  stayed	
  at	
  the	
  Taj	
  
Palace	
  Hotel.	
  It’s	
  quite	
  a	
  place.	
  They	
  can	
  hire	
  about	
  a	
  dozen	
  Indians	
  for	
  the	
  wages	
  they	
  have	
  to	
  pay	
  in	
  America.	
  
There’s	
  always	
  someone	
  around	
  to	
  push	
  your	
  elevator	
  buVon	
  and	
  come	
  to	
  get	
  you	
  something	
  whether	
  you	
  need	
  
it	
  or	
  not.	
  Everything	
  is	
  expensive	
  and	
  top	
  notch.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  bring	
  much	
  to	
  wear	
  except	
  shorts	
  and	
  tee	
  shirts.	
  It	
  was	
  
so	
  hot,	
  just	
  like	
  Chennai.	
  I	
  went	
  downstairs	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  drink	
  but	
  was	
  told	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  spruce	
  up	
  my	
  act	
  if	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  
get	
  in.	
  Where	
  are	
  my	
  people?!	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  driver	
  to	
  take	
  me	
  on	
  a	
  tour	
  of	
  Delhi.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  lot	
  calmer	
  than	
  
Chennai.	
  I	
  even	
  saw	
  people	
  stop	
  at	
  lights.	
  I	
  learned	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  New	
  Delhi	
  and	
  an	
  Old	
  Delhi.	
  It’s	
  a	
  stark	
  
difference.	
  New	
  Delhi	
  was	
  designed	
  and	
  built	
  a	
  hundred	
  years	
  ago	
  with	
  wide	
  boulevards	
  and	
  sound	
  urban	
  
planning.	
  The	
  Government	
  buildings	
  were	
  beauIful.	
  Old	
  Delhi	
  sIll	
  was	
  slower	
  than	
  Chennai	
  but	
  it	
  definitely	
  was	
  
a	
  world	
  apart	
  from	
  New	
  Delhi.	
  Old	
  really	
  means	
  old	
  here.	
  It’s	
  filled	
  with	
  streets	
  so	
  narrow	
  that	
  cars	
  can’t	
  enter.	
  
It’s	
  more	
  chaoIc	
  there	
  but	
  manageable.	
  My	
  driver	
  said	
  we	
  were	
  going	
  to	
  visit	
  the	
  Huge	
  Red	
  Foot.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  ask	
  
several	
  Imes	
  to	
  explain	
  the	
  significance	
  of	
  the	
  big	
  foot.	
  A\er	
  seeing	
  all	
  the	
  Hindu	
  Temples	
  I	
  was	
  sure	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  
Foot	
  God	
  someone	
  worshipped	
  somewhere	
  in	
  the	
  past.	
  My	
  mind	
  kept	
  going	
  to	
  the	
  largest	
  In	
  foil	
  ball	
  aVracIons	
  
in	
  the	
  US.	
  A\er	
  my	
  driver	
  realized	
  I	
  was	
  confused	
  he	
  kept	
  trying	
  other	
  words	
  and	
  finally	
  it	
  became	
  clear	
  that	
  we	
  
were	
  visiIng	
  a	
  Huge	
  Red	
  Fort.	
  That’s	
  very	
  different.	
  In	
  this	
  part	
  of	
  India	
  the	
  history	
  is	
  decidedly	
  Islamic.	
  Huge	
  
Forts	
  and	
  tombs	
  were	
  built	
  by	
  Mogul	
  kings	
  in	
  the	
  14th-­‐17th	
  centuries.	
  They	
  are	
  beauIful	
  and	
  ornate	
  structures.	
  
What	
  I	
  was	
  most	
  impressed	
  by	
  was	
  the	
  aVenIon	
  to	
  tolerance	
  these	
  monarchs	
  put	
  into	
  their	
  architecture.	
  There	
  
were	
  Stars	
  of	
  David,	
  Lotus	
  Flowers	
  and	
  Hindu	
  symbols	
  everywhere.	
  They	
  reigned	
  in	
  a	
  spirit	
  of	
  diversity	
  that	
  was	
  
unusual	
  given	
  the	
  Ime.	
  When	
  we	
  arrived	
  at	
  the	
  Red	
  Fort	
  I	
  was	
  greeted	
  by	
  the	
  throng	
  of	
  vendors	
  and	
  beggars.	
  I	
  
did	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  ignore	
  them	
  unIl	
  one	
  of	
  them	
  said,	
  “sir	
  could	
  you	
  look	
  at	
  my	
  face?”	
  That	
  broke	
  my	
  heart	
  as	
  I	
  
realized	
  how	
  removed	
  I	
  was	
  from	
  them.	
  I	
  saw	
  them	
  as	
  a	
  nuisance	
  and	
  they	
  were	
  real	
  live	
  living	
  people.	
  I	
  looked	
  
into	
  his	
  face.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  teenage	
  boy	
  selling	
  postcards.	
  I	
  looked	
  him	
  in	
  the	
  eye	
  and	
  told	
  him	
  I	
  didn’t	
  want	
  any.	
  He	
  
said	
  that	
  was	
  fine,	
  he	
  just	
  wanted	
  me	
  to	
  noIce	
  him.	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  out	
  I	
  saw	
  him	
  again	
  and	
  I	
  bought	
  some	
  of	
  his	
  
merchandise.	
  The	
  day	
  went	
  by	
  quickly	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  gebng	
  Ired	
  of	
  monuments.	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  booked	
  an	
  all	
  day	
  
visit	
  to	
  the	
  Taj	
  Mahal.	
  Oh	
  Yeah,	
  I	
  saw	
  Babu	
  for	
  an	
  hour	
  or	
  two.	
  He’s	
  one	
  busy	
  guy	
  doing	
  his	
  lighIng	
  architecture	
  
all	
  day	
  and	
  night.	
  I’ve	
  never	
  seen	
  anyone	
  sleep	
  like	
  him.	
  I	
  don’t	
  think	
  his	
  head	
  gets	
  to	
  quite	
  hit	
  the	
  pillow	
  before	
  
he’s	
  out.	
  However,	
  his	
  snoring	
  is	
  like	
  a	
  lullaby.	
  Thank	
  God	
  for	
  earplugs.
The	
  next	
  day	
  a	
  van	
  picked	
  me	
  up	
  for	
  the	
  trip	
  to	
  Taj	
  Mahal	
  at	
  6AM.	
  We	
  wouldn’t	
  get	
  there	
  unIl	
  noon.	
  We	
  picked	
  
up	
  six	
  people	
  from	
  various	
  hotels	
  and	
  off	
  we	
  went.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  driver	
  and	
  a	
  side	
  kick.	
  They	
  didn’t	
  offer	
  up	
  any	
  
informaIon	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  up	
  unless	
  I	
  asked	
  them	
  for	
  it.	
  The	
  scenery	
  was	
  endlessly	
  fascinaIng.	
  Cows	
  were	
  
everywhere.	
  A	
  man	
  with	
  a	
  standing	
  cobra	
  in	
  a	
  basket	
  was	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  us	
  to	
  give	
  him	
  something.	
  Taxis	
  called	
  “tuk	
  
tuks”	
  race	
  around	
  like	
  bugs.	
  They	
  are	
  three	
  wheeled	
  vehicles	
  with	
  a	
  cab.	
  We	
  saw	
  fi\een	
  people	
  crammed	
  into	
  
this	
  thing	
  that	
  had	
  a	
  motor	
  scooter	
  engine.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  believe	
  it	
  could	
  move	
  at	
  all.	
  But	
  they	
  were	
  making	
  Ime.	
  We	
  
got	
  to	
  Acra	
  around	
  noon	
  and	
  when	
  we	
  all	
  got	
  out	
  the	
  vendors	
  where	
  hovering	
  like	
  hawks	
  waiIng	
  for	
  us.	
  This	
  
Ime	
  I	
  had	
  company	
  in	
  our	
  quest	
  to	
  buy	
  nothing.	
  They	
  were	
  persistent.	
  I	
  heard	
  a	
  young	
  man	
  say,	
  “sir	
  please	
  look	
  
at	
  my	
  face.”	
  Wow!	
  Now	
  that’s	
  a	
  good	
  markeIng	
  device.	
  He	
  established	
  a	
  connecIon.	
  I	
  looked	
  at	
  him.	
  He	
  
introduced	
  himself	
  as	
  Ricky.	
  He	
  showed	
  me	
  his	
  wares	
  and	
  I	
  said	
  no.	
  He	
  said	
  he	
  would	
  look	
  for	
  me	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  out.	
  
I	
  never	
  doubted	
  him.
                                                                                                 51
The	
  tour	
  provided	
  a	
  guide	
  through	
  the	
  monument.	
  It	
  was	
  well	
  worth	
  it.	
  Most	
  of	
  us	
  know	
  that	
  the	
  Taj	
  Mahal	
  was	
  
built	
  as	
  a	
  monument	
  and	
  tomb	
  by	
  the	
  king	
  for	
  his	
  beloved	
  wife,	
  Taj	
  Mahal.	
  When	
  she	
  died	
  she	
  requested	
  that	
  he	
  
never	
  marry	
  again	
  and	
  that	
  he	
  build	
  her	
  a	
  grand	
  tomb.	
  It	
  took	
  22	
  years	
  to	
  build.	
  Soon	
  a\er	
  it	
  was	
  built	
  the	
  king’s	
  
fourth	
  son	
  killed	
  his	
  three	
  brothers	
  and	
  imprisoned	
  his	
  father.	
  The	
  son	
  reigned	
  for	
  50	
  years	
  in	
  relaIve	
  peace,	
  so	
  
much	
  for	
  jusIce.	
  The	
  father	
  had	
  to	
  watch	
  the	
  Taj	
  Mahal	
  from	
  across	
  the	
  water	
  in	
  a	
  very	
  elaborate	
  Foot…I	
  mean	
  
Fort.	
  The	
  Taj	
  Mahal	
  didn’t	
  disappoint.	
  It	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  beauIful	
  things	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  seen	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  I’m	
  so	
  glad	
  I	
  
made	
  the	
  effort.	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  out	
  I	
  saw	
  Ricky’s	
  face	
  again.	
  He	
  scammed	
  me	
  on	
  a	
  Taj	
  Mahal	
  picture	
  book.	
  I	
  made	
  
his	
  day	
  I’m	
  sure.	
  That	
  was	
  the	
  last	
  Ime	
  I	
  looked	
  at	
  any	
  street	
  vendor’s	
  face.
The	
  next	
  day	
  Babu	
  and	
  I	
  want	
  off	
  to	
  Hyderabad.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  confess	
  I	
  never	
  heard	
  of	
  the	
  place.	
  The	
  weather	
  was	
  
amazing,	
  like	
  San	
  Diego.	
  It	
  got	
  up	
  into	
  the	
  low	
  80’s	
  and	
  was	
  downright	
  cool	
  at	
  night.	
  We	
  stayed	
  at	
  a	
  MarrioV	
  
hotel.	
  It	
  was	
  nice	
  but	
  not	
  on	
  the	
  same	
  level	
  as	
  the	
  Taj	
  Palace.	
  I	
  hadn’t	
  made	
  any	
  plans	
  while	
  I	
  was	
  there.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  
want	
  to	
  see	
  any	
  more	
  monuments.	
  There	
  were	
  several	
  but	
  I	
  just	
  wanted	
  to	
  hang	
  around.	
  Shankar	
  menIoned	
  
going	
  to	
  see	
  Sai	
  Baba	
  in	
  his	
  town,	
  PuVaparthy.	
  I	
  asked	
  the	
  concierge	
  about	
  it	
  and	
  he	
  put	
  together	
  a	
  train	
  
iInerary.	
  All	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  do	
  was	
  go	
  to	
  the	
  train	
  staIon	
  and	
  get	
  the	
  Ickets.	
  He	
  offered	
  to	
  come	
  with	
  me.	
  I	
  was	
  feeling	
  
very	
  unjustly	
  confident	
  and	
  assured	
  him	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  handle	
  it.	
  That	
  was	
  a	
  mistake.	
  The	
  next	
  morning	
  I	
  hailed	
  a	
  
tuk	
  tuk	
  and	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  train	
  staIon.	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  counter	
  where	
  everyone	
  was	
  ordering	
  Ickets	
  but	
  was	
  told	
  
that	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  the	
  ReservaIon	
  Counter.	
  Where	
  was	
  that?	
  “ That	
  way	
  toward	
  the	
  bus	
  staIon”.	
  I	
  walked	
  toward	
  
the	
  bus	
  staIon	
  but	
  didn’t	
  see	
  any	
  Icket	
  counter.	
  A\er	
  looking	
  around	
  for	
  about	
  15	
  minutes	
  a	
  counter	
  appeared.	
  I	
  
was	
  next	
  in	
  line	
  but	
  then	
  a	
  torrent	
  of	
  people	
  kept	
  cubng	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me	
  without	
  any	
  hesitaIon.	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  in	
  a	
  rush	
  
so	
  I	
  just	
  observed	
  them	
  unIl	
  I	
  found	
  a	
  place	
  to	
  squeeze	
  in.	
  Again	
  I	
  was	
  at	
  the	
  wrong	
  counter.	
  The	
  reservaIon	
  
office	
  was	
  past	
  the	
  bus	
  staIon.	
  I	
  walked	
  past	
  the	
  bus	
  staIon	
  and	
  lo	
  and	
  behold	
  there	
  it	
  was.	
  I	
  walked	
  in.	
  One	
  
thing	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  menIon	
  here	
  is	
  that	
  since	
  the	
  terrorist	
  aVack	
  in	
  Mumbai,	
  India	
  has	
  been	
  very	
  security	
  conscious.	
  
They	
  put	
  up	
  electronic	
  scanners	
  in	
  every	
  hotel	
  and	
  public	
  building.	
  They	
  are	
  mostly	
  basic	
  wooden	
  arches	
  that	
  
have	
  something	
  electronic	
  aVached	
  to	
  them.	
  Most	
  of	
  them	
  don’t	
  work.	
  When	
  they	
  do	
  work,	
  no	
  one	
  cares.	
  Every	
  
Ime	
  I	
  went	
  through	
  one	
  I	
  beeped	
  and	
  never	
  once	
  did	
  anyone	
  bat	
  an	
  eye.	
  Just	
  try	
  not	
  walking	
  through	
  it	
  though.	
  
That’s	
  a	
  problem.	
  So	
  I	
  walked	
  through	
  the	
  security	
  checkpoint	
  and	
  got	
  the	
  form.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  good	
  form.	
  I	
  
wanted	
  a	
  first	
  class	
  sleeper	
  with	
  AC	
  for	
  the	
  overnight	
  trip	
  to	
  PuVaparthy.	
  I	
  got	
  my	
  Ickets	
  and	
  walked	
  out	
  proud	
  
that	
  I	
  had	
  accomplished	
  this	
  feat	
  without	
  understanding	
  a	
  single	
  word	
  the	
  clerk	
  said	
  to	
  me.
I	
  had	
  breakfast	
  in	
  a	
  local	
  restaurant	
  and	
  was	
  joined	
  by	
  a	
  fellow	
  with	
  one	
  arm.	
  He	
  was	
  working	
  for	
  the	
  Seventh	
  
Day	
  AdvenIsts	
  at	
  a	
  school	
  for	
  poor	
  children.	
  You	
  could	
  see	
  he	
  was	
  proud	
  of	
  his	
  work.	
  A\er	
  Breakfast	
  I	
  went	
  out	
  
to	
  look	
  to	
  buy	
  some	
  suitable	
  clothes	
  for	
  the	
  wedding	
  in	
  Bangalore	
  I	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  aVend.	
  I	
  crossed	
  a	
  busy	
  street	
  
sure	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  the	
  traffic	
  well	
  in	
  my	
  site	
  when	
  a	
  motorcycle	
  hit	
  me	
  on	
  the	
  leg.	
  Don’t	
  worry,	
  he	
  didn’t	
  get	
  hurt.	
  He	
  
turned	
  around	
  to	
  see	
  that	
  no	
  one	
  noIced	
  and	
  drove	
  off.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  serious	
  but	
  I	
  did	
  get	
  a	
  nasty	
  bruise.	
  It	
  was	
  Ime	
  
to	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  hotel.	
  I	
  hailed	
  a	
  tuk	
  tuk	
  and	
  told	
  him	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  the	
  MarrioV	
  Hotel.	
  He	
  didn’t	
  know	
  what	
  
I	
  was	
  talking	
  about	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  where	
  the	
  hotel	
  was.	
  That’s	
  not	
  good.	
  A\er	
  a	
  few	
  inquiries	
  I	
  found	
  one	
  that	
  
said	
  he	
  knew	
  where	
  it	
  was.	
  In	
  fact	
  he	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  where	
  it	
  was	
  but	
  he	
  wanted	
  someone	
  driving	
  in	
  his	
  taxi	
  going	
  
somewhere.	
  He	
  looked	
  exactly	
  like	
  Cheech	
  Marin.	
  I	
  wrote	
  it	
  out	
  for	
  him	
  and	
  he	
  went	
  on	
  the	
  lookout	
  for	
  someone	
  
that	
  might	
  help	
  us.	
  Finally	
  he	
  saw	
  an	
  upscale	
  cab	
  and	
  asked	
  the	
  driver.	
  We	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  hotel	
  and	
  all	
  was	
  well.	
  Later	
  
that	
  night	
  I	
  saw	
  the	
  concierge	
  and	
  told	
  him	
  about	
  my	
  achievement.	
  He	
  looked	
  at	
  the	
  Icket	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  not	
  
happy.	
  He	
  first	
  reminded	
  me	
  that	
  he	
  offered	
  to	
  come	
  with	
  me.	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  I	
  took	
  full	
  responsibility	
  for	
  my	
  acIons,	
  
now	
  what	
  was	
  the	
  problem.	
  Apparently	
  I	
  bought	
  a	
  2nd	
  class	
  Icket	
  on	
  a	
  sleeper	
  with	
  no	
  A/C.	
  That	
  was	
  a	
  bad	
  
thing	
  he	
  assured	
  me.	
  Not	
  only	
  that	
  but	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  bunk,	
  the	
  worst	
  of	
  the	
  worst.	
  It	
  would	
  smell	
  and	
  be	
  
uncomfortable.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  think	
  it	
  sounded	
  that	
  bad	
  but	
  a\er	
  listening	
  to	
  him	
  I	
  felt	
  I	
  bought	
  a	
  one	
  way	
  Icket	
  to	
  the	
  
gulag.	
  I	
  was	
  now	
  completely	
  demoralized	
  and	
  wished	
  I	
  had	
  just	
  conInued	
  to	
  be	
  Babu’s	
  sidekick	
  and	
  stayed	
  in	
  my	
  
nice	
  hotels	
  like	
  a	
  good	
  boy.	
  But	
  it	
  was	
  too	
  late,	
  the	
  die	
  had	
  been	
  cast.	
  
That	
  evening	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  go.	
  As	
  usual	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  leave	
  more	
  than	
  enough	
  Ime	
  to	
  get	
  there	
  so	
  I	
  could	
  figure	
  it	
  
all	
  out	
  and	
  not	
  be	
  stressed	
  for	
  Ime.	
  The	
  concierge	
  said	
  not	
  to	
  worry	
  and	
  that	
  I	
  should	
  get	
  some	
  dinner	
  before	
  
                                                                                               52
the	
  train	
  as	
  it	
  wouldn’t	
  be	
  comfortable	
  to	
  eat	
  on	
  the	
  train.	
  He	
  would	
  arrange	
  for	
  a	
  car.	
  I	
  reluctantly	
  agreed	
  and	
  
had	
  dinner.	
  A\er	
  dinner	
  I	
  didn’t	
  see	
  the	
  concierge	
  and	
  Ime	
  was	
  now	
  a	
  bit	
  precious.	
  At	
  the	
  same	
  Ime	
  I	
  had	
  
arranged	
  for	
  a	
  package	
  to	
  be	
  sent	
  home	
  and	
  the	
  DHL	
  man	
  was	
  there	
  trying	
  to	
  sort	
  out	
  the	
  paperwork.	
  That	
  took	
  
15	
  minutes	
  and	
  there	
  sIll	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  car	
  to	
  take	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  staIon.	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  in	
  the	
  mood	
  for	
  this.	
  Finally	
  a	
  car	
  
materialized	
  and	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  staIon	
  within	
  15	
  minutes	
  of	
  my	
  departure.	
  I	
  quickly	
  asked	
  for	
  help	
  to	
  idenIfy	
  what	
  
car	
  to	
  get	
  on.	
  I	
  got	
  in	
  and	
  sat	
  down.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  full	
  train.	
  I	
  introduced	
  myself	
  to	
  everyone.	
  Most	
  people	
  had	
  food	
  out	
  
and	
  were	
  concerned	
  that	
  I	
  hadn’t	
  eaten.	
  I	
  assured	
  them	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  hungry.	
  Vendors	
  came	
  by	
  every	
  couple	
  of	
  
minutes	
  offering	
  drinks	
  and	
  food	
  galore	
  at	
  bargain	
  prices.	
  Who	
  said	
  there’s	
  no	
  such	
  thing	
  as	
  the	
  10	
  cent	
  cup	
  of	
  
coffee	
  anymore.	
  I	
  seVled	
  in	
  for	
  a	
  long	
  night	
  knowing	
  I	
  was	
  among	
  friends.
The	
  way	
  they	
  sleep	
  on	
  a	
  train	
  is	
  a	
  bit	
  ingenious.	
  There	
  are	
  two	
  benches	
  facing	
  each	
  other	
  in	
  an	
  open	
  
compartment.	
  Six	
  people,	
  three	
  on	
  each	
  side	
  are	
  facing	
  each	
  other.	
  There’s	
  an	
  upper	
  berth	
  above	
  us.	
  The	
  seat	
  
back	
  swings	
  up	
  and	
  forms	
  the	
  middle	
  berth.	
  It’s	
  simple	
  but	
  funcIonal.	
  I	
  put	
  my	
  suitcase	
  and	
  rucksack	
  up	
  there.	
  
There	
  was	
  enough	
  room	
  for	
  me.	
  Everyone	
  but	
  me	
  had	
  the	
  drill	
  down.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  think	
  of	
  bringing	
  a	
  pillow.	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  
use	
  what	
  I	
  had	
  but	
  it	
  wasn’t	
  working.	
  Suddenly,	
  in	
  a	
  flash	
  of	
  brilliance	
  I	
  realized	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  bag	
  of	
  dirty	
  laundry.	
  What	
  
a	
  comfy	
  pillow	
  that	
  was.	
  The	
  next	
  thing	
  I	
  knew	
  we	
  were	
  all	
  waking	
  up.	
  My	
  berth	
  swung	
  down	
  into	
  a	
  seatback	
  and	
  
before	
  you	
  know	
  it	
  I	
  was	
  sipping	
  on	
  a	
  Rs5	
  cup	
  of	
  coffee.	
  Life	
  was	
  good.
PuVaparthy	
  was	
  a	
  small	
  train	
  stop.	
  There	
  were	
  plenty	
  of	
  tuk	
  tuks	
  around.	
  One	
  of	
  them	
  spoVed	
  me	
  and	
  became	
  
my	
  driver.	
  However,	
  I	
  was	
  waiIng	
  for	
  a	
  friend	
  of	
  Gopi	
  (Gita	
  and	
  Jugga’s	
  son	
  in	
  Chennai)	
  who	
  lived	
  there.	
  He	
  didn’t	
  
show.	
  A\er	
  waiIng	
  a	
  few	
  minutes	
  my	
  driver,	
  Shankar,	
  took	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  hotel.	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  we	
  passed	
  Sai	
  Baba’s	
  
hospital	
  and	
  his	
  University.	
  The	
  whole	
  town	
  was	
  devoted	
  to	
  their	
  guru	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  devoted	
  to	
  them.	
  Shankar	
  
informed	
  me	
  that	
  he	
  was	
  my	
  driver	
  and	
  gave	
  me	
  his	
  cell	
  phone	
  number	
  to	
  call	
  anyIme	
  I	
  needed	
  him.	
  My	
  hotel	
  
was	
  $20/night.	
  It	
  was	
  comfortable	
  with	
  A/C	
  and	
  a	
  fridge.	
  The	
  people	
  were	
  all	
  very	
  helpful	
  and	
  kind.	
  I	
  seVled	
  in	
  
and	
  had	
  breakfast	
  downstairs.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  fine	
  Indian	
  meal.	
  I	
  figured	
  I	
  could	
  live	
  in	
  this	
  hotel	
  and	
  eat	
  at	
  the	
  
restaurant	
  three	
  Ime/day	
  for	
  under	
  a	
  $1,000/month.	
  If	
  I	
  could	
  be	
  a	
  devotee	
  of	
  Sai	
  Baba	
  why	
  not?	
  This	
  would	
  be	
  
heaven.	
  So	
  let’s	
  find	
  out	
  more	
  about	
  this	
  guy.	
  
What	
  I	
  knew	
  was	
  from	
  my	
  friend	
  Bill	
  Bailey	
  in	
  San	
  Diego.	
  He	
  had	
  recently	
  been	
  led	
  to	
  him	
  and	
  now	
  was	
  a	
  musical	
  
director	
  for	
  the	
  Sai	
  Baba	
  choir.	
  He	
  loved	
  his	
  relaIonship	
  with	
  his	
  guru.	
  Shankar	
  took	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  gate	
  of	
  the	
  center.	
  
It	
  looked	
  like	
  a	
  typical	
  Hindu	
  establishment.	
  People	
  were	
  washing	
  sacred	
  smoke	
  over	
  their	
  faces	
  from	
  the	
  burning	
  
oils	
  on	
  the	
  altar.	
  There	
  were	
  places	
  where	
  people	
  stayed	
  that	
  were	
  not	
  opened	
  to	
  the	
  public.	
  Everything	
  led	
  to	
  
the	
  big	
  hall.	
  It	
  was	
  open	
  on	
  all	
  sides	
  with	
  an	
  ornate	
  ceiling	
  of	
  gold	
  and	
  white	
  panels.	
  Red	
  fabric	
  lanterns	
  hung	
  
down	
  and	
  there	
  was	
  sparkling	
  garland	
  everywhere.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  get	
  into	
  the	
  morning	
  Darshan	
  (sermon).	
  I	
  had	
  come	
  
too	
  late.	
  I	
  stood	
  outside	
  with	
  a	
  big	
  crowd	
  about	
  ten	
  people	
  deep.	
  Slowly	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  front	
  as	
  people	
  came	
  and	
  
went.	
  Kirtan	
  (call	
  and	
  response	
  Hindu	
  chanIng	
  led	
  by	
  a	
  singer	
  and	
  a	
  group	
  with	
  a	
  Harmonium,	
  sitar	
  and	
  tabla).	
  I	
  
always	
  loved	
  this	
  chanIng.	
  When	
  you	
  know	
  all	
  the	
  words	
  and	
  you	
  can	
  fall	
  right	
  into	
  it,	
  ecstasy	
  just	
  springs	
  up	
  to	
  
greet	
  you.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  know	
  the	
  words	
  so	
  I	
  just	
  hummed	
  along.	
  Every	
  once	
  in	
  a	
  while	
  someone	
  spoVed	
  Baba	
  and	
  a	
  
wave	
  of	
  excitement	
  swept	
  through	
  the	
  crowd.	
  Hands	
  went	
  up	
  reverence	
  and	
  this	
  crowd	
  was	
  transformed	
  into	
  
lovers.	
  I	
  could	
  only	
  observe	
  and	
  wonder	
  what	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  like	
  to	
  see	
  God	
  right	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  you.	
  Baba	
  didn’t	
  show	
  up	
  
as	
  far	
  as	
  I	
  could	
  tell.	
  A	
  man	
  got	
  up	
  and	
  gave	
  a	
  speech	
  that	
  sounded	
  like	
  any	
  public	
  official.	
  I	
  stuck	
  it	
  out	
  longer	
  
than	
  most	
  and	
  decided	
  to	
  go	
  home.	
  On	
  my	
  way	
  back	
  I	
  was	
  hounded	
  by	
  the	
  usual	
  crowd	
  of	
  hawkers.	
  There	
  were	
  
some	
  nice	
  drums	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  bought	
  but	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  place	
  to	
  put	
  them.	
  One	
  man	
  was	
  standing	
  on	
  the	
  sidewalk	
  
and	
  he	
  reached	
  out	
  his	
  hand	
  to	
  me.	
  I	
  shook	
  his	
  hand	
  and	
  quickly	
  realized	
  I	
  was	
  all	
  his.	
  He	
  pleaded	
  with	
  me	
  just	
  to	
  
take	
  a	
  look	
  at	
  his	
  store.	
  So	
  off	
  I	
  went.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  jeweler	
  named	
  Jhon	
  (pronounced	
  John).	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  handsome	
  
Muslim	
  man.	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  much	
  to	
  his	
  parents	
  disapproval	
  he	
  had	
  and	
  older	
  girlfriend	
  in	
  Germany	
  that	
  he	
  
loved	
  very	
  much.	
  His	
  offerings	
  were	
  very	
  nice	
  and	
  I	
  ended	
  doing	
  some	
  Christmas	
  shopping.	
  He	
  offered	
  me	
  tea.	
  
He	
  kept	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  me	
  to	
  spend	
  more.	
  I	
  said,	
  “I’m	
  finished	
  now,	
  be	
  thankful,	
  I	
  made	
  your	
  day.”	
  He	
  smiled	
  and	
  
said,	
  “Yes,	
  you	
  made	
  my	
  day.”	
  Making	
  his	
  day	
  cost	
  about	
  $250.	
  It	
  was	
  money	
  well	
  spent.	
  I	
  enjoyed	
  his	
  company	
  
and	
  I	
  liked	
  what	
  he	
  was	
  selling.	
  He	
  led	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  restaurant	
  “Sai	
  Tower”	
  in	
  a	
  nice	
  hotel.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  wonderful	
  meal.	
  I	
  
                                                                                               53
saw	
  on	
  the	
  menu	
  the	
  most	
  alluring	
  and	
  corrupIng	
  words	
  for	
  me,	
  “Breakfast	
  Buffet	
  (Rs	
  165)”.	
  I	
  knew	
  where	
  I	
  stop	
  
tomorrow	
  morning	
  on	
  my	
  way	
  to	
  the	
  train	
  staIon.	
  
I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  hotel	
  to	
  refresh	
  myself.	
  It	
  was	
  such	
  a	
  nice	
  place.	
  Everyone	
  revered	
  this	
  man	
  and	
  the	
  town	
  had	
  
an	
  aura	
  of	
  reverence	
  not	
  just	
  for	
  him	
  but	
  for	
  everything.	
  All	
  you	
  had	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  invoke	
  Sai	
  Baba	
  and	
  it	
  would	
  stop	
  
anyone	
  in	
  their	
  tracks	
  to	
  reflect	
  on	
  what	
  they	
  were	
  doing	
  in	
  this	
  moment.	
  I	
  wish	
  we	
  had	
  a	
  Sai	
  Baba.	
  I	
  wish	
  there	
  
was	
  an	
  invocaIon	
  that	
  would	
  stop	
  us	
  just	
  for	
  a	
  moment.	
  Just	
  a	
  moment	
  to	
  ask	
  ourselves	
  what	
  are	
  we	
  doing,	
  why	
  
are	
  we	
  doing	
  it,	
  who	
  is	
  being	
  served	
  by	
  this?	
  Whoever	
  stood	
  before	
  me	
  and	
  invoked	
  the	
  holiness,	
  I	
  would	
  thank	
  
them	
  for	
  bringing	
  me	
  back.	
  Those	
  hawkers	
  that	
  said,	
  “Look	
  at	
  my	
  face	
  please.”	
  Was	
  that	
  Sai	
  Baba?	
  Forget	
  their	
  
moIvaIon,	
  just	
  hear	
  the	
  words	
  that	
  surround	
  it.	
  For	
  just	
  a	
  moment	
  listen	
  to	
  your	
  deepest	
  heart	
  and	
  be	
  thankful	
  
that	
  you	
  were	
  reminded.	
  Who	
  am	
  I	
  and	
  who	
  is	
  this?	
  There	
  you	
  are,	
  connected,	
  transformed.	
  Don’t	
  ignore	
  it	
  and	
  
don’t	
  be	
  concerned	
  for	
  your	
  life,	
  just	
  for	
  a	
  moment	
  let	
  life	
  speak	
  to	
  you.
I	
  wanted	
  to	
  get	
  into	
  the	
  main	
  hall	
  and	
  see	
  Sai	
  Baba.	
  I	
  was	
  told	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  get	
  there	
  around	
  1PM	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  good	
  
seat.	
  I	
  wished	
  he	
  hadn’t	
  used	
  the	
  word	
  seat.	
  I	
  hailed	
  a	
  tuk	
  tuk	
  outside	
  my	
  hotel	
  and	
  got	
  there	
  around	
  3PM.	
  A\er	
  
the	
  security	
  search	
  there	
  were	
  people	
  in	
  blue	
  scarves	
  that	
  led	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  good	
  square	
  foot	
  on	
  the	
  hard	
  marble	
  floor.	
  
People	
  brought	
  cushions	
  and	
  these	
  back	
  support	
  devices.	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  sorry	
  old	
  ass.	
  I	
  did	
  have	
  the	
  presence	
  of	
  mind	
  
to	
  sit	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  a	
  pillar	
  so	
  I	
  had	
  some	
  back	
  support.	
  Around	
  6PM	
  they	
  started	
  Kirtan.	
  Around	
  7PM	
  Baba	
  
appeared.	
  The	
  blue	
  scarves	
  were	
  everywhere	
  trying	
  to	
  keep	
  everyone	
  seated.	
  The	
  excitement	
  was	
  wonderful.	
  
Baba	
  was	
  wheeled	
  around	
  the	
  crowd	
  on	
  a	
  big	
  cushy	
  yellow	
  chair.	
  People	
  extended	
  their	
  hands	
  out	
  to	
  him	
  and	
  
whisked	
  his	
  energy	
  over	
  their	
  faces.	
  How	
  they	
  loved	
  him.	
  A\er	
  all	
  that	
  he	
  went	
  on	
  to	
  the	
  dais	
  and	
  started	
  his	
  
darshan.	
  He	
  spoke	
  in	
  the	
  local	
  language	
  with	
  an	
  interpreter.	
  He	
  talked	
  about	
  his	
  hospital	
  and	
  university.	
  All	
  of	
  this	
  
is	
  free.	
  There’s	
  no	
  money	
  accepted	
  for	
  any	
  services.	
  It	
  was	
  hard	
  to	
  imagine	
  there	
  was	
  enough	
  money	
  for	
  all	
  this.	
  
The	
  hospital	
  is	
  huge.	
  He	
  offers	
  a	
  complete	
  educaIon	
  up	
  to	
  PhD	
  programs	
  for	
  poor	
  students.	
  He	
  has	
  worldwide	
  
following.	
  I’m	
  told	
  everything	
  is	
  financially	
  transparent.	
  The	
  talk	
  was	
  meant	
  for	
  locals	
  and	
  not	
  for	
  a	
  westerner	
  like	
  
me.	
  He	
  wanted	
  women	
  to	
  stay	
  home	
  and	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  the	
  children	
  and	
  elderly	
  parents.	
  My	
  liberaIon	
  training	
  
bristled	
  at	
  the	
  message.	
  That’s	
  none	
  of	
  my	
  business.	
  I	
  believe	
  from	
  his	
  heart	
  he	
  wanted	
  everyone	
  to	
  be	
  happy.	
  
Who	
  am	
  I	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  judgment	
  about	
  all	
  this?	
  I	
  knew	
  nothing	
  about	
  what	
  he	
  was	
  saying	
  and	
  who	
  was	
  listening.	
  I	
  
got	
  out	
  of	
  way	
  and	
  let	
  Baba	
  speak	
  to	
  his	
  devotees.	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  all	
  done	
  the	
  Blue	
  Scarves	
  gave	
  out	
  liVle	
  sweet	
  
cookies	
  and	
  we	
  all	
  went	
  home.	
  I	
  slept	
  well	
  that	
  night.	
  My	
  train	
  le\	
  at	
  ten	
  in	
  the	
  morning	
  for	
  Bangalore,	
  a	
  three	
  
hour	
  trip.
A\er	
  my	
  morning	
  personal	
  duIes	
  I	
  le\	
  the	
  hotel	
  and	
  got	
  on	
  a	
  tuk	
  tuk	
  for	
  the	
  Sai	
  Hotel.	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  buffet	
  on	
  my	
  
mind.	
  It	
  didn’t	
  disappoint.	
  I	
  ate	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  Idly’s	
  and	
  sauces	
  with	
  sweet	
  coffee.	
  A	
  gentlemen	
  asked	
  if	
  he	
  could	
  
share	
  my	
  booth.	
  He	
  was	
  and	
  Indian	
  expat	
  that	
  lives	
  in	
  Chicago.	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  doctor	
  who	
  had	
  come	
  with	
  a	
  group	
  of	
  
400	
  devotees.	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  all	
  about	
  the	
  workings	
  of	
  Sai	
  Baba’s	
  hospital	
  and	
  how	
  the	
  money	
  is	
  used	
  in	
  such	
  a	
  
responsible	
  manner.	
  His	
  group	
  was	
  leaving	
  but	
  he	
  was	
  staying	
  on	
  for	
  another	
  week	
  to	
  help	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  hospital.	
  I	
  
was	
  overcome	
  by	
  this	
  wonderful	
  feeling	
  of	
  all	
  devotees	
  doing	
  such	
  good	
  work	
  for	
  a	
  people	
  that	
  provide	
  an	
  
endless	
  home	
  for	
  good	
  work.	
  
A\er	
  I	
  had	
  eaten	
  too	
  much	
  I	
  went	
  into	
  the	
  lobby	
  to	
  read	
  a	
  paper.	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  Ime	
  before	
  my	
  train.	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  
Ime	
  I	
  hailed	
  a	
  tuk	
  tuk	
  and	
  put	
  my	
  luggage	
  into	
  it.	
  As	
  soon	
  as	
  I	
  got	
  in	
  Shankar	
  pulled	
  up	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  angry.	
  “I	
  
waited	
  yesterday	
  for	
  a	
  half	
  hour	
  and	
  you	
  never	
  called.	
  I	
  waited	
  a	
  half	
  hour	
  for	
  you	
  this	
  morning	
  and	
  you	
  weren’t	
  
even	
  there”.	
  I	
  sat	
  and	
  considered	
  my	
  opIons.	
  I	
  pulled	
  out	
  my	
  stuff	
  and	
  put	
  it	
  into	
  his	
  tuk	
  tuk.	
  Understandably	
  the	
  
other	
  driver	
  was	
  not	
  happy.	
  Shankar	
  and	
  I	
  drove	
  off	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  listen	
  to	
  him	
  complain	
  and	
  finally	
  everything	
  
seVled	
  down.	
  I	
  pulled	
  out	
  my	
  liVle	
  video	
  camera	
  for	
  some	
  last	
  shots.	
  I	
  focused	
  on	
  Shankar	
  and	
  narrated,	
  “this	
  is	
  
Shankar,	
  he’s	
  my	
  driver	
  and	
  he’s	
  angry	
  at	
  me.”	
  He	
  turned	
  around	
  and	
  said,	
  “No,	
  everything	
  is	
  OK.”	
  He	
  dropped	
  
me	
  off	
  at	
  the	
  staIon	
  and	
  I	
  gave	
  him	
  Rs500	
  for	
  the	
  Rs150	
  trip.	
  Everything	
  was	
  OK	
  for	
  both	
  of	
  us.	
  His	
  anger	
  served	
  
him	
  well.	
  My	
  heavy	
  awareness	
  of	
  privilege	
  humbled	
  me.	
  
Inside	
  the	
  train	
  staIon	
  I	
  just	
  wandered	
  around	
  unIl	
  I	
  came	
  across	
  an	
  employee	
  and	
  asked	
  him	
  on	
  which	
  plaXorm	
  
the	
  train	
  would	
  arrive.	
  He	
  looked	
  at	
  my	
  Icket	
  and	
  said	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  waiIng	
  list.	
  Apparently	
  I	
  made	
  another	
  
                                                                                                54
mistake	
  at	
  the	
  Hyderabad	
  staIon.	
  He	
  brought	
  me	
  into	
  the	
  staIon	
  office	
  where	
  all	
  the	
  switches	
  and	
  brains	
  of	
  the	
  
operaIons	
  took	
  place.	
  A\er	
  a	
  few	
  minutes	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  seat	
  assignment.	
  Car	
  S2	
  seat	
  54.	
  I	
  went	
  outside	
  feeling	
  
thankful	
  that	
  I	
  asked	
  a	
  simple	
  quesIon	
  and	
  got	
  a	
  very	
  helpful	
  answer.	
  I	
  dri\ed	
  around	
  the	
  staIon	
  again	
  unIl	
  a	
  
young	
  man	
  came	
  over	
  and	
  said	
  he	
  wanted	
  to	
  take	
  my	
  picture.	
  It	
  was	
  awkward	
  because	
  I	
  knew	
  it	
  wasn’t	
  for	
  my	
  
good	
  looks.	
  The	
  next	
  thing	
  I	
  knew	
  I	
  was	
  the	
  subject	
  of	
  a	
  photo	
  shoot.	
  His	
  scam	
  was	
  to	
  take	
  pictures	
  and	
  then	
  sell	
  
me	
  the	
  camera.	
  I	
  just	
  ignored	
  him.	
  There	
  was	
  an	
  old	
  woman	
  begging	
  for	
  rupees.	
  Once	
  again	
  I	
  ran	
  out	
  of	
  small	
  
change.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  small	
  group	
  of	
  people	
  that	
  looked	
  friendly	
  so	
  I	
  got	
  closer	
  to	
  them.	
  One	
  man	
  was	
  from	
  Nepal	
  
who	
  lived	
  in	
  Cleveland.	
  They	
  were	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  group	
  of	
  400	
  from	
  the	
  Midwest	
  US	
  I	
  learned	
  about	
  at	
  breakfast.	
  
The	
  Nepalese	
  man	
  was	
  headed	
  with	
  his	
  wife	
  to	
  Katmandu	
  where	
  he	
  grew	
  up.	
  He	
  started	
  telling	
  me	
  about	
  Sai	
  
Baba	
  and	
  the	
  miracles	
  he	
  performs.	
  “You	
  are	
  on	
  the	
  right	
  path!”	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  good	
  hands	
  so	
  I	
  sat	
  down	
  
among	
  them.	
  Finally,	
  I	
  reached	
  into	
  my	
  wallet	
  and	
  gave	
  the	
  old	
  woman	
  Rs50	
  ($1).	
  That’s	
  a	
  lot.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  
but	
  everyone	
  knows	
  when	
  a	
  beggar	
  scores	
  big.	
  The	
  photo	
  man	
  was	
  on	
  me	
  like	
  glue.	
  My	
  Nepalese	
  friend	
  saw	
  my	
  
plight	
  and	
  explained	
  what	
  he	
  wanted.	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  I	
  wanted	
  none	
  of	
  it.	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  group	
  was	
  this	
  
white	
  haired	
  disInguished	
  looking	
  Indian	
  gentleman.	
  His	
  dress	
  and	
  mannerisms	
  reminded	
  me	
  of	
  the	
  days	
  of	
  
Gandhi	
  and	
  Nehru.	
  He	
  heard	
  of	
  what	
  this	
  young	
  man	
  had	
  done	
  and	
  started	
  scolding	
  him	
  mercilessly.	
  “How	
  can	
  
you	
  just	
  take	
  someone’s	
  photo.	
  I’ll	
  have	
  you	
  banished	
  from	
  the	
  train	
  staIon.	
  I’ll	
  get	
  the	
  police.	
  What	
  would	
  Baba	
  
say	
  about	
  this?”	
  It	
  went	
  on	
  and	
  on.	
  He	
  brought	
  over	
  the	
  staIon	
  master	
  and	
  told	
  him	
  to	
  force	
  the	
  young	
  man	
  
from	
  the	
  staIon	
  and	
  scolded	
  the	
  staIon	
  master	
  for	
  allowing	
  such	
  behavior	
  in	
  his	
  train	
  staIon.	
  I	
  thanked	
  the	
  man	
  
for	
  his	
  service	
  and	
  got	
  on	
  the	
  train.	
  
I	
  found	
  my	
  seat.	
  I	
  was	
  with	
  a	
  group	
  of	
  Islamic	
  clerics.	
  They	
  were	
  studying	
  to	
  become	
  Imams.	
  When	
  I	
  sat	
  down	
  I	
  
felt	
  like	
  they	
  could	
  see	
  the	
  horns	
  of	
  Great	
  Satan	
  coming	
  out	
  of	
  my	
  head	
  and	
  I	
  could	
  hear	
  them	
  muVering	
  jihad	
  
slogans	
  under	
  their	
  breath.	
  I	
  just	
  listened	
  to	
  this	
  voice	
  of	
  condiIoned	
  prejudice	
  inside	
  my	
  head	
  knowing	
  it	
  was	
  all	
  
false.	
  That	
  didn’t	
  stop	
  it	
  but	
  I	
  didn’t	
  have	
  to	
  listen.	
  I	
  introduced	
  myself	
  and	
  that	
  broke	
  whatever	
  ice	
  I	
  had	
  
imagined	
  was	
  there.	
  The	
  man	
  next	
  to	
  me	
  spoke	
  passable	
  English	
  and	
  we	
  shared	
  informaIon	
  about	
  where	
  and	
  
why	
  we	
  were	
  on	
  the	
  train.	
  I	
  got	
  my	
  10	
  cent	
  cup	
  of	
  Indian	
  tea.	
  It’s	
  a	
  great	
  way	
  to	
  stock	
  up	
  on	
  small	
  change.	
  I	
  
needed	
  it.	
  Beggars	
  have	
  a	
  place	
  in	
  this	
  society.	
  They	
  get	
  on	
  the	
  train	
  for	
  free	
  and	
  walk	
  up	
  and	
  down	
  the	
  aisle	
  
begging	
  for	
  rupees.	
  The	
  one	
  thing	
  I	
  was	
  thankful	
  for	
  is	
  that	
  they	
  didn’t	
  single	
  me	
  out.	
  I	
  got	
  my	
  share	
  of	
  pity	
  
inducing	
  stares	
  and	
  pleading.	
  All	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  give	
  them	
  a	
  rupee	
  coin	
  and	
  they	
  went	
  away.	
  My	
  advice	
  to	
  anyone	
  
going	
  to	
  India	
  is	
  first	
  they	
  should	
  secure	
  several	
  rolls	
  of	
  Rs1	
  coins	
  to	
  pass	
  out.	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  students	
  in	
  my	
  
compartment	
  was	
  reading	
  from	
  a	
  text	
  he	
  had	
  wriVen.	
  The	
  rest	
  of	
  them	
  were	
  nodding	
  their	
  heads	
  and	
  asking	
  
quesIons.	
  I	
  asked	
  the	
  man	
  next	
  to	
  me	
  what	
  he	
  was	
  doing.	
  He	
  said	
  he	
  was	
  giving	
  a	
  teaching	
  and	
  soliciIng	
  
responses	
  and	
  criIques	
  to	
  sharpen	
  his	
  understanding.	
  It	
  went	
  on	
  for	
  quite	
  a	
  while.	
  Another	
  man	
  who	
  was	
  a	
  
follower	
  of	
  Baba	
  Ji	
  was	
  listening	
  from	
  across	
  the	
  car	
  on	
  the	
  other	
  side	
  of	
  the	
  aisle.	
  He	
  came	
  over	
  to	
  start	
  a	
  
dialogue	
  with	
  these	
  Muslims	
  and	
  quesIon	
  them.	
  They	
  spoke	
  in	
  their	
  naIve	
  tongue	
  so	
  I	
  understood	
  nothing	
  but	
  I	
  
could	
  tell	
  what	
  was	
  going	
  on.	
  Another	
  22	
  year	
  old	
  young	
  man	
  talked	
  to	
  me	
  for	
  over	
  an	
  hour.	
  His	
  English	
  was	
  
excellent	
  and	
  he	
  wanted	
  to	
  join	
  the	
  Foreign	
  Service.	
  He	
  was	
  interested	
  in	
  me.	
  I	
  enjoyed	
  his	
  company.	
  He’s	
  
beginning	
  and	
  I’m	
  ending.	
  What	
  a	
  perspecIve!	
  He	
  was	
  growing	
  and	
  I	
  am	
  fading.	
  Whenever	
  I	
  write	
  something	
  like	
  
that	
  I	
  can	
  hear	
  your	
  voices	
  saying,	
  “No	
  you’re	
  not	
  fading!	
  You	
  have	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  life	
  le\,	
  don’t	
  give	
  up,	
  Kevin.”	
  Don’t	
  
you	
  understand?	
  You	
  are	
  growing	
  or	
  fading	
  too.	
  It’s	
  not	
  the	
  cancer	
  speaking,	
  it’s	
  awareness.	
  Don’t	
  cling	
  to	
  what	
  
doesn’t	
  belong	
  to	
  you.	
  Open	
  up	
  to	
  where	
  you	
  are	
  and	
  live	
  only	
  that.	
  Live	
  your	
  distorted	
  imaginaIon,	
  dictated	
  by	
  
past	
  and	
  future	
  and	
  you	
  are	
  lost	
  in	
  your	
  manufactured	
  world.	
  I	
  have	
  no	
  room	
  for	
  that	
  anymore.	
  
A\er	
  my	
  Muslim	
  friends	
  did	
  their	
  noon	
  prayers	
  they	
  broke	
  out	
  the	
  Indian	
  trail	
  mix.	
  They	
  persistently	
  passed	
  it	
  on	
  
to	
  me	
  and	
  liVle	
  did	
  they	
  know	
  about	
  American	
  snack	
  addicIon.	
  I	
  ate	
  everything	
  they	
  passed	
  to	
  me.	
  Finally	
  they	
  
just	
  gave	
  me	
  the	
  whole	
  bag.	
  The	
  scenery	
  was	
  very	
  much	
  like	
  Southern	
  California.	
  It	
  was	
  semi-­‐arid	
  with	
  
mountains	
  in	
  the	
  background.	
  If	
  I	
  ever	
  decide	
  to	
  see	
  all	
  of	
  India,	
  I	
  would	
  travel	
  by	
  train.	
  There’s	
  none	
  of	
  the	
  
roadside	
  madness.	
  The	
  countryside,	
  doVed	
  with	
  cows	
  and	
  farmers	
  doing	
  their	
  everyday	
  pass	
  by	
  like	
  a	
  movie.	
  The	
  
people	
  are	
  real;	
  they’re	
  friendly	
  and	
  helpful.	
  If	
  you	
  want	
  luxury	
  it’s	
  available	
  in	
  first	
  class.	
  I	
  would	
  do	
  that	
  when	
  
                                                                                             55
it’s	
  really	
  hot.	
  Otherwise	
  this	
  is	
  the	
  place	
  for	
  me.	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  India.	
  I	
  love	
  this	
  country.	
  
The	
  train	
  pulled	
  into	
  Bangalore	
  and	
  my	
  outsider	
  paranoia	
  popped	
  into	
  my	
  head.	
  “Watch	
  your	
  stuff,	
  hold	
  onto	
  
your	
  bag	
  and	
  your	
  passport.	
  You’ll	
  be	
  going	
  through	
  the	
  gauntlet.	
  My	
  young	
  friend	
  was	
  no	
  help.	
  He	
  looked	
  at	
  me	
  
solemnly	
  and	
  said	
  “Good	
  Luck”.	
  I	
  walked	
  out	
  to	
  the	
  staIon.	
  Shields	
  up!	
  I	
  was	
  gebng	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  crowds	
  when	
  a	
  
man	
  came	
  over	
  and	
  said	
  “ Taxi?”	
  I	
  said	
  yes.	
  He	
  took	
  my	
  bags	
  to	
  the	
  taxi.	
  I	
  got	
  in	
  and	
  he	
  drove	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  hotel.	
  
Shields	
  down.	
  This	
  hotel,	
  The	
  Windsor,	
  is	
  an	
  unapologeIc	
  tribute	
  to	
  English	
  rule.	
  My	
  hippie	
  classism	
  came	
  
rushing	
  back	
  again.	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  imagine	
  a	
  hotel	
  in	
  Atlanta	
  made	
  to	
  look	
  like	
  an	
  old	
  plantaIon	
  with	
  servile	
  Africans	
  
everywhere.	
  I	
  don’t	
  think	
  it	
  would	
  go	
  over	
  very	
  well.	
  I	
  got	
  seVled	
  and	
  went	
  down	
  to	
  the	
  restaurant	
  for	
  a	
  beer	
  and	
  
a	
  sandwich.	
  It	
  was	
  very	
  posh.	
  I	
  sat	
  next	
  to	
  Hamed,	
  a	
  young	
  sheik	
  from	
  Dubai.	
  We	
  talked	
  the	
  whole	
  Ime.	
  He	
  was	
  a 	
  
young	
  father	
  with	
  three	
  liVle	
  children.	
  Same	
  as	
  everyone,	
  only	
  the	
  scenery	
  changes.	
  
I	
  had	
  to	
  get	
  ready	
  for	
  the	
  pre	
  wedding	
  celebraIon	
  that	
  evening.	
  Babu	
  was	
  working	
  as	
  usual	
  and	
  only	
  a	
  big	
  family	
  
event	
  could	
  tear	
  him	
  away	
  from	
  his	
  job.	
  A	
  driver	
  came	
  by	
  to	
  pick	
  me	
  up	
  and	
  we	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  pick	
  up	
  Babu.	
  He	
  
came	
  out	
  of	
  a	
  huge	
  hotel	
  under	
  construcIon	
  a\er	
  about	
  15	
  minutes.	
  We	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  celebraIon.	
  It’s	
  a	
  
community	
  affair.	
  There’s	
  a	
  building	
  dedicated	
  to	
  weddings.	
  The	
  third	
  floor	
  is	
  where	
  the	
  events	
  are	
  held.	
  The	
  
second	
  floor	
  is	
  where	
  the	
  food	
  is	
  served.	
  Babu	
  tried	
  to	
  prepare	
  me.	
  He	
  said	
  this	
  would	
  be	
  a	
  small	
  wedding	
  and	
  
not	
  very	
  elaborate	
  due	
  to	
  the	
  status	
  of	
  the	
  family.	
  This	
  “pre	
  wedding”	
  event	
  is	
  indeed	
  small.	
  There	
  were	
  only	
  
about	
  200	
  people.	
  We	
  had	
  to	
  eat	
  in	
  shi\s	
  as	
  this	
  huge	
  eaIng	
  hall	
  only	
  could	
  fit	
  75	
  or	
  so	
  at	
  a	
  Ime.	
  We	
  went	
  over	
  
to	
  the	
  local	
  Hindu	
  temple.	
  Its	
  patron	
  god	
  is	
  the	
  Monkey	
  God	
  (don’t	
  ask,	
  some	
  God	
  incarnated	
  as	
  a	
  monkey	
  to	
  
save	
  the	
  world,	
  frankly	
  I	
  want	
  him	
  back.	
  I’ve	
  had	
  enough	
  of	
  asses	
  and	
  elephants).	
  Monkey	
  god	
  is	
  everywhere	
  and	
  
there’s	
  a	
  priest	
  blessing	
  the	
  altar	
  and	
  bringing	
  out	
  the	
  burning	
  oil	
  that	
  was	
  all	
  waved	
  over	
  our	
  heads.	
  Babu	
  
quickly	
  put	
  some	
  money	
  on	
  the	
  tray.	
  I	
  never	
  did	
  figure	
  out	
  the	
  money	
  in	
  the	
  temple	
  thing.	
  The	
  drill	
  here	
  is	
  that	
  
the	
  groom	
  objects	
  to	
  gebng	
  married.	
  He	
  protests	
  that	
  he	
  wants	
  to	
  live	
  the	
  life	
  of	
  an	
  aestheIc	
  and	
  follow	
  the	
  
path	
  of	
  enlightenment.	
  He’s	
  brought	
  to	
  the	
  temple	
  so	
  the	
  priest	
  can	
  talk	
  to	
  him	
  about	
  it.	
  I	
  suppose	
  he	
  eventually	
  
realizes	
  that	
  a	
  life	
  of	
  celibacy	
  and	
  renunciaIon	
  isn’t	
  in	
  the	
  cards	
  and	
  he	
  agrees	
  to	
  get	
  married.	
  To	
  be	
  honest,	
  
looking	
  at	
  his	
  beauIful	
  wife	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  skipped	
  that	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  ceremony.	
  They	
  would	
  have	
  had	
  to	
  drag	
  me	
  
over	
  the	
  temple.	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  been	
  afraid	
  my	
  fiancée	
  would	
  have	
  bribed	
  the	
  priest	
  to	
  accept	
  me	
  into	
  the	
  order.	
  
Everyone	
  comes	
  back.	
  It’s	
  dinner	
  Ime.	
  We	
  go	
  downstairs	
  to	
  the	
  banquet	
  hall.	
  We	
  go	
  into	
  the	
  hand	
  washing	
  room	
  
and	
  get	
  cleaned	
  up.	
  There	
  are	
  narrow	
  stainless	
  steel	
  tables	
  and	
  tall	
  stainless	
  steel	
  stools	
  to	
  sit	
  on.	
  The	
  help	
  cleans 	
  
off	
  the	
  table	
  from	
  the	
  last	
  sibng	
  and	
  rolls	
  out	
  a	
  white	
  paper	
  covering.	
  Next	
  everyone	
  gets	
  a	
  banana	
  leaf	
  that	
  
serves	
  as	
  a	
  plate.	
  Each	
  guest	
  examines	
  their	
  leaf	
  for	
  tears	
  and	
  gets	
  another	
  one	
  if	
  it	
  proves	
  defecIve.	
  You	
  sprinkle	
  
the	
  leaf	
  with	
  water	
  and	
  drain	
  it	
  on	
  the	
  floor.	
  The	
  servers	
  come	
  around	
  with	
  buckets	
  of	
  food.	
  There’s	
  rice,	
  several	
  
curries	
  and	
  a	
  host	
  of	
  other	
  dishes.	
  They	
  keep	
  coming	
  around	
  and	
  I	
  learned	
  that	
  saying	
  no	
  means	
  “load	
  it	
  up	
  
boys”.	
  Babu	
  tried	
  to	
  teach	
  me	
  the	
  word	
  for	
  “I’m	
  about	
  to	
  explode	
  all	
  over	
  you,	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  when	
  to	
  stop	
  
because	
  everything	
  is	
  so	
  good	
  I	
  just	
  want	
  to	
  die	
  right	
  now	
  from	
  over	
  eaIng,	
  please	
  help	
  me	
  and	
  stop	
  pubng	
  
food	
  on	
  my	
  banana	
  leaf!”	
  Their	
  actually	
  is	
  a	
  word	
  and	
  a	
  hand	
  gesture	
  for	
  it.	
  Finally	
  they	
  had	
  pity	
  on	
  me	
  and	
  
rolled	
  me	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  hall.	
  The	
  ceremony	
  just	
  goes	
  on	
  all	
  night.	
  Most	
  of	
  guests	
  sleep	
  dorm	
  style	
  on	
  the	
  fourth	
  floor	
  
and	
  stay	
  up	
  all	
  night	
  like	
  a	
  family	
  pajama	
  party.	
  Babu	
  said	
  no	
  one	
  sleep	
  the	
  night	
  before	
  a	
  wedding.	
  We	
  le\	
  for	
  
the	
  hotel	
  around	
  midnight.
Babu’s	
  family	
  arrived	
  on	
  the	
  train	
  from	
  Chennai	
  at	
  6AM.	
  I	
  got	
  about	
  4	
  hours	
  sleep.	
  I	
  hopped	
  into	
  the	
  shower	
  as	
  
everyone	
  arrived.	
  I	
  put	
  on	
  my	
  Kurt	
  (Indian	
  shirt	
  and	
  pants).	
  Everyone	
  kept	
  remarking	
  how	
  I	
  looked	
  like	
  Nehru.	
  It	
  
was	
  quite	
  comfortable.	
  Off	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  wedding.	
  We	
  stopped	
  for	
  breakfast.	
  It	
  was	
  wonderful	
  and	
  I	
  got	
  really	
  
full	
  on	
  curry	
  soaked	
  Idlys	
  and	
  dosa	
  (large	
  thin	
  pancake)	
  stuffed	
  with	
  curried	
  potatoes.	
  When	
  we	
  arrived	
  at	
  the	
  
wedding	
  hall	
  everyone	
  was	
  outside	
  the	
  hall	
  to	
  greet	
  us.	
  We	
  went	
  upstairs	
  and	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  big	
  arbor	
  set	
  up.	
  Fruit	
  
and	
  flowers	
  were	
  everywhere.	
  There	
  were	
  big	
  Indian	
  trumpets	
  and	
  tablas	
  playing	
  chaoIc	
  music.	
  The	
  bride	
  was	
  
decked	
  out	
  with	
  jewelry	
  and	
  makeup.	
  She	
  looked	
  beauIful.	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  say	
  both	
  of	
  them	
  looked	
  like	
  something	
  out	
  
of	
  a	
  movie.	
  They	
  were	
  a	
  stunning	
  couple.	
  We	
  all	
  went	
  over	
  to	
  the	
  temple	
  where	
  the	
  priest	
  blessed	
  the	
  altar	
  and	
  
everyone	
  got	
  some	
  smoke	
  and	
  yellow	
  water.	
  I	
  got	
  Puja	
  or	
  a	
  third	
  eye	
  face	
  painIng.	
  I	
  drank	
  a	
  liVle	
  of	
  the	
  yellow	
  
                                                                                              56
water	
  and	
  splashed	
  the	
  rest	
  over	
  my	
  head	
  like	
  I	
  did	
  the	
  night	
  before.	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  few	
  looks	
  of	
  kind	
  disapproval.	
  I	
  think	
  
Hinduism	
  takes	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  pracIce.	
  We	
  all	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  hall	
  for	
  the	
  wedding.	
  The	
  rituals	
  are	
  endless.	
  The	
  couple	
  
ends	
  up	
  with	
  their	
  robes	
  Ied	
  together	
  in	
  a	
  knot,	
  they	
  are	
  now	
  husband	
  and	
  wife.	
  
I	
  was	
  seated	
  in	
  the	
  front	
  row	
  during	
  the	
  whole	
  thing.	
  There	
  were	
  people	
  assigned	
  to	
  talk	
  to	
  me.	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  it	
  was	
  
not	
  the	
  most	
  sought	
  a\er	
  assignment.	
  However,	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  make	
  it	
  as	
  interesIng	
  as	
  possible.	
  A	
  cousin	
  of	
  Babu	
  
spent	
  most	
  of	
  her	
  Ime	
  with	
  me.	
  We	
  talked	
  about	
  Indian	
  culture.	
  She’s	
  a	
  so\ware	
  engineer	
  for	
  a	
  local	
  company.	
  
She	
  was	
  certainly	
  someone	
  that	
  is	
  bucking	
  her	
  culture.	
  She	
  met	
  her	
  husband	
  by	
  calling	
  a	
  wrong	
  number.	
  That’s	
  
her	
  story	
  anyway.	
  He’s	
  from	
  a	
  different	
  ethnicity;	
  he	
  speaks	
  Kanada.	
  I	
  never	
  heard	
  of	
  that	
  one	
  before	
  but	
  it’s	
  very	
  
unusual	
  to	
  marry	
  outside	
  of	
  your	
  ethnic	
  group.	
  When	
  you	
  marry	
  in	
  India	
  you	
  marry	
  a	
  whole	
  community.	
  Your	
  
parents	
  normally	
  arrange	
  your	
  marriage.	
  Each	
  partner	
  gets	
  a	
  right	
  of	
  refusal	
  if	
  they	
  don’t	
  like	
  the	
  pick.	
  No	
  harm	
  
no	
  foul.	
  Babu’s	
  cousin	
  works	
  so	
  she	
  thought	
  Sai	
  Baba’s	
  advice	
  was	
  gebng	
  old	
  fashioned.	
  Most	
  Indians	
  now	
  only	
  
have	
  one	
  or	
  two	
  children.	
  Things	
  are	
  rapidly	
  changing.
The	
  wedding	
  simply	
  goes	
  on	
  and	
  on.	
  Babu	
  had	
  to	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  work	
  so	
  we	
  went	
  down	
  to	
  the	
  eaIng	
  hall	
  and	
  did	
  
that	
  whole	
  meal	
  thing	
  all	
  over	
  again.	
  Babu	
  pointed	
  out	
  to	
  me	
  that	
  everything	
  is	
  cooked	
  right	
  there	
  in	
  the	
  hall.	
  
Vegetables	
  and	
  rice	
  were	
  everywhere.	
  Big	
  cooking	
  pots	
  were	
  constantly	
  brewing	
  up	
  new	
  batches	
  of	
  food.	
  It	
  was	
  
an	
  amazing	
  process.	
  A\er	
  our	
  wonderful	
  meal	
  we	
  waited	
  on	
  line	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  couple	
  our	
  gi\s.	
  When	
  I	
  got	
  there	
  
they	
  stood	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  me	
  and	
  bowed	
  at	
  my	
  feet	
  and	
  asked	
  for	
  my	
  blessing.	
  I’m	
  clumsy	
  at	
  that	
  but	
  in	
  my	
  heart	
  I	
  
wished	
  them	
  the	
  happiest	
  life	
  imaginable.	
  The	
  whole	
  thing	
  went	
  on	
  from	
  9AM	
  Ill	
  2PM.	
  
Babu	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  work.	
  Gowhri	
  and	
  Ramesh	
  asked	
  if	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  go	
  sightseeing	
  in	
  the	
  a\ernoon.	
  I	
  said	
  I	
  was	
  Ired	
  
and	
  just	
  wanted	
  to	
  relax	
  before	
  we	
  all	
  had	
  to	
  go.	
  The	
  driver	
  said	
  I	
  should	
  start	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  airport	
  at	
  5PM	
  for	
  an	
  
11PM	
  flight.	
  That	
  sounded	
  ridiculous	
  but	
  he	
  insisted	
  that	
  with	
  the	
  rain	
  and	
  traffic	
  it	
  could	
  take	
  over	
  two	
  hours	
  to	
  
get	
  there.	
  I	
  agreed.	
  I	
  packed	
  up	
  and	
  went	
  down	
  to	
  the	
  lobby	
  so	
  everyone	
  could	
  sleep	
  in	
  the	
  room.	
  I	
  dozed	
  off	
  on	
  
a	
  sofa	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  minutes.	
  It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  go.	
  The	
  trip	
  to	
  the	
  airport	
  took	
  one	
  hour.	
  The	
  driver	
  was	
  apologeIc	
  and	
  I	
  
was	
  in	
  for	
  a	
  long	
  sit	
  at	
  the	
  airport.	
  My	
  impressions	
  of	
  Bangalore	
  were	
  very	
  posiIve.	
  I	
  could	
  see	
  that	
  prosperity	
  is	
  
breaking	
  out	
  everywhere.	
  However,	
  it’s	
  not	
  a	
  chaoIc	
  place.	
  The	
  infrastructure	
  and	
  buildings	
  are	
  in	
  good	
  shape	
  
and	
  aVracIve.	
  It’s	
  easy	
  to	
  see	
  that	
  if	
  the	
  economic	
  miracle	
  taking	
  hold	
  in	
  India	
  conInues	
  for	
  another	
  decade	
  
Bangalore	
  will	
  have	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  show	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  world.	
  I	
  was	
  surprised.
A\er	
  a	
  nice	
  flight,	
  I	
  arrived	
  back	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  Good	
  ol’predictable,	
  expensive	
  Singapore.	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I	
  had	
  been	
  
gone	
  for	
  a	
  month.	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  believe	
  it	
  was	
  only	
  10	
  days.	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  believe	
  that	
  it’s	
  only	
  been	
  a	
  month	
  since	
  I	
  
le\	
  California.	
  India	
  is	
  everything	
  I	
  imagined	
  it	
  to	
  be.	
  Every	
  Indian	
  I	
  met	
  and	
  spoke	
  with	
  is	
  keenly	
  aware	
  that	
  
western	
  culture	
  is	
  coming	
  to	
  India.	
  To	
  some	
  it’s	
  a	
  breath	
  of	
  fresh	
  air.	
  To	
  others	
  it’s	
  like	
  an	
  unwelcomed	
  guest.	
  It’s	
  
part	
  of	
  the	
  package	
  and	
  I	
  didn’t	
  meet	
  anyone	
  that	
  wants	
  to	
  turn	
  back.	
  During	
  my	
  trip	
  I	
  was	
  saw	
  the	
  veil	
  western	
  
culture	
  puts	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  our	
  eyes.	
  It	
  must	
  be	
  pierced	
  if	
  you	
  want	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  beauty	
  that’s	
  there	
  in	
  every	
  face.	
  They	
  
are	
  a	
  kind	
  hearted	
  people	
  with	
  a	
  deep	
  sense	
  of	
  life	
  and	
  death.	
  It	
  is	
  breathtaking	
  to	
  be	
  in	
  a	
  place	
  where	
  God	
  is	
  
never	
  far	
  from	
  the	
  surface	
  and	
  begs	
  from	
  each	
  of	
  us	
  a	
  second	
  look.	
  Stop	
  where	
  you	
  are	
  and	
  look	
  once	
  again	
  to	
  
see	
  what’s	
  hidden,	
  there,	
  right	
  there	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  your	
  nose.	
  Do	
  you	
  see	
  it?

Reaching	
  out	
  to	
  see	
  
Through	
  the	
  thick	
  glass	
  between	
  us
Hardly	
  touching	
  you.

Service	
  with	
  a	
  Smile
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  August	
  17,	
  2009

I’ve	
  now	
  been	
  through	
  four	
  treatments.	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  know	
  if	
  this	
  working.	
  The	
  best	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  said	
  it	
  that	
  
nothing	
  bad	
  is	
  showing	
  up.	
  I’m	
  feeling	
  good	
  and	
  when	
  you	
  have	
  my	
  prognosis	
  that’s	
  a	
  real	
  blessing.	
  

                                                                                               57
I’ve	
  started	
  doing	
  some	
  alternaIve	
  treatments.	
  My	
  local	
  Zen	
  teacher,	
  Vivian,	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  one	
  of	
  her	
  students,	
  
Dr	
  Sandardas,	
  a	
  naturopath.	
  He	
  did	
  several	
  tests	
  on	
  me	
  and	
  determined	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  biologically	
  69	
  years	
  old.	
  I	
  
can’t	
  dispute	
  that	
  knowing	
  what	
  my	
  body	
  has	
  been	
  through.	
  The	
  tesIng	
  he	
  put	
  me	
  through	
  showed	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  
candida.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  disease	
  that	
  all	
  naturopaths	
  seem	
  to	
  think	
  everyone	
  has.	
  The	
  good	
  news	
  is	
  that	
  I	
  could	
  cure	
  it	
  
with	
  a	
  two	
  week	
  treatment	
  of	
  supplements	
  and	
  diet.	
  The	
  bad	
  news	
  is	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  sIck	
  to	
  a	
  diet.	
  I	
  really	
  dislike	
  diets	
  
to	
  cure	
  a	
  disease	
  I	
  don’t	
  believe	
  I	
  have.	
  However,	
  I	
  did	
  it	
  and	
  when	
  I	
  was	
  retested,	
  the	
  imaginary	
  disease	
  was	
  
gone.	
  I	
  guess	
  it	
  was	
  worth	
  it.	
  

Dr	
  Sandardas	
  also	
  runs	
  a	
  program	
  for	
  clearing	
  up	
  mental	
  blocks	
  that	
  keep	
  one	
  from	
  doing	
  all	
  the	
  wonderful	
  
things	
  one	
  wants	
  to	
  do	
  but	
  for	
  some	
  strange	
  reason	
  can’t.	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  do	
  it	
  despite	
  my	
  skepIcism.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  day	
  
long	
  class	
  that	
  pushed	
  all	
  my	
  buVons.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  self	
  improvement	
  program	
  I	
  feel	
  I	
  could	
  have	
  wriVen	
  having	
  done	
  
so	
  much	
  self-­‐improvement	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  I’m	
  what	
  you	
  call	
  over-­‐improved.	
  I’m	
  so	
  improved	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  
disproved.	
  There’s	
  no	
  program	
  for	
  that.	
  That	
  being	
  said,	
  I	
  always	
  seem	
  to	
  get	
  something	
  out	
  of	
  it.	
  However,	
  there	
  
was	
  a	
  follow	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  program	
  that	
  I	
  respecXully	
  declined.	
  There’s	
  a	
  Ime	
  for	
  this	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  Ime.	
  All	
  the	
  tools	
  
I’ve	
  learned	
  have	
  served	
  me	
  well	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  would	
  recommend	
  to	
  anyone	
  to	
  gather	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  tools	
  to	
  help	
  you	
  
enjoy	
  your	
  life,	
  whatever	
  form	
  your	
  life	
  takes.	
  Don’t	
  hide	
  from	
  yourself,	
  you’ll	
  only	
  react	
  without	
  awareness.	
  
There	
  are	
  ways	
  to	
  become	
  inImate	
  with	
  your	
  own	
  life.	
  Find	
  the	
  way	
  that	
  calls	
  to	
  you	
  and	
  embrace	
  it.	
  

My	
  Zen	
  teacher	
  has	
  been	
  very	
  good	
  for	
  me.	
  We	
  sit	
  on	
  Wed	
  evenings	
  and	
  every	
  other	
  Sunday	
  morning.	
  She	
  
conducts	
  interviews	
  a	
  few	
  Imes	
  a	
  month.	
  This	
  interview,	
  called	
  dokusan,	
  is	
  where	
  the	
  student	
  tests	
  his/her	
  
understanding	
  with	
  the	
  teacher.	
  I	
  reminds	
  me	
  of	
  test	
  Ime	
  and	
  I	
  always	
  have	
  some	
  resistance	
  to	
  it.	
  I	
  find	
  it	
  a	
  
rewarding,	
  insighXul	
  and	
  necessary	
  part	
  of	
  my	
  Zen	
  pracIce.	
  I	
  finally	
  answered	
  the	
  koan	
  “Mu”	
  and	
  now	
  I’ve	
  
moved	
  onto	
  the	
  next	
  koan.	
  This	
  one	
  is	
  called	
  “one	
  finger	
  Zen”.	
  A	
  Zen	
  master	
  answered	
  every	
  quesIon	
  posed	
  by	
  
poinIng	
  one	
  finger	
  up.	
  A	
  student	
  was	
  asked	
  a	
  quesIon	
  and	
  he	
  pointed	
  one	
  finger	
  up.	
  The	
  master	
  cut	
  off	
  the	
  
student’s	
  finger	
  and	
  the	
  student	
  aVained	
  enlightenment.	
  Go	
  figure.	
  If	
  it	
  were	
  that	
  easy	
  I’d	
  only	
  have	
  one	
  finger	
  
le\.	
  I’m	
  looking	
  forward	
  to	
  answering	
  this	
  one	
  without	
  any	
  bloodshed.	
  Chopping	
  my	
  finger	
  off	
  to	
  answer	
  a	
  koan	
  
is	
  a	
  bit	
  extreme	
  at	
  my	
  age.

My	
  roommate,	
  Laraine,	
  had	
  a	
  housewarming	
  party	
  with	
  about	
  a	
  dozen	
  friends.	
  Three	
  of	
  them	
  were	
  affected	
  by	
  
colon	
  cancer.	
  Raj,	
  an	
  Indian	
  fellow,	
  was	
  currently	
  undergoing	
  treatment	
  for	
  it.	
  It’s	
  the	
  biggest	
  killer	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  
Peter,	
  a	
  local	
  musician	
  has	
  a	
  sister	
  in	
  Spain	
  going	
  through	
  it.	
  I	
  heard	
  that	
  50,000	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  US	
  will	
  die	
  of	
  it	
  this	
  
year.	
  

A	
  woman	
  at	
  the	
  party,	
  Shirley,	
  told	
  me	
  about	
  a	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  master	
  and	
  healer	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  I	
  asked	
  her	
  to	
  take	
  me	
  
to	
  him.	
  Shirley	
  is	
  somewhere	
  around	
  my	
  age.	
  She	
  pracIces	
  Theosophy.	
  That’s	
  something	
  I’ve	
  heard	
  of	
  but	
  didn’t	
  
know	
  much	
  about.	
  We	
  spent	
  the	
  day	
  together	
  visiIng	
  the	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  master	
  and	
  then	
  touring	
  around	
  Singapore’s	
  
LiVle	
  India	
  and	
  Bugis	
  districts.	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  is	
  an	
  energy	
  healing	
  modality.	
  I	
  only	
  know	
  of	
  it	
  because	
  a	
  fellow	
  resident	
  
at	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center,	
  Catherine,	
  was	
  studying	
  to	
  become	
  a	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  healer.	
  This	
  gentleman	
  had	
  a	
  liVle	
  
storefront	
  on	
  the	
  West	
  end	
  of	
  Singapore.	
  Standing	
  with	
  my	
  back	
  to	
  him	
  he	
  starts	
  waving	
  his	
  arms	
  around	
  
supposedly	
  moving	
  my	
  chi	
  or	
  energy	
  within	
  my	
  body.	
  This	
  is	
  all	
  for	
  the	
  best	
  I	
  assume.	
  Suddenly	
  my	
  body	
  started	
  
to	
  move	
  back	
  and	
  forth.	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  see	
  him	
  so	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  what	
  was	
  going	
  on.	
  A\erwards	
  he	
  explained	
  what	
  he	
  
was	
  doing	
  and	
  showed	
  me	
  a	
  video	
  of	
  him	
  moving	
  crowds	
  of	
  people	
  like	
  a	
  puppet	
  master.	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  sign	
  up	
  for	
  
a	
  ten	
  treatment	
  regimen	
  that	
  he	
  says	
  will	
  cause	
  these	
  cancer	
  cells	
  to	
  give	
  up.	
  He	
  pracIces	
  a	
  form	
  of	
  Thai	
  
Buddhism.	
  His	
  assistant	
  (spouse?)	
  also	
  pracIces	
  with	
  this	
  Thai	
  teacher.	
  His	
  teacher	
  knows	
  what	
  happened	
  to	
  
Michael	
  Jackson.	
  He	
  apparently	
  is	
  not	
  in	
  the	
  best	
  place	
  reserved	
  for	
  the	
  most	
  holy	
  among	
  us.	
  However,	
  he	
  is	
  in	
  a	
  
really	
  good	
  place.	
  It	
  must	
  be	
  like	
  my	
  apartment	
  in	
  La	
  Jolla.	
  Not	
  by	
  the	
  beach	
  but	
  nice	
  nonetheless.	
  Asian	
  people	
  
seem	
  to	
  really	
  like	
  him.	
  His	
  death	
  was	
  a	
  real	
  blow	
  to	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  people	
  here.	
  I’m	
  sure	
  at	
  least	
  some	
  people	
  are	
  
                                                                                                 58
relieved	
  that	
  he’s	
  doing	
  well	
  in	
  the	
  a\erlife.	
  Despite	
  pushing	
  my	
  religious	
  buVons	
  I	
  said	
  I	
  would	
  try	
  to	
  visit	
  their	
  
teacher’s	
  temple	
  when	
  I	
  go	
  to	
  Thailand.

On	
  July	
  31st,	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  Thailand	
  to	
  vacaIon	
  with	
  my	
  dear	
  friends	
  Joe	
  and	
  Mike.	
  It	
  was	
  so	
  wonderful	
  to	
  have	
  
friends	
  willing	
  to	
  travel	
  so	
  far	
  to	
  see	
  me.	
  I	
  aVended	
  their	
  wedding	
  just	
  days	
  before	
  the	
  California	
  bigots	
  voted	
  to	
  
take	
  away	
  the	
  rights	
  of	
  gay	
  Americans	
  to	
  be	
  married.	
  I	
  was	
  honored	
  to	
  be	
  there	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  confidence	
  that	
  the	
  
right	
  of	
  all	
  people	
  to	
  marry	
  whoever	
  they	
  want	
  will	
  soon	
  be	
  restored.	
  I	
  just	
  refuse	
  to	
  die	
  unIl	
  that	
  happens.	
  Now	
  
there’s	
  a	
  conflict,	
  I’ve	
  predicted	
  that	
  the	
  bigot’s	
  proposiIon	
  will	
  be	
  overturned	
  in	
  2010.	
  OK,	
  I	
  refuse	
  to	
  die	
  unIl	
  
everyone	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  is	
  free	
  to	
  marry	
  anyone	
  they	
  like.	
  Saudi	
  Arabia	
  could	
  keep	
  me	
  alive	
  for	
  centuries.

Now,	
  where	
  was	
  I;	
  Thailand.	
  We	
  first	
  stayed	
  in	
  a	
  nice	
  new	
  budget	
  hotel	
  in	
  a	
  very	
  busy	
  part	
  of	
  Bangkok.	
  I	
  was	
  met	
  
at	
  the	
  airport	
  by	
  three	
  women	
  I	
  had	
  met	
  online.	
  They	
  were	
  very	
  eager	
  to	
  see	
  me	
  and	
  I	
  liked	
  them	
  all.	
  One	
  of	
  
them	
  even	
  knew	
  a	
  few	
  words	
  of	
  English.	
  We	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  hotel	
  and	
  had	
  dinner.	
  I	
  got	
  two	
  rooms	
  so	
  I	
  could	
  get	
  to	
  
know	
  them	
  beVer.	
  One	
  of	
  them,	
  Ploy,	
  was	
  parIcularly	
  interested	
  in	
  me	
  and	
  she	
  spoke	
  no	
  English	
  whatsoever.	
  I	
  
had	
  Google	
  translator	
  to	
  the	
  rescue.	
  However,	
  the	
  Thai	
  alphabet	
  required	
  a	
  Thai	
  keyboard	
  that	
  I	
  didn’t	
  have	
  and	
  
Ploy	
  would	
  not	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  use	
  it	
  anyway.	
  So	
  we	
  did	
  our	
  best	
  to	
  communicate	
  in	
  other	
  ways.	
  

Side	
  note:	
  I	
  have	
  redefined	
  civilizaIon	
  since	
  my	
  trip	
  to	
  India.	
  Both	
  India	
  and	
  Thailand	
  offer	
  a	
  very	
  civilized	
  toilet	
  
amenity	
  I	
  think	
  should	
  become	
  an	
  essenIal	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  home.	
  It’s	
  a	
  sprayer	
  like	
  the	
  one	
  on	
  your	
  
kitchen	
  sink.	
  You	
  put	
  that	
  under	
  your	
  buV	
  and	
  spray	
  away.	
  It’s	
  just	
  great.	
  No	
  more	
  TP	
  required.	
  So	
  you	
  heard	
  it	
  
first,	
  buV	
  spraying	
  is	
  coming	
  to	
  a	
  bathroom	
  near	
  you.	
  Get	
  ahead	
  of	
  the	
  curve!
Back	
  to	
  my	
  story:

Mike	
  arrived	
  late	
  that	
  night	
  and	
  Joe	
  got	
  stuck	
  in	
  Tokyo.	
  The	
  next	
  morning	
  I	
  went	
  off	
  with	
  my	
  three	
  new	
  friends	
  
and	
  a	
  driver,	
  KiVy.	
  We	
  saw	
  the	
  Royal	
  Palace.	
  It	
  was	
  quite	
  spectacular.	
  There	
  were	
  several	
  temples	
  there	
  and	
  
everyone	
  was	
  quite	
  shocked	
  at	
  my	
  familiarity	
  with	
  Buddhism.	
  Ploy	
  was	
  definitely	
  on	
  board	
  for	
  a	
  lifeIme	
  
commitment.	
  I	
  knew	
  this	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  good	
  sign.	
  Mike	
  texted	
  me	
  that	
  he	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  find	
  a	
  SIM	
  card	
  for	
  his	
  phone	
  
so	
  he	
  could	
  use	
  it	
  locally.	
  He	
  met	
  a	
  few	
  guys	
  and	
  went	
  for	
  beers.	
  He	
  later	
  texted	
  that	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  meet	
  me	
  at	
  the	
  
hotel.	
  That	
  was	
  the	
  last	
  Ime	
  I	
  heard	
  from	
  Mike	
  for	
  24	
  hours.	
  It	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  point	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  call	
  in	
  the	
  
police.	
  Of	
  course	
  everything	
  was	
  fine.	
  Joe	
  finally	
  got	
  his	
  flight	
  and	
  I	
  met	
  up	
  with	
  Mike.	
  While	
  we	
  were	
  talking	
  my	
  
franIc	
  24	
  hour	
  old	
  text	
  messages	
  finally	
  hit	
  his	
  phone.	
  It	
  got	
  lost	
  in	
  the	
  ether.

The	
  next	
  day,	
  Mike,	
  Joe,	
  Ploy	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  “FloaIng	
  Market”.	
  It’s	
  a	
  must	
  see	
  according	
  to	
  all	
  the	
  travel	
  
books.	
  It	
  was	
  quite	
  boring	
  and	
  more	
  expensive	
  than	
  it	
  was	
  supposed	
  to	
  be.	
  The	
  only	
  saving	
  grace	
  was	
  stumbling	
  
onto	
  a	
  real	
  gem	
  of	
  an	
  outdoor	
  Thai	
  restaurant.	
  It	
  was	
  wonderful	
  all	
  the	
  way	
  around.	
  Good	
  food	
  can	
  turn	
  any	
  day	
  
around.

The	
  Thai	
  people	
  love	
  the	
  queen	
  and	
  king.	
  It’s	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  places	
  where	
  the	
  monarchy	
  seems	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  arbiter	
  of	
  
all	
  that’s	
  right	
  and	
  just	
  in	
  their	
  culture.	
  They’ve	
  had	
  some	
  poliIcal	
  trouble	
  lately	
  where	
  the	
  Prime	
  Minister	
  was	
  
ousted	
  by	
  the	
  military	
  over	
  charges	
  of	
  corrupIon	
  that	
  no	
  one	
  doubted.	
  There’s	
  a	
  peIIon	
  drive	
  to	
  pardon	
  him	
  
and	
  get	
  the	
  democraIc	
  process	
  started	
  over	
  again.	
  They’ve	
  collected	
  five	
  million	
  signatures	
  and	
  plan	
  to	
  present	
  it	
  
to	
  the	
  king.	
  He	
  has	
  the	
  authority	
  to	
  pardon	
  anyone	
  he	
  likes.	
  However,	
  the	
  king	
  doesn’t	
  normally	
  interfere	
  in	
  the	
  
poliIcal	
  process	
  here	
  or	
  take	
  sides.	
  That	
  seems	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  key	
  to	
  his	
  success.	
  He’s	
  been	
  around	
  for	
  something	
  like	
  
sixty	
  years	
  and	
  you	
  don’t	
  get	
  longevity	
  like	
  that	
  taking	
  sides.	
  He	
  has	
  managed	
  to	
  rise	
  above	
  it.	
  He	
  is	
  clearly	
  
venerated	
  by	
  his	
  people	
  and	
  it	
  shows	
  up	
  everywhere.	
  It’s	
  cute	
  but	
  monarchy	
  never	
  appealed	
  to	
  me	
  and	
  I’ve	
  
never	
  quite	
  understood	
  how	
  or	
  why	
  some	
  countries	
  totally	
  buy	
  into	
  it.	
  It’s	
  my	
  American	
  cultural	
  bias.

                                                                                                59
When	
  we	
  returned	
  an	
  old	
  High	
  School	
  friend	
  of	
  mine	
  called.	
  Dave	
  has	
  been	
  living	
  in	
  Bangkok	
  for	
  several	
  years	
  
and	
  wanted	
  to	
  show	
  me	
  and	
  my	
  friends	
  around	
  the	
  bar	
  scene.	
  I	
  sent	
  Ploy	
  home	
  and	
  told	
  her	
  I	
  would	
  keep	
  in	
  
touch.	
  I	
  bought	
  her	
  a	
  cell	
  phone	
  and	
  that	
  became	
  the	
  running	
  joke	
  of	
  the	
  trip.	
  Hey,	
  I’ve	
  never	
  been	
  a	
  Sugar	
  
Daddy.	
  Finally	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  place	
  I	
  could	
  afford	
  it!	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  what	
  I	
  was	
  thinking	
  when	
  I	
  met	
  Ploy.	
  I	
  liked	
  her	
  
and	
  to	
  be	
  honest	
  I	
  feel	
  lonely	
  in	
  my	
  new	
  role	
  of	
  single	
  guy.	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  for	
  me.	
  My	
  mind	
  went	
  to	
  dreams	
  
of	
  living	
  in	
  a	
  remote	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  world	
  with	
  a	
  woman	
  that	
  loved	
  me	
  in	
  a	
  simple	
  way.	
  Given	
  the	
  convenIonal	
  
medical	
  wisdom	
  that	
  I	
  won’t	
  be	
  occupying	
  this	
  body	
  much	
  longer,	
  the	
  thought	
  of	
  romancing	
  an	
  American	
  woman	
  
and	
  someday	
  finding	
  something	
  remotely	
  resembling	
  a	
  loving	
  partnership	
  seems	
  even	
  more	
  ridiculous.	
  This	
  
could	
  be	
  a	
  way	
  to	
  live	
  out	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  sIll	
  think	
  it	
  may	
  be.	
  I	
  don’t	
  do	
  loneliness	
  well.	
  

Men	
  are	
  a	
  strange	
  breed.	
  Mars	
  is	
  very	
  different	
  from	
  Venus	
  and	
  Bangkok	
  certainly	
  shows	
  off	
  those	
  differences.	
  
Dave	
  knew	
  all	
  the	
  places	
  to	
  go	
  and	
  had	
  the	
  energy	
  to	
  keep	
  us	
  all	
  going.	
  The	
  first	
  stop	
  was	
  a	
  place	
  where	
  all	
  these	
  
girls	
  were	
  dancing	
  on	
  the	
  stage	
  with	
  liVle	
  numbers	
  on	
  them.	
  The	
  men	
  would	
  simply	
  point	
  and	
  the	
  girl	
  would	
  
come	
  over	
  and	
  entertain	
  them.	
  In	
  this	
  bar	
  the	
  girls	
  were	
  actually	
  “lady	
  boys”.	
  It	
  was	
  unbelievable.	
  They	
  were	
  
absolutely	
  beauIful	
  women.	
  I’ve	
  always	
  joked	
  to	
  my	
  more	
  open	
  minded	
  friends	
  (i.e.	
  not	
  homophobes)	
  that	
  I	
  
consider	
  myself	
  85%	
  heterosexual.	
  If	
  ever	
  my	
  15%	
  were	
  to	
  be	
  acIvated	
  this	
  was	
  it.	
  This	
  was	
  an	
  amazing	
  place.	
  
We	
  went	
  on	
  to	
  visit	
  every	
  imaginable	
  den	
  of	
  debauchery	
  in	
  Bangkok.	
  This	
  made	
  anything	
  I’ve	
  seen	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  so	
  
very	
  tame.	
  I	
  was	
  a	
  stranger	
  in	
  a	
  strange	
  land.	
  If	
  Las	
  Vegas’	
  moVo	
  is	
  “what	
  happens	
  in	
  Vegas,	
  stays	
  in	
  Vegas”;	
  
Bangkok’s	
  moVo	
  should	
  be,	
  “What	
  happens	
  in	
  Bangkok	
  is	
  between	
  me	
  and	
  my	
  lawyer.”	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  realized	
  one	
  thing	
  about	
  what	
  I	
  just	
  witnessed;	
  all	
  this	
  was	
  for	
  the	
  entertainment	
  of	
  men.	
  Most	
  
women	
  reading	
  this	
  are	
  going	
  through	
  some	
  form	
  of	
  judgment	
  ranging	
  from	
  disgust	
  to	
  a	
  cavalier	
  resignaIon	
  of	
  
“boys	
  will	
  be	
  boys”.	
  Most	
  men	
  on	
  the	
  other	
  hand	
  are	
  fantasizing	
  about	
  a	
  business	
  trip	
  to	
  Bangkok.	
  Of	
  course,	
  
most	
  men	
  will	
  deny	
  that	
  to	
  the	
  women	
  in	
  their	
  lives.	
  Certainly	
  there	
  are	
  men	
  that	
  sincerely	
  mean	
  it.	
  Trust	
  me;	
  
the	
  man	
  you’re	
  with	
  is	
  not	
  one	
  of	
  them.	
  Just	
  using	
  the	
  odds	
  based	
  on	
  my	
  unscienIfic	
  polling	
  data	
  collected	
  over	
  
my	
  lifeIme,	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  tell	
  you	
  that	
  all	
  men	
  are	
  pigs.	
  Some	
  happen	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  domesIcated	
  than	
  others.	
  It’s	
  
nothing	
  personal	
  and	
  men	
  are	
  capable	
  of	
  loving	
  the	
  women	
  they	
  are	
  with.	
  Men	
  see	
  sex	
  as	
  entertainment,	
  a	
  very	
  
important	
  entertainment	
  that	
  should	
  be	
  enjoyed	
  a	
  lot	
  more	
  than	
  most	
  women	
  think	
  is	
  good	
  for	
  us.	
  I	
  know	
  I’m	
  on	
  
thin	
  ice.	
  Lord	
  knows	
  how	
  I	
  got	
  into	
  this	
  from	
  an	
  innocent	
  trip	
  to	
  Thailand.	
  However,	
  you	
  could	
  not	
  help	
  but	
  noIce	
  
there	
  are	
  no	
  equivalent	
  places	
  for	
  women.	
  Does	
  this	
  make	
  women	
  inherently	
  more	
  virtuous	
  than	
  men?	
  Maybe	
  
so.	
  However,	
  what	
  do	
  you	
  know	
  about	
  the	
  men	
  that	
  go	
  to	
  these	
  places?	
  Are	
  they	
  all	
  hopeless	
  sex	
  addicts?	
  The	
  
ice	
  is	
  really	
  cracking	
  isn’t	
  it?	
  I’m	
  simply	
  observing	
  from	
  the	
  inside.	
  I	
  get	
  the	
  problem	
  of	
  young	
  people	
  servicing	
  
the	
  needs	
  of	
  men	
  in	
  the	
  sex	
  trade.	
  I	
  don’t	
  approve	
  of	
  exploitaIon	
  in	
  any	
  form.	
  I	
  once	
  had	
  a	
  conversaIon	
  with	
  my	
  
friend	
  Florencia.	
  I	
  pronounced	
  that	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  imagine	
  paying	
  for	
  sex.	
  Her	
  response	
  was,	
  “You	
  cheap	
  bastard!”	
  
There’s	
  a	
  point	
  here	
  and	
  as	
  soon	
  as	
  I	
  know	
  what	
  it	
  is	
  I’ll	
  pass	
  it	
  on.	
  For	
  now	
  I’ll	
  try	
  to	
  slide	
  off	
  the	
  ice	
  and	
  get	
  on	
  
with	
  the	
  trip.

A\er	
  that	
  night	
  Joe,	
  Mike	
  and	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  PaVaya	
  Beach.	
  Joe	
  ended	
  up	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  making	
  the	
  room	
  
reservaIons.	
  He	
  reserved	
  a	
  two	
  bedroom	
  suite	
  in	
  “Boyz	
  Town”.	
  All	
  my	
  life	
  I	
  have	
  had	
  gay	
  friends	
  and	
  consider	
  
myself	
  enriched	
  by	
  my	
  associaIon	
  with	
  the	
  gay	
  community.	
  However,	
  I	
  have	
  never	
  really	
  more	
  than	
  dabbled	
  in	
  
the	
  culture.	
  I’ve	
  been	
  to	
  a	
  few	
  gay	
  bars	
  with	
  friends	
  and	
  gone	
  to	
  parIes	
  when	
  invited.	
  I	
  was	
  now	
  being	
  thrown	
  
into	
  the	
  pool	
  without	
  those	
  liVle	
  bubbles	
  on	
  my	
  arms.	
  This	
  hotel	
  was	
  very	
  nice	
  and	
  very	
  gay.	
  There	
  were	
  gay	
  
waiters,	
  recepIonists,	
  painIngs,	
  staircases,	
  doorknobs,	
  air	
  condiIoners,	
  sofas,	
  beers,	
  coffee	
  and	
  I	
  think	
  I	
  even	
  
saw	
  a	
  gay	
  mosquito.	
  I	
  was	
  determined	
  to	
  show	
  that	
  a	
  lifeIme	
  of	
  solidarity	
  with	
  my	
  gay	
  and	
  lesbian	
  brothers	
  and	
  
sisters	
  would	
  not	
  deter	
  me	
  from	
  enjoying	
  Boyz	
  Town.	
  Imagine	
  my	
  disappointment	
  when	
  Joe	
  didn’t	
  like	
  the	
  hotel.	
  

We	
  marched	
  along	
  the	
  beach	
  and	
  found	
  a	
  wonderful	
  two	
  bedroom	
  suite	
  overlooking	
  the	
  water.	
  Joe	
  got	
  our	
  
                                                                                                      60
money	
  back	
  from	
  the	
  boy’s	
  place	
  and	
  we	
  checked	
  into	
  our	
  new	
  home.	
  The	
  only	
  problem	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  was	
  right	
  on	
  
the	
  busy	
  street	
  that	
  was	
  between	
  the	
  hotel	
  and	
  the	
  water.	
  It	
  was	
  fine	
  with	
  me.	
  However,	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  Joe	
  went	
  
on	
  a	
  mission	
  to	
  find	
  an	
  even	
  beVer	
  place.	
  Mike	
  and	
  Joe	
  have	
  been	
  together	
  for	
  20	
  years.	
  I	
  followed	
  Mike’s	
  lead.	
  
He	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  across	
  the	
  street	
  to	
  the	
  beach	
  and	
  plopped	
  our	
  asses	
  onto	
  a	
  lounge	
  with	
  an	
  umbrella	
  and	
  let	
  the	
  
locals	
  spoil	
  us.	
  Everything	
  we	
  could	
  want	
  was	
  paraded	
  at	
  regular	
  intervals.	
  Food,	
  drinks,	
  cra\s,	
  sunglasses,	
  penis	
  
enhancement	
  oil,	
  massages,	
  you	
  name	
  it.	
  Mike	
  confidently	
  said	
  Joe	
  will	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  everything.	
  A\er	
  several	
  
hours	
  of	
  relaxing,	
  Joe	
  announced	
  that	
  he	
  found	
  the	
  place.	
  He	
  got	
  us	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  hotel	
  and	
  off	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  five	
  
star	
  paradise	
  we	
  called	
  home	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  three	
  nights.	
  Joe	
  really	
  scored	
  on	
  this	
  one.	
  We	
  had	
  two	
  big	
  adjoining	
  
rooms	
  overlooking	
  the	
  ocean.	
  It	
  had	
  a	
  great	
  pool	
  and	
  beach.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  Boyz	
  Town	
  but	
  I	
  just	
  sucked	
  it	
  up	
  and	
  
made	
  do.	
  

Mike	
  met	
  another	
  man	
  named	
  Dave	
  in	
  Bangkok	
  and	
  we	
  agreed	
  to	
  hook	
  up	
  with	
  him	
  in	
  PaVaya.	
  We	
  hung	
  out	
  
with	
  him	
  for	
  most	
  of	
  our	
  Ime	
  there.	
  He	
  was	
  gay	
  and	
  had	
  retained	
  the	
  services	
  of	
  a	
  Thai	
  man	
  for	
  his	
  enIre	
  trip.	
  
They	
  were	
  constant	
  companions.	
  There	
  was	
  something	
  about	
  all	
  this	
  that	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  seen	
  before.	
  It	
  seemed	
  so	
  
natural	
  and	
  sensible.	
  We	
  learned	
  that	
  Sod	
  was	
  married	
  and	
  had	
  a	
  son.	
  He	
  worked	
  the	
  bars	
  as	
  a	
  younger	
  man.	
  He	
  
made	
  enough	
  money	
  to	
  build	
  a	
  house	
  in	
  Northern	
  Thailand	
  for	
  his	
  family.	
  Now	
  he	
  only	
  takes	
  clients	
  that	
  he	
  
knows.	
  Here	
  I	
  go	
  wading	
  on	
  that	
  ice	
  again.	
  Dave	
  is	
  a	
  lonely	
  gay	
  man	
  and	
  comes	
  to	
  Thailand	
  for	
  some	
  affecIon	
  
and	
  companionship.	
  Sod	
  agrees	
  to	
  the	
  arrangement	
  and	
  spends	
  his	
  Ime	
  with	
  him.	
  I	
  don’t	
  expect	
  anyone	
  to	
  
understand	
  this	
  but	
  it	
  challenged	
  my	
  prejudice	
  against	
  prosItuIon.	
  I	
  can	
  hardly	
  say	
  the	
  word	
  as	
  a	
  descripIon	
  of	
  
what	
  I	
  witnessed.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  enough	
  about	
  Thai	
  culture	
  to	
  make	
  any	
  sound	
  conclusions	
  but	
  I	
  can	
  say	
  the	
  
pracIce	
  is	
  a	
  much	
  gentler	
  form	
  of	
  the	
  ancient	
  trade	
  than	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  seen	
  before.	
  Enough	
  said.

PaVaya	
  was	
  very	
  relaxing.	
  We	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  an	
  island	
  and	
  relaxed	
  on	
  the	
  beach.	
  Mike,	
  Joe	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  out	
  on	
  jet	
  
skis.	
  It	
  was	
  my	
  first	
  Ime	
  and	
  we	
  had	
  a	
  blast.	
  On	
  the	
  last	
  full	
  day	
  we	
  sat	
  on	
  the	
  gay	
  beach	
  in	
  PaVaya.	
  I	
  experienced	
  
many	
  firsts;	
  a	
  manicure,	
  pedicure,	
  eyebrow	
  tweezing,	
  ear	
  hair	
  tweezing	
  and	
  foot	
  massage.	
  I	
  got	
  the	
  whole	
  queer	
  
eye	
  for	
  the	
  straight	
  guy	
  treatment.	
  Yes,	
  my	
  15%	
  was	
  in	
  its	
  glory.	
  
It	
  was	
  great	
  to	
  be	
  with	
  Joe	
  and	
  Mike.	
  They	
  are	
  very	
  easy	
  travelling	
  companions.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  trip	
  to	
  see	
  them	
  up	
  close	
  
and	
  personal.	
  They	
  are	
  so	
  married!	
  Everything	
  you’d	
  expect	
  from	
  the	
  ups	
  and	
  downs	
  of	
  knowing	
  each	
  other	
  so	
  
well	
  were	
  all	
  there.	
  There	
  are	
  many	
  Imes	
  when	
  I	
  miss	
  being	
  married.	
  It’s	
  important	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  spend	
  real	
  Ime	
  
with	
  married	
  couples.	
  It’s	
  a	
  great	
  thing	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  long	
  term	
  partner.	
  I	
  loved	
  the	
  way	
  they	
  supported	
  each	
  other’s	
  
wants.	
  That	
  when	
  I	
  felt	
  alone.	
  But	
  seeing	
  the	
  challenges	
  married	
  couples	
  face	
  helps	
  take	
  the	
  edge	
  off	
  the	
  
loneliness.	
  There’s	
  something	
  to	
  be	
  said	
  for	
  the	
  single	
  life	
  as	
  well.

Finally	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  pack	
  up	
  and	
  head	
  back	
  to	
  Bangkok.	
  Mike	
  and	
  Joe	
  had	
  arranged	
  to	
  spend	
  the	
  last	
  two	
  nights	
  
in	
  a	
  gay	
  resort	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  hotel	
  in	
  my	
  friend	
  Dave’s	
  neighborhood.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  very	
  good	
  hotel.	
  They	
  did	
  their	
  
best.	
  I	
  hooked	
  up	
  with	
  Dave	
  and	
  a	
  business	
  associate	
  Sharon	
  from	
  Israel.	
  Dave	
  is	
  trying	
  to	
  raise	
  capital	
  for	
  his	
  
venture	
  called	
  “Raintrust”.	
  He	
  made	
  dinner	
  and	
  arranged	
  for	
  a	
  massage	
  for	
  me	
  with	
  his	
  favorite	
  masseuse.	
  Thai	
  
massages	
  are	
  quite	
  famous.	
  A\er	
  a	
  two	
  hour	
  massage	
  it	
  was	
  gebng	
  late.	
  No	
  one	
  was	
  up	
  so	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  
hotel.	
  

The	
  next	
  morning	
  Dave,	
  Sharon	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  huge	
  outdoor	
  market.	
  It	
  was	
  incredible	
  and	
  wonderful.	
  Dave	
  
wanted	
  to	
  introduce	
  me	
  to	
  his	
  spiritual	
  teacher,	
  Sister	
  Lau.	
  She	
  leads	
  a	
  local	
  chapter	
  of	
  Brahman	
  Kumaris,	
  a	
  
worldwide	
  organizaIon	
  founded	
  in	
  India.	
  We	
  got	
  there	
  quite	
  late	
  but	
  she	
  was	
  very	
  gracious	
  to	
  us.	
  There	
  
happened	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  Cancer	
  group	
  meeIng	
  there.	
  The	
  organizaIon	
  does	
  service	
  work	
  with	
  the	
  sick	
  and	
  dying.	
  We	
  
shared	
  our	
  survival	
  stories	
  and	
  ended	
  with	
  a	
  guided	
  meditaIon.	
  One	
  woman	
  was	
  taking	
  care	
  of	
  a	
  cancer	
  paIent,	
  
Fiona.	
  She	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  local	
  hospital	
  suffering	
  from	
  an	
  aggressive	
  form	
  of	
  breast	
  cancer.	
  She	
  had	
  two	
  young	
  children	
  
and	
  was	
  desperate	
  to	
  spend	
  more	
  Ime	
  with	
  them.	
  She	
  thought	
  I	
  could	
  help	
  her	
  let	
  go	
  and	
  invited	
  me	
  to	
  visit	
  
                                                                                                61
with	
  her.	
  I	
  said	
  I	
  would	
  a\er	
  we	
  were	
  done	
  with	
  Sister	
  Lau.	
  We	
  went	
  downstairs	
  and	
  watched	
  a	
  meditaIon	
  on	
  
DVD.	
  Sister	
  Lau	
  had	
  food	
  prepared	
  for	
  us.	
  She	
  gave	
  us	
  a	
  final	
  blessing.	
  Her	
  energy	
  was	
  so	
  gentle	
  and	
  kind.	
  I	
  was	
  
very	
  grateful	
  to	
  be	
  with	
  her,	
  she’s	
  a	
  powerful	
  soul.	
  

A\er	
  that	
  we	
  went	
  into	
  a	
  cab.	
  Dave	
  and	
  Sharon	
  had	
  some	
  plans	
  and	
  I	
  made	
  my	
  way	
  to	
  the	
  hospital.	
  It’s	
  one	
  of	
  
those	
  very	
  advanced	
  hospitals	
  Thailand	
  is	
  becoming	
  known	
  for.	
  They	
  offer	
  top	
  of	
  the	
  line	
  medical	
  care	
  in	
  a	
  state	
  
of	
  the	
  art	
  facility	
  at	
  a	
  much	
  lower	
  cost.	
  When	
  I	
  arrived	
  I	
  found	
  Fiona	
  in	
  a	
  hospital	
  bed.	
  The	
  scene	
  was	
  all	
  too	
  
familiar	
  to	
  me.	
  In	
  a	
  way	
  I’ve	
  created	
  distance	
  from	
  my	
  disease.	
  I	
  haven’t	
  been	
  in	
  treatment	
  now	
  for	
  over	
  a	
  year.	
  
My	
  last	
  operaIon	
  was	
  more	
  than	
  two	
  years	
  ago.	
  I	
  feel	
  fine	
  and	
  the	
  idea	
  that	
  I	
  will	
  be	
  returning	
  to	
  the	
  end	
  game	
  
any	
  Ime	
  soon	
  seems	
  remote.	
  Now	
  the	
  sword	
  swinging	
  over	
  my	
  head	
  showed	
  its	
  face	
  to	
  me	
  again.	
  The	
  grim	
  
reaper	
  smiled	
  and	
  pointed	
  his	
  finger,	
  beckoning	
  me,	
  “ That’s	
  right,	
  come	
  to	
  poppa”.	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  his	
  chamber	
  again.	
  
No	
  fear	
  but	
  aware	
  that	
  this	
  was	
  the	
  waiIng	
  room.	
  His	
  energy	
  was	
  all	
  around	
  the	
  place.	
  Fiona	
  was	
  a	
  fine	
  woman	
  
that	
  knew	
  where	
  she	
  was.	
  Her	
  cancer	
  was	
  hibng	
  her	
  spine	
  and	
  other	
  places.	
  It	
  wouldn’t	
  be	
  long	
  but	
  she	
  was	
  
willing	
  to	
  try	
  anything	
  to	
  buy	
  herself	
  another	
  six	
  months	
  with	
  her	
  children,	
  ages	
  4	
  and	
  8.	
  She	
  told	
  heartbreaking	
  
stories	
  of	
  her	
  4	
  year	
  old	
  that	
  didn’t	
  really	
  understand	
  what	
  was	
  happening.	
  She	
  arranged	
  for	
  her	
  children	
  to	
  be	
  
taken	
  by	
  some	
  friends	
  to	
  form	
  a	
  blended	
  family	
  with	
  their	
  own	
  child.	
  The	
  children	
  were	
  already	
  living	
  with	
  their	
  
new	
  family.	
  She	
  didn’t	
  need	
  my	
  help.	
  She	
  was	
  teaching	
  me.	
  It	
  was	
  my	
  job	
  to	
  just	
  sit	
  and	
  be	
  with	
  her.	
  I	
  found	
  her	
  
ready	
  to	
  go.	
  Fight	
  like	
  hell	
  for	
  whatever	
  you	
  want.	
  Rage	
  against	
  the	
  dying	
  of	
  the	
  light…then	
  jump.

Joe	
  and	
  Mike	
  urged	
  me	
  to	
  join	
  them	
  in	
  the	
  gay	
  hotel.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  like	
  mine	
  so	
  I	
  moved	
  in	
  for	
  the	
  night.	
  They	
  had	
  a	
  
suite	
  with	
  an	
  extra	
  room.	
  Joe	
  was	
  leaving	
  early	
  for	
  a	
  five	
  am	
  flight.	
  We	
  went	
  downstairs	
  to	
  the	
  pool.	
  They	
  pointed	
  
out	
  all	
  the	
  ameniIes	
  one	
  expects	
  to	
  see	
  at	
  a	
  gay	
  resort.	
  It	
  was	
  quite	
  educaIonal.	
  We	
  were	
  talking	
  around	
  the	
  
pool	
  and	
  I	
  struck	
  up	
  a	
  conversaIon	
  with	
  a	
  BriIsh	
  gentleman.	
  A\er	
  a	
  few	
  minutes,	
  Joe	
  says	
  to	
  him,	
  “Kevin	
  is	
  
straight.”	
  He	
  replied,	
  “Yes,	
  I	
  gathered	
  that.”	
  What	
  an	
  insult!	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  pedicure,	
  a	
  manicure,	
  eyebrows	
  trimmed,	
  I’ve	
  
been	
  in	
  more	
  gay	
  bars	
  in	
  the	
  last	
  few	
  days	
  then	
  in	
  my	
  enIre	
  life.	
  I’ve	
  gone	
  the	
  extra	
  mile	
  here!	
  I	
  thought	
  I	
  could	
  
at	
  least	
  put	
  on	
  a	
  good	
  act.

Joe	
  le\	
  by	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  got	
  up.	
  Mike	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  airport	
  together	
  and	
  said	
  our	
  goodbyes.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  wonderful	
  
vacaIon	
  with	
  my	
  wonderful	
  friends.

Back	
  in	
  good	
  ol’predictable	
  Singapore.	
  It	
  really	
  feels	
  like	
  home	
  now.	
  I	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  get	
  around,	
  where	
  to	
  eat	
  and	
  I	
  
even	
  have	
  some	
  friends	
  to	
  call	
  on.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  go	
  for	
  my	
  next	
  treatment.	
  Every	
  Ime	
  I	
  go	
  there	
  I	
  am	
  reminded	
  that	
  
I’ve	
  goVen	
  away	
  with	
  another	
  two	
  weeks	
  of	
  good	
  health.	
  I	
  don’t	
  take	
  that	
  for	
  granted.	
  The	
  doctor	
  does	
  his	
  
cursory	
  check	
  up	
  but	
  there’s	
  not	
  much	
  to	
  do.	
  I	
  get	
  my	
  vaccine	
  injecIon	
  and	
  leave.	
  There	
  will	
  be	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  tell	
  if	
  
this	
  is	
  working	
  for	
  quite	
  a	
  while.	
  My	
  immune	
  cells	
  have	
  to	
  turn	
  the	
  ship	
  around	
  and	
  get	
  on	
  the	
  winning	
  side.	
  It	
  
will	
  be	
  easier	
  to	
  tell	
  if	
  it’s	
  not	
  working.	
  Let’s	
  not	
  go	
  there.	
  

I’ve	
  now	
  done	
  five	
  of	
  ten	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  treatments.	
  He’s	
  just	
  moving	
  my	
  body	
  at	
  will.	
  I	
  spin	
  around	
  like	
  Pinocchio.	
  It’s	
  
quite	
  amazing.	
  We’ll	
  see	
  if	
  it’s	
  having	
  any	
  effect.	
  If	
  my	
  tumors	
  are	
  gone	
  I’m	
  moving	
  next	
  door	
  to	
  this	
  guy.

My	
  friend	
  Shirley	
  that	
  introduced	
  me	
  to	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  is	
  dedicated	
  to	
  service	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  her	
  pracIce	
  of	
  Theosophy.	
  
She’s	
  done	
  work	
  in	
  India	
  with	
  poor	
  children.	
  She	
  introduced	
  me	
  to	
  her	
  friend	
  Norma.	
  She	
  runs	
  a	
  costume	
  jewelry	
  
store	
  on	
  Arab	
  Street	
  here	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  Her	
  husband	
  is	
  Thai	
  and	
  lives	
  in	
  Bangkok.	
  She	
  has	
  a	
  home	
  in	
  Chang	
  Mai	
  in	
  
northern	
  Thailand	
  that’s	
  been	
  vacant	
  for	
  several	
  years.	
  She	
  has	
  offered	
  Shirley	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  her	
  house	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  
poor	
  children.	
  Shirley	
  invited	
  me	
  to	
  parIcipate.	
  I’m	
  going	
  to	
  join	
  her	
  on	
  a	
  trip	
  there	
  to	
  scope	
  it	
  out	
  and	
  see	
  if	
  we	
  
can	
  make	
  something	
  good	
  happen.	
  I	
  really	
  loved	
  the	
  place	
  and	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  see	
  more	
  of	
  it.	
  Going	
  with	
  friends	
  that	
  
know	
  the	
  place	
  makes	
  it	
  easy.
                                                                                               62
When	
  you	
  arrive	
  in	
  Bangkok	
  and	
  leave	
  the	
  airport	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  billboard	
  that	
  reads,	
  “Welcome	
  to	
  Thailand,	
  the	
  land	
  
of	
  smiles.”	
  There	
  is	
  this	
  spirit	
  here	
  that	
  makes	
  me	
  want	
  to	
  get	
  closer	
  to	
  them.	
  They	
  are	
  Buddhist	
  down	
  to	
  their	
  
bones.	
  I	
  touched	
  a	
  side	
  of	
  Thailand	
  where	
  one	
  might	
  think	
  smiles	
  were	
  the	
  last	
  thing	
  on	
  their	
  minds.	
  But	
  that	
  
wasn’t	
  the	
  case.	
  They	
  serve	
  wherever	
  they	
  are	
  with	
  a	
  gentle	
  spirit.	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  know	
  more	
  of	
  it.	
  My	
  skepIcal	
  mind	
  
thinks	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  an	
  act.	
  But	
  at	
  the	
  very	
  least	
  it’s	
  a	
  good	
  one.	
  

What's	
  complicated?
With	
  all	
  this	
  constant	
  changing?
Nothing	
  but	
  me,	
  now


Moment	
  to	
  Moment	
  Life
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  September	
  14,	
  2009

So	
  much	
  goes	
  on	
  in	
  my	
  life,	
  it’s	
  hard	
  to	
  keep	
  up.	
  Since	
  Thailand	
  I’ve	
  had	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  treatments.	
  I’m	
  well	
  over	
  the	
  
half	
  way	
  point.	
  The	
  doctor	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  the	
  best	
  vaccine	
  he’d	
  ever	
  seen.	
  I	
  don’t	
  know	
  what	
  a	
  good	
  vaccine	
  
looks	
  like	
  or	
  if	
  that’s	
  even	
  a	
  sign	
  of	
  a	
  posiIve	
  outcome.	
  Let’s	
  say	
  it	
  is.	
  I	
  finished	
  my	
  treatment	
  with	
  the	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  
master.	
  He	
  had	
  me	
  spinning	
  around	
  like	
  a	
  whirling	
  dervish.	
  Again	
  it	
  all	
  looks	
  good	
  but	
  what	
  is	
  it	
  doing?	
  Each	
  day	
  I	
  
wake	
  up	
  and	
  feel	
  preVy	
  good,	
  that’s	
  an	
  accomplishment.	
  

My	
  sister	
  Pat	
  and	
  her	
  daughter	
  Vicki	
  came	
  out	
  for	
  a	
  visit.	
  I	
  put	
  together	
  an	
  iInerary	
  for	
  a	
  trip	
  to	
  Indonesia.	
  She	
  
arrived	
  in	
  Singapore	
  and	
  stayed	
  at	
  a	
  very	
  nice	
  hotel	
  just	
  outside	
  of	
  the	
  shopping	
  district.	
  I	
  met	
  them	
  at	
  the	
  
airport	
  and	
  got	
  them	
  all	
  seVled	
  in.	
  We	
  made	
  plans	
  for	
  the	
  following	
  day.	
  I	
  said	
  good	
  byes	
  and	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  find	
  my	
  
bus	
  stop.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  walk	
  through	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  Singapore	
  where	
  women	
  seem	
  to	
  like	
  me.	
  It’s	
  a	
  strange	
  phenomena	
  I’ve	
  
noIced	
  here	
  from	
  Ime	
  to	
  Ime.	
  It’s	
  nice	
  when	
  people	
  like	
  me.	
  They	
  even	
  proclaim	
  that	
  they	
  will	
  do	
  anything	
  for	
  
me.	
  That’s	
  nice	
  too.	
  So	
  I	
  never	
  minded	
  the	
  walk	
  to	
  the	
  bus.	
  I’d	
  take	
  the	
  bus	
  more	
  o\en	
  if	
  people	
  were	
  that	
  
friendly	
  everywhere.	
  

The	
  trip	
  included	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  days	
  in	
  Singapore	
  at	
  both	
  ends	
  of	
  the	
  trip.	
  They	
  accompanied	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  NaIonal	
  
Cancer	
  Center	
  and	
  watched	
  the	
  nurses	
  administer	
  the	
  vaccine.	
  They	
  also	
  watched	
  the	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  master	
  do	
  his	
  
magic	
  on	
  me.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  LiVle	
  India	
  for	
  dinner.	
  Then	
  they	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  Botanical	
  Garden	
  on	
  their	
  own.	
  They	
  also	
  
managed	
  a	
  shopping	
  excursion	
  on	
  Orchard	
  Rd.	
  I	
  can’t	
  say	
  they	
  got	
  the	
  grand	
  tour	
  but	
  they	
  saw	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  they	
  
wanted	
  to	
  see.	
  

It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  Indonesia.	
  We	
  flew	
  to	
  Yogyakarta	
  (pronounced	
  Jogjakarta)	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  trip.	
  The	
  
landing	
  was	
  really	
  wonderful.	
  As	
  we	
  descended	
  there	
  were	
  volcanic	
  mountain	
  tops	
  sIcking	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  cloud	
  
cover.	
  Yogyakarta	
  used	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  capital	
  of	
  Indonesia	
  unIl	
  someIme	
  a\er	
  independence	
  it	
  was	
  replaced	
  by	
  
Jakarta.	
  It	
  makes	
  a	
  big	
  difference.	
  I’ve	
  never	
  been	
  to	
  Jakarta	
  but	
  it	
  seems	
  like	
  a	
  much	
  larger	
  and	
  more	
  worldly	
  
city.	
  When	
  we	
  landed	
  we	
  got	
  off	
  the	
  plane	
  and	
  stood	
  in	
  line	
  to	
  get	
  our	
  “on	
  arrival	
  visas”.	
  We	
  don’t	
  know	
  how	
  it	
  
happened	
  but	
  we	
  were	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  the	
  line	
  when	
  we	
  started	
  but	
  ended	
  up	
  dead	
  last.	
  It	
  was	
  like	
  everyone	
  
behind	
  us	
  just	
  disappeared.	
  We	
  got	
  into	
  our	
  cab	
  and	
  drove	
  through	
  a	
  busy	
  and	
  definitely	
  third	
  world	
  city.	
  It	
  was	
  
somewhere	
  between	
  India	
  and	
  Thailand	
  on	
  the	
  prosperity	
  track.	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  largest	
  Muslim	
  country	
  in	
  the	
  world.	
  
Their	
  brand	
  is	
  very	
  moderate.	
  You	
  would	
  hardly	
  noIce	
  it.	
  

I	
  picked	
  the	
  hotels	
  based	
  on	
  rates	
  and	
  reviews	
  so	
  there’s	
  always	
  some	
  trepidaIon	
  as	
  to	
  what	
  it	
  will	
  actually	
  be	
  
like.	
  It	
  turned	
  out	
  to	
  be	
  fabulous.	
  It	
  was	
  originally	
  a	
  residence	
  turned	
  into	
  a	
  hotel.	
  The	
  Japanese	
  commandeered	
  
                                                                                              63
it	
  during	
  their	
  brief	
  visit	
  to	
  the	
  island.	
  The	
  rooms	
  were	
  great	
  and	
  the	
  service	
  excellent.	
  The	
  only	
  thing	
  is	
  that	
  they	
  
preyed	
  on	
  my	
  main	
  weakness,	
  breakfast	
  buffets.	
  They	
  are	
  evil	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  subjected	
  to	
  them	
  every	
  day	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  
Indonesia.	
  I	
  am	
  powerless	
  and	
  my	
  weight	
  is	
  unmanageable	
  in	
  their	
  presence.	
  Only	
  a	
  higher	
  power	
  can	
  help	
  me	
  
and	
  honestly	
  that’s	
  doubXul.	
  At	
  least	
  the	
  ones	
  sent	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  so	
  far	
  have	
  only	
  joined	
  in	
  the	
  feast.	
  Giving	
  me	
  a	
  
breakfast	
  buffet	
  is	
  like	
  pubng	
  a	
  junkie	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  the	
  opium	
  harvest.

A\er	
  we	
  seVled	
  in	
  we	
  took	
  a	
  walk	
  to	
  the	
  Sultan’s	
  palace.	
  Yogyakarta	
  is	
  ruled	
  by	
  a	
  sultan.	
  I	
  have	
  no	
  idea	
  how	
  one	
  
gets	
  to	
  be	
  sultan,	
  perhaps	
  it’s	
  like	
  running	
  for	
  governor.	
  The	
  streets	
  of	
  Yogyakarta	
  are	
  very	
  busy	
  with	
  the	
  
populaIon	
  determined	
  to	
  get	
  some	
  of	
  my	
  money.	
  One	
  man	
  came	
  up	
  to	
  brush	
  up	
  on	
  his	
  English.	
  His	
  wife	
  is	
  an	
  
arIst.	
  He	
  took	
  us	
  to	
  her	
  shop.	
  We	
  never	
  met	
  her	
  but	
  we	
  did	
  meet	
  some	
  BaIk	
  arIsts	
  who	
  showed	
  us	
  how	
  they	
  do	
  
their	
  cra\.	
  I	
  enjoyed	
  the	
  show	
  and	
  bought	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  things.	
  I’m	
  not	
  sure	
  how	
  much	
  my	
  friend	
  got	
  by	
  bringing	
  
us	
  there	
  but	
  that	
  is	
  how	
  it’s	
  done.	
  By	
  any	
  means	
  necessary	
  get	
  them	
  to	
  spend	
  their	
  money.	
  I	
  admit	
  I	
  like	
  to	
  spend	
  
money	
  and	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  good	
  deal	
  and	
  they	
  seemed	
  happy	
  to	
  see	
  me.	
  I'm	
  seeing	
  a	
  paVern	
  here.

We	
  kept	
  on	
  walking.	
  The	
  trip	
  to	
  the	
  sultan’s	
  palace	
  was	
  much	
  further	
  than	
  we	
  thought.	
  I	
  had	
  tomorrow’s	
  
breakfast	
  buffet	
  to	
  walk	
  off.	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  to	
  walk	
  back	
  Singapore	
  to	
  do	
  that.	
  The	
  sultan’s	
  palace	
  was	
  downright	
  
weird.	
  It	
  was	
  surrounded	
  by	
  what	
  looked	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  fairgrounds	
  a\er	
  the	
  fair.	
  No	
  grass,	
  just	
  dirt	
  and	
  patches	
  of	
  
weeds.	
  We	
  could	
  only	
  go	
  up	
  the	
  gate	
  and	
  look	
  into	
  a	
  big	
  but	
  uninspiring	
  house.	
  We	
  were	
  later	
  told	
  that	
  ten	
  
thousand	
  people	
  live	
  in	
  the	
  sultan’s	
  palace.	
  A	
  lot	
  of	
  them	
  are	
  soldiers.	
  That’s	
  probably	
  a	
  good	
  thing	
  for	
  the	
  
sultan.	
  We	
  were	
  Ired	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  back	
  but	
  we	
  couldn’t	
  bring	
  ourselves	
  to	
  take	
  a	
  cycle	
  cab.	
  They	
  are	
  the	
  preferred	
  
mode	
  of	
  public	
  transportaIon	
  here.	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  booked	
  a	
  tour	
  to	
  Borobodur,	
  an	
  ancient	
  Buddhist	
  temple	
  built	
  around	
  700AD	
  and	
  re-­‐discovered	
  
someIme	
  in	
  the	
  later	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  20th	
  century.	
  It	
  was	
  quite	
  magnificent.	
  We	
  hired	
  a	
  tour	
  guide.	
  He	
  explained	
  that	
  
the	
  temple	
  was	
  constructed	
  of	
  volcanic	
  rock	
  on	
  eight	
  levels.	
  Each	
  level	
  dealt	
  with	
  a	
  realm	
  of	
  human	
  existence	
  
from	
  hell,	
  hunger,	
  animality	
  all	
  the	
  way	
  up	
  to	
  nirvana.	
  The	
  walls	
  on	
  each	
  level	
  were	
  covered	
  with	
  carved	
  stone	
  
panels	
  that	
  told	
  a	
  Buddhist	
  story	
  related	
  to	
  that	
  level	
  of	
  existence.	
  There	
  were	
  hundreds	
  of	
  headless	
  Buddhas	
  
everywhere.	
  Apparently	
  the	
  heads	
  made	
  great	
  gi\s	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  millennia.	
  There	
  were	
  many	
  intact	
  as	
  well.	
  
When	
  we	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  top	
  level	
  everything	
  opened	
  up.	
  There	
  were	
  no	
  stories	
  to	
  tell.	
  This	
  level	
  represented	
  
empIness	
  or	
  nirvana.	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  huge	
  temple	
  on	
  top	
  with	
  nothing	
  in	
  it.	
  Surrounding	
  the	
  temple	
  there	
  were	
  
many	
  small	
  stupas,	
  each	
  with	
  a	
  Buddha	
  inside.	
  I	
  could	
  really	
  relate	
  to	
  how	
  this	
  temple	
  was	
  designed.	
  It’s	
  a	
  lot	
  like	
  
my	
  experience	
  of	
  Buddhism.	
  The	
  seven	
  levels	
  are	
  cramped	
  with	
  the	
  stuff	
  we	
  all	
  experience	
  in	
  our	
  daily	
  lives.	
  
Ascending	
  to	
  higher	
  levels,	
  the	
  stuff	
  decreases	
  though	
  sIll	
  surrounds	
  us.	
  All	
  the	
  while	
  nirvana	
  is	
  right	
  there	
  
waiIng	
  for	
  us	
  to	
  simply	
  let	
  go.

Leaving	
  Borobodur	
  was	
  not	
  as	
  easy	
  as	
  coming	
  into	
  it.	
  There	
  were	
  very	
  enthusiasIc	
  vendors	
  waiIng	
  to	
  pounce.	
  
Out	
  of	
  my	
  extreme	
  compassion	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  buy	
  something.	
  This	
  compassion	
  was	
  not	
  for	
  the	
  vendors	
  but	
  for	
  my	
  
sister	
  and	
  niece.	
  Once	
  they	
  smelled	
  blood	
  they	
  le\	
  them	
  alone.	
  They	
  circled	
  around	
  me	
  taking	
  one	
  liVle	
  bite	
  
a\er	
  another.	
  I	
  was	
  shelling	
  out	
  tens	
  of	
  thousands	
  of	
  Rupiahs.	
  (10,000rupia	
  =	
  $1).	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  great	
  stuff.	
  In	
  all	
  
my	
  travels	
  in	
  Asia,	
  I	
  now	
  can	
  say	
  with	
  complete	
  confidence	
  that	
  I’m	
  a	
  total	
  sucker	
  for	
  the	
  hard	
  sell.	
  I	
  am	
  why	
  they	
  
do	
  this.	
  This	
  is	
  when	
  they	
  get	
  to	
  shine.	
  I	
  can	
  imagine	
  them	
  all	
  talking	
  about	
  the	
  excitement	
  of	
  finding	
  their	
  prey	
  
a\er	
  a	
  long	
  hunt.	
  There	
  he	
  was,	
  the	
  perfect	
  specimen;	
  white,	
  funny	
  hat,	
  camera,	
  look	
  of	
  total	
  confusion	
  on	
  his	
  
face.	
  It’s	
  like	
  a	
  NaIonal	
  Geographic	
  film	
  of	
  a	
  lion	
  sneaking	
  up	
  on	
  herd	
  of	
  gazelles.	
  You	
  know	
  someone	
  is	
  going	
  to	
  
get	
  it.	
  That’s	
  me!	
  In	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  it	
  all	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  deep	
  breath	
  and	
  saw	
  that	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  choice	
  to	
  make.	
  I	
  could	
  either	
  
experience	
  this	
  as	
  a	
  worn	
  out	
  tourist	
  being	
  harassed	
  or	
  a	
  buyer	
  interacIng	
  with	
  well	
  meaning	
  vendors.	
  I	
  li\ed	
  my	
  
hands	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  sky	
  and	
  yelled,	
  “I	
  love	
  you	
  all!”	
  From	
  that	
  moment	
  on	
  I	
  just	
  looked	
  at	
  what	
  they	
  were	
  selling	
  and	
  
bought	
  what	
  I	
  wanted.	
  In	
  the	
  end,	
  everything	
  I	
  bought	
  was	
  good	
  stuff	
  at	
  a	
  great	
  price.	
  
                                                                                                  64
Once	
  we	
  managed	
  to	
  close	
  the	
  door	
  on	
  the	
  van	
  without	
  chopping	
  off	
  the	
  fingers	
  of	
  the	
  vendors	
  making	
  their	
  
final	
  pitch	
  we	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  ancient	
  Hindu	
  temple,	
  Pramabadam.	
  It	
  too	
  was	
  made	
  out	
  of	
  volcanic	
  rock.	
  There	
  
were	
  six	
  temples,	
  one	
  for	
  Brahma,	
  Vishnu	
  and	
  Shiva	
  and	
  one	
  each	
  for	
  their	
  transport.	
  There	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
informaIon	
  on	
  the	
  place	
  and	
  by	
  the	
  Ime	
  we	
  finished	
  our	
  tour	
  we	
  were	
  done	
  for	
  the	
  day.	
  We	
  proceeded	
  out	
  to	
  
see	
  a	
  volcano.	
  The	
  best	
  part	
  of	
  this	
  leg	
  was	
  the	
  countryside	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  rice	
  paddies	
  and	
  agriculture.	
  We	
  even	
  
saw	
  some	
  wild	
  monkeys	
  doing	
  wild	
  monkey	
  stuff.	
  People	
  seemed	
  to	
  live	
  an	
  ancient	
  life	
  here.	
  They	
  were	
  
harvesIng	
  with	
  sickles.	
  The	
  grass	
  collected	
  was	
  threshed	
  by	
  hand	
  and	
  the	
  rice	
  grain	
  was	
  laid	
  out	
  on	
  mats.	
  
Occasionally	
  you	
  saw	
  huge	
  bags	
  of	
  rice	
  on	
  the	
  roadside	
  ready	
  for	
  purchase	
  and	
  transport.	
  The	
  volcano	
  was	
  a	
  
bust.	
  We	
  couldn’t	
  see	
  anything	
  at	
  all	
  due	
  to	
  weather.	
  All	
  in	
  all	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  great	
  day	
  to	
  see	
  life	
  around	
  central	
  Java.

We	
  were	
  very	
  Ired	
  and	
  decided	
  that	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  would	
  spend	
  in	
  total	
  laziness	
  in	
  our	
  posh	
  and	
  wonderful	
  
hotel.	
  Something	
  at	
  this	
  point	
  has	
  to	
  be	
  said	
  about	
  travelling	
  with	
  my	
  sister	
  Pat.	
  She	
  has	
  been	
  all	
  around	
  the	
  
world.	
  If	
  she	
  were	
  to	
  teach	
  a	
  course	
  on	
  her	
  travels	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  Itled,	
  “Cultural	
  Studies	
  in	
  ComparaIve	
  Room	
  
Service	
  101.”	
  She	
  likes	
  hotels	
  and	
  all	
  the	
  ameniIes	
  they	
  offer.	
  Good	
  thing	
  Vicki	
  and	
  I	
  were	
  with	
  her	
  as	
  she	
  was	
  
outnumbered.	
  However,	
  Vicki	
  is	
  not	
  that	
  far	
  behind	
  Pat	
  in	
  her	
  love	
  of	
  in-­‐room	
  dining.	
  But	
  being	
  a	
  teenager	
  she	
  
needs	
  to	
  get	
  out	
  and	
  do	
  things.	
  

We	
  spent	
  the	
  day	
  waking	
  up	
  late,	
  gebng	
  our	
  gargantuan	
  breakfast,	
  lounging	
  around	
  the	
  pool,	
  gebng	
  a	
  two	
  hour	
  
massage	
  and,	
  of	
  course,	
  dinner	
  in	
  bed.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  great	
  day	
  actually.	
  We	
  were	
  well	
  rested	
  for	
  our	
  next	
  trip	
  to	
  Bali,	
  
the	
  only	
  Hindu	
  state	
  in	
  Indonesia.	
  The	
  flight	
  to	
  Bali	
  was	
  short	
  and	
  unevenXul.	
  The	
  cab	
  driver,	
  MaI,	
  offered	
  to	
  
take	
  us	
  around	
  the	
  island	
  for	
  10	
  hours	
  for	
  a	
  very	
  reasonable	
  price.	
  We	
  got	
  to	
  our	
  hotel	
  and	
  again	
  it	
  was	
  
spectacular.	
  It	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  most	
  sedate	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  island	
  called	
  Nusa	
  Dua.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  Nusa	
  Dua	
  Hotel	
  Beach	
  Resort	
  
and	
  Spa.	
  It’s	
  a	
  huge	
  hotel	
  with	
  several	
  pools,	
  many	
  restaurants	
  and,	
  of	
  course,	
  the	
  hypnoIc	
  breakfast	
  buffet.	
  The	
  
beach	
  was	
  great	
  and	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  long	
  walkway	
  along	
  the	
  shore	
  with	
  several	
  jebes	
  going	
  out	
  to	
  a	
  liVle	
  pagoda-­‐
styled	
  structure	
  to	
  sit	
  and	
  watch	
  the	
  waves.	
  We	
  relaxed	
  the	
  whole	
  day.	
  In	
  the	
  evening	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  an	
  Indonesian	
  
folk	
  dance	
  and	
  dinner.	
  It	
  featured	
  Rama	
  and	
  SiVa,	
  a	
  Monkey	
  god	
  and	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  children	
  in	
  Monkey	
  suits.	
  The	
  
musicians	
  played	
  Indonesian	
  xylophone	
  like	
  instruments	
  and	
  some	
  simple	
  drums.	
  It	
  was	
  very	
  beauIful.

I	
  reserved	
  a	
  day	
  with	
  MaI.	
  A\er	
  rolling	
  me	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  breakfast	
  buffet	
  we	
  gathered	
  in	
  the	
  lobby.	
  He	
  arrived	
  
around	
  10	
  AM.	
  His	
  English	
  was	
  reasonably	
  good.	
  Our	
  first	
  stop	
  was	
  to	
  the	
  monkey	
  temple.	
  It’s	
  an	
  old	
  Hindu	
  
temple	
  occupied	
  by	
  a	
  lot	
  very	
  well	
  fed	
  monkeys.	
  I	
  bought	
  a	
  huge	
  bunch	
  of	
  bananas	
  and	
  walked	
  down	
  the	
  
pathway.	
  Vicki	
  became	
  a	
  liVle	
  girl	
  again	
  as	
  she	
  marveled	
  at	
  these	
  totally	
  human	
  looking	
  creatures.	
  She	
  definitely	
  
wanted	
  a	
  pet	
  monkey.	
  Pat	
  was	
  visibly	
  nervous.	
  She	
  was	
  cauIously	
  enjoying	
  their	
  presence	
  all	
  the	
  while	
  trying	
  to	
  
decide	
  if	
  they	
  were	
  just	
  rats	
  with	
  human	
  faces.	
  They	
  had	
  no	
  fear	
  of	
  humans	
  and	
  we	
  were	
  warned	
  to	
  hold	
  onto	
  
sunglasses	
  and	
  hats.	
  They	
  loved	
  to	
  steal	
  them.	
  One	
  climbed	
  all	
  over	
  me	
  and	
  was	
  quite	
  friendly.	
  I	
  loved	
  to	
  watch	
  
them	
  in	
  groups	
  picking	
  off	
  liVle	
  bugs	
  from	
  their	
  fur.	
  It’s	
  such	
  a	
  loving	
  and	
  warm	
  relaIonship.	
  There	
  were	
  young	
  
babies	
  holding	
  onto	
  their	
  mothers	
  and	
  big	
  boss	
  men	
  looking	
  like	
  they	
  were	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  something	
  and	
  couldn’t	
  
be	
  bothered	
  with	
  bananas	
  (unless	
  you	
  offered	
  them	
  one).	
  We	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  in	
  common	
  with	
  them.	
  Toward	
  the	
  
end	
  a	
  local	
  caretaker	
  took	
  an	
  interest	
  in	
  us	
  and	
  led	
  us	
  to	
  an	
  old	
  temple	
  site.	
  He	
  gave	
  us	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  informaIon	
  about	
  
the	
  place.	
  He	
  then	
  went	
  inside	
  the	
  shrine	
  to	
  get	
  some	
  hand	
  painted	
  cards	
  to	
  sell	
  to	
  me.	
  They	
  must	
  put	
  a	
  stamp	
  
on	
  my	
  forehead	
  when	
  I	
  arrive	
  that	
  only	
  they	
  can	
  read	
  with	
  special	
  glasses.

We	
  winded	
  our	
  way	
  into	
  the	
  countryside.	
  Again	
  rice	
  paddies	
  were	
  everywhere.	
  Family	
  farming	
  goes	
  on	
  in	
  every	
  
corner	
  of	
  the	
  country.	
  There	
  were	
  walled	
  in	
  compounds	
  each	
  with	
  a	
  Hindu	
  Temple.	
  I	
  tried	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  find	
  out	
  
what	
  they	
  were.	
  MaI	
  said	
  every	
  family	
  has	
  its	
  own	
  temple.	
  I	
  found	
  that	
  hard	
  to	
  believe	
  because	
  they	
  were	
  quite	
  
impressive	
  structures	
  to	
  be	
  put	
  up	
  by	
  every	
  family.	
  He	
  said	
  he	
  had	
  one	
  for	
  his	
  family.	
  I’m	
  sIll	
  not	
  convinced	
  that	
  
                                                                                               65
every	
  nuclear	
  household	
  has	
  a	
  big	
  Hindu	
  Temple	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  their	
  backyard	
  furniture.	
  We	
  stopped	
  for	
  lunch	
  at	
  a	
  
restaurant	
  that	
  overlooks	
  a	
  lake	
  and	
  a	
  beauIful	
  volcano.	
  It	
  was	
  spectacular.	
  It	
  had	
  recently	
  erupted	
  and	
  you	
  
could	
  see	
  where	
  the	
  lava	
  had	
  flowed.	
  There	
  was	
  an	
  island	
  of	
  green	
  that	
  miraculously	
  survived.	
  

Next	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  ride	
  some	
  elephants.	
  There	
  never	
  were	
  any	
  elephants	
  in	
  Bali.	
  They	
  hang	
  out	
  on	
  the	
  Island	
  of	
  
Sumatra.	
  They	
  were	
  transported	
  here	
  with	
  their	
  trainers.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  fun	
  experience.	
  I	
  had	
  never	
  been	
  that	
  up	
  close	
  
and	
  personal	
  with	
  one	
  of	
  these	
  incredible	
  creatures.	
  We	
  walked	
  on	
  a	
  path,	
  went	
  into	
  the	
  water,	
  they	
  sat	
  down,	
  
stood	
  on	
  a	
  liVle	
  stump	
  and	
  reared	
  on	
  their	
  hind	
  legs.	
  Let’s	
  face	
  it,	
  who	
  doesn’t	
  like	
  elephants?

Our	
  last	
  stop	
  was	
  to	
  see	
  a	
  Keci	
  dance	
  in	
  an	
  old	
  Hindu	
  temple	
  overlooking	
  the	
  ocean	
  at	
  sunset.	
  On	
  the	
  stage	
  there	
  
were	
  about	
  50	
  young	
  men	
  making	
  short	
  staccato	
  sounds	
  and	
  waving	
  their	
  hands	
  while	
  a	
  Hindu	
  pageant	
  depicIng	
  
a	
  Hindu	
  myth	
  about	
  Rama	
  and	
  SiVa.	
  It	
  involved	
  a	
  Monkey	
  god	
  that	
  saves	
  the	
  day	
  and	
  some	
  bad	
  guys	
  that	
  try	
  to	
  
stop	
  him	
  from	
  saving	
  the	
  day.	
  In	
  the	
  end	
  Rama	
  and	
  SiVa	
  get	
  reunited.	
  I’m	
  sure	
  there’s	
  a	
  deeper	
  message	
  here	
  but	
  
you	
  get	
  the	
  dri\.	
  I	
  always	
  wanted	
  to	
  see	
  this	
  ever	
  since	
  the	
  movie	
  Baraka	
  showed	
  the	
  ritual.	
  They	
  made	
  it	
  look	
  so	
  
mysterious.	
  This	
  was	
  more	
  like	
  a	
  folk	
  dance.	
  The	
  sebng	
  was	
  beauIful	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  fun	
  evening.	
  We	
  were	
  preVy	
  
beat	
  by	
  the	
  Ime	
  we	
  got	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  hotel.	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  would	
  be	
  dedicated	
  to	
  relaxing	
  around	
  the	
  hotel	
  and,	
  
what	
  else,	
  dinner	
  in	
  bed.

The	
  day	
  went	
  as	
  planned.	
  We	
  ate	
  a	
  huge	
  breakfast	
  and	
  sat	
  around	
  the	
  pools.	
  This	
  is	
  hard	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  do	
  for	
  some	
  
reason.	
  I	
  don’t	
  mean	
  the	
  eaIng	
  breakfast	
  part,	
  that’s	
  my	
  best	
  sport.	
  I’m	
  not	
  made	
  to	
  sit	
  around	
  for	
  too	
  long.	
  I	
  
took	
  a	
  walk	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  walkway.	
  I	
  found	
  a	
  fresh	
  seafood	
  restaurant	
  and	
  made	
  several	
  stops	
  there	
  over	
  
the	
  course	
  of	
  my	
  stay.	
  I	
  met	
  the	
  owner	
  and	
  we	
  became	
  beer	
  buddies	
  at	
  one	
  point.	
  If	
  you	
  ever	
  go	
  there	
  the	
  place	
  
is	
  called	
  Kendi	
  Kuning.	
  It’s	
  my	
  pick	
  for	
  a	
  good	
  meal	
  at	
  a	
  great	
  locaIon.	
  During	
  the	
  day	
  I	
  felt	
  some	
  old	
  haunIng	
  
feelings	
  overtake	
  me.	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  romanIc	
  sebng.	
  I	
  walked	
  out	
  onto	
  the	
  pier	
  and	
  sat	
  in	
  meditaIon	
  for	
  some	
  Ime.	
  
The	
  sound	
  of	
  the	
  wind	
  and	
  the	
  ocean	
  was	
  very	
  calming.	
  It	
  was	
  low	
  Ide	
  and	
  there	
  were	
  local	
  people	
  standing	
  in	
  
the	
  water	
  collecIng	
  shellfish	
  with	
  wide	
  brimmed	
  straw	
  hats.	
  When	
  the	
  mind	
  seVles	
  and	
  the	
  boundaries	
  so\en,	
  
there	
  emerges	
  a	
  belonging	
  to	
  everything;	
  the	
  fishermen,	
  the	
  ocean,	
  the	
  wind,	
  the	
  waves,	
  the	
  boats;	
  to	
  all	
  life.	
  I	
  
checked	
  my	
  sadness	
  at	
  the	
  gateway	
  of	
  the	
  eternal.	
  There’s	
  no	
  sadness	
  here.	
  There’s	
  only	
  the	
  universal,	
  our	
  very	
  
nature.	
  I	
  feel	
  so	
  blessed	
  that	
  I	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  take	
  refuge	
  here.

Kuta	
  beach	
  is	
  nearby.	
  It’s	
  the	
  party	
  place	
  where	
  young	
  people	
  hang	
  out	
  to	
  surf	
  and	
  do	
  what	
  young	
  people	
  do	
  
best,	
  live	
  as	
  if	
  there’s	
  no	
  tomorrow.	
  We	
  took	
  a	
  cab	
  there	
  and	
  were	
  immediately	
  disappointed.	
  It	
  was	
  crowded,	
  
noisy	
  and	
  the	
  hawkers	
  couldn’t	
  even	
  get	
  the	
  master	
  sucker	
  to	
  buy	
  anything.	
  We	
  walked	
  past	
  endless	
  shops	
  of	
  
stuff	
  we’ve	
  seen	
  a	
  million	
  Imes.	
  There	
  was	
  nothing	
  new	
  here	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  noisy	
  and	
  way	
  too	
  busy.	
  We	
  stumbled	
  
onto	
  the	
  memorial	
  site	
  of	
  the	
  club	
  that	
  was	
  blown	
  up	
  by	
  Indonesia’s	
  homegrown	
  terrorist	
  group	
  Jamal	
  Islamiya.	
  
Around	
  230	
  young	
  people	
  died.	
  Australia	
  was	
  the	
  biggest	
  conIngent	
  with	
  Indonesia	
  second.	
  They	
  have	
  been	
  
largely	
  broken	
  up	
  since	
  then	
  but	
  they	
  managed	
  to	
  blow	
  up	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  hotels	
  recently.	
  It’s	
  sad	
  as	
  Indonesia’s	
  
form	
  of	
  Islam	
  is	
  so	
  gentle	
  you	
  would	
  hardly	
  recognize	
  it.	
  It’s	
  a	
  permissive	
  society	
  with	
  a	
  live	
  and	
  let	
  live	
  spirit.	
  We	
  
didn’t	
  spend	
  too	
  much	
  Ime	
  there	
  as	
  it	
  was	
  just	
  more	
  of	
  what	
  you	
  see	
  in	
  any	
  busy	
  tourist	
  shopping	
  area.	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  took	
  it	
  easy	
  again.	
  We	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  our	
  last	
  day.	
  I	
  was	
  looking	
  forward	
  to	
  going	
  home.	
  For	
  
some	
  reason	
  I	
  had	
  been	
  thinking	
  it	
  was	
  September.	
  I	
  knew	
  we	
  flew	
  on	
  the	
  first	
  but	
  I	
  totally	
  forgot	
  there	
  was	
  
going	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  31st	
  this	
  month.	
  I	
  finally	
  remembered	
  it’s	
  August.	
  I’m	
  really	
  taking	
  to	
  this	
  reIrement	
  thing.	
  Hey,	
  it’s	
  
not	
  my	
  fault.	
  It’s	
  always	
  summer	
  down	
  here.	
  There	
  are	
  no	
  seasonal	
  or	
  holidays	
  cues.	
  We	
  felt	
  that	
  we	
  had	
  seen	
  
enough	
  of	
  the	
  outside	
  world	
  so	
  we	
  had	
  two	
  days	
  to	
  hang	
  around	
  the	
  resort.	
  EaIng,	
  sleeping,	
  lazing	
  in	
  the	
  pool	
  
like	
  a	
  big	
  ol’fat	
  manatee	
  and,	
  of	
  course,	
  dinner	
  in	
  bed;	
  a	
  tough	
  life	
  all	
  around.	
  

                                                                                              66
On	
  the	
  last	
  day	
  we	
  decided	
  to	
  rent	
  some	
  jet	
  skis.	
  The	
  Ide	
  was	
  too	
  low	
  and	
  the	
  first	
  place	
  would	
  only	
  rent	
  them	
  
to	
  us	
  if	
  one	
  of	
  their	
  people	
  could	
  escort	
  us.	
  I	
  didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  do	
  that.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  next	
  place	
  that	
  apparently	
  
had	
  lower	
  safety	
  standards.	
  We	
  got	
  out	
  on	
  the	
  water	
  and	
  I	
  just	
  said	
  a	
  prayer	
  because	
  the	
  rocks	
  looked	
  about	
  two	
  
inches	
  from	
  the	
  surface.	
  There	
  were	
  shell	
  fishermen	
  wading	
  in	
  water	
  up	
  to	
  their	
  knees.	
  It	
  was	
  great	
  fun.	
  The	
  
machines	
  and	
  us	
  survived	
  just	
  fine.	
  Some	
  Ime	
  a\er	
  that	
  I	
  noIced	
  that	
  my	
  right	
  eye	
  wasn’t	
  quite	
  right.	
  If	
  you	
  take	
  
your	
  finger	
  and	
  put	
  it	
  on	
  the	
  right	
  side	
  of	
  your	
  nose	
  you	
  can	
  see	
  it.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  move	
  my	
  finger	
  an	
  inch	
  before	
  I	
  could	
  
see	
  it.	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  cataract	
  in	
  that	
  eye	
  so	
  my	
  vision	
  wasn’t	
  very	
  good	
  to	
  begin	
  with.	
  I	
  also	
  have	
  glaucoma.	
  I	
  was	
  
worried	
  about	
  that.	
  The	
  only	
  thing	
  I	
  really	
  know	
  about	
  going	
  blind	
  from	
  glaucoma	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  affects	
  the	
  peripheral	
  
vision.	
  Gradually	
  the	
  field	
  of	
  sight	
  becomes	
  tunneled	
  and	
  then	
  goes	
  away	
  completely.	
  Once	
  that	
  happens	
  it’s	
  
irreversible.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  decision	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  a	
  hospital	
  in	
  the	
  capital	
  city,	
  Denspasar	
  or	
  wait	
  unIl	
  I	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  
Singapore	
  and	
  hope	
  I’m	
  not	
  blind	
  when	
  I	
  wake	
  up.	
  The	
  resort	
  had	
  a	
  resident	
  nurse	
  on	
  duty.	
  She	
  made	
  all	
  the	
  
arrangements	
  with	
  the	
  ophthalmologist.	
  Pat	
  and	
  Vicki,	
  bless	
  their	
  hearts,	
  came	
  along.	
  The	
  doctor	
  took	
  a	
  look	
  and	
  
said	
  it’s	
  just	
  the	
  cataract,	
  not	
  the	
  glaucoma	
  so	
  don’t	
  worry	
  be	
  happy.	
  I	
  le\	
  feeling	
  relieved.

We	
  le\	
  Bali	
  on	
  a	
  very	
  early	
  flight.	
  Back	
  in	
  Singapore	
  I	
  got	
  hooked	
  up	
  with	
  my	
  health	
  insurer	
  and	
  made	
  an	
  
appointment	
  to	
  see	
  an	
  eye	
  doctor.	
  Pat	
  and	
  Vicki	
  were	
  to	
  leave	
  the	
  day	
  a\er	
  next.	
  I	
  signed	
  up	
  for	
  a	
  five	
  day	
  Zen	
  
retreat	
  (called	
  sesshin).	
  The	
  day	
  a\er	
  the	
  retreat	
  I	
  was	
  to	
  have	
  my	
  sixth	
  vaccinaIon	
  and	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  would	
  go	
  
to	
  the	
  ophthalmologist.	
  Pat	
  and	
  Vicki	
  sIll	
  had	
  one	
  day	
  to	
  see	
  Singapore.	
  They	
  came	
  over	
  to	
  my	
  place	
  and	
  we	
  took	
  
a	
  walk	
  to	
  East	
  Coast	
  Park.	
  It’s	
  a	
  long	
  stretch	
  of	
  beach	
  that’s	
  a	
  favorite	
  playground	
  for	
  everyone.	
  There’s	
  an	
  
extreme	
  sports	
  park,	
  beaches,	
  jogging	
  and	
  bike	
  trails	
  that	
  go	
  on	
  for	
  miles.	
  There’s	
  also	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  favorite	
  
“Hawker’s	
  Market”	
  center	
  that	
  has	
  every	
  imaginable	
  Asian	
  food	
  stall.	
  Vicki	
  was	
  interested	
  in	
  a	
  lagoon	
  that	
  had	
  a	
  
water	
  skiing	
  ride	
  where	
  you	
  are	
  pulled	
  by	
  a	
  rope	
  that	
  is	
  propelled	
  by	
  a	
  cable	
  run.	
  Skiers	
  are	
  invited	
  to	
  jump	
  over	
  
all	
  kinds	
  of	
  obstacles.	
  Those	
  who	
  took	
  the	
  invitaIon	
  generally	
  got	
  a	
  shorter	
  ride	
  and	
  a	
  quick	
  dunk.	
  It	
  looked	
  like	
  
fun.	
  By	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  day	
  they	
  were	
  ready	
  to	
  go	
  home.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  long	
  trip	
  and	
  Vicki	
  was	
  right	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  her	
  
long	
  summer	
  vacaIon.	
  It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  gear	
  up	
  for	
  senior	
  year.	
  What	
  a	
  long	
  road	
  that	
  is.	
  The	
  next	
  morning	
  I	
  got	
  up	
  
early	
  to	
  join	
  them	
  at	
  the	
  airport.	
  Vicki	
  has	
  become	
  what	
  Pat	
  missed	
  the	
  most	
  from	
  her	
  years	
  in	
  business,	
  a	
  
personal	
  assistant.	
  Vicki	
  told	
  her,	
  “Mom,	
  you	
  just	
  relax,	
  give	
  me	
  the	
  passport,	
  the	
  money	
  and	
  the	
  confirmaIon	
  
number,	
  I’ll	
  handle	
  the	
  rest.”	
  I’ve	
  seen	
  that	
  trend	
  develop	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  My	
  sister	
  Pat	
  handles	
  every	
  situaIon	
  
with	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  measured	
  chaos	
  that	
  only	
  makes	
  her	
  success	
  in	
  business	
  all	
  the	
  more	
  mysterious.	
  Vicki	
  has	
  
developed	
  into	
  quite	
  the	
  accomplished	
  organizer.	
  She	
  loves	
  to	
  do	
  it	
  and	
  she	
  loves	
  her	
  mom	
  and	
  wants	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  
her.	
  It’s	
  very	
  beauIful.	
  A\er	
  she	
  got	
  the	
  boarding	
  passes	
  and	
  the	
  luggage	
  all	
  checked	
  in	
  we	
  took	
  some	
  parIng	
  
photos.	
  I	
  gave	
  Vicki	
  one	
  last	
  hug	
  and	
  told	
  her	
  how	
  proud	
  I	
  am	
  of	
  her.	
  Then	
  I	
  gave	
  my	
  big	
  sister	
  a	
  hug.	
  Our	
  eyes	
  
caught	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  we	
  both	
  welled	
  up.	
  Vicki	
  said,	
  “no	
  crying!”	
  In	
  truth	
  we	
  never	
  know	
  when	
  will	
  be	
  the	
  last	
  
Ime	
  but	
  in	
  my	
  situaIon	
  there’s	
  a	
  heightened	
  awareness	
  that	
  good	
  bye	
  means	
  something	
  now.	
  They	
  le\	
  and	
  I	
  
went	
  home.	
  

The	
  Zen	
  teacher	
  here	
  is	
  Vivian	
  Boey.	
  She’s	
  Chinese.	
  It’s	
  amazing	
  how	
  common	
  it	
  is	
  for	
  Chinese	
  and	
  Indian	
  
Singaporeans	
  to	
  take	
  “ChrisIan”	
  names.	
  I’ve	
  never	
  met	
  so	
  many	
  people	
  that	
  aVended	
  Catholic	
  school.	
  Coming	
  
from	
  and	
  Irish	
  Catholic	
  heritage	
  that	
  says	
  a	
  lot.	
  One	
  must	
  say	
  that	
  in	
  Vivian’s	
  case	
  it	
  didn’t	
  sIck.	
  The	
  sangha	
  
(Buddhist	
  community)	
  is	
  a	
  small	
  group	
  of	
  about	
  25	
  people	
  that	
  meet	
  in	
  her	
  apartment	
  weekly	
  to	
  sit	
  in	
  sazen	
  (Zen	
  
meditaIon).	
  I’ve	
  bonded	
  with	
  the	
  group	
  during	
  my	
  Ime	
  here.	
  Over	
  the	
  last	
  few	
  years	
  of	
  living	
  in	
  Zen	
  
communiIes	
  I’ve	
  goVen	
  accustomed	
  to	
  doing	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  sazen.	
  I	
  haven’t	
  been	
  doing	
  as	
  much	
  on	
  my	
  own	
  so	
  I	
  was	
  
looking	
  forward	
  to	
  the	
  retreat.	
  I	
  was	
  quite	
  surprised	
  to	
  find	
  out	
  that	
  we	
  would	
  all	
  be	
  sleeping	
  in	
  her	
  apartment.	
  It	
  
was	
  a	
  very	
  nice	
  and	
  large	
  place	
  but	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  see	
  how	
  so	
  many	
  people	
  would	
  be	
  comfortable.	
  However,	
  they’ve	
  
done	
  this	
  many	
  Imes	
  and	
  it’s	
  a	
  well	
  oiled	
  process.	
  An	
  old	
  school	
  Zen	
  Master,	
  Kubota	
  Jiun	
  Roshi	
  led	
  the	
  sesshin.	
  
He	
  looked	
  every	
  bit	
  the	
  part.	
  We	
  started	
  the	
  sesshin	
  seated	
  at	
  our	
  cushions	
  in	
  her	
  big	
  living	
  room.	
  Roshi	
  gave	
  his	
  
first	
  encouragement	
  to	
  all	
  of	
  us.	
  He	
  wanted	
  us	
  all	
  to	
  strive	
  for	
  Kensho	
  (enlightenment	
  experience).	
  We	
  are	
  all	
  
                                                                                                 67
qualified	
  to	
  do	
  this.	
  Then	
  he	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  his	
  room	
  where	
  he	
  would	
  conduct	
  interviews	
  throughout	
  the	
  sesshin,	
  
only	
  coming	
  out	
  to	
  give	
  us	
  Taisho	
  (dharma	
  talk).	
  In	
  my	
  first	
  interview	
  he	
  wanted	
  to	
  know	
  about	
  me.	
  I	
  gave	
  him	
  
the	
  nickel	
  tour	
  of	
  my	
  spiritual	
  accomplishments	
  and	
  history.	
  He	
  was	
  extremely	
  unimpressed.	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  to	
  count	
  
my	
  breaths.	
  This	
  is	
  considered	
  a	
  beginners	
  pracIce	
  and	
  at	
  first	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  happy	
  with	
  that.	
  However,	
  that	
  didn’t	
  
last	
  long	
  and	
  I	
  determined	
  that	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  five	
  days	
  I	
  would	
  count	
  my	
  breaths	
  with	
  no	
  holding	
  back.	
  Beginner’s	
  
Mind	
  is	
  the	
  highest	
  state	
  of	
  pracIce	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  go	
  all	
  the	
  way	
  with	
  it.	
  

Sesshin	
  is	
  about	
  following	
  the	
  schedule.	
  We	
  wake	
  up	
  at	
  5AM	
  and	
  sit	
  at	
  5:30	
  unIl	
  7:30	
  Breakfast.	
  We	
  sit	
  for	
  25	
  
minutes	
  and	
  do	
  Kinhin	
  (walking	
  meditaIon)	
  for	
  5	
  minutes	
  repeatedly.	
  We	
  do	
  Samu	
  (work	
  pracIce)	
  and	
  then	
  a	
  
short	
  break	
  before	
  we	
  sit	
  again	
  at	
  10AM.	
  There	
  is	
  a	
  Taisho	
  before	
  lunch	
  that	
  is	
  served	
  at	
  noon.	
  All	
  meals	
  are	
  
eaten	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  our	
  cushions	
  preceded	
  by	
  a	
  meal	
  prayer.	
  We	
  eat,	
  wash	
  up	
  and	
  take	
  a	
  break	
  Ill	
  2PM	
  when	
  we	
  sit	
  
again	
  Ill	
  dinner	
  is	
  served	
  at	
  5PM.	
  We	
  eat,	
  clean	
  up,	
  take	
  a	
  break	
  unIl	
  our	
  last	
  sit	
  from	
  6:30	
  Ill	
  9PM	
  and	
  lights	
  out	
  
at	
  9:30PM.	
  During	
  each	
  sit	
  there	
  is	
  either	
  a	
  Taisho	
  or	
  Dokusan	
  (Interview	
  with	
  the	
  Roshi).	
  There	
  are	
  several	
  
service	
  posiIons	
  one	
  can	
  perform	
  during	
  the	
  sesshin.	
  There	
  is	
  the	
  Tenzo	
  (cook),	
  Jikido	
  (Imekeeper)	
  and	
  Jissha	
  
(Roshi’s	
  aVendant).	
  I’ve	
  done	
  all	
  of	
  these	
  but	
  the	
  way	
  they	
  do	
  it	
  here	
  is	
  a	
  liVle	
  different.	
  I	
  especially	
  liked	
  the	
  
Jissha.	
  She	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  sweet	
  young	
  Asian	
  woman.	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  for	
  Taisho	
  she	
  would	
  get	
  off	
  her	
  cushion	
  and	
  
walk	
  in	
  a	
  shuffle	
  bent	
  over	
  with	
  Chinese	
  humility.	
  She	
  would	
  knock	
  on	
  the	
  door	
  and	
  say	
  something	
  in	
  Japanese	
  
that	
  most	
  likely	
  meant,	
  “we	
  are	
  ready	
  for	
  your	
  teaching.”	
  The	
  old	
  Roshi	
  would	
  open	
  the	
  door,	
  bow	
  to	
  his	
  Jissha	
  
and	
  walk	
  into	
  the	
  Zendo	
  (meditaIon	
  hall).	
  Because	
  of	
  his	
  age	
  he	
  walked	
  like	
  so	
  many	
  drawings	
  of	
  an	
  old	
  Zen	
  
master.	
  He	
  was	
  slightly	
  bent	
  over	
  and	
  shuffled	
  as	
  he	
  walked	
  with	
  his	
  young	
  jissha	
  taking	
  care	
  of	
  him.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  
just	
  so	
  sweet.	
  

The	
  first	
  night	
  and	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  were	
  very	
  tough.	
  I	
  really	
  didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  be	
  there.	
  I’m	
  half	
  blind	
  and	
  I	
  just	
  got	
  back	
  
from	
  a	
  long	
  trip.	
  Maybe	
  I	
  could	
  faint	
  during	
  kinhin	
  and	
  have	
  the	
  teacher	
  tell	
  me	
  I	
  should	
  go	
  home.	
  That	
  would	
  be	
  
an	
  honorable	
  way	
  out.	
  Deep	
  down	
  I	
  knew	
  I	
  would	
  not	
  do	
  that.	
  I	
  never	
  leave	
  no	
  maVer	
  how	
  much	
  my	
  small	
  mind	
  
complains.	
  During	
  my	
  interviews	
  the	
  Roshi	
  kept	
  encouraging	
  me	
  to	
  tell	
  self	
  centered	
  Kevin	
  to	
  reIre.	
  He	
  can	
  come	
  
back	
  a\er	
  sesshin	
  but	
  for	
  right	
  now	
  he	
  should	
  reIre.	
  Let	
  Empty	
  Kevin	
  come	
  forward	
  by	
  focusing	
  on	
  your	
  breath.	
  
With	
  each	
  exhale	
  count	
  one..two…up	
  to	
  ten	
  then	
  start	
  over.	
  “Put	
  your	
  whole	
  life	
  into	
  it.”	
  Each	
  dokusan	
  he	
  asked	
  
“Is	
  Kevin	
  reIred?”	
  I	
  would	
  reply,	
  “He	
  took	
  a	
  short	
  nap	
  once.”	
  “ Tell	
  him	
  to	
  reIre.”	
  We	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  fun	
  with	
  that.	
  By	
  
the	
  second	
  full	
  day	
  I	
  was	
  seVled	
  into	
  my	
  pracIce.	
  My	
  legs	
  really	
  hurt	
  and	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  sit	
  in	
  a	
  chair.	
  This	
  has	
  been	
  
my	
  pracIce	
  ever	
  since	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  blood	
  clot	
  last	
  year.	
  There’s	
  a	
  blood	
  and	
  guts	
  aspect	
  to	
  sazen	
  when	
  you	
  sit	
  cross	
  
legged	
  for	
  the	
  enIre	
  sesshin.	
  Somehow	
  the	
  pain	
  is	
  part	
  and	
  parcel	
  to	
  the	
  pracIce.	
  I’ve	
  found	
  giving	
  up	
  on	
  that	
  
premise	
  very	
  helpful.	
  Kevin	
  has	
  glorified	
  martyrdom	
  a	
  bit	
  too	
  much	
  this	
  lifeIme.	
  

Another	
  Japanese	
  Zen	
  Master,	
  Yamada	
  Ryoun	
  Roshi,	
  took	
  a	
  break	
  from	
  his	
  business	
  trip	
  in	
  India	
  to	
  give	
  us	
  a	
  
Taisho.	
  He	
  is	
  the	
  son	
  of	
  the	
  founder	
  of	
  this	
  asangha	
  (Buddhist	
  lineage),	
  Yamada	
  Koun	
  Roshi,	
  now	
  deceased.	
  He	
  
wanted	
  to	
  assure	
  us	
  that	
  “You	
  can	
  never	
  die!”	
  He	
  offered	
  us	
  a	
  wriVen	
  guarantee.	
  He	
  said	
  this	
  from	
  his	
  own	
  
invesIgaIon	
  into	
  the	
  true	
  nature	
  of	
  life.	
  That	
  sounds	
  inspiring	
  in	
  a	
  sense	
  but	
  most	
  of	
  his	
  talk	
  was	
  about	
  the	
  true	
  
nature	
  of	
  all	
  life	
  which	
  is	
  empIness.	
  We	
  are	
  already	
  empty	
  or,	
  as	
  he	
  put	
  it,	
  “gone!”	
  We	
  need	
  to	
  see	
  this	
  “gone	
  
nature”.	
  Once	
  you	
  do	
  you	
  will	
  know	
  that	
  you	
  can	
  never	
  die.	
  He	
  liked	
  the	
  movie	
  “Sixth	
  Sense”	
  because	
  all	
  he	
  sees	
  
is	
  dead	
  people.	
  That’s	
  more	
  true	
  than	
  we	
  realize.	
  This	
  all	
  sounds	
  quite	
  absurd	
  but	
  I	
  can	
  say	
  that	
  as	
  I	
  deepen	
  my	
  
pracIce,	
  especially	
  with	
  this	
  cancer	
  experience,	
  I’ve	
  seen	
  the	
  line	
  between	
  life	
  and	
  death	
  gebng	
  very	
  thin.	
  That	
  
has	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  do	
  with	
  my	
  acceptance	
  of	
  death.	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  great	
  source	
  of	
  strength	
  to	
  me.	
  

On	
  the	
  fourth	
  day	
  Kubota	
  Roshi	
  again	
  exhorted	
  me	
  to	
  tell	
  Kevin	
  to	
  reIre	
  and	
  count	
  my	
  breaths	
  in	
  empIness.	
  
“100%	
  empIness!”	
  I	
  did	
  this	
  diligently	
  and	
  gradually	
  Kevin	
  reIred.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  more	
  effort	
  required	
  to	
  count	
  
my	
  breaths.	
  Thoughts	
  seemed	
  to	
  fall	
  off	
  a	
  ledge	
  into	
  an	
  empty	
  abyss	
  before	
  they	
  could	
  rise	
  up	
  to	
  bother	
  me.	
  
                                                                                                68
Boundaries	
  between	
  me	
  and	
  the	
  other	
  parIcipants	
  melted	
  away.	
  I	
  walked,	
  I	
  sat,	
  I	
  counted,	
  nothing	
  else.	
  It	
  was	
  
the	
  top	
  of	
  the	
  temple,	
  empty	
  of	
  all	
  hindrances	
  in	
  the	
  mind.	
  It	
  was	
  quite	
  beauIful.	
  During	
  my	
  next	
  Dokusan	
  I	
  sat	
  
in	
  front	
  of	
  Roshi	
  and	
  said	
  “100%!”	
  We	
  both	
  laughed	
  and	
  he	
  shook	
  my	
  hand,	
  “wonderful…great.”	
  The	
  problem	
  
with	
  these	
  experiences	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  pracItoner	
  must	
  immediately	
  let	
  go	
  of	
  them.	
  The	
  normal	
  course	
  of	
  events	
  is	
  
to	
  try	
  to	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  that	
  state.	
  However,	
  that	
  life	
  is	
  already	
  gone.	
  Roshi	
  said	
  “live	
  a	
  moment	
  to	
  moment	
  life.	
  Each	
  
breath	
  is	
  a	
  new	
  birth	
  and	
  a	
  death.”	
  I’m	
  preVy	
  normal	
  though.	
  I	
  spent	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  sesshin	
  trying	
  to	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  
where	
  I	
  was.	
  

The	
  sesshin	
  ended	
  with	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  celebraIon.	
  I	
  felt	
  a	
  stronger	
  bond	
  with	
  the	
  group	
  than	
  I	
  had	
  before.	
  There	
  were	
  
lots	
  of	
  photos	
  and	
  laughter	
  as	
  we	
  ate	
  the	
  final	
  meal	
  around	
  the	
  zendo.	
  Seeing	
  this	
  old	
  roshi	
  is	
  inspiraIon	
  enough	
  
for	
  me.	
  He	
  is	
  a	
  free	
  man.	
  Every	
  breath	
  is	
  a	
  new	
  life	
  and	
  he	
  seems	
  to	
  just	
  take	
  in	
  every	
  new	
  life	
  and	
  let	
  it	
  go,	
  
enjoying	
  what’s	
  right	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  him.	
  He	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  is	
  real	
  compassion.	
  When	
  we	
  can	
  greet	
  each	
  moment	
  
without	
  the	
  thoughts	
  of	
  the	
  past	
  or	
  anIcipaIon	
  of	
  the	
  future	
  hindering	
  our	
  experience	
  we	
  are	
  free.	
  We	
  can	
  then	
  
simply	
  respond	
  to	
  what’s	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  us	
  with	
  absolute	
  compassion.	
  We	
  cannot	
  die,	
  there’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  fear,	
  our	
  
true	
  nature	
  is	
  freedom.	
  

I	
  went	
  home	
  to	
  freshen	
  up	
  and	
  then	
  we	
  all	
  went	
  out	
  to	
  dinner.	
  There	
  were	
  two	
  tables	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  the	
  first	
  one	
  
there.	
  Most	
  of	
  the	
  older	
  folks	
  gathered	
  at	
  my	
  table	
  with	
  Roshi.	
  The	
  younger	
  ones	
  were	
  at	
  the	
  other	
  table.	
  The	
  
food	
  was	
  great	
  and	
  the	
  company	
  wonderful.	
  There	
  were	
  two	
  Germans	
  that	
  came	
  all	
  the	
  way	
  from	
  Europe	
  to	
  
aVend	
  the	
  sesshin.	
  I	
  got	
  lots	
  of	
  history	
  on	
  the	
  sangha	
  and	
  their	
  connecIon	
  to	
  the	
  pracIce.	
  The	
  noise	
  level	
  at	
  the	
  
younger	
  table	
  was	
  much	
  more	
  animated	
  and	
  Roshi	
  naturally	
  gravitated	
  to	
  that	
  table	
  and	
  joined	
  in	
  the	
  fun.	
  As	
  we	
  
said	
  good	
  bye	
  he	
  told	
  me	
  “ Tell	
  Kevin	
  to	
  reIre!”	
  I	
  replied	
  “Kevin	
  never	
  reIres.”	
  He	
  walked	
  off	
  muVering	
  and	
  
shaking	
  his	
  head	
  “Kevin	
  never	
  reIres.”	
  His	
  muVering	
  was	
  a	
  admonishment.	
  It’s	
  up	
  to	
  me	
  to	
  reIre	
  Kevin.	
  I	
  keep	
  
feeding	
  him.	
  I	
  keep	
  him	
  working	
  way	
  beyond	
  his	
  job	
  scope	
  which	
  is	
  simply	
  to	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  daily	
  life.	
  Beyond	
  that,	
  
fears	
  of	
  tomorrow	
  and	
  regrets	
  of	
  yesterday	
  are	
  not	
  his	
  job	
  anymore,	
  they	
  never	
  really	
  were.	
  The	
  war	
  is	
  over,	
  it’s	
  
Ime	
  to	
  surrender.	
  

On	
  September	
  9th	
  I	
  received	
  my	
  sixth	
  of	
  ten	
  vaccines.	
  There	
  is	
  another	
  American	
  here	
  gebng	
  the	
  treatment.	
  Dr	
  
Toh	
  said	
  his	
  vaccine	
  is	
  very	
  good	
  as	
  well.	
  American	
  blood	
  kicks	
  buV.	
  He	
  said,	
  “don’t	
  tell	
  Joe	
  but	
  yours	
  is	
  the	
  best.”	
  
That	
  being	
  said	
  I	
  won’t	
  know	
  if	
  good	
  vaccine	
  means	
  anything	
  or	
  not.	
  It	
  will	
  take	
  Ime	
  to	
  determine	
  that.	
  I	
  will	
  
know	
  right	
  away	
  if	
  it’s	
  not	
  working	
  and	
  my	
  cancer	
  gets	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  corral.	
  Let’s	
  not	
  go	
  there.

On	
  Friday	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  eye	
  doctor.	
  She	
  appeared	
  to	
  be	
  about	
  12	
  years	
  old	
  but	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  get	
  used	
  to	
  that.	
  She	
  
took	
  out	
  her	
  headgear	
  to	
  magnify	
  her	
  vision	
  and	
  a	
  bright	
  handheld	
  light.	
  She	
  had	
  me	
  look	
  up,	
  down,	
  sideways,	
  
back,	
  front,	
  upside	
  down,	
  right	
  side	
  up.	
  I	
  was	
  gebng	
  Ired	
  of	
  this	
  and	
  then	
  I	
  saw	
  a	
  look	
  on	
  her	
  face	
  that	
  said	
  “this	
  
isn’t	
  good.”	
  I	
  don’t	
  like	
  that	
  look.	
  I’ve	
  goVen	
  good	
  at	
  recognizing	
  it	
  these	
  past	
  few	
  years.	
  She	
  said	
  I	
  had	
  torn	
  my	
  
reIna	
  and	
  I	
  needed	
  surgery	
  immediately.	
  The	
  doctor	
  in	
  Indonesia	
  was	
  wrong.	
  With	
  a	
  torn	
  reIna,	
  Ime	
  is	
  of	
  the	
  
essence.	
  She	
  wanted	
  to	
  know	
  when	
  this	
  happened.	
  It	
  seemed	
  somewhat	
  gradual	
  but	
  the	
  Ime	
  I	
  noIced	
  it	
  was	
  
about	
  10	
  days	
  ago.	
  She	
  said	
  if	
  it’s	
  caught	
  within	
  two	
  weeks	
  it	
  should	
  be	
  ok.	
  The	
  surgery	
  has	
  95%	
  success	
  rate.	
  
They	
  put	
  gas	
  into	
  the	
  eye	
  so	
  I	
  won’t	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  fly	
  for	
  at	
  least	
  two	
  weeks	
  and	
  possibly	
  up	
  to	
  two	
  months.	
  “Is	
  that	
  
Ok	
  with	
  you?”	
  Let	
  me	
  see,	
  stay	
  an	
  extra	
  week	
  in	
  Singapore	
  and	
  don’t	
  go	
  blind	
  in	
  one	
  eye	
  or	
  go	
  blind	
  in	
  one	
  eye	
  
for	
  an	
  extra	
  week	
  home.	
  So	
  I	
  signed	
  up	
  for	
  surgery	
  that	
  evening.	
  I	
  spent	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  day	
  in	
  pre	
  op	
  stuff.	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  
go	
  home	
  to	
  collect	
  my	
  things	
  and	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  hospital.	
  By	
  7PM	
  I	
  was	
  under	
  the	
  anesthesia.	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  with	
  a	
  
bandaged	
  eye.	
  The	
  doctor	
  said	
  everything	
  went	
  well.	
  The	
  reIna	
  was	
  torn	
  in	
  two	
  places.	
  It’s	
  now	
  all	
  repaired	
  but	
  I	
  
have	
  to	
  be	
  very	
  careful.	
  I’m	
  supposed	
  to	
  keep	
  my	
  head	
  looking	
  at	
  the	
  floor.	
  I	
  can’t	
  cook	
  as	
  they	
  don’t	
  want	
  any	
  
irritaIon	
  gebng	
  into	
  the	
  eye.	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  keep	
  all	
  this	
  up	
  for	
  two	
  weeks.	
  They	
  sent	
  me	
  home.	
  My	
  friend	
  Shirley	
  has	
  
been	
  so	
  generous	
  with	
  her	
  Ime.	
  However,	
  I	
  needed	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  help.	
  When	
  I	
  got	
  home	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  
                                                                                                69
trouble.	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  way	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  myself	
  alone	
  with	
  these	
  restricIons.	
  I	
  asked	
  my	
  doctor	
  to	
  readmit	
  
me	
  to	
  the	
  hospital	
  unIl	
  we	
  can	
  figure	
  out	
  how	
  to	
  make	
  this	
  work.	
  That	
  was	
  a	
  good	
  decision	
  on	
  my	
  part.	
  I’m	
  
enjoying	
  my	
  stay	
  in	
  the	
  hospital.	
  Now	
  that	
  self	
  centered	
  Kevin	
  has	
  been	
  reIred	
  I	
  don’t	
  even	
  noIce	
  that	
  all	
  the	
  
nurses	
  are	
  quite	
  beauIful	
  and	
  friendly.	
  Not	
  me,	
  everyone	
  is	
  now	
  the	
  same.	
  Self	
  centered	
  Kevin	
  would	
  have	
  really	
  
noIced	
  but	
  as	
  you	
  all	
  know,	
  he’s	
  reIred.	
  I’m	
  not	
  sure	
  why	
  all	
  the	
  nurses	
  are	
  young.	
  Vivian	
  stopped	
  by	
  and	
  her	
  
husband	
  Wa	
  Keong	
  is	
  a	
  doctor.	
  I	
  asked	
  him	
  about	
  that	
  but	
  he	
  had	
  no	
  answer.	
  I	
  have	
  this	
  feeling	
  that	
  around	
  35	
  
they	
  all	
  are	
  encouraged	
  to	
  reIre.	
  I	
  don’t	
  how	
  else	
  to	
  explain	
  it.	
  Not	
  that	
  empty	
  Kevin	
  has	
  noIced	
  any	
  of	
  this.

That’s	
  where	
  it	
  stands	
  today.	
  I’m	
  healing	
  and	
  I’m	
  living	
  my	
  moment	
  to	
  moment	
  life.	
  I	
  am	
  not	
  afraid,	
  I	
  am	
  not	
  
unhappy,	
  I	
  am	
  ready	
  for	
  whatever	
  comes	
  into	
  my	
  life.	
  I	
  cannot	
  die,	
  I	
  can	
  see	
  the	
  top	
  of	
  the	
  temple.	
  There’s	
  
nothing	
  there	
  to	
  be	
  afraid	
  of.	
  One,	
  two….ten.

SeVle	
  into	
  life
The	
  road	
  winds	
  with	
  its	
  own	
  mind
Driving	
  through	
  the	
  clouds

Hearts	
  of	
  Gold
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  October	
  6,	
  2009

I	
  have	
  been	
  feeling	
  quite	
  achy	
  in	
  my	
  right	
  hip,	
  knee	
  and	
  groin	
  area.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  gebng	
  steadily	
  worse	
  over	
  Ime	
  
since	
  I’ve	
  been	
  here.	
  	
  I	
  complained	
  to	
  my	
  doctor	
  about	
  it	
  and	
  he	
  felt	
  around	
  but	
  didn’t	
  find	
  anything.	
  	
  That	
  was	
  
comforIng.	
  	
  	
  The	
  pain	
  of	
  cancer	
  is	
  something	
  that	
  steadily	
  grows	
  over	
  Ime	
  unIl	
  it	
  is	
  all	
  consuming.	
  	
  It	
  starts	
  
somewhere	
  and	
  grows.	
  	
  Every	
  pain,	
  no	
  maVer	
  how	
  small,	
  is	
  accompanied	
  by	
  the	
  thought,	
  is	
  this	
  the	
  start?	
  	
  	
  I’ve	
  
been	
  sleeping	
  on	
  a	
  bad	
  maVress	
  since	
  I’ve	
  been	
  here.	
  	
  I	
  ‘m	
  just	
  sharing	
  an	
  apartment	
  and	
  took	
  what	
  came	
  with	
  
the	
  place.	
  	
  The	
  length	
  of	
  the	
  stay	
  didn’t	
  jusIfy	
  buying	
  a	
  good	
  maVress.	
  	
  At	
  least	
  it	
  didn’t	
  feel	
  that	
  way	
  three	
  
months	
  ago.	
  	
  If	
  I	
  knew	
  then	
  how	
  I	
  would	
  be	
  feeling	
  now	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  sprung	
  for	
  it.	
  	
  Now	
  it’s	
  really	
  too	
  late.	
  	
  It’s	
  
gebng	
  Ime	
  to	
  think	
  about	
  leaving.	
  	
  My	
  return	
  is	
  only	
  a	
  month	
  away.
My	
  brother	
  John’s	
  wife,	
  Sharon,	
  recommended	
  an	
  acupuncturist	
  in	
  Singapore	
  so	
  I	
  called	
  them	
  about	
  my	
  pain.	
  	
  I	
  
had	
  been	
  doing	
  acupuncture	
  in	
  San	
  Diego	
  for	
  three	
  years.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  different	
  experience.	
  	
  They	
  put	
  the	
  
pins	
  in	
  as	
  I’m	
  use	
  to.	
  	
  Then	
  they	
  heat	
  up	
  the	
  needles	
  to	
  the	
  point	
  where	
  I’m	
  brushing	
  off	
  ashes	
  when	
  it’s	
  all	
  done.	
  	
  
There	
  are	
  heat	
  lamps	
  bearing	
  down	
  on	
  my	
  skin.	
  	
  This	
  goes	
  on	
  for	
  about	
  twenty	
  minutes.	
  	
  Ten	
  more	
  minutes	
  and	
  
they	
  could	
  just	
  slather	
  me	
  in	
  special	
  sauce	
  and	
  pickles.	
  	
  A\er	
  that	
  they	
  do	
  “cupping”.	
  	
  They	
  take	
  about	
  twenty	
  
liVle	
  sucIon	
  cups	
  about	
  two	
  inches	
  in	
  diameter	
  and	
  sIck	
  them	
  on	
  my	
  skin	
  for	
  five	
  minutes.	
  	
  It	
  hurts	
  going	
  on,	
  it	
  
hurts	
  taking	
  them	
  off	
  and	
  when	
  I’m	
  done	
  I	
  look	
  like	
  I’ve	
  been	
  making	
  love	
  to	
  a	
  squid.	
  	
  I	
  do	
  feel	
  a	
  liVle	
  beVer	
  so	
  I	
  
will	
  go	
  back	
  for	
  more.	
  

I’ve	
  noIced	
  one	
  thing	
  about	
  hospitals.	
  	
  They	
  aVract	
  sick	
  people.	
  	
  Since	
  I’ve	
  been	
  frequenIng	
  them	
  lately	
  I’ve	
  
become	
  an	
  expert	
  people	
  watcher.	
  	
  It’s	
  the	
  same	
  in	
  Singapore	
  as	
  in	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  people	
  that	
  need	
  help.	
  	
  
They	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  cared	
  for.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  to	
  watch	
  the	
  interacIon	
  with	
  the	
  paIent	
  and	
  their	
  caregivers.	
  	
  In	
  Asia	
  there’s	
  a	
  
special	
  bond	
  between	
  the	
  old	
  and	
  the	
  young.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  I’m	
  just	
  imagining	
  it.	
  	
  I’m	
  moved	
  whenever	
  I	
  see	
  an	
  old	
  
man	
  moving	
  slowly	
  holding	
  the	
  hand	
  of	
  his	
  grandson	
  or	
  daughter.	
  	
  	
  There’s	
  such	
  an	
  unspoken	
  bond	
  based	
  on	
  
tradiIon,	
  loyalty	
  and	
  love.	
  	
  	
  In	
  the	
  US	
  I	
  see	
  more	
  selfishness	
  mixed	
  in	
  with	
  the	
  kindness.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  to	
  say	
  we	
  are	
  a	
  
                                                                                                    70
selfish	
  people.	
  	
  The	
  same	
  dedicaIon	
  and	
  love	
  exists	
  in	
  my	
  country	
  as	
  well.	
  	
  But	
  there	
  is	
  more	
  impaIence	
  and	
  a	
  
feeling	
  of	
  injusIce	
  and	
  indignaIon	
  on	
  the	
  faces	
  of	
  the	
  stricken.	
  	
  We	
  want	
  someone	
  to	
  blame	
  for	
  our	
  misfortune.	
  	
  
In	
  Asia	
  there’s	
  acceptance.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  it’s	
  just	
  the	
  small	
  sample	
  I’ve	
  seen	
  or	
  my	
  own	
  narrow	
  view	
  in	
  play.	
  	
  However,	
  
this	
  observaIon	
  has	
  been	
  my	
  teacher.	
  	
  When	
  you	
  take	
  a	
  small	
  step	
  away	
  from	
  being	
  the	
  center	
  of	
  the	
  universe,	
  it	
  
becomes	
  obvious	
  that	
  our	
  demise	
  is	
  about	
  as	
  significant	
  as	
  the	
  cow	
  that	
  died	
  so	
  you	
  could	
  eat	
  a	
  hamburger.	
  	
  If	
  
you	
  have	
  someone	
  to	
  care	
  for	
  you,	
  appreciate	
  it.

This	
  week	
  I	
  aVended	
  a	
  Sunday	
  service	
  of	
  Nichiren	
  Shu	
  Buddhism	
  in	
  the	
  Geyland	
  District	
  of	
  Singapore.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  
usually	
  about	
  fi\y	
  people	
  of	
  all	
  ages	
  there.	
  	
  	
  For	
  some	
  reason	
  it’s	
  exclusively	
  Chinese.	
  	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  a	
  liVle	
  awkward	
  on	
  
my	
  way	
  there	
  but	
  when	
  I	
  arrive	
  they	
  really	
  go	
  out	
  of	
  their	
  way	
  to	
  welcome	
  me.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  family	
  affair.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  a	
  
couple	
  of	
  auIsIc	
  kids	
  that	
  come	
  with	
  their	
  parents.	
  	
  Parents	
  of	
  auIsIc	
  children	
  always	
  inspire	
  me.	
  	
  They	
  nurture	
  
without	
  gebng	
  what	
  we	
  call	
  love	
  in	
  return.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  no	
  hugs	
  or	
  words	
  of	
  affecIon	
  that’s	
  the	
  usual	
  payoff	
  for	
  all	
  
the	
  work	
  of	
  parenIng.	
  	
  The	
  group	
  has	
  to	
  endure	
  their	
  outbursts	
  but	
  they	
  insIncIvely	
  know	
  that’s	
  their	
  job	
  as	
  
sangha	
  members.	
  	
  The	
  service	
  is	
  officiated	
  by	
  a	
  priest	
  from	
  Japan	
  that	
  speaks	
  thickly	
  accented	
  English.	
  	
  Only	
  half	
  
the	
  congregaIon	
  speaks	
  English	
  so	
  there’s	
  an	
  interpreter	
  provided	
  for	
  his	
  dharma	
  talks.	
  	
  The	
  priest	
  is	
  thirty	
  one	
  
years	
  old,	
  the	
  same	
  age	
  as	
  my	
  daughter.	
  	
  His	
  daughter	
  is	
  around	
  five	
  years	
  old	
  and	
  has	
  the	
  run	
  of	
  the	
  place.	
  	
  She’s	
  
very	
  full	
  of	
  life.

We	
  chant	
  chapters	
  of	
  the	
  Lotus	
  Sutra	
  and	
  the	
  daimoku	
  (Namu	
  Myoho	
  Renge	
  Kyo).	
  	
  Then	
  he	
  gives	
  his	
  talk.	
  	
  I	
  know	
  
I’ve	
  been	
  a	
  Buddhist	
  too	
  long.	
  	
  I’m	
  the	
  old	
  codger	
  now	
  second	
  guessing	
  what	
  he	
  should	
  have	
  said,	
  the	
  young	
  
whippersnapper.	
  	
  But	
  he	
  touched	
  me	
  when	
  he	
  talked	
  about	
  blessing	
  our	
  food.	
  	
  There	
  is	
  a	
  Japanese	
  word	
  to	
  start	
  
the	
  meal,	
  Itadaki-­‐masu.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  direct	
  translaIon	
  but	
  it	
  means	
  something	
  like	
  “I	
  am	
  eaIng	
  your	
  life.”	
  	
  At	
  
first	
  I	
  thought	
  that	
  can’t	
  be	
  a	
  very	
  close	
  translaIon	
  and	
  I	
  choked	
  it	
  up	
  to	
  his	
  inexperience	
  with	
  both	
  Buddhism	
  
and	
  the	
  English	
  language.	
  	
  But	
  I	
  realized	
  how	
  wonderful	
  that	
  really	
  was.	
  	
  In	
  Zen	
  we	
  say	
  our	
  meal	
  gatha	
  that	
  takes	
  
a	
  couple	
  of	
  minutes	
  and	
  says	
  the	
  same	
  thing.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  all	
  one	
  life,	
  consuming	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  EaIng	
  is	
  the	
  obvious	
  
example.	
  	
  He	
  said	
  we	
  should	
  honor	
  the	
  animals	
  we	
  eat	
  that	
  gave	
  their	
  lives	
  for	
  us.	
  	
  However,	
  I	
  would	
  extend	
  that	
  
to	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  The	
  care	
  we	
  give	
  to	
  one	
  another	
  consumes	
  our	
  Ime	
  and	
  our	
  energy.	
  	
  The	
  work	
  we	
  do	
  every	
  day	
  is	
  
dedicaIng	
  our	
  life	
  to	
  all	
  life.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  not	
  alive	
  just	
  for	
  us.	
  	
  Nothing	
  lives	
  just	
  for	
  itself.	
  	
  It	
  gives	
  and	
  receives.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  
born,	
  lives	
  and	
  dies.	
  	
  All	
  life	
  is	
  interdependent	
  on	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  its	
  environment.	
  	
  Itadaki-­‐masu.	
  	
  	
  I	
  see	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
comparing	
  in	
  this	
  world.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  love	
  to	
  categorize	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  This	
  person	
  is	
  richer,	
  poorer,	
  handsome,	
  ugly,	
  sad,	
  
happy,	
  good,	
  bad,	
  right,	
  wrong.	
  	
  What	
  is	
  this	
  need	
  to	
  put	
  each	
  other	
  in	
  some	
  liVle	
  box?	
  	
  I	
  think	
  it’s	
  because	
  we	
  
want	
  to	
  make	
  sense	
  of	
  ourselves.	
  	
  I	
  am	
  doing	
  my	
  best	
  to	
  watch	
  myself	
  as	
  I	
  make	
  people	
  small	
  enough	
  to	
  fit	
  into	
  
my	
  liVle	
  boxes.	
  	
  Being	
  mindful	
  reveals	
  how	
  false	
  it	
  all	
  is.	
  	
  Every	
  one	
  of	
  us	
  deserves	
  our	
  care,	
  aVenIon	
  and	
  
support.	
  	
  Every	
  one	
  of	
  us	
  is	
  every	
  one	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  Whenever	
  we	
  compare	
  this	
  to	
  that,	
  it’s	
  really	
  important	
  to	
  watch	
  
what	
  is	
  going	
  on	
  inside	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  separaIng	
  ourselves	
  from	
  others.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  moving	
  away	
  from	
  the	
  universal	
  
to	
  the	
  individual;	
  from	
  God	
  to	
  self.	
  	
  It	
  feels	
  good	
  and	
  right	
  but	
  in	
  reality	
  it’s	
  harmful	
  and	
  false.	
  	
  I	
  know	
  it	
  sounds	
  
crazy	
  but	
  just	
  look	
  at	
  it,	
  humor	
  me.

                                                                                                          71
I	
  was	
  returning	
  from	
  the	
  hospital	
  on	
  my	
  way	
  to	
  the	
  MRT	
  (subway).	
  	
  I	
  saw	
  a	
  young	
  man	
  with	
  plasIc	
  red	
  horns	
  on	
  
his	
  head.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  been	
  wondering	
  how	
  or	
  if	
  Halloween	
  was	
  done	
  here.	
  	
  	
  He	
  was	
  someone	
  obviously	
  in	
  the	
  spirit	
  
but	
  then	
  I	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  liVle	
  early	
  to	
  be	
  in	
  the	
  spirit.	
  	
  Halloween	
  was	
  almost	
  a	
  month	
  away.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  about	
  100’	
  
from	
  him	
  and	
  the	
  next	
  thing	
  I	
  knew	
  he	
  was	
  walking	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  As	
  it	
  turned	
  out	
  he	
  was	
  the	
  AnI	
  Christ.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  
twenty	
  something	
  schizophrenic	
  that	
  decided	
  to	
  go	
  where	
  I	
  was	
  going.	
  	
  Not	
  being	
  trained	
  in	
  dealing	
  with	
  
someone	
  like	
  him,	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  much	
  to	
  do	
  but	
  to	
  listen	
  and	
  trust	
  that	
  eventually	
  he	
  would	
  go	
  about	
  his	
  
business.	
  	
  At	
  least	
  I	
  could	
  keep	
  him	
  safe	
  while	
  he	
  was	
  in	
  my	
  care.	
  	
  I	
  thought	
  about	
  his	
  parents	
  and	
  how	
  terrifying	
  
it	
  is	
  when	
  your	
  child	
  is	
  troubled.	
  	
  The	
  only	
  thing	
  I	
  could	
  think	
  of	
  saying	
  in	
  response	
  was,	
  “AnI	
  Christ,	
  that’s	
  a	
  big	
  
responsibility,	
  are	
  you	
  really	
  up	
  to	
  it?”	
  	
  He	
  seemed	
  confident	
  he	
  could	
  do	
  it.	
  	
  He	
  already	
  had	
  a	
  few	
  earthquakes	
  
under	
  his	
  belt.	
  	
  The	
  recent	
  Tsunami	
  wasn’t	
  him	
  though.	
  	
  We	
  got	
  on	
  the	
  crowded	
  MRT	
  and	
  I	
  could	
  see	
  that	
  
everyone	
  was	
  appreciaIve	
  that	
  I	
  was	
  taking	
  care	
  of	
  him.	
  	
  BeVer	
  you	
  than	
  me,	
  buddy.	
  	
  I	
  listened	
  to	
  his	
  
unstoppable	
  ramblings	
  about	
  the	
  workings	
  of	
  Satan;	
  where	
  he	
  is	
  in	
  the	
  hierarchy;	
  who	
  was	
  really	
  evil	
  in	
  the	
  
world;	
  what	
  they	
  were	
  doing	
  and	
  what	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  happen	
  in	
  the	
  end	
  days.	
  	
  I	
  wished	
  there	
  was	
  something	
  I	
  
could	
  do	
  but	
  I	
  knew	
  it	
  was	
  way	
  beyond	
  my	
  pay	
  grade.	
  	
  In	
  reality,	
  he’s	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  few	
  friendly	
  people	
  I’ve	
  
encountered	
  on	
  the	
  streets	
  of	
  Singapore.	
  	
  Most	
  people	
  keep	
  to	
  themselves.	
  	
  That’s	
  true	
  in	
  most	
  big	
  ciIes.	
  He	
  got	
  
off	
  at	
  his	
  stop,	
  we	
  said	
  goodbye.	
  On	
  his	
  way	
  out	
  he	
  turned	
  everyone	
  in	
  the	
  train	
  into	
  liVle	
  fluffy	
  rabbits	
  so	
  I	
  got	
  
my	
  choice	
  of	
  seats.	
  	
  That	
  was	
  nice	
  of	
  him.	
  	
  I	
  like	
  rabbits.

My	
  brother	
  John	
  and	
  his	
  daughter	
  Allison	
  came	
  to	
  visit	
  me.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  planned	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  Borneo	
  and	
  have	
  an	
  
exciIng	
  adventure	
  in	
  the	
  rainforest	
  communing	
  with	
  the	
  orangutans.	
  	
  	
  We	
  had	
  to	
  cancel	
  that	
  trip	
  because	
  of	
  my	
  
unanIcipated	
  eye	
  surgery.	
  	
  	
  They	
  came	
  anyway	
  with	
  no	
  expectaIon	
  other	
  than	
  hanging	
  around	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  There’s	
  
not	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  see	
  in	
  Singapore	
  and	
  I’m	
  not	
  the	
  best	
  tour	
  guide.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  LiVle	
  India	
  which	
  is	
  interesIng	
  for	
  an	
  
hour	
  or	
  two.	
  	
  That	
  evening	
  we	
  went	
  on	
  the	
  Singapore	
  Zoo’s	
  “Night	
  Safari”	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  wildlife.	
  	
  It	
  reminded	
  me	
  of	
  
the	
  San	
  Diego	
  Zoo.	
  	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  Allison	
  and	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  walk	
  around	
  the	
  Botanical	
  Garden.	
  	
  It’s	
  Singapore’s	
  Central	
  
Park.	
  	
  My	
  Chi	
  Gong	
  healer	
  told	
  me	
  to	
  meditate	
  by	
  the	
  big	
  old	
  tree	
  there	
  and	
  let	
  it	
  absorb	
  my	
  cancer.	
  	
  As	
  we	
  
walked	
  I	
  spoVed	
  it.	
  	
  Allie	
  and	
  I	
  sat	
  under	
  this	
  awesome	
  creature.	
  	
  It	
  had	
  a	
  trunk	
  with	
  wings	
  that	
  really	
  felt	
  like	
  it	
  
was	
  holding	
  me	
  in	
  its	
  care.	
  	
  I	
  le\	
  a\er	
  it	
  took	
  all	
  my	
  cancer	
  away.	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  made	
  arrangements	
  to	
  stay	
  at	
  a	
  resort	
  on	
  a	
  liVle	
  island	
  in	
  Malaysia,	
  Tioman.	
  	
  They	
  have	
  their	
  
own	
  liVle	
  airline	
  that	
  flies	
  guests	
  to	
  and	
  from	
  the	
  island	
  on	
  a	
  small	
  prop	
  plane.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  nice	
  resort,	
  not	
  elegant	
  
but	
  very	
  serviceable.	
  My	
  porch	
  was	
  quite	
  dirty	
  with	
  the	
  remains	
  of	
  a	
  monkey	
  party.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  poop	
  and	
  nuts	
  all	
  
over	
  the	
  porch.	
  	
  That’s	
  what	
  monkeys	
  do	
  when	
  they	
  party	
  apparently.	
  	
  The	
  resort	
  had	
  a	
  more	
  than	
  adequate	
  
breakfast	
  buffet,	
  need	
  I	
  say	
  more,	
  I	
  was	
  happy.	
  	
  We	
  only	
  had	
  one	
  full	
  day	
  there.	
  	
  John	
  and	
  Allie	
  went	
  snorkeling.	
  	
  I 	
  
had	
  to	
  pass	
  on	
  that	
  to	
  protect	
  my	
  eye.	
  	
  Later	
  on	
  in	
  the	
  day	
  we	
  went	
  on	
  a	
  short	
  jungle	
  trek	
  up	
  to	
  a	
  waterfall.	
  	
  You	
  
could	
  tell	
  this	
  was	
  our	
  guide’s	
  back	
  yard.	
  	
  He	
  pointed	
  out	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  chameleons	
  hiding	
  in	
  the	
  trees.	
  It’s	
  ironic	
  that	
  
the	
  only	
  wildlife	
  we	
  saw	
  was	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  chameleons.	
  	
  Not	
  the	
  sharpest	
  tools	
  in	
  the	
  jungle.	
  	
  	
  It	
  was	
  really	
  hot	
  and	
  
sweaty	
  and	
  by	
  the	
  Ime	
  we	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  waterfall	
  we	
  were	
  ready	
  for	
  it.	
  	
  The	
  water	
  was	
  freezing	
  and	
  completely	
  
refreshing.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  great!	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  back	
  he	
  really	
  wanted	
  to	
  show	
  us	
  Malaysian	
  poison	
  ivy.	
  	
  I	
  grew	
  up	
  on	
  poison	
  
                                                                                                     72
ivy	
  and	
  this	
  was	
  not	
  the	
  Long	
  Island	
  stuff.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  tree	
  and	
  the	
  leaves	
  had	
  liVle	
  sharp	
  hairs	
  on	
  it.	
  	
  If	
  you	
  got	
  it	
  you	
  
would	
  get	
  a	
  rash	
  that	
  itched;	
  so	
  far	
  so	
  good.	
  	
  A\er	
  a	
  while	
  it	
  would	
  travel	
  up	
  your	
  bloodstream	
  and	
  your	
  joints	
  
would	
  ache	
  leading	
  to	
  sIffness	
  and	
  paralysis.	
  	
  If	
  you	
  were	
  lucky	
  enough	
  to	
  get	
  to	
  a	
  doctor	
  you’d	
  beVer	
  hope	
  he	
  
knew	
  about	
  this	
  stuff	
  because	
  there	
  was	
  only	
  one	
  way	
  to	
  stop	
  it.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  sure	
  what	
  that	
  was	
  but	
  I	
  was	
  definitely	
  
on	
  the	
  lookout	
  for	
  it	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  trip.	
  	
  Just	
  before	
  we	
  finished	
  the	
  trip	
  someone	
  in	
  the	
  group	
  spoVed	
  a	
  monkey	
  
in	
  the	
  trees.	
  	
  It	
  took	
  me	
  quite	
  a	
  while	
  to	
  see	
  it.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  beVer	
  hidden	
  than	
  the	
  chameleons.	
  	
  It	
  just	
  sat	
  there	
  
watching	
  us.	
  	
  I	
  like	
  monkeys	
  too.

The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  got	
  onto	
  our	
  liVle	
  plane	
  back	
  to	
  Singapore.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  lunch	
  in	
  Chinatown	
  with	
  my	
  friend	
  Shirley.	
  	
  
Later	
  that	
  evening	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  upscale	
  Mandarin	
  Oriental	
  Hotel	
  where	
  my	
  friend	
  Cynthia	
  was	
  singing.	
  	
  She	
  
came	
  from	
  the	
  US	
  and	
  travels	
  all	
  over	
  the	
  world	
  from	
  gig	
  to	
  gig	
  singing	
  in	
  hotel	
  lounges	
  to	
  very	
  few	
  customers.	
  	
  
They	
  wouldn’t	
  let	
  me	
  in	
  because	
  I	
  had	
  shorts	
  on.	
  	
  Allison	
  had	
  shorts	
  on	
  but	
  that	
  was	
  OK.	
  	
  Trust	
  me,	
  sexism	
  is	
  alive	
  
and	
  well	
  in	
  Asia.	
  	
  We	
  sat	
  outside	
  the	
  main	
  room	
  and	
  listened.	
  	
  She	
  came	
  out	
  during	
  the	
  breaks	
  to	
  keep	
  us	
  
company.	
  Then	
  it	
  was	
  already	
  Ime	
  for	
  goodbyes.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  long	
  way	
  to	
  Singapore	
  and	
  I’m	
  very	
  blessed	
  to	
  have	
  
people	
  that	
  were	
  willing	
  to	
  come	
  just	
  to	
  keep	
  me	
  company.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  someone	
  by	
  my	
  side	
  day	
  in	
  and	
  out	
  but	
  I	
  
am	
  blessed	
  with	
  family	
  and	
  friends	
  that	
  will	
  literally	
  go	
  the	
  ends	
  of	
  the	
  earth	
  to	
  support	
  me.	
  	
  They	
  have	
  big	
  
hearts	
  and	
  there’s	
  nothing	
  richer	
  in	
  this	
  world	
  than	
  that.

Pass	
  it	
  on	
  won’t	
  you

The	
  world	
  is	
  kind	
  and	
  gentle

Almost	
  all	
  the	
  Ime


The	
  End	
  of	
  the	
  Road
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Thursday,	
  October	
  22,	
  2009

A\er	
  my	
  short	
  visit	
  from	
  my	
  brother	
  John	
  and	
  his	
  daughter	
  Allison	
  I	
  expected	
  to	
  take	
  it	
  easy	
  here.	
  	
  That	
  didn’t	
  
last	
  long.	
  	
  My	
  friend	
  of	
  twenty	
  five	
  years,	
  Bob	
  Reuter,	
  married	
  a	
  woman	
  in	
  Beijing	
  and	
  he	
  was	
  staying	
  there	
  with	
  
her	
  for	
  several	
  months.	
  	
  My	
  two	
  dear	
  friends	
  from	
  the	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center,	
  Tina	
  and	
  Jolene	
  were	
  teaching	
  
English	
  and	
  learning	
  Chinese	
  in	
  Chengdu.	
  	
  That	
  got	
  the	
  wheels	
  turning.	
  	
  I	
  looked	
  on	
  the	
  map	
  and	
  saw	
  how	
  close	
  
Chengdu	
  is	
  to	
  Lhasa,	
  Tibet.	
  	
  Every	
  good	
  Buddhist	
  wants	
  to	
  see	
  Tibet.	
  	
  I	
  le\	
  the	
  final	
  decision	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  wizards	
  at	
  
Expedia.	
  	
  The	
  cost	
  for	
  the	
  four	
  part	
  trip	
  was	
  reasonable.	
  	
  I	
  found	
  a	
  tour	
  of	
  Tibet	
  that	
  looked	
  promising.	
  	
  I	
  booked	
  
it	
  all	
  and	
  took	
  off	
  right	
  a\er	
  my	
  seventh	
  vaccinaIon	
  and	
  scheduled	
  to	
  return	
  in	
  the	
  wee	
  hours	
  of	
  the	
  morning	
  on	
  
the	
  day	
  of	
  my	
  eighth	
  vaccinaIon,	
  Oct	
  19th.	
  

We	
  all	
  know	
  about	
  the	
  emergence	
  of	
  China.	
  	
  People	
  my	
  age	
  remember	
  an	
  image	
  of	
  China	
  as	
  this	
  crazy	
  society	
  of	
  
communists	
  poised	
  to	
  take	
  over	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  As	
  I	
  walked	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  plane	
  and	
  into	
  Beijing	
  Airport	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  
believe	
  it.	
  	
  UnIl	
  the	
  1980’s	
  if	
  you	
  made	
  a	
  trip	
  to	
  “Red	
  China”	
  it	
  was	
  tantamount	
  to	
  giving	
  up	
  your	
  ciIzenship.	
  	
  

                                                                                                       73
Now	
  it’s	
  just	
  like	
  any	
  other	
  place.	
  	
  Gebng	
  into	
  the	
  country	
  was	
  the	
  easiest	
  I	
  had	
  ever	
  experienced.	
  	
  There	
  were	
  
no	
  lines,	
  no	
  hassles	
  at	
  all.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  met	
  by	
  Bob	
  and	
  Ling	
  and	
  we	
  proceeded	
  to	
  a	
  taxi	
  to	
  take	
  me	
  to	
  my	
  hotel.	
  	
  A\er	
  I	
  
got	
  checked	
  in	
  we	
  went	
  out	
  to	
  dinner	
  with	
  Ling’s	
  family.	
  	
  There	
  were	
  nine	
  of	
  us.	
  Ling’s	
  two	
  brothers,	
  spouses	
  and	
  
one	
  son	
  each.	
  	
  The	
  meal	
  was	
  sumptuous	
  and	
  over	
  the	
  top	
  in	
  quanIty.	
  	
  Food	
  was	
  passed	
  around	
  on	
  a	
  big	
  lazy	
  
Susan.	
  	
  Bob	
  was	
  concerned	
  that	
  I	
  would	
  embarrass	
  him	
  with	
  my	
  chopsIcks	
  experIse.	
  	
  His	
  fears	
  were	
  being	
  
realized	
  mainly	
  due	
  to	
  his	
  inepItude	
  with	
  them.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  showing	
  off	
  when	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  big	
  piece	
  of	
  slippery	
  fish	
  and	
  
dropped	
  it	
  on	
  the	
  table.	
  	
  Bob	
  relaxed.	
  	
  In	
  Singapore	
  I	
  am	
  frequently	
  the	
  only	
  person	
  in	
  an	
  eaIng	
  house	
  (outside	
  
dining)	
  with	
  chopsIcks.	
  	
  The	
  Chinese	
  here	
  take	
  a	
  fork	
  in	
  one	
  hand	
  and	
  a	
  spoon	
  in	
  the	
  other	
  and	
  eat	
  using	
  both	
  
utensils	
  simultaneously.	
  	
  	
  There’s	
  awkwardness	
  about	
  dining	
  with	
  people	
  that	
  don’t	
  speak	
  a	
  common	
  language.	
  	
  	
  
We	
  did	
  the	
  best	
  we	
  could	
  and	
  they	
  tried	
  as	
  well.	
  	
  I	
  give	
  my	
  friend	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  credit	
  for	
  fibng	
  in	
  so	
  well	
  in	
  so	
  short	
  a	
  
period	
  of	
  Ime.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  easy	
  for	
  a	
  Westerner	
  to	
  fit	
  into	
  Chinese	
  life.

Beijing	
  is	
  a	
  beauIful	
  city.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  surprised.	
  	
  The	
  capitalist	
  revoluIon	
  has	
  transformed	
  this	
  country	
  so	
  quickly.	
  	
  
Once	
  I	
  dated	
  a	
  woman	
  that	
  grew	
  up	
  in	
  Communist	
  China	
  and	
  later	
  moved	
  to	
  California.	
  	
  She	
  recounted	
  how	
  
everyone	
  would	
  come	
  home	
  a\er	
  work	
  and	
  the	
  whole	
  neighborhood	
  would	
  eat	
  dinner	
  together	
  and	
  recount	
  
their	
  day	
  and	
  talk	
  about	
  literature	
  and	
  other	
  interests.	
  	
  A\er	
  	
  10	
  years	
  in	
  the	
  USA	
  she	
  got	
  homesick.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  
saddened	
  to	
  find	
  the	
  communal	
  spirit	
  was	
  gone.	
  	
  Everyone	
  was	
  busy	
  making	
  money.	
  	
  I’ve	
  studied	
  and	
  paid	
  
aVenIon	
  to	
  the	
  transiIon	
  of	
  Communism	
  to	
  Capitalism	
  during	
  the	
  past	
  20	
  years.	
  	
  While	
  no	
  one	
  would	
  suggest	
  
going	
  backwards	
  there	
  was	
  something	
  about	
  those	
  days	
  that	
  people	
  miss	
  in	
  the	
  “every	
  man	
  for	
  himself”	
  
capitalist	
  society.	
  	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  it	
  with	
  my	
  fellow	
  Americans.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  lived	
  for	
  so	
  long	
  with	
  greed	
  it’s	
  
become	
  our	
  secret	
  lover.	
  	
  Any	
  thought	
  that	
  we	
  should	
  slow	
  down	
  and	
  do	
  with	
  less	
  seems	
  somehow	
  unpatrioIc.	
  	
  
The	
  age	
  of	
  materialism	
  is	
  going	
  strong	
  but	
  there	
  will	
  be	
  an	
  end.	
  	
  For	
  the	
  past	
  three	
  hundred	
  years	
  economic	
  and	
  
poliIcal	
  theory	
  were	
  all	
  about	
  relieving	
  poverty	
  and	
  creaIng	
  wealth.	
  	
  Once	
  that	
  happened	
  the	
  world’s	
  problems	
  
would	
  be	
  over	
  and	
  we’d	
  live	
  in	
  peace	
  and	
  happiness.	
  	
  That’s	
  proving	
  to	
  be	
  false.	
  	
  The	
  rich	
  are	
  just	
  as	
  unhappy	
  as	
  
the	
  poor.	
  	
  They	
  just	
  have	
  beVer	
  stuff.	
  

So	
  where	
  was	
  I?	
  Beijing	
  is	
  a	
  beauIful	
  city.	
  	
  	
  I	
  remember	
  seeing	
  it	
  on	
  TV	
  in	
  the	
  sixIes.	
  	
  Everyone	
  rode	
  bicycles	
  and	
  
there	
  were	
  few	
  cars.	
  	
  The	
  city	
  was	
  built	
  for	
  bicycles	
  with	
  side	
  lanes	
  for	
  cars.	
  	
  That’s	
  all	
  been	
  reversed	
  now	
  and	
  it’s	
  
causing	
  problems	
  as	
  they	
  have	
  to	
  completely	
  redesign	
  the	
  city	
  as	
  there	
  are	
  few	
  bicycles	
  on	
  the	
  road	
  compared	
  to	
  
cars.	
  	
  At	
  least	
  they	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  drive	
  on	
  the	
  right	
  side	
  of	
  the	
  road.	
  	
  Ling	
  owns	
  her	
  apartment	
  in	
  a	
  nice	
  
neighborhood.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  comfortable	
  and	
  safe	
  place.	
  	
  She	
  handles	
  all	
  the	
  money	
  so	
  I	
  gave	
  her	
  my	
  spending	
  money.	
  	
  
It	
  was	
  great	
  to	
  have	
  someone	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  that.	
  	
  She	
  took	
  care	
  of	
  everything.	
  

On	
  our	
  first	
  full	
  day	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  Forbidden	
  City.	
  	
  I	
  resisted	
  gebng	
  a	
  guide	
  or	
  a	
  walking	
  tour	
  recording.	
  	
  So	
  the	
  
most	
  I	
  can	
  say	
  is	
  what	
  I	
  learned	
  in	
  the	
  “Last	
  Emperor”	
  movie	
  I	
  saw	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  ago.	
  	
  	
  Rather	
  than	
  repeat	
  it	
  here,	
  
just	
  see	
  the	
  movie.	
  	
  	
  It	
  was	
  spectacular	
  and	
  huge.	
  	
  We	
  ended	
  up	
  going	
  to	
  Tian	
  an	
  men	
  Square	
  a\er	
  that.	
  	
  I	
  get	
  a	
  
few	
  shots	
  of	
  me	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  Chairman	
  Mao’s	
  photo	
  that	
  we’re	
  all	
  familiar	
  with.	
  	
  I	
  always	
  had	
  a	
  so\	
  spot	
  in	
  my	
  
heart	
  for	
  the	
  old	
  guy.	
  	
  While	
  Commies	
  can	
  be	
  oppressive	
  I	
  was	
  always	
  aVracted	
  to	
  their	
  sense	
  of	
  equality	
  for	
  the	
  
                                                                                                       74
masses.	
  	
  When	
  Communism	
  fell	
  it	
  was	
  easy	
  to	
  see	
  why	
  the	
  philosophy	
  was	
  so	
  aVracIve	
  for	
  so	
  long.	
  	
  There	
  	
  are	
  
now	
  once	
  again	
  the	
  few	
  that	
  get	
  rich	
  and	
  the	
  rest	
  are	
  le\	
  behind.	
  	
  So	
  much	
  of	
  history	
  has	
  been	
  about	
  the	
  
struggle	
  of	
  the	
  poor	
  to	
  salvage	
  something	
  out	
  of	
  life	
  against	
  a	
  mountain	
  of	
  wealth	
  and	
  power	
  dead	
  set	
  against	
  
their	
  advance.	
  	
  In	
  that	
  struggle	
  my	
  heart	
  has	
  always	
  been	
  with	
  the	
  least	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  like	
  oppression	
  of	
  any	
  kind	
  
and	
  I	
  believe	
  that	
  all	
  people	
  have	
  a	
  right	
  to	
  a	
  minimum	
  standard	
  of	
  dignified	
  care	
  and	
  sustenance.	
  	
  So	
  in	
  that	
  vein	
  
I	
  always	
  celebrated	
  the	
  rise	
  of	
  the	
  masses.	
  	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  always	
  work	
  out	
  well	
  but	
  I	
  know	
  whose	
  side	
  I’m	
  on.	
  	
  Give	
  
me	
  the	
  pitchforks	
  and	
  the	
  torches	
  of	
  a	
  peasant	
  uprising	
  any	
  day.	
  	
  I’ve	
  always	
  strived	
  to	
  become	
  the	
  best	
  of	
  both	
  
worlds,	
  a	
  rich	
  man	
  of	
  the	
  people.

So	
  where	
  was	
  I?	
  	
  Tien	
  an	
  Men	
  Square	
  was	
  alive	
  with	
  the	
  60th	
  anniversary	
  of	
  the	
  “New	
  China”.	
  	
  They	
  have	
  moved	
  
from	
  the	
  menacing	
  spectacles	
  of	
  tank,	
  missile	
  and	
  troop	
  parades	
  to	
  an	
  electronic	
  fesIval	
  of	
  big	
  screens	
  and	
  
blaring	
  propagandists	
  puffing	
  up	
  their	
  country's	
  emergence.	
  	
  The	
  pride	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  was	
  contagious.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  like	
  
the	
  US	
  I	
  grew	
  up	
  in.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  prosperous	
  and	
  proud	
  of	
  our	
  country.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  the	
  world	
  powerhouse.	
  	
  Now	
  
we’re	
  just	
  a	
  bit	
  confused	
  about	
  it	
  all.	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  went	
  off	
  to	
  see	
  the	
  Great	
  Wall.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  hours	
  outside	
  the	
  city.	
  	
  The	
  mountains	
  are	
  
beauIful.	
  	
  	
  It	
  was	
  good	
  to	
  get	
  away	
  from	
  the	
  crowds.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  onto	
  a	
  cable	
  car	
  to	
  the	
  Wall.	
  	
  	
  It	
  is	
  a	
  remarkable	
  
sight.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  told	
  it	
  goes	
  on	
  for	
  8,000	
  km.	
  	
  	
  A\er	
  seeing	
  so	
  many	
  monuments	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  at	
  least	
  this	
  one	
  
serves	
  a	
  purpose.	
  	
  So	
  many	
  are	
  tombs	
  or	
  ridiculous	
  structures	
  to	
  house	
  a	
  few	
  people.	
  	
  	
  The	
  Great	
  Wall	
  was	
  to	
  
keep	
  out	
  people	
  that	
  wanted	
  to	
  kill	
  them.	
  	
  Now	
  there’s	
  a	
  construcIon	
  project	
  I	
  can	
  get	
  behind.

The	
  next	
  stop	
  was	
  the	
  Ming	
  tombs.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  old	
  tombs	
  of	
  kings	
  that	
  were	
  discovered	
  in	
  the	
  sixIes.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  
another	
  fi\y	
  years	
  of	
  calling	
  the	
  1960’s	
  “the	
  sixIes”.	
  	
  We’ll	
  have	
  to	
  be	
  more	
  specific	
  a\er	
  that.	
  	
  Not	
  my	
  problem.	
  	
  
The	
  tombs	
  were	
  interesIng	
  but	
  boring.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  down	
  a	
  long	
  stairway	
  to	
  what	
  looked	
  like	
  a	
  big	
  subway	
  staIon.	
  	
  
There	
  no	
  statues	
  or	
  much	
  interesIng	
  stuff	
  in	
  there.	
  	
  The	
  best	
  part	
  about	
  it	
  were	
  the	
  farm	
  stands	
  all	
  around	
  the	
  
area.	
  I	
  love	
  fresh	
  stuff	
  sold	
  by	
  farmers.	
  	
  It’s	
  that	
  pitchfork	
  and	
  torch	
  thing	
  again.

That	
  was	
  about	
  it	
  for	
  Beijing.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  world	
  class	
  city	
  that	
  has	
  arrived.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  glad	
  that	
  my	
  friend	
  Bob	
  had	
  found	
  
some	
  happiness	
  there.	
  	
  I	
  wish	
  them	
  all	
  the	
  best.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  easy	
  to	
  find	
  the	
  right	
  person	
  in	
  this	
  stage	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  I’ve	
  
given	
  up	
  on	
  that.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  easy	
  to	
  do.

I	
  was	
  met	
  at	
  the	
  arrivals	
  gate	
  in	
  Chengdu	
  	
  by	
  the	
  smiling	
  faces	
  of	
  Tina	
  and	
  Jolene.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  easy	
  to	
  pick	
  out	
  in	
  
this	
  crowd.	
  	
  We	
  took	
  a	
  cab	
  to	
  my	
  hotel	
  room	
  in	
  the	
  “Sichuan	
  Normal	
  University”	
  where	
  they	
  were	
  teaching.	
  	
  I	
  
hadn’t	
  heard	
  that	
  term	
  in	
  a	
  long	
  Ime.	
  	
  My	
  first	
  college	
  was	
  once	
  called	
  the	
  “PlaVsburgh	
  Normal	
  School”.	
  	
  That	
  
used	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  term	
  for	
  teacher’s	
  college.	
  	
  Like	
  PlaVsburgh	
  this	
  also	
  was	
  a	
  teachers	
  college.	
  	
  	
  The	
  room	
  was	
  quite	
  
adequate	
  and	
  very	
  inexpensive.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  say	
  that	
  the	
  Chinese	
  don’t	
  go	
  in	
  for	
  comfy	
  maVresses.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  as	
  
hard	
  as	
  rocks	
  and	
  a	
  liVle	
  smoother.	
  	
  	
  On	
  the	
  sleep	
  number	
  scale	
  they	
  are	
  about	
  150.	
  It	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  problem.	
  	
  I	
  
figured	
  it	
  compensated	
  for	
  the	
  too	
  so\	
  maVress	
  I	
  have	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  	
  	
  The	
  first	
  order	
  of	
  business	
  was	
  to	
  buy	
  new	
  
slacks	
  for	
  my	
  ever	
  expanding	
  belly.	
  	
  Tina	
  took	
  me	
  to	
  a	
  local	
  mall	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  blown	
  away.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  hoping	
  for	
  a	
  liVle	
  
                                                                                                     75
factory	
  outlet	
  where	
  Wal-­‐Mart	
  is	
  exploiIng	
  everyone	
  to	
  bring	
  me	
  low	
  prices.	
  	
  Instead	
  I	
  bought	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  pairs	
  
of	
  fancy	
  pants,	
  a	
  downright	
  spiffy	
  jacket	
  and	
  a	
  belt	
  to	
  match.	
  	
  I	
  kidded	
  Tina	
  that	
  she	
  brought	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  Chinese	
  
Nordstrom’s.	
  	
  	
  I	
  was	
  glad	
  that	
  my	
  clothes	
  fit	
  me	
  even	
  though	
  I	
  was	
  teetering	
  on	
  the	
  verge	
  of	
  immensity.	
  	
  There’s	
  
nothing	
  like	
  comfort.	
  	
  I	
  even	
  had	
  room	
  to	
  grow.	
  

Tina	
  wanted	
  me	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  class	
  with	
  her	
  so	
  her	
  students	
  could	
  hear	
  another	
  real	
  American	
  speaking	
  English	
  
real	
  good.	
  	
  That	
  would	
  be	
  my	
  specialty.	
  	
  The	
  class	
  was	
  mostly	
  young	
  women.	
  	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  joke	
  a	
  bit	
  but	
  their	
  English	
  
is	
  sIll	
  in	
  its	
  infancy.	
  	
  Tina	
  said	
  they	
  have	
  a	
  great	
  vocabulary	
  but	
  don’t	
  really	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  use	
  it.	
  	
  She	
  gave	
  out	
  the	
  
results	
  of	
  the	
  previous	
  assignment	
  and	
  explained	
  the	
  next	
  one	
  to	
  them.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  hard	
  to	
  know	
  how	
  much	
  they	
  
understood.	
  	
  Finally,	
  I	
  was	
  introduced	
  to	
  the	
  class.	
  	
  I	
  told	
  them	
  about	
  myself	
  and	
  then	
  went	
  into	
  my	
  impressions	
  
of	
  China	
  past	
  and	
  present.	
  	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  Ime	
  for	
  quesIons	
  one	
  young	
  lady	
  asked	
  how	
  she	
  could	
  grow	
  up	
  to	
  be	
  as	
  
clever	
  as	
  me.	
  	
  Now	
  here’s	
  someone	
  that	
  gets	
  me.	
  	
  What	
  command	
  of	
  the	
  English	
  language!	
  	
  I	
  would	
  have	
  given	
  
her	
  a	
  big	
  A+	
  on	
  the	
  spot.	
  	
  How	
  percepIve!	
  	
  I	
  told	
  her	
  that	
  achieving	
  this	
  height	
  of	
  cleverness	
  is	
  way	
  beyond	
  most	
  
people’s	
  ability	
  so	
  just	
  seVle	
  for	
  what	
  you	
  have	
  and	
  be	
  grateful.	
  	
  Actually	
  I	
  launched	
  into	
  a	
  new	
  age	
  diatribe	
  
                                                                                                                                                                        	
  
about	
  being	
  yourself	
  and	
  doing	
  what	
  you	
  love.	
  	
  That	
  would	
  surely	
  guarantee	
  you	
  won’t	
  turn	
  out	
  anything	
  like	
  me.	
  
However,	
  some	
  of	
  us	
  follow	
  the	
  crooked	
  path.

We	
  spent	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  our	
  visit	
  going	
  to	
  one	
  Buddhist	
  and	
  one	
  Taoist	
  temple	
  the	
  communists	
  forgot	
  to	
  destroy.	
  	
  
They	
  were	
  really	
  wonderful	
  and	
  huge.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  west	
  we	
  have	
  a	
  noIon	
  of	
  Taoism	
  that	
  is	
  so	
  different	
  than	
  what	
  is	
  
pracIced	
  in	
  China	
  and	
  Singapore.	
  	
  We	
  focus	
  on	
  the	
  Tao	
  Te	
  Ching	
  which	
  are	
  quotes	
  from	
  a	
  great	
  ancient	
  master	
  
named	
  Lao	
  Tzu,	
  the	
  founder	
  of	
  Taoism.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  a	
  truly	
  wonderful	
  and	
  inspiraIonal	
  book.	
  	
  However,	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  find	
  
one	
  reference	
  to	
  him	
  in	
  China	
  or	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  really	
  into	
  ancestor	
  worship	
  and	
  mediums	
  that	
  channel	
  
the	
  ancients	
  and	
  give	
  advice.	
  	
  They	
  set	
  up	
  altars	
  where	
  they	
  burn	
  lots	
  of	
  paper	
  and	
  incense	
  in	
  honor	
  of	
  the	
  
ancestors.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  able	
  to	
  really	
  represent	
  the	
  pracIce	
  but	
  it’s	
  quite	
  different	
  than	
  our	
  western	
  percepIon.	
  	
  And	
  
don’t	
  get	
  me	
  started	
  on	
  the	
  Buddhists!	
  	
  I’ll	
  save	
  that	
  for	
  later.	
  	
  However,	
  the	
  temples	
  are	
  truly	
  wonderful	
  and	
  it	
  
was	
  a	
  pleasure	
  touring	
  the	
  grounds	
  which	
  were	
  immense	
  for	
  a	
  big	
  city.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  more	
  like	
  very	
  peaceful	
  parks.	
  

On	
  Sunday	
  we	
  went	
  out	
  for	
  a	
  foot	
  massage.	
  	
  Jolene	
  said	
  when	
  it	
  was	
  all	
  done	
  you’ll	
  feel	
  like	
  you’re	
  walking	
  on	
  
pillows.	
  	
  We	
  sat	
  down	
  and	
  they	
  brought	
  over	
  some	
  colored	
  water	
  in	
  a	
  bucket	
  to	
  put	
  my	
  feet	
  in.	
  	
  I	
  put	
  them	
  in	
  and	
  
I	
  now	
  know	
  how	
  a	
  lobster	
  feels.	
  	
  I’ll	
  never	
  eat	
  it	
  again.	
  	
  I	
  stuck	
  it	
  out	
  but	
  I	
  later	
  found	
  out	
  that	
  the	
  woman	
  next	
  to	
  
me	
  was	
  also	
  bitching	
  about	
  the	
  scalding	
  water.	
  	
  You	
  go	
  girl!	
  A\er	
  all	
  the	
  feeling	
  le\	
  my	
  feet	
  and	
  you	
  could	
  pick	
  
apart	
  the	
  boiled	
  toes	
  with	
  a	
  chopsIck	
  a	
  woman	
  came	
  over	
  to	
  rub,	
  kick,	
  punch,	
  stab,	
  bite	
  and	
  twist	
  every	
  inch	
  of	
  
my	
  poor	
  boiled	
  feet.	
  	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  all	
  done	
  Jolene	
  asked,	
  “Don’t	
  your	
  feet	
  feel	
  like	
  you’re	
  walking	
  on	
  air?”	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  
like	
  I	
  was	
  walking	
  on	
  shoes	
  made	
  at	
  Weiner	
  schnitzels.	
  	
  My	
  feel	
  felt	
  like	
  le\over	
  liVle	
  hot	
  dogs	
  that	
  sat	
  in	
  a	
  
vendors	
  cart	
  all	
  day.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  shamelessly	
  abused.	
  	
  Needless	
  to	
  say	
  I	
  don’t	
  understand	
  all	
  the	
  fuss	
  about	
  foot	
  
massages.	
  

We	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  Chinese	
  opera	
  that	
  was	
  more	
  like	
  a	
  variety	
  show.	
  	
  There	
  were	
  musicians,	
  singers,	
  hand	
  shadow	
  

                                                                                                     76
thing	
  and	
  a	
  great	
  comedy	
  act.	
  	
  The	
  grand	
  finale	
  was	
  a	
  magic	
  show	
  where	
  the	
  big	
  trick	
  was	
  changing	
  masks	
  with	
  
the	
  flick	
  of	
  the	
  head.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  how	
  it	
  was	
  done.	
  	
  I	
  believe	
  it	
  was	
  real	
  magic.	
  	
  By	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  show	
  Tina	
  
mastered	
  the	
  art.	
  	
  	
  When	
  she	
  returns	
  I	
  expect	
  her	
  to	
  put	
  on	
  a	
  full	
  display	
  of	
  her	
  mask	
  magic	
  for	
  us	
  all.	
  	
  She	
  has	
  a	
  
whole	
  year	
  to	
  pracIce.	
  

Their	
  Chinese	
  language	
  skills	
  were	
  definitely	
  developing.	
  	
  It’s	
  got	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  real	
  challenge.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  trying	
  to	
  learn	
  
the	
  characters.	
  	
  However	
  they	
  don’t	
  really	
  make	
  sense.	
  	
  For	
  example,	
  Tina	
  said	
  the	
  characters	
  for	
  “Water”	
  and	
  
“Flower”	
  mean	
  daffodil.	
  	
  There’s	
  no	
  reason	
  for	
  it	
  even	
  though	
  her	
  teacher	
  thought	
  it	
  was	
  totally	
  logical.	
  	
  I	
  knew	
  
right	
  then	
  and	
  there	
  I	
  was	
  quite	
  happy	
  being	
  a	
  mono-­‐linguisIc	
  rather	
  cute	
  American	
  (as	
  opposed	
  to	
  an	
  ugly	
  one).	
  

The	
  food	
  in	
  Sichuan	
  is	
  wonderful.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  been	
  slowly	
  but	
  surely	
  eaIng	
  hot	
  stuff	
  while	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  	
  My	
  lower	
  
digesIve	
  challenges	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  gebng	
  beVer.	
  	
  Chengdu	
  was	
  the	
  true	
  test.	
  	
  Most	
  dishes	
  seem	
  to	
  be	
  “Hot	
  
peppers	
  with	
  noodles”;	
  “Hot	
  peppers	
  with	
  rice”;	
  “Hot	
  peppers	
  with	
  hoVer	
  peppers”	
  and	
  so	
  on.	
  	
  They	
  even	
  have	
  
this	
  spice	
  that	
  I	
  think	
  is	
  illegal	
  in	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  peppercorn	
  type	
  thing	
  that	
  makes	
  your	
  mouth	
  numb.	
  	
  	
  It	
  was	
  
great!	
  	
  Hot	
  peppers	
  and	
  a	
  numb	
  mouth,	
  total	
  genius!	
  

Next	
  it	
  was	
  on	
  to	
  Tibet.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  while	
  since	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  police	
  state.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  my	
  first	
  introducIon	
  in	
  the	
  Chengdu	
  
airport.	
  	
  The	
  representaIve	
  from	
  the	
  tour	
  company	
  was	
  there	
  to	
  guide	
  me	
  through	
  the	
  process.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  
another	
  man	
  on	
  my	
  flight,	
  Stewart.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  same	
  tour.	
  	
  What	
  a	
  character!	
  He’s	
  a	
  Chinese	
  Canadian	
  from	
  
Calgary.	
  	
  His	
  wife	
  and	
  child	
  were	
  visiIng	
  relaIves	
  in	
  China	
  and	
  he	
  went	
  gallivanIng	
  around	
  Asia.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
fun.	
  	
  We	
  got	
  past	
  the	
  security	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  paperwork	
  that	
  proved	
  we	
  were	
  not	
  incognito	
  diplomats,	
  journalists	
  or	
  
other	
  bad	
  players.	
  

When	
  we	
  arrived	
  in	
  Lhasa	
  we	
  were	
  met	
  by	
  the	
  bus	
  for	
  the	
  hour	
  long	
  journey	
  to	
  our	
  hotel	
  in	
  Lhasa.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  
beauIful	
  city.	
  	
  The	
  Dalai	
  Lama’s	
  palace	
  is	
  called	
  “Potela”.	
  	
  It’s	
  high	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  hill	
  overlooking	
  the	
  city.	
  	
  It’s	
  
magnificent.	
  	
  We	
  stayed	
  in	
  a	
  hotel	
  call	
  the	
  “Cool	
  Yak”.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  located	
  down	
  an	
  alley	
  off	
  the	
  main	
  drag	
  in	
  the	
  “Old	
  
City.”	
  	
  The	
  room	
  was	
  perfectly	
  fine	
  with	
  a	
  toilet	
  that	
  did	
  everything	
  just	
  fine	
  except	
  flush.	
  	
  I	
  stayed	
  there	
  a	
  total	
  of	
  
three	
  nights	
  and	
  had	
  to	
  have	
  it	
  repaired	
  twice.	
  	
  Then	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  the	
  shower	
  was	
  hand	
  held	
  and	
  reachable	
  
from	
  the	
  seat.	
  	
  I	
  now	
  had	
  my	
  old	
  friend	
  the	
  buV	
  sprayer.	
  	
  My	
  aim	
  was	
  perfect	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  Ime	
  and	
  I	
  saved	
  a	
  
bunch	
  on	
  paper.	
  	
  Problem	
  solved.

Outside	
  was	
  bustling	
  with	
  acIvity.	
  	
  Shops	
  and	
  restaurants	
  were	
  all	
  catering	
  to	
  the	
  biggest	
  industry	
  in	
  Tibet,	
  
tourists	
  like	
  me.	
  	
  They	
  weren’t	
  oppressive	
  in	
  their	
  sales	
  pitch.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  good	
  at	
  closing	
  the	
  sale	
  but	
  they	
  didn’t	
  
go	
  out	
  of	
  their	
  way	
  to	
  drag	
  you	
  in.	
  	
  That	
  was	
  a	
  good	
  thing	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  Everywhere	
  there	
  were	
  Chinese	
  police	
  and	
  
military	
  patrolling	
  the	
  streets.	
  It’s	
  always	
  comforIng	
  to	
  know	
  there	
  are	
  plenty	
  of	
  eighteen	
  year	
  olds	
  with	
  
automaIc	
  weapons	
  ready	
  to	
  protect	
  me.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  shame.	
  	
  From	
  what	
  I	
  learned	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  Ime	
  when	
  Tibet	
  was	
  
ruled	
  by	
  a	
  king.	
  	
  The	
  Dalai	
  Lama	
  was	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  spiritual	
  life	
  and	
  the	
  king	
  was	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  the	
  government.	
  	
  
China	
  would	
  do	
  well	
  to	
  allow	
  this	
  model	
  in	
  Tibet.	
  	
  However,	
  I	
  feel	
  that	
  is	
  the	
  one	
  thing	
  the	
  Chinese	
  fear	
  most,	
  
compeIng	
  power	
  centers.	
  	
  UnIl	
  they	
  learn	
  how	
  to	
  share	
  power	
  and	
  privilege	
  they	
  are	
  bound	
  to	
  suffer	
  the	
  
                                                                                                       77
outbreaks	
  of	
  violence	
  here	
  and	
  across	
  all	
  their	
  minority	
  ethnic	
  areas.	
  	
  	
  

The	
  next	
  morning	
  we	
  all	
  got	
  in	
  a	
  bus	
  and	
  headed	
  into	
  the	
  back	
  country	
  of	
  Tibet.	
  	
  The	
  alItude	
  made	
  it	
  hard	
  to	
  do	
  
just	
  about	
  anything.	
  	
  The	
  highest	
  point	
  of	
  the	
  trip	
  was	
  5.400	
  meters	
  which	
  felt	
  like	
  about	
  60,000	
  feet.	
  	
  My	
  lungs	
  
were	
  always	
  trying	
  to	
  catch	
  up	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  we	
  stopped	
  at	
  Tashilumpu	
  Monastery.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  magnificent.	
  	
  
As	
  the	
  guide	
  was	
  showing	
  us	
  around	
  I	
  was	
  reminded	
  about	
  a	
  bus	
  trip	
  I	
  took	
  from	
  JFK	
  to	
  ManhaVan	
  a	
  lifeIme	
  
ago.	
  	
  I	
  always	
  took	
  a	
  cab	
  but	
  I	
  decided	
  to	
  save	
  some	
  money	
  this	
  trip.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  western	
  man	
  who	
  was	
  
a	
  Tibetan	
  monk	
  on	
  the	
  bus.	
  	
  I	
  engaged	
  him	
  in	
  a	
  conversaIon	
  about	
  meditaIon.	
  	
  He	
  asked	
  me,	
  “When	
  you	
  finish	
  
your	
  meditaIon	
  do	
  you	
  ask	
  for	
  a	
  blessing?”	
  	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  that	
  sounded	
  supersIIous	
  to	
  me	
  and	
  that’s	
  not	
  my	
  
pracIce.	
  	
  He	
  said	
  with	
  real	
  concern,	
  “No,	
  there	
  are	
  a	
  thousand	
  Buddha’s	
  all	
  around	
  you	
  waiIng	
  to	
  help	
  you	
  and	
  
all	
  you	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  is	
  ask.”	
  	
  That	
  made	
  me	
  cry	
  as	
  I	
  looked	
  at	
  my	
  stoic	
  approach	
  to	
  my	
  pracIce.	
  	
  I	
  never	
  forgot	
  that	
  
moment.	
  	
  In	
  this	
  huge	
  monastery	
  we	
  went	
  into	
  the	
  main	
  sanctuary.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  huge	
  Buddha	
  there.	
  	
  I	
  bowed	
  
and	
  felt	
  a	
  deep	
  presence	
  in	
  looking	
  into	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  the	
  “World	
  honored	
  one”.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  along	
  a	
  hallway	
  around	
  
the	
  statue	
  and	
  the	
  guide	
  pointed	
  out	
  the	
  painIngs	
  on	
  the	
  wall.	
  	
  He	
  said,	
  “ These	
  are	
  the	
  thousand	
  Buddha’s”.	
  	
  	
  I	
  
asked.	
  

We	
  were	
  ulImately	
  headed	
  for	
  Mt	
  Everest	
  that	
  day.	
  	
  I	
  didn’t	
  read	
  the	
  fine	
  print	
  about	
  this	
  tour.	
  	
  The	
  trip	
  to	
  the	
  
mountain	
  is	
  spectacular	
  but	
  long	
  and	
  hard.	
  	
  We	
  passed	
  by	
  the	
  “ Turquoise	
  Lake”.	
  	
  It’s	
  quite	
  beauIful	
  surrounded	
  
my	
  very	
  barren	
  mountains.	
  	
  We	
  headed	
  up	
  an	
  endless	
  pass.	
  	
  The	
  views	
  were	
  spectacular.	
  	
  We	
  stayed	
  in	
  Shigatse,	
  
the	
  second	
  largest	
  city	
  in	
  Tibet.	
  	
  We	
  woke	
  up	
  early	
  and	
  went	
  on	
  the	
  most	
  challenging	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  trip.	
  	
  The	
  road	
  
to	
  the	
  Everest	
  Base	
  Camp	
  is	
  “unfinished”.	
  	
  That	
  means	
  a	
  100	
  Km	
  dirt	
  road.	
  	
  Judging	
  by	
  how	
  I	
  felt	
  upon	
  our	
  arrival	
  
that’s	
  about	
  6,000	
  miles.	
  	
  	
  All	
  along	
  the	
  way	
  we	
  passed	
  through	
  liVle	
  hamlets	
  where	
  people	
  lived	
  by	
  farming	
  and	
  
herding	
  caVle,	
  sheep	
  and	
  yaks.	
  	
  Cell	
  phone	
  coverage	
  in	
  Tibet	
  is	
  far	
  superior	
  to	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  think	
  there	
  were	
  
any	
  dead	
  zones	
  in	
  the	
  whole	
  country.	
  	
  I	
  tried	
  to	
  imagine	
  what	
  a	
  big	
  change	
  that	
  must	
  be	
  for	
  these	
  people.	
  	
  Just	
  
twenty	
  years	
  ago	
  they	
  had	
  no	
  contact	
  with	
  the	
  outside	
  world.	
  	
  The	
  trip	
  to	
  the	
  next	
  isolated	
  hamlet	
  was	
  at	
  least	
  a	
  
full	
  day	
  unless	
  you	
  owned	
  motorized	
  transportaIon.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  Chinese	
  credit	
  for	
  their	
  efforts	
  to	
  
modernize	
  the	
  country.	
  	
  We	
  reached	
  the	
  base	
  camp	
  around	
  5PM.	
  	
  It	
  gets	
  dark	
  late	
  there.	
  	
  China	
  has	
  one	
  Ime	
  
zone	
  although	
  they	
  are	
  big	
  enough	
  to	
  have	
  at	
  least	
  three.	
  	
  Not	
  a	
  bad	
  idea.	
  	
  If	
  we	
  just	
  made	
  everyone	
  in	
  the	
  
conInental	
  US	
  use	
  the	
  halfway	
  point	
  between	
  Central	
  and	
  Mountain	
  Time	
  it	
  would	
  only	
  affect	
  either	
  coast	
  by	
  1.5	
  
hours.	
  	
  Pass	
  it	
  on.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  always	
  such	
  a	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  ass	
  to	
  schedule	
  business	
  meeIngs	
  across	
  the	
  country	
  or	
  get	
  
woken	
  up	
  at	
  3AM	
  when	
  someone	
  on	
  the	
  opposite	
  coast	
  got	
  it	
  wrong.	
  

So	
  where	
  was	
  I?	
  	
  Now	
  that	
  it’s	
  over	
  I	
  can	
  confidently	
  say	
  that	
  Mount	
  Everest	
  is	
  worth	
  the	
  trip.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  
places	
  that	
  being	
  there	
  is	
  more	
  amazing	
  than	
  I	
  imagined	
  it	
  would	
  be.	
  	
  There’s	
  only	
  a	
  few	
  places	
  that	
  I	
  can	
  say	
  
were	
  like	
  that;	
  the	
  Grand	
  Canyon	
  and	
  the	
  Taj	
  Mahal	
  are	
  the	
  only	
  ones	
  that	
  come	
  to	
  mind.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  very	
  cold	
  and	
  
windy	
  there.	
  	
  I	
  finally	
  got	
  to	
  wear	
  the	
  pseudo	
  “North	
  Face”	
  jacket	
  I	
  bought	
  in	
  Lhasa.	
  	
  It	
  did	
  the	
  trick.	
  	
  I	
  never	
  did	
  
get	
  to	
  wear	
  the	
  pseudo	
  Cedar	
  boots	
  I	
  bought	
  but	
  my	
  good	
  ol’	
  all	
  purpose	
  black	
  shoes	
  were	
  just	
  fine.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  up	
  
to	
  Base	
  Camp	
  #1	
  and	
  took	
  lots	
  of	
  photos.	
  	
  The	
  “guest	
  house”	
  was	
  about	
  what	
  I	
  expected.	
  	
  Four	
  of	
  us	
  had	
  to	
  share	
  
                                                                                                   78
a	
  room	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  cold	
  during	
  the	
  night.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  an	
  outhouse	
  (emphasis	
  on	
  “out”)	
  and	
  a	
  wall	
  for	
  us	
  guys	
  to	
  
use.	
  	
  As	
  usual	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  get	
  up	
  a	
  few	
  Imes	
  during	
  the	
  night.	
  	
  Luckily,	
  the	
  wind	
  died	
  down.	
  	
  There’s	
  something	
  very	
  
saIsfying	
  for	
  a	
  man	
  to	
  pee	
  under	
  a	
  beauIful	
  night	
  sky.	
  	
  It’s	
  the	
  perfect	
  Ime	
  for	
  reflecIon	
  and	
  wonder.	
  	
  I’m	
  quite	
  
sure	
  that	
  many	
  sudden	
  enlightenment	
  experiences	
  happened	
  just	
  like	
  that.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  greatest	
  night	
  sky	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  
seen.	
  	
  The	
  moon	
  was	
  just	
  a	
  sliver	
  and	
  the	
  Milky	
  Way	
  was	
  clear	
  and	
  bright.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  since	
  I	
  
appreciated	
  my	
  old	
  night	
  Ime	
  bladder.	
  	
  	
  Stewart	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  four	
  guys	
  that	
  shared	
  my	
  room	
  that	
  night.	
  	
  He	
  
warned	
  me	
  about	
  his	
  snoring	
  but	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  prepared	
  for	
  it.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  reliving	
  some	
  weird	
  stuff	
  all	
  night.	
  I	
  thought	
  he	
  
was	
  going	
  to	
  grow	
  fangs	
  any	
  moment.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  talking,	
  snoring	
  and	
  making	
  all	
  kinds	
  of	
  weird	
  noises.	
  	
  When	
  he	
  
woke	
  up	
  he	
  said	
  he	
  was	
  hallucinaIng	
  all	
  night.	
  	
  We	
  blamed	
  it	
  on	
  the	
  alItude.	
  	
  Needless	
  to	
  say	
  I	
  made	
  extra	
  sure	
  
my	
  door	
  was	
  locked	
  from	
  then	
  on	
  and	
  I	
  kept	
  a	
  cross	
  and	
  garlic	
  by	
  my	
  bedside.	
  	
  	
  

At	
  this	
  Ime	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  bring	
  to	
  your	
  aVenIon	
  of	
  one	
  thing	
  Tibet	
  desperately	
  needs,	
  toilets.	
  	
  Every	
  nature	
  
stop	
  was	
  tough,	
  especially	
  for	
  the	
  ladies.	
  	
  I	
  prayed	
  for	
  a	
  well	
  behaved	
  buV	
  and	
  thankfully	
  I	
  got	
  it.	
  	
  Ever	
  since	
  I	
  
came	
  to	
  Asia	
  my	
  buV	
  has	
  been	
  very	
  cooperaIve	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  Ime.	
  	
  It	
  seems	
  to	
  know	
  when	
  it	
  can	
  screw	
  with	
  me	
  
just	
  for	
  fun.	
  	
  In	
  Imes	
  when	
  it	
  absolutely	
  posiIvely	
  must	
  behave	
  itself,	
  it	
  does.	
  	
  I	
  am	
  eternally	
  grateful	
  for	
  this	
  
internal	
  rapprochement.	
  	
  It	
  could	
  have	
  been	
  a	
  much	
  different	
  story.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  tough	
  place	
  to	
  hitch-­‐hike	
  back	
  from.	
  

So	
  where	
  was	
  I?	
  	
  Outhouses;	
  wherever	
  we	
  stopped	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  structure,	
  usually	
  made	
  of	
  cement,	
  	
  divided	
  into	
  
Men’s	
  and	
  Women’s	
  rooms.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  learned	
  one	
  Chinese	
  character	
  on	
  this	
  vacaIon,	
  Men’s	
  Room.	
  	
  I’d	
  know	
  it	
  
anywhere.	
  	
  Each	
  side	
  had	
  three	
  rectangular	
  holes	
  in	
  the	
  floor.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  never	
  any	
  paper	
  so	
  you	
  learned	
  the	
  
hard	
  way	
  to	
  bring	
  your	
  own.	
  	
  The	
  hole	
  led	
  to	
  the	
  open	
  air.	
  	
  SomeImes	
  when	
  it	
  was	
  windy	
  there	
  was	
  an	
  element	
  
of	
  doubt	
  about	
  which	
  way	
  things	
  would	
  travel.	
  	
  Once	
  I	
  missed	
  with	
  the	
  paper	
  and	
  kicked	
  it	
  into	
  the	
  hole.	
  	
  Not	
  a	
  
good	
  idea.	
  	
  Stuff	
  went	
  flying	
  everywhere	
  in	
  the	
  updra\	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  no	
  idea	
  what	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  air	
  and	
  dust	
  hibng	
  my	
  
face.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  my	
  mission	
  in	
  life	
  is	
  to	
  bring	
  flush	
  toilets	
  to	
  Tibet.	
  	
  Not	
  exactly	
  the	
  stuff	
  of	
  Bill	
  and	
  Melinda	
  Gates	
  
but	
  I’m	
  a	
  humble	
  man.	
  

Dawn	
  comes	
  late	
  at	
  Everest.	
  	
  	
  The	
  sun	
  has	
  a	
  long	
  way	
  up	
  before	
  it	
  reaches	
  the	
  peak.	
  It’s	
  also	
  the	
  western	
  edge	
  of	
  
the	
  single	
  Chinese	
  Ime	
  zone.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  in	
  for	
  breakfast	
  a\er	
  reluctantly	
  emerging	
  from	
  our	
  beds.	
  	
  Breakfast	
  was	
  
a	
  plain,	
  sweetened	
  but	
  dry	
  pancake	
  with	
  hot	
  tea.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  beVer	
  than	
  I’m	
  making	
  it	
  sound	
  but	
  it	
  was	
  preVy	
  simple.	
  	
  
The	
  stove	
  burned	
  Yak	
  dung.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  smell	
  and	
  when	
  they	
  put	
  it	
  in	
  it	
  looked	
  like	
  so\	
  coal.	
  	
  What	
  an	
  
incredible	
  animal.	
  	
  They	
  provide	
  wool	
  and	
  meat	
  and	
  they	
  shit	
  coal!	
  	
  How	
  cool	
  is	
  that?	
  	
  It	
  was	
  nice	
  and	
  warm	
  
inside	
  the	
  place.	
  There’s	
  a	
  great	
  camaraderie	
  in	
  coming	
  in	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  cold	
  and	
  sharing	
  a	
  hot	
  cup	
  of	
  something.	
  

Finally	
  the	
  sun	
  came	
  up	
  and	
  slowly	
  illuminated	
  the	
  mountain.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  wonderful.	
  	
  Just	
  across	
  from	
  the	
  
guesthouse	
  was	
  Rongbuk	
  Monastery,	
  the	
  highest	
  monastery	
  in	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  	
  What	
  a	
  wonderful	
  feeling	
  it	
  was	
  to	
  be	
  
here.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  perfect	
  weather.	
  	
  The	
  guide	
  told	
  us	
  that	
  many	
  Imes	
  they	
  come	
  here	
  and	
  can’t	
  see	
  the	
  mountain.	
  	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                         	
  
That’s	
  called	
  a	
  f@*&ing	
  bummer.	
  	
  	
  The	
  trip	
  back	
  to	
  Shigatze	
  was	
  the	
  same	
  route.	
  	
  A	
  hose	
  in	
  the	
  bus	
  sprung	
  a	
  leak.	
  
Several	
  people	
  got	
  out	
  to	
  pee	
  but	
  it	
  didn’t	
  seem	
  very	
  urgent	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  Big	
  mistake.	
  	
  We	
  wound	
  our	
  way	
  up	
  this	
  

                                                                                                 79
interminable	
  pass	
  that	
  was	
  magnificent	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  there.	
  	
  Now	
  it	
  was	
  an	
  obstacle	
  to	
  gebng	
  off	
  this	
  damn	
  dirt	
  
road.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  praying	
  for	
  the	
  bus	
  to	
  break	
  down	
  so	
  I	
  could	
  get	
  out	
  and	
  pee.	
  By	
  the	
  Ime	
  we	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  pass	
  my	
  
bladder	
  was	
  about	
  to	
  burst.	
  	
  I	
  knew	
  there	
  was	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  wonderful	
  Tibetan	
  outhouses	
  at	
  the	
  peak	
  because	
  
we	
  stopped	
  there	
  on	
  our	
  way	
  to	
  Everest.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  counIng	
  the	
  switchbacks,	
  looking	
  up	
  at	
  this	
  incredibly	
  high	
  peak.	
  
Finally	
  I	
  see	
  it	
  coming.	
  	
  Prayer	
  flags	
  flying	
  everywhere,	
  the	
  glorious	
  outhouse	
  so	
  close	
  I	
  could	
  kiss	
  it	
  and	
  we	
  drove	
  
right	
  past.	
  	
  I	
  never	
  heard	
  of	
  anyone	
  dying	
  from	
  having	
  to	
  pee	
  but	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  was	
  a	
  viable	
  opIon.	
  	
  I	
  could	
  see	
  a	
  
liVle	
  village	
  in	
  the	
  distance	
  at	
  the	
  boVom	
  of	
  the	
  mountain.	
  	
  Once	
  again	
  I	
  counted	
  the	
  switchbacks.	
  	
  At	
  least	
  we	
  
moved	
  faster	
  going	
  down.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  eyeing	
  my	
  empty	
  water	
  boVle	
  and	
  mentally	
  construcIng	
  an	
  emergency	
  opIon.	
  	
  
Finally	
  the	
  village	
  was	
  near,	
  salvaIon	
  was	
  upon	
  us	
  and	
  we	
  passed	
  right	
  on	
  through.	
  	
  That	
  was	
  enough.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  
to	
  demand	
  a	
  pee	
  break.	
  	
  They	
  said	
  we	
  would	
  be	
  passing	
  a	
  checkpoint	
  in	
  about	
  five	
  minutes	
  and	
  we	
  have	
  to	
  stop	
  
there.	
  	
  What	
  seemed	
  like	
  an	
  hour	
  later	
  we	
  did	
  stop.	
  	
  I	
  loved	
  those	
  liVle	
  rectangular	
  holes	
  in	
  the	
  cement	
  floor.	
  	
  I	
  
didn’t	
  care	
  which	
  way	
  the	
  wind	
  blew.	
  	
  Jesus,	
  Mary	
  and	
  Joseph,	
  free	
  at	
  last!

Late	
  that	
  night	
  we	
  got	
  back	
  to	
  Shigatze	
  and	
  stayed	
  in	
  the	
  same	
  hotel.	
  	
  We	
  made	
  our	
  way	
  back	
  to	
  Lhasa	
  the	
  next	
  
day	
  taking	
  a	
  different	
  route	
  along	
  a	
  beauIful	
  river.	
  	
  I	
  commented	
  that	
  no	
  one	
  ate	
  fish	
  here	
  even	
  though	
  there	
  
were	
  plenty	
  of	
  lakes	
  and	
  streams.	
  	
  The	
  guide	
  explained	
  that	
  as	
  Buddhists	
  they	
  are	
  against	
  all	
  killing.	
  	
  However,	
  if	
  
they	
  ate	
  no	
  meat	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  no	
  Tibetans.	
  People	
  can’t	
  live	
  on	
  grass	
  and	
  dirt.	
  	
  So	
  they	
  kill	
  primarily	
  cows	
  and	
  
yaks.	
  	
  The	
  raIonale	
  is	
  that	
  one	
  animal	
  can	
  feed	
  many	
  people.	
  	
  One	
  fish	
  feeds	
  one	
  person.	
  	
  Also	
  their	
  burial	
  rites	
  
contribute	
  to	
  the	
  “fish	
  free”	
  diet.	
  	
  When	
  an	
  adult	
  dies	
  they	
  put	
  the	
  body	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  open	
  for	
  the	
  animals	
  to	
  feed	
  
on.	
  	
  When	
  a	
  child	
  dies	
  they	
  sink	
  it	
  in	
  the	
  lake	
  for	
  the	
  fish	
  to	
  feed	
  on.	
  	
  That	
  explains	
  that.	
  	
  If	
  anyone	
  happens	
  to	
  
wonder	
  what	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  do	
  with	
  my	
  body	
  when	
  the	
  Ime	
  comes	
  feel	
  free	
  to	
  sink,	
  bury,	
  burn	
  or	
  leave	
  me	
  out	
  
for	
  the	
  vultures,	
  whatever	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  convenient.	
  

On	
  our	
  last	
  day	
  of	
  the	
  tour	
  we	
  visited	
  the	
  home	
  of	
  the	
  Dalai	
  Lama,	
  Potela.	
  	
  It’s	
  the	
  magnificent	
  structure	
  that	
  
dominates	
  Lhasa.	
  	
  The	
  walk	
  up	
  was	
  long.	
  	
  I	
  did	
  very	
  well	
  considering	
  the	
  shape	
  I’m	
  supposed	
  to	
  be	
  in.	
  	
  We	
  saw	
  
where	
  the	
  Dalai	
  Lama	
  entertained	
  foreign	
  and	
  domesIc	
  leaders.	
  	
  Also	
  where	
  the	
  monks	
  worshipped	
  and	
  how	
  
they	
  all	
  lived	
  before	
  the	
  commies	
  turned	
  it	
  into	
  a	
  museum.	
  	
  Next	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  Sera	
  monastery	
  where	
  monks	
  in	
  
training	
  parIcipate	
  in	
  debaIng	
  philosophical	
  quesIons	
  with	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  seen	
  it	
  on	
  TV	
  before	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  
impressive.	
  	
  Lastly	
  we	
  visited	
  the	
  Jokhang	
  Temple.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  World	
  Heritage	
  site	
  in	
  the	
  Old	
  City	
  near	
  the	
  Cool	
  Yak	
  
hotel.	
  	
  Outside	
  there	
  were	
  people	
  doing	
  prostraIons.	
  	
  	
  My	
  guide	
  told	
  me	
  that	
  every	
  year	
  he	
  and	
  his	
  family	
  do	
  a	
  
pilgrimage	
  to	
  his	
  temple	
  and	
  monastery.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  common	
  pracIce	
  here.	
  	
  He	
  doesn’t	
  do	
  the	
  prostraIons.	
  	
  That’s	
  
done	
  by	
  people	
  in	
  a	
  once	
  in	
  lifeIme	
  show	
  of	
  immense	
  faith.	
  	
  Some	
  people	
  travel	
  for	
  hundreds	
  of	
  miles	
  doing	
  
prostraIons	
  every	
  few	
  steps.	
  

I	
  am	
  truly	
  grateful	
  that	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  visit	
  Buddhist	
  countries	
  this	
  lifeIme.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  surprised	
  that	
  in	
  Thailand	
  and	
  in	
  Tibet	
  
meditaIon	
  is	
  not	
  pracIced	
  by	
  the	
  people.	
  	
  They	
  do	
  all	
  kinds	
  of	
  rituals	
  and	
  visit	
  their	
  temples	
  o\en	
  and	
  provide	
  
for	
  the	
  monks	
  they	
  revere.	
  	
  They	
  see	
  meditaIon	
  as	
  a	
  very	
  advanced	
  pracIce	
  that	
  should	
  only	
  be	
  done	
  a\er	
  a	
  
long	
  period	
  of	
  monasIc	
  training.	
  	
  American	
  Buddhists	
  put	
  meditaIon	
  first.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  what	
  brings	
  us	
  together.	
  	
  Very	
  
                                                                                                     80
few	
  Americans	
  become	
  Buddhist	
  to	
  parIcipate	
  in	
  ancient	
  rituals.	
  	
  We	
  want	
  to	
  get	
  it	
  now.	
  	
  There’s	
  a	
  certain	
  
impaIence	
  about	
  it	
  that	
  doesn’t	
  exist	
  in	
  countries	
  that	
  have	
  absorbed	
  the	
  dharma	
  in	
  their	
  bones.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  
meditaIon	
  and	
  most	
  likely	
  would	
  not	
  be	
  aVracted	
  to	
  a	
  religion	
  that	
  has	
  the	
  stark	
  divide	
  of	
  priest	
  and	
  layman.	
  	
  
America	
  Buddhism	
  is	
  a	
  brand	
  new	
  faith	
  that	
  honors	
  its	
  roots	
  but	
  has	
  changed	
  everything.

I	
  had	
  a	
  final	
  day	
  to	
  myself.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  confident	
  walking	
  around	
  the	
  alleyways	
  of	
  Lhasa.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  very	
  safe	
  city.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  that	
  
this	
  is	
  the	
  place	
  I	
  would	
  go	
  if	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  live	
  in	
  Asia.	
  	
  The	
  city	
  has	
  a	
  heart	
  of	
  gold.	
  	
  People	
  walk	
  around	
  with	
  prayer	
  
wheels	
  or	
  malas	
  (string	
  of	
  beads)	
  muVering	
  prayers	
  as	
  they	
  go.	
  	
  Everyone	
  seems	
  genuinely	
  happy.	
  	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  to	
  
the	
  airport	
  I	
  talked	
  with	
  my	
  guide.	
  	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  that	
  so	
  many	
  people	
  in	
  the	
  US	
  have	
  so	
  much	
  and	
  are	
  not	
  happy.	
  	
  
Here	
  people	
  are	
  happy	
  with	
  so	
  liVle.	
  	
  We’ve	
  come	
  to	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  material	
  world	
  in	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  It	
  no	
  longer	
  serves	
  
us.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  saying	
  poverty	
  is	
  the	
  answer	
  but	
  poverty	
  of	
  the	
  spirit	
  is	
  in	
  some	
  ways	
  worse	
  than	
  material	
  poverty.	
  	
  	
  
We’ve	
  become	
  isolated	
  in	
  our	
  selves.	
  	
  People	
  in	
  Tibet	
  see	
  themselves	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  whole.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  a	
  village,	
  an	
  
extended	
  family,	
  a	
  whole	
  procession	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  same	
  in	
  India	
  and	
  Thailand.	
  	
  Acceptance	
  has	
  its	
  downside	
  
but	
  people	
  seem	
  so	
  much	
  more	
  content	
  with	
  their	
  lot	
  in	
  life.	
  	
  As	
  they	
  all	
  move	
  toward	
  the	
  American	
  Dream	
  I	
  can	
  
only	
  hope	
  they	
  don’t	
  throw	
  the	
  baby	
  out	
  with	
  the	
  bathwater.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  we	
  can	
  hold	
  the	
  baby	
  for	
  a	
  while.	
  	
  I	
  pray	
  
that	
  in	
  all	
  the	
  current	
  difficulIes	
  we	
  come	
  out	
  of	
  this	
  a	
  kinder	
  and	
  gentler	
  people.	
  	
  It’s	
  seems	
  like	
  such	
  a	
  fantasy.	
  	
  
We’ve	
  been	
  so	
  ingrained	
  that	
  more	
  is	
  never	
  enough.	
  	
  Forgive	
  me	
  for	
  taking	
  so	
  long	
  to	
  see	
  it.

	
  	
  This	
  whole	
  trip	
  went	
  so	
  smoothly.	
  	
  China	
  Air	
  was	
  a	
  good	
  carrier	
  and	
  got	
  me	
  where	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  go	
  on	
  Ime	
  with	
  
reasonable	
  comfort.	
  	
  The	
  last	
  stop	
  a\er	
  Lhasa	
  was	
  a	
  transfer	
  in	
  Chengdu.	
  	
  We	
  le\	
  a	
  liVle	
  late	
  but	
  I	
  sIll	
  had	
  plenty	
  
of	
  Ime	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  connecIon	
  to	
  Singapore.	
  	
  My	
  eyes	
  were	
  so	
  blurry	
  that	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  read	
  any	
  of	
  the	
  signs	
  unIl	
  I	
  
was	
  right	
  on	
  top	
  of	
  them.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  Mr.	
  McGoo.	
  	
  I	
  followed	
  the	
  signs	
  up	
  the	
  escalator	
  to	
  “InternaIonal	
  
Departures”.	
  	
  In	
  this	
  big	
  hall	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  line	
  about	
  a	
  mile	
  long	
  that	
  wasn’t	
  moving.	
  	
  	
  The	
  goal	
  was	
  “Chinese	
  
Customs”.	
  	
  Apparently	
  gebng	
  in	
  is	
  a	
  lot	
  easier	
  than	
  leaving.	
  	
  I	
  waited	
  about	
  ten	
  minutes	
  with	
  absolutely	
  no	
  
movement.	
  	
  I	
  started	
  thinking	
  about	
  hotels	
  in	
  Chengdu.	
  	
  What	
  could	
  be	
  causing	
  this	
  needless	
  delay?	
  	
  Since	
  I	
  
couldn’t	
  really	
  see	
  anything	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  enIrely	
  sure	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  the	
  right	
  line.	
  	
  	
  Gebng	
  off	
  the	
  line	
  to	
  check	
  it	
  out	
  was	
  
not	
  an	
  opIon.	
  	
  Suddenly	
  everyone	
  started	
  to	
  move	
  fast.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  an	
  official	
  there	
  just	
  checking	
  passports	
  and	
  
stamping	
  a	
  card.	
  	
  When	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  him	
  I	
  showed	
  him	
  my	
  passport,	
  I	
  pledged	
  to	
  spend	
  twice	
  my	
  income	
  on	
  Chinese	
  
exports	
  and	
  he	
  pledged	
  to	
  lend	
  me	
  the	
  money	
  to	
  do	
  that.	
  	
  I	
  kissed	
  a	
  statue	
  of	
  Mao	
  Tze	
  Dong’s	
  ass	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  
my	
  way	
  home.	
  

I	
  got	
  home	
  around	
  2AM.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  ninth	
  of	
  ten	
  vaccine	
  treatments	
  that	
  day.	
  	
  I’m	
  planning	
  my	
  return	
  home	
  but	
  I	
  
was	
  surprised	
  that	
  it	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  that	
  easy.	
  	
  Ever	
  since	
  my	
  eye	
  surgery	
  last	
  month	
  my	
  blood	
  pressure	
  went	
  way	
  
up.	
  	
  There’s	
  no	
  connecIon	
  between	
  the	
  two	
  events	
  but	
  there	
  it	
  is.	
  	
  I	
  personally	
  think	
  it’s	
  the	
  weight	
  I’ve	
  gained	
  
going	
  all	
  over	
  Asia	
  in	
  what	
  has	
  been	
  five	
  months	
  of	
  endless	
  vacaIoning.	
  	
  	
  I	
  haven’t	
  fallen	
  off	
  the	
  wagon,	
  it	
  just	
  
won’t	
  move	
  any	
  more	
  under	
  the	
  weight.	
  	
  I’ve	
  always	
  been	
  a	
  yo-­‐yo	
  dieter	
  but	
  now	
  I’ve	
  moved	
  way	
  beyond	
  that	
  
and	
  I’m	
  tesIng	
  the	
  outer	
  limits	
  of	
  string	
  theory.	
  	
  The	
  party	
  is	
  over.	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  get	
  back	
  on	
  the	
  health	
  bus.	
  	
  I’ll	
  be	
  
reluctantly	
  taking	
  a	
  small	
  dose	
  of	
  blood	
  pressure	
  medicaIon.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  drink	
  lots	
  of	
  water,	
  lay	
  low	
  on	
  the	
  fat	
  and	
  
                                                                                                       81
salt.	
  	
  In	
  other	
  words	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  pay	
  for	
  all	
  my	
  sins.	
  	
  Well,	
  not	
  all	
  of	
  them,	
  it’s	
  a	
  gradual	
  process.

It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  come	
  home.	
  	
  I	
  miss	
  all	
  of	
  the	
  people	
  on	
  whose	
  love	
  I	
  depend.	
  	
  Emissaries	
  came	
  a	
  long	
  way	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  
make	
  it	
  through.	
  	
  Amazing	
  technology	
  made	
  it	
  feel	
  like	
  you	
  were	
  right	
  next	
  door.	
  	
  Every	
  day	
  I	
  open	
  my	
  email	
  like	
  a 	
  
liVle	
  child	
  opening	
  a	
  present.	
  	
  Your	
  aVenIon	
  is	
  my	
  present.	
  	
  You	
  love	
  is	
  my	
  love.	
  

Mountain	
  folk	
  at	
  home

no	
  whisper	
  of	
  discontent.

Wrapped	
  up	
  in	
  warm	
  arms

Goodbye	
  Singapore
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  November	
  17,	
  2009

When	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  Tibet	
  I	
  turned	
  on	
  the	
  TV.	
  	
  There	
  usually	
  was	
  one	
  English	
  staIon	
  in	
  China.	
  	
  The	
  hotel	
  didn’t	
  have	
  it.	
  	
  
However,	
  they	
  played	
  “ The	
  Godfather	
  Part	
  II”	
  in	
  English	
  with	
  Chinese	
  subItles.	
  	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  resist	
  watching	
  it	
  for	
  
the	
  one	
  hundredth	
  and	
  one	
  Ime.	
  	
  I	
  found	
  a	
  friend	
  in	
  Hyman	
  Roth.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  the	
  Jewish	
  gangster	
  that	
  ploVed	
  with	
  
Michael	
  Corleone	
  to	
  take	
  over	
  the	
  casinos	
  in	
  Havana	
  just	
  before	
  the	
  revoluIon.	
  	
  Hyman	
  had	
  a	
  terminal	
  heart	
  
condiIon.	
  	
  He	
  said	
  to	
  Michael,	
  “what	
  I	
  wouldn’t	
  give	
  for	
  twenty	
  more	
  years.”	
  	
  Amen.	
  	
  That’s	
  been	
  my	
  prayer	
  to	
  
every	
  deity	
  in	
  the	
  universe.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  love	
  to	
  have	
  that	
  much	
  Ime	
  now	
  that	
  I’ve	
  lived	
  so	
  inImately	
  with	
  death.	
  	
  
Michael	
  made	
  sure	
  Hyman	
  didn’t	
  get	
  his	
  wish.	
  	
  A\er	
  all,	
  it’s	
  just	
  a	
  wish.

I’ve	
  been	
  feeling	
  sore	
  in	
  my	
  lower	
  back	
  and	
  in	
  a	
  very	
  private	
  part	
  that	
  will	
  go	
  unmenIoned.	
  	
  	
  Suffice	
  it	
  to	
  say	
  it’s	
  
the	
  one	
  that	
  hangs	
  on	
  the	
  right.	
  	
  The	
  le\	
  one	
  feels	
  fine	
  but	
  the	
  right	
  one	
  is	
  sore.	
  	
  There	
  is	
  a	
  tumor	
  in	
  that	
  area	
  so	
  
I’m	
  always	
  hyper	
  aware	
  of	
  any	
  pain	
  in	
  the	
  vicinity.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  a	
  constant	
  pain	
  and	
  it	
  usually	
  comes	
  on	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  
the	
  day.	
  	
  When	
  I	
  first	
  arrived	
  my	
  friend	
  Ling	
  bought	
  me	
  some	
  Chinese	
  ointment	
  and	
  said	
  she	
  would	
  show	
  me	
  
how	
  to	
  use	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  lost	
  touch	
  with	
  her	
  and	
  the	
  boVle	
  just	
  sat	
  there	
  on	
  the	
  shelf.	
  	
  I	
  took	
  it	
  out	
  and	
  read	
  the	
  few	
  
English	
  words	
  on	
  the	
  label.	
  It	
  was	
  for	
  external	
  use	
  for	
  pain.	
  	
  Well	
  then	
  let’s	
  go!	
  	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  few	
  drops	
  and	
  rubbed	
  it	
  
on.	
  	
  It	
  started	
  off	
  slow	
  but	
  the	
  warmth	
  began	
  to	
  intensify	
  and	
  spread.	
  	
  Although	
  the	
  label	
  is	
  in	
  Chinese	
  I	
  can	
  say	
  
with	
  confidence	
  that	
  the	
  acIve	
  ingredients	
  are	
  concentrated	
  Harbenero	
  oil	
  and	
  napalm.	
  	
  In	
  retrospect	
  it	
  might	
  
have	
  been	
  beVer	
  to	
  try	
  it	
  on	
  my	
  back	
  or	
  beVer	
  yet	
  on	
  someone	
  else’s	
  back.	
  	
  As	
  the	
  “warmth”	
  got	
  deeper	
  and	
  I	
  
lost	
  all	
  feeling	
  in	
  my	
  manhood	
  I	
  realized	
  that	
  the	
  strategy	
  here	
  is	
  simply	
  to	
  make	
  me	
  forget	
  about	
  the	
  original	
  
pain	
  by	
  subsItuIng	
  a	
  much	
  worse	
  pain.	
  	
  A\er	
  a	
  few	
  treatments	
  I’d	
  be	
  thankful	
  for	
  the	
  original	
  pain.	
  	
  A\er	
  
another	
  five	
  minutes	
  I	
  was	
  squeaking	
  like	
  Mickey	
  Mouse.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  afraid	
  to	
  look	
  down	
  at	
  the	
  smoldering	
  wreckage.	
  	
  
The	
  “warmth”	
  subsided	
  and	
  I	
  fell	
  asleep.	
  	
  The	
  next	
  morning	
  there	
  were	
  Iny	
  liVle	
  crabs	
  in	
  body	
  bags	
  all	
  over	
  my	
  
bed.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  think	
  there’s	
  any	
  lasIng	
  damage.	
  	
  It’s	
  been	
  a	
  useless	
  body	
  part	
  for	
  some	
  Ime	
  now.

On	
  Wednesday	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  CT	
  Scan	
  to	
  see	
  what’s	
  going	
  inside	
  this	
  body	
  of	
  mine.	
  	
  I	
  call	
  the	
  Ime	
  between	
  the	
  test	
  and	
  
the	
  result	
  “the	
  drum	
  roll.”	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  Ime	
  of	
  reflecIon	
  and	
  fear.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  stay	
  centered	
  as	
  I	
  wait	
  for	
  the	
  verdict.	
  	
  Any	
  

                                                                                                        82
one	
  of	
  these	
  tests	
  could	
  show	
  a	
  spot	
  on	
  a	
  vital	
  organ	
  or	
  an	
  exisIng	
  tumor	
  that’s	
  growing	
  aggressively.	
  	
  I’ll	
  always	
  
remember	
  when	
  my	
  friend	
  Bob	
  went	
  in	
  for	
  his	
  test	
  results.	
  	
  His	
  doctor	
  told	
  him,	
  “Go	
  have	
  some	
  fun	
  Bob.”	
  	
  Six	
  
months	
  later	
  he	
  died.	
  	
  He	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  fun	
  and	
  took	
  it	
  bravely	
  but	
  it’s	
  a	
  lonely	
  fun.	
  	
  It’s	
  very	
  true	
  about	
  the	
  
loneliness	
  of	
  dying.	
  	
  There’s	
  a	
  waiIng	
  room	
  where	
  the	
  living	
  can’t	
  enter.	
  	
  I	
  get	
  to	
  go	
  in	
  and	
  out	
  and	
  visit	
  with	
  the	
  
living	
  but	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  return	
  to	
  the	
  waiIng	
  room	
  when	
  I’m	
  done.	
  	
  I’m	
  the	
  only	
  one	
  there.

Thursday	
  I	
  got	
  word	
  from	
  Singapore	
  Airlines	
  that	
  a	
  seat	
  on	
  the	
  Saturday	
  flight	
  became	
  available.	
  	
  I	
  accepted	
  and	
  
immediately	
  went	
  into	
  a	
  downward	
  spiral	
  for	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  leaving	
  a	
  place	
  I	
  have	
  called	
  home	
  since	
  
June.	
  	
  I	
  never	
  leave	
  places	
  without	
  feeling	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  loss.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  easy	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  suddenly	
  thrown	
  into	
  the	
  
unknown	
  again.	
  	
  This	
  state	
  of	
  dark	
  anIcipaIon	
  and	
  not	
  knowing	
  stopped	
  me	
  in	
  my	
  tracks.	
  	
  I	
  own	
  a	
  bag	
  of	
  tricks	
  
to	
  help	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  focus	
  on	
  prayer	
  and	
  meditaIon.	
  	
  I	
  come	
  to	
  peace	
  with	
  impermanence.	
  	
  	
  Who	
  am	
  I	
  at	
  the	
  core	
  of	
  
the	
  maVer?	
  	
  When	
  life	
  really	
  comes	
  into	
  focus	
  the	
  fear	
  is	
  exposed	
  for	
  what	
  it	
  is,	
  a	
  condiIoned	
  thought.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  live	
  
with	
  it	
  without	
  being	
  it.	
  

Friday	
  came	
  and	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  scared.	
  	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  escape	
  from	
  the	
  waiIng	
  room	
  especially	
  on	
  drum	
  roll	
  day.	
  	
  I	
  did	
  
what	
  I	
  always	
  do.	
  	
  I	
  showered,	
  shaved	
  and	
  ate	
  breakfast	
  .	
  	
  The	
  stress	
  of	
  preparing	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  day’s	
  flight	
  was	
  	
  a	
  
welcomed	
  distracIon.	
  

My	
  appointment	
  was	
  at	
  10AM.	
  	
  The	
  doctor	
  was	
  parIcularly	
  busy	
  this	
  day	
  and	
  I	
  didn’t	
  get	
  out	
  of	
  there	
  Ill	
  noon	
  
even	
  though	
  the	
  actual	
  appointment	
  was	
  only	
  twenty	
  minutes.	
  	
  I	
  waited	
  as	
  one	
  paIent	
  a\er	
  another	
  was	
  called	
  
in.	
  	
  Cancer	
  wards	
  are	
  sobering	
  places.	
  	
  I	
  remember	
  the	
  first	
  Ime	
  I	
  was	
  referred	
  there.	
  	
  It’s	
  like	
  entering	
  another	
  
dimension.	
  	
  In	
  Ime	
  even	
  this	
  becomes	
  home.	
  	
  However,	
  watching	
  the	
  people	
  someImes	
  brings	
  up	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
emoIon.	
  	
  There’s	
  so	
  much	
  kindness	
  and	
  bravery.	
  	
  

Finally	
  it	
  was	
  my	
  turn.	
  	
  The	
  lovely	
  young	
  assistants	
  came	
  up	
  to	
  greet	
  me,	
  Jocelyn,	
  Joanne	
  and	
  Yu	
  Pei.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  
become	
  friends	
  over	
  the	
  months.	
  	
  The	
  doctor	
  went	
  over	
  the	
  results.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  usual	
  good	
  news/bad	
  news	
  but	
  
nothing	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  ordinary	
  terrible.	
  	
  On	
  the	
  good	
  side	
  one	
  lung	
  tumor	
  has	
  disappeared.	
  	
  The	
  fact	
  that	
  something	
  
went	
  away	
  is	
  encouraging	
  and	
  could	
  have	
  been	
  caused	
  by	
  the	
  vaccine.	
  	
  However,	
  one	
  new	
  tumor	
  emerged	
  in	
  the	
  
lung.	
  	
  I	
  asked	
  about	
  the	
  lower	
  body	
  especially	
  where	
  I’ve	
  been	
  feeling	
  this	
  pain.	
  	
  He	
  said	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  there.	
  	
  
There	
  was	
  one	
  near	
  my	
  kidney.	
  	
  I’ve	
  never	
  heard	
  that	
  one	
  before.	
  	
  So	
  I	
  have	
  the	
  same	
  number	
  of	
  tumors	
  it’s	
  just	
  
that	
  they	
  are	
  not	
  where	
  they	
  used	
  to	
  be.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  nomadic	
  cancer.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  strangely	
  relieved	
  by	
  the	
  news.	
  	
  I	
  will	
  not	
  
have	
  to	
  “go	
  have	
  some	
  fun.”	
  	
  I	
  get	
  to	
  live	
  for	
  	
  the	
  next	
  drum	
  roll.

I	
  had	
  made	
  plans	
  to	
  have	
  lunch	
  in	
  Chinatown	
  with	
  a	
  young	
  man	
  I	
  met	
  in	
  Tibet.	
  	
  He	
  pracIced	
  Buddhism	
  and	
  I	
  
wanted	
  to	
  let	
  him	
  know	
  about	
  the	
  sangha	
  I	
  was	
  connected	
  to.	
  	
  He’s	
  just	
  the	
  right	
  age	
  for	
  that	
  group.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  good	
  
to	
  see	
  him.	
  	
  His	
  father	
  was	
  recently	
  diagnosed	
  so	
  he’s	
  been	
  feeling	
  the	
  fear.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  I	
  helped	
  him	
  a	
  bit.

My	
  best	
  friend	
  Shirley	
  recently	
  started	
  working	
  in	
  a	
  tailor	
  shop	
  in	
  Chinatown.	
  	
  I	
  wanted	
  to	
  say	
  goodbye.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  
for	
  coffee.	
  	
  She’s	
  a	
  real	
  sweetheart.	
  	
  She	
  said,	
  “Kevin,	
  leave	
  your	
  cancer	
  here,	
  if	
  it	
  comes	
  off	
  the	
  luggage	
  belt,	
  
                                                                                                      83
don’t	
  pick	
  it	
  up.”	
  	
  Shirley	
  got	
  a	
  big	
  goodbye	
  hug.	
  	
  She	
  is	
  a	
  friend	
  in	
  need,	
  indeed.	
  	
  I	
  will	
  miss	
  her.

I’m	
  going	
  to	
  miss	
  Singapore.	
  	
  There’s	
  such	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  innocence	
  that	
  the	
  US	
  had	
  when	
  I	
  was	
  growing	
  up.	
  	
  We	
  
were	
  on	
  top	
  of	
  the	
  world	
  then.	
  	
  Listening	
  to	
  the	
  news	
  so	
  far	
  away	
  one	
  would	
  think	
  we’re	
  having	
  street	
  fights	
  
every	
  night	
  in	
  America.	
  	
  The	
  great	
  benefit	
  of	
  successful,	
  benevolent	
  one	
  party	
  rule	
  is	
  that	
  no	
  one	
  in	
  Singapore	
  is	
  
allowed	
  to	
  hate	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  Hell,	
  they’re	
  not	
  even	
  allowed	
  to	
  chew	
  gum.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  chew	
  gum	
  so	
  I	
  think	
  it’s	
  a	
  great	
  
law.	
  	
  They	
  don’t	
  have	
  the	
  luxury	
  of	
  being	
  able	
  to	
  tolerate	
  hate	
  crimes.	
  	
  It	
  could	
  so	
  easily	
  degenerate	
  into	
  
sectarianism.	
  	
  Singapore	
  is	
  a	
  small	
  island	
  surrounded	
  by	
  big,	
  proud	
  countries	
  that	
  have	
  an	
  ethnic	
  stake	
  in	
  the	
  
place.	
  	
  The	
  government	
  here	
  acIvely	
  promotes	
  diversity	
  and	
  tolerance.	
  	
  All	
  groups	
  are	
  represented	
  in	
  the	
  
government.	
  	
  There’s	
  an	
  invisible	
  line	
  no	
  one	
  is	
  allowed	
  to	
  cross.	
  	
  That	
  line	
  is	
  incivility.	
  	
  If	
  an	
  ethnic	
  group	
  
organized	
  around	
  hatred	
  for	
  another	
  group	
  they	
  wouldn’t	
  be	
  a	
  group	
  for	
  long.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  a	
  police	
  state	
  that	
  insists	
  its	
  
people	
  stay	
  on	
  the	
  “It’s	
  a	
  Small	
  World	
  A\er	
  all”	
  Disney	
  ride	
  unIl	
  they	
  get	
  it.	
  	
  It’s	
  one	
  big	
  Shirley	
  Temple	
  movie.	
  	
  
Everyone	
  is	
  free	
  to	
  express	
  American	
  style	
  craziness	
  and	
  even	
  criIcize	
  government	
  policy	
  but	
  just	
  don’t	
  step	
  over	
  
that	
  line,	
  or	
  chew	
  gum.	
  	
  What	
  the	
  ciIzens	
  get	
  in	
  return	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  most	
  prosperous	
  places	
  on	
  earth.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  
cleanest	
  and	
  safest	
  place	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  seen.	
  

As	
  I	
  wandered	
  around	
  Asia	
  I	
  came	
  up	
  with	
  a	
  quesIon	
  for	
  my	
  freedom	
  loving	
  fellow	
  Americans.	
  	
  Would	
  you	
  
choose	
  a	
  mild	
  dictatorship	
  like	
  Singapore	
  with	
  all	
  the	
  economic	
  perks	
  of	
  Western	
  consumerism	
  or	
  the	
  poverty	
  of	
  
a	
  democraIc	
  India.	
  	
  If	
  you	
  answered	
  India	
  most	
  likely	
  you’ve	
  never	
  been	
  there.	
  	
  	
  I	
  loved	
  India	
  but	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  
difficult	
  for	
  most	
  middle	
  class	
  Americans	
  to	
  get	
  used	
  to.	
  	
  Singapore	
  feels	
  just	
  like	
  home.	
  	
  Unless	
  your	
  daily	
  
acIviIes	
  involve	
  breakfast,	
  shower,	
  start	
  a	
  protest	
  movement,	
  come	
  home,	
  eat	
  dinner,	
  write	
  insurrecIonist	
  
propaganda	
  and	
  go	
  to	
  bed,	
  the	
  odds	
  are	
  you’d	
  feel	
  right	
  at	
  home	
  here.	
  	
  They	
  have	
  worked	
  out	
  a	
  social	
  contract	
  
that	
  everyone	
  thinks	
  is	
  flawed	
  but	
  no	
  one	
  would	
  dare	
  mess	
  with.	
  	
  Not	
  because	
  of	
  government	
  inImidaIon	
  but	
  
because	
  it	
  works.	
  	
  If	
  you	
  are	
  poor	
  in	
  Singapore	
  you	
  are	
  provided	
  for	
  in	
  a	
  limited	
  way.	
  	
  You	
  get	
  subsidized	
  housing	
  
and	
  health	
  care.	
  	
  The	
  health	
  care	
  system	
  here	
  is	
  more	
  like	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  savings	
  accounts	
  that	
  are	
  put	
  aside	
  
for	
  all	
  working	
  Singaporeans.	
  	
  These	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  for	
  health	
  care	
  and	
  housing.	
  	
  People	
  can	
  buy	
  Health	
  Insurance	
  
plans.	
  	
  However,	
  there’s	
  one	
  major	
  difference	
  here.	
  	
  The	
  cost	
  is	
  literally	
  30%	
  of	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  A\er	
  my	
  eye	
  surgery	
  I	
  
paid	
  full	
  cost	
  for	
  a	
  private	
  room	
  in	
  a	
  hospital.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  $200/day.	
  	
  They	
  provided	
  all	
  my	
  medicaIons,	
  meals	
  and	
  
medical	
  monitoring	
  services.	
  	
  I	
  needed	
  a	
  blood	
  pressure	
  medicaIon	
  and	
  a	
  two	
  week	
  supply	
  was	
  less	
  than	
  50	
  
cents.	
  	
  Without	
  any	
  subsidy	
  whatsoever,	
  my	
  world	
  class	
  health	
  care	
  in	
  Singapore	
  would	
  cost	
  me	
  no	
  more	
  than	
  
the	
  out	
  of	
  pocket	
  cost	
  of	
  my	
  horrifically	
  expensive	
  insurance.	
  	
  The	
  difference	
  in	
  the	
  USA	
  is	
  that	
  our	
  government	
  is	
  
owned	
  by	
  corporaIons.	
  	
  We’ve	
  been	
  screwed.	
  	
  Our	
  government	
  is	
  legally	
  not	
  allowed	
  to	
  negoIate	
  with	
  drug	
  
companies	
  for	
  the	
  price	
  of	
  the	
  drugs	
  the	
  government	
  provides	
  to	
  our	
  ciIzens.	
  	
  Do	
  we	
  need	
  any	
  further	
  proof	
  that	
  
our	
  government	
  is	
  owned	
  by	
  drug	
  companies?

There’s	
  no	
  homeless	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  	
  Everyone	
  gets	
  a	
  government	
  home	
  that	
  needs	
  one.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  HDG	
  housing	
  
projects	
  everywhere.	
  	
  	
  A	
  great	
  majority	
  of	
  ciIzens	
  here	
  own	
  them.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  well	
  maintained	
  and	
  comfortable	
  
places	
  to	
  live.	
  	
  If	
  you	
  are	
  poor	
  you	
  are	
  provided	
  with	
  minimal	
  housing.	
  	
  It’s	
  compassionate	
  and	
  efficient.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  
                                                                                                      84
US	
  we	
  are	
  inefficient	
  and	
  mean	
  to	
  those	
  that	
  can’t	
  afford	
  housing.	
  	
  I	
  heard	
  an	
  esImate	
  that	
  it	
  cost	
  $20,000/year	
  
in	
  services	
  to	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  every	
  homeless	
  person	
  in	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  There	
  have	
  been	
  some	
  ciIes	
  that	
  have	
  successfully	
  
given	
  minimal	
  housing	
  to	
  the	
  homeless	
  and	
  saved	
  money.	
  	
  We	
  seem	
  to	
  go	
  out	
  of	
  our	
  way	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  we	
  never	
  
take	
  the	
  road	
  of	
  compassion.	
  	
  We	
  would	
  rather	
  expand	
  our	
  prisons	
  than	
  improve	
  our	
  schools	
  or	
  social	
  services	
  
that	
  might	
  keep	
  our	
  young	
  people	
  from	
  a	
  life	
  of	
  crime.	
  	
  This	
  doesn’t	
  happen	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  	
  They	
  invest	
  in	
  their	
  
people’s	
  well	
  being.

They	
  are	
  also	
  tough	
  on	
  crime.	
  	
  If	
  you	
  deal	
  drugs	
  you	
  are	
  executed.	
  	
  I	
  am	
  inalterably	
  opposed	
  to	
  the	
  death	
  penalty	
  
but	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  admit	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  drugs	
  here.	
  	
  That	
  adds	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  the	
  civility	
  of	
  the	
  place.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  no	
  guns	
  here	
  
either.	
  	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  right	
  to	
  bear	
  arms	
  and	
  there	
  are	
  severe	
  penalIes	
  for	
  having	
  them.	
  	
  That’s	
  what	
  I	
  love	
  about	
  
looking	
  beneath	
  the	
  surface	
  of	
  a	
  country’s	
  way	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  They’ve	
  certainly	
  borrowed	
  a	
  lot	
  from	
  the	
  US.	
  	
  They	
  also	
  
have	
  the	
  luxury	
  of	
  not	
  repeaIng	
  our	
  mistakes.	
  

	
  
I	
  love	
  my	
  country	
  and	
  its	
  form	
  of	
  government.	
  	
  I’m	
  very	
  proud	
  of	
  our	
  journey	
  of	
  ever	
  expanding	
  inclusiveness.	
  	
  
We’ve	
  led	
  the	
  way	
  on	
  civil	
  rights,	
  women’s	
  rights,	
  gay	
  rights,	
  environmental	
  rights	
  and	
  even	
  animal	
  rights.	
  	
  It’s	
  an	
  
evoluIon	
  I’ve	
  been	
  privileged	
  to	
  witness	
  and	
  occasionally	
  add	
  my	
  voice	
  to.	
  	
  However,	
  we’ve	
  really	
  pissed	
  each	
  
other	
  off	
  in	
  the	
  process.	
  	
  We’re	
  not	
  a	
  kind	
  society.	
  	
  All	
  too	
  o\en	
  opponents	
  are	
  demonized	
  and	
  villianized.	
  	
  I	
  
loved	
  my	
  Unitarian	
  minister	
  Arvid	
  Straube’s	
  definiIon	
  of	
  tolerance.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  call	
  to	
  acIon.	
  	
  He	
  said,	
  “ Tolerance	
  is	
  the	
  
ability	
  to	
  explain	
  your	
  opponent’s	
  point	
  of	
  view	
  to	
  his/her	
  saIsfacIon.”	
  	
  Try	
  it	
  before	
  self	
  righteousness	
  hardens	
  
into	
  your	
  character.	
  	
  I’m	
  a	
  bleeding	
  heart	
  liberal.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  that	
  all	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  My	
  heart	
  is	
  with	
  the	
  working	
  poor	
  
and	
  those	
  that	
  struggle	
  everyday	
  living	
  from	
  paycheck	
  to	
  paycheck	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  good	
  life	
  for	
  themselves	
  and	
  their	
  
families.	
  	
  My	
  ideal	
  society	
  is	
  where	
  everyone	
  would	
  gladly	
  pay	
  more	
  taxes	
  if	
  it	
  meant	
  every	
  ciIzen	
  would	
  be	
  
guaranteed	
  food,	
  clothing,	
  shelter,	
  educaIon	
  and	
  health	
  care.	
  	
  Once	
  upon	
  a	
  Ime	
  that	
  would	
  have	
  been	
  called	
  
generosity,	
  a	
  core	
  ChrisIan	
  value.	
  	
  Now	
  it’s	
  the	
  work	
  of	
  socialists	
  and	
  Maoists	
  bent	
  on	
  destroying	
  the	
  American	
  
way	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  What	
  happened	
  to	
  us?	
  	
  We	
  can’t	
  even	
  discuss	
  it	
  anymore.	
  	
  I	
  understand	
  the	
  fear	
  of	
  government	
  
overreaching	
  into	
  our	
  lives.	
  	
  But	
  government	
  has	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  soluIon	
  every	
  bit	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  
country.	
  	
  To	
  say	
  government	
  is	
  always	
  bad	
  and	
  is	
  never	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  soluIon	
  is	
  like	
  saying	
  you	
  want	
  to	
  build	
  a	
  
house	
  but	
  you	
  can’t	
  use	
  a	
  hammer	
  because	
  you	
  hit	
  your	
  finger	
  with	
  one	
  in	
  the	
  past.	
  	
  Government	
  does	
  some	
  
things	
  well	
  and	
  is	
  essenIal	
  to	
  maintain	
  a	
  civil	
  society.	
  	
  It’s	
  all	
  in	
  the	
  balance.	
  	
  Here	
  in	
  Singapore	
  they	
  do	
  a	
  good	
  
balancing	
  act.	
  	
  We	
  would	
  do	
  well	
  to	
  invesIgate.	
  

Sorry	
  for	
  the	
  poliIcs.	
  	
  The	
  important	
  thing	
  for	
  me	
  is	
  to	
  look	
  at	
  how	
  I	
  contributed	
  to	
  all	
  this	
  hatred	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  	
  
I’ve	
  done	
  more	
  than	
  my	
  share	
  of	
  self	
  righteous	
  skewering.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  me	
  no	
  where.	
  	
  In	
  quiet	
  moments	
  a	
  new	
  voice	
  
comes	
  to	
  me	
  now.	
  	
  It	
  says,	
  “Relax,	
  the	
  war	
  is	
  over.	
  	
  Put	
  down	
  your	
  weapons,	
  let’s	
  go	
  home.”	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  wise	
  voice.	
  	
  It’s	
  
hard	
  to	
  even	
  remember	
  what	
  got	
  me	
  spun	
  up	
  and	
  excited.	
  	
  What	
  was	
  that	
  all	
  about?	
  	
  It	
  never	
  was	
  all	
  that	
  
important.	
  	
  Why	
  did	
  I	
  give	
  it	
  so	
  much	
  energy?	
  	
  PoliIcs	
  went	
  on	
  this	
  way	
  and	
  that.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  more	
  like	
  a	
  game	
  than	
  
reality.	
  	
  It	
  made	
  me	
  feel	
  strong	
  and	
  right	
  but	
  the	
  price	
  was	
  so	
  much	
  anger.	
  The	
  payment	
  was	
  made	
  in	
  friendships	
  
                                                                                                    85
lost	
  and	
  missed	
  moments	
  of	
  love	
  and	
  compassion.	
  	
  The	
  nuns	
  at	
  St	
  Philips	
  loved	
  to	
  say	
  “ Time	
  wasted	
  is	
  never	
  
found	
  again.”	
  	
  	
  I	
  know	
  about	
  Ime	
  now	
  and	
  there	
  isn’t	
  any	
  to	
  waste.	
  	
  The	
  war	
  is	
  over.	
  

It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  come	
  home.	
  	
  This	
  morning	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  and	
  cursed	
  the	
  alarm.	
  	
  Then	
  I	
  thought	
  of	
  home.	
  I’m	
  ready	
  to	
  
leave.	
  	
  My	
  bag	
  weighs	
  a	
  ton.	
  	
  I’ve	
  sent	
  two	
  large	
  boxes	
  back	
  already.	
  	
  I	
  never	
  thought	
  of	
  myself	
  as	
  a	
  collector	
  but	
  I 	
  
have	
  100	
  more	
  pounds	
  of	
  stuff	
  then	
  when	
  I	
  le\.	
  	
  That	
  doesn’t	
  even	
  include	
  the	
  extra	
  20	
  lbs	
  of	
  me.

I’m	
  waiIng	
  to	
  leave	
  but	
  there’s	
  something	
  missing.	
  	
  Suddenly,	
  the	
  good	
  witch	
  is	
  circling	
  around	
  me.	
  	
  All	
  my	
  
friends	
  are	
  there.	
  	
  She	
  asks,	
  “And	
  what	
  have	
  you	
  learned	
  here?”	
  	
  I	
  say,	
  “I	
  know	
  now	
  that	
  people	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  
hurt	
  us.	
  	
  They’re	
  friendly	
  and	
  kind.	
  	
  They	
  want	
  the	
  same	
  things	
  we	
  do.	
  	
  They	
  look	
  at	
  my	
  country	
  as	
  a	
  big	
  giant	
  
with	
  the	
  best	
  toys.	
  	
  They	
  all	
  want	
  our	
  toys	
  but	
  they	
  don’t	
  think	
  we	
  like	
  to	
  share.”	
  	
  Glenda	
  said,	
  “Spare	
  me	
  the	
  
sermon,	
  white	
  boy.	
  	
  What	
  did	
  you	
  really	
  learn	
  here?”	
  	
  Now	
  I’m	
  going	
  to	
  have	
  to	
  think.	
  	
  I	
  came	
  here	
  with	
  lots	
  of	
  
stories	
  about	
  how	
  I	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  beat	
  this	
  death	
  sentence	
  with	
  a	
  Hail	
  Mary	
  pass	
  in	
  a	
  strange	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  I	
  
found	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  help	
  when	
  I	
  really	
  needed	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  so	
  much	
  incredible	
  technology	
  to	
  keep	
  in	
  touch	
  with	
  everyone	
  
and	
  avoid	
  feeling	
  all	
  alone.	
  	
  The	
  ghosts	
  of	
  loneliness	
  were	
  never	
  far	
  away.	
  	
  I	
  depend	
  on	
  so	
  many	
  for	
  my	
  well	
  
being.	
  	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  le\	
  alone	
  here.	
  	
  But	
  I	
  was	
  alone	
  enough	
  to	
  reflect	
  on	
  what	
  was	
  really	
  true	
  about	
  me.	
  	
  “I	
  have	
  
everything	
  I	
  need	
  inside	
  of	
  me	
  and	
  I	
  don’t	
  need	
  to	
  look	
  outside	
  myself	
  anymore	
  for	
  happiness.”	
  	
  She	
  rolled	
  her	
  
eyes	
  and	
  said,	
  “oh	
  well,	
  that	
  will	
  have	
  to	
  do,	
  I’m	
  on	
  a	
  Ight	
  schedule.	
  	
  Keep	
  working	
  on	
  it.	
  	
  Now,	
  click	
  your	
  sandals	
  
three	
  Imes	
  and	
  say,	
  “Ok	
  God,	
  what’s	
  next.”

The	
  flight	
  was	
  long	
  but	
  unevenXul.	
  	
  Jessica	
  picked	
  me	
  up	
  at	
  the	
  airport.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  great	
  to	
  see	
  her	
  shining	
  face.	
  	
  It	
  
felt	
  good	
  to	
  be	
  home.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  business.	
  	
  We	
  drove	
  right	
  up	
  to	
  Yokoji.	
  	
  She	
  wanted	
  to	
  get	
  home	
  
before	
  dark	
  and	
  took	
  off	
  quickly.	
  	
  I	
  visited	
  with	
  Tenshin,	
  my	
  teacher,	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  minutes.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  right	
  to	
  sleep.	
  	
  The	
  
next	
  morning	
  I	
  dove	
  right	
  back	
  into	
  Zen	
  pracIce.	
  	
  It	
  took	
  a	
  day	
  before	
  my	
  mind	
  seVled	
  back	
  into	
  monasIc	
  living.	
  	
  
Sit,	
  walk,	
  eat,	
  work,	
  sleep.	
  	
  Pure	
  	
  simplicity	
  surrounded	
  by	
  mountains	
  and	
  forests.	
  	
  No	
  buzzing	
  of	
  human	
  
business.	
  	
  	
  At	
  some	
  point	
  I	
  knew	
  that	
  there	
  was	
  nothing	
  more	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  do	
  with	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  I’ve	
  done	
  all	
  I	
  can	
  do	
  to	
  
shape	
  it	
  into	
  something	
  and	
  now	
  I	
  quesIon	
  why.	
  	
  I’m	
  happy	
  with	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  I’ve	
  become	
  a	
  lover	
  of	
  reality.	
  

People	
  come	
  by	
  on	
  weekends	
  and	
  parIcularly	
  for	
  our	
  Sunday	
  service.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  welcomed	
  by	
  everyone.	
  	
  They	
  seem	
  
genuinely	
  happy	
  to	
  see	
  me.	
  	
  My	
  jet	
  lag	
  has	
  been	
  helpful	
  for	
  the	
  residents.	
  	
  I	
  get	
  up	
  naturally	
  around	
  3AM.	
  	
  A\er	
  
surrendering	
  a	
  good	
  night	
  sleep	
  I	
  get	
  up	
  and	
  make	
  coffee	
  for	
  everyone.	
  	
  It’s	
  rare	
  they	
  get	
  a	
  cup	
  before	
  the	
  5:30	
  
start	
  of	
  meditaIon.	
  	
  Caffeine	
  supported	
  awakening,	
  it’s	
  the	
  American	
  way.

On	
  Sunday	
  a\ernoon	
  I	
  went	
  home	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  for	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  doctor	
  appointments	
  on	
  Monday.	
  	
  My	
  eye	
  
specialist	
  was	
  very	
  impressed	
  with	
  my	
  recent	
  reInal	
  detachment	
  surgery.	
  	
  Apparently,	
  it	
  doesn’t	
  always	
  go	
  this	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                        	
  
well.	
  	
  Later	
  in	
  the	
  day	
  I	
  had	
  an	
  appointment	
  with	
  my	
  Oncologist,	
  Fred	
  Millard.	
  	
  I	
  brought	
  a	
  CD	
  with	
  my	
  latest	
  scan.	
  
I	
  don’t	
  like	
  looking	
  at	
  pictures	
  of	
  my	
  broken	
  body.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  like	
  hearing	
  about	
  what’s	
  going	
  on.	
  	
  That	
  may	
  be	
  a	
  sign	
  
of	
  denial	
  on	
  my	
  part.	
  	
  However,	
  I	
  think	
  it’s	
  something	
  different.	
  	
  I’ve	
  already	
  surrendered	
  to	
  the	
  inevitable.	
  	
  I	
  live	
  
at	
  the	
  whim	
  of	
  desIny	
  now.	
  	
  Why	
  do	
  I	
  need	
  all	
  this	
  informaIon?	
  	
  I	
  told	
  him	
  that	
  Dr	
  Toh	
  in	
  Singapore	
  didn’t	
  see	
  a	
  
                                                                                                    86
tumor	
  in	
  my	
  lower	
  groin	
  area.	
  	
  He	
  looked	
  and	
  showed	
  it	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  He	
  described	
  the	
  pain	
  it	
  could	
  cause.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  
pain	
  I	
  had	
  been	
  feeling.	
  	
  I	
  didn’t	
  want	
  to	
  hear	
  that	
  a	
  tumor	
  actually	
  was	
  doing	
  what	
  they	
  normally	
  do.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  a	
  
constant	
  pain	
  as	
  cancer	
  usually	
  is.	
  	
  Nor	
  is	
  it	
  a	
  terrible	
  pain	
  but	
  it’s	
  bad	
  enough	
  that	
  I	
  need	
  to	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  will	
  
not	
  use	
  the	
  Chinese	
  napalm	
  anymore.	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  for	
  good	
  old	
  American	
  pain	
  killers.	
  

His	
  quick	
  analysis	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  tumors	
  are	
  stable.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  either	
  the	
  same	
  size	
  or	
  slightly	
  bigger.	
  	
  He	
  will	
  do	
  a	
  
more	
  complete	
  analysis	
  and	
  get	
  back	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  Frankly,	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  change	
  my	
  phone	
  number.	
  	
  We’ll	
  do	
  another	
  scan	
  
in	
  a	
  few	
  months.	
  	
  Business	
  as	
  usual	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  of	
  cancer	
  survival.	
  	
  I	
  le\	
  the	
  office	
  sad	
  and	
  lonely	
  even	
  though	
  I	
  
didn’t	
  get	
  the	
  terrible	
  news	
  of	
  imminent	
  death.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  just	
  the	
  reminder	
  that	
  everything	
  is	
  going	
  as	
  planned.	
  	
  The	
  
next	
  scan	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  good	
  indicaIon	
  if	
  my	
  trip	
  to	
  Singapore	
  bore	
  any	
  fruit.	
  	
  I	
  could	
  use	
  some	
  good	
  news.	
  	
  His	
  
recommendaIon	
  is	
  hold	
  off	
  on	
  any	
  further	
  treatment	
  unless	
  things	
  get	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  gate	
  or	
  start	
  taking	
  off.	
  	
  	
  
There’s	
  a	
  treatment	
  that	
  can	
  extend	
  my	
  life	
  a	
  bit	
  for	
  some	
  exorbitant	
  price	
  that	
  I	
  won’t	
  have	
  to	
  pay	
  because	
  I’m	
  
one	
  of	
  the	
  lucky	
  ones	
  with	
  good	
  health	
  care.	
  	
  	
  I’ll	
  cross	
  that	
  bridge	
  if	
  I	
  get	
  to	
  the	
  river.

It	
  was	
  good	
  to	
  be	
  home	
  in	
  San	
  Diego.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  dinner	
  that	
  evening	
  with	
  Conor	
  and	
  his	
  partner,	
  Candace.	
  	
  They	
  
seemed	
  happy.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  a	
  good	
  Ime.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  my	
  family.	
  	
  I	
  stayed	
  with	
  my	
  dear	
  friends,	
  Micheal	
  and	
  Sally.	
  	
  	
  I	
  take	
  
refuge	
  in	
  my	
  friends.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  so	
  many	
  dear	
  ones.	
  

I’m	
  on	
  my	
  way	
  back	
  to	
  Yokoji.	
  	
  It’s	
  the	
  final	
  week	
  of	
  the	
  three	
  month	
  training	
  period.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  in	
  Sesshin.	
  	
  I’m	
  
ready	
  to	
  dive	
  in	
  again,	
  unplug	
  from	
  the	
  matrix	
  and	
  bring	
  reality	
  forward.	
  	
  We	
  end	
  on	
  Sunday,	
  then	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  for	
  my	
  
favorite	
  holiday,	
  Thanksgiving.	
  	
  Lord,	
  I	
  give	
  thanks	
  for	
  every	
  blessing	
  in	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  You	
  are	
  one	
  of	
  them.

My	
  home	
  welcomes	
  me

calm,	
  rested,	
  a	
  gentle	
  smile

the	
  sleepy	
  wind	
  blows

Happy	
  and	
  Merry
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Friday,	
  January	
  8,	
  2010

Thanksgiving	
  was	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  fun.	
  	
  My	
  dear	
  friend	
  Cathy	
  has	
  been	
  hosIng	
  the	
  tribe	
  for	
  a	
  long	
  Ime.	
  	
  Every	
  year	
  we	
  try	
  
to	
  figure	
  out	
  when	
  she	
  started.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  never	
  remember.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  long	
  Ime	
  ago.	
  This	
  year	
  was	
  a	
  bit	
  smaller	
  than	
  
last.	
  	
  Twenty	
  five	
  showed	
  up	
  in	
  total	
  during	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  I’m	
  cheaIng	
  a	
  liVle	
  because	
  Rich	
  and	
  Genny	
  came	
  for	
  
breakfast.	
  	
  I’m	
  in	
  compeIIon	
  with	
  my	
  brother	
  John	
  in	
  NYC.	
  	
  He	
  reported	
  twenty	
  three.	
  	
  I’m	
  backing	
  into	
  a	
  solid	
  
win.

We	
  spread	
  preparaIons	
  out	
  over	
  a	
  few	
  days.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  Ime	
  to	
  work	
  on	
  it.	
  	
  We’ve	
  been	
  doing	
  it	
  so	
  long	
  it’s	
  
gebng	
  quite	
  rouIng	
  and	
  stress	
  free.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  hard	
  traffic	
  day	
  for	
  just	
  about	
  everyone.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  a	
  few	
  young	
  
children	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  coming	
  for	
  a	
  several	
  years.	
  	
  They	
  add	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  the	
  fun.	
  	
  Cathy	
  always	
  has	
  some	
  good	
  
games	
  and	
  gizmos	
  to	
  entertain	
  everyone.	
  	
  What	
  can	
  I	
  say,	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  simple	
  and	
  pleasant	
  day	
  with	
  good	
  friends	
  and	
  
family.	
  	
  We	
  don’t	
  do	
  any	
  big	
  prayers	
  or	
  rounds	
  of	
  graItude.	
  	
  We	
  just	
  enjoy	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  appreciate	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  
                                                                                                        87
That’s	
  sacred	
  stuff.	
  

A\er	
  a	
  few	
  days	
  I	
  took	
  off	
  to	
  the	
  East	
  Coast.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  planned	
  a	
  two	
  week	
  marathon	
  trip	
  to	
  Florida	
  and	
  NY	
  to	
  see	
  a	
  
whole	
  lot	
  of	
  family	
  and	
  friends.	
  	
  When	
  I	
  reviewed	
  my	
  iInerary	
  it	
  looked	
  like	
  I	
  entered	
  some	
  crazy	
  contest.	
  	
  	
  
Actually	
  it	
  was	
  more	
  like	
  “this	
  is	
  your	
  life”.	
  	
  Here’s	
  the	
  roundup	
  of	
  everyone	
  I	
  visited.	
  

I	
   stayed	
   in	
   my	
   beloved	
  South	
  Beach,	
  Miami.	
   	
   My	
   hotel	
   was	
  surprisingly	
   nice.	
   	
   I	
  got	
   up	
   late	
  and	
  went	
   to	
  my	
  
company,	
  ECOA,	
  to	
  see	
  everyone.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  been	
   with	
  this	
  company	
  since	
  2000.	
  	
  I 	
  volunteered	
  to	
  run	
  the	
  place	
  and	
  
then	
  in	
  2001	
  my	
  friend	
  and	
  brother-­‐in-­‐law,	
  Steve	
  and	
  I 	
  bought	
  it	
  from	
  the	
  company	
  I	
  worked	
  for.	
  	
  He’s	
  	
  married	
  to	
  
Lin’s	
  sister,	
  Millie.	
   	
  We’ve	
  known	
  each	
   other	
  since	
  1975.	
   	
  Our	
  poliIcal	
  arguments	
  around	
  the	
  dinner	
  table	
  were	
  
legendary.	
   	
  I’m	
  very	
   proud	
  that	
  he	
  voted	
  for	
  Barak	
  Obama.	
  	
  That’s	
  a 	
  33	
  year	
  sales	
  job.	
  On	
  my	
   list	
  of	
   best	
   friends	
  
Steve	
  is 	
  up	
  top.	
  	
   He’s	
  like	
  a 	
  brother	
  in	
  arms.	
  	
   I	
  would	
   trust	
  him	
  with	
   anything.	
  When	
  I 	
  was	
  diagnosed	
  Steve	
  let	
  me	
  
back	
   away	
  from	
  my	
  responsibility	
   at	
  the	
  company.	
   	
  I	
  really	
  owe	
   him	
  a	
  lot.	
   	
   When	
   I 	
   arrived	
  I 	
  yelled,	
  “Honey,	
   I’m	
  
home!”	
   	
  Everyone	
  showered	
   me	
  with	
  so	
   much	
  love	
  I	
   thought	
  my	
  heart	
   would	
  burst.	
   	
  We	
  ain’t	
  got	
  a	
  barrel	
  o’	
  
money,	
  but	
  hell,	
  this	
  is	
  family.	
   	
   I 	
  met	
  with	
  Yoli	
  and	
  her	
  husband,	
  Jose.	
  	
  I’ve	
  knew	
   their	
   daughters	
  when	
  they	
  were	
  
kids	
  and	
  now	
  they	
  have	
  kids.	
  	
  When	
   we	
  were	
  at	
  social	
  funcIons	
  I 	
  always	
  asked	
  Jose’s	
  Mom,	
  Glady,	
   to	
  dance	
  the	
  
salsa	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  Olivia’s	
  daughters	
  tried	
  to	
  teach	
  me	
  the	
  meringue	
  and	
  now	
  Olivia 	
  is	
  a 	
  grandma.	
  	
  	
  I	
  could	
  write	
  a	
  
page	
   on	
  everyone	
  there.	
   	
   So	
  many	
   lives	
  this 	
  liVle	
  company	
  has	
  touched.	
   	
   I 	
   felt	
   like	
  George	
  Bailey	
  in	
  the	
  movie,	
  
“It’s	
  a	
  Wonderful	
  Life.”	
  	
  Some	
  angel	
  is	
  gebng	
  his	
  wings	
  for	
  this	
  one.	
  

I	
  saw	
  my	
  cousin	
  Jennifer.	
  	
  She’s	
  always	
  been	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  favorites.	
  	
  That	
  was	
  a	
  great	
  unintended	
  benefit	
  of	
  moving	
  
to	
  South	
  Beach.	
  	
  She’s	
  a	
  strong	
  woman	
  with	
  a	
  heart	
  of	
  gold.	
  	
  We	
  just	
  smile	
  at	
  each	
  other	
  whenever	
  we’re	
  
together.	
  	
  It’s	
  like	
  we	
  know	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  each	
  one	
  of	
  knows	
  we	
  know	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  Ponder	
  that.

All	
  throughout	
  the	
  four	
  years	
  I	
  lived	
  in	
  Miami,	
  I	
  aVended	
  the	
  Moon	
  Heart	
  Sangha	
  in	
  Coconut	
  Grove.	
  	
  It’s	
  run	
  by	
  
Soan	
  and	
  MaryAnn	
  Poor.	
  	
  I	
  aVended	
  many	
  sesshins	
  (Zen	
  Retreat)	
  he	
  put	
  on	
  in	
  his	
  home	
  or	
  at	
  the	
  center.	
  	
  Their	
  
house	
  was	
  perfect	
  for	
  small	
  numbers.	
  	
  We	
  slept	
  on	
  the	
  porch.	
  	
  He	
  lived	
  on	
  a	
  tropical	
  acre	
  densely	
  forested	
  so	
  you	
  
felt	
  like	
  you	
  were	
  in	
  Southeast	
  Asia.	
  	
  Soan	
  would	
  come	
  by	
  with	
  a	
  bell	
  to	
  wake	
  us	
  up.	
  	
  MaryAnn	
  did	
  all	
  the	
  food	
  
preparaIon.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  absolutely	
  silent.	
  	
  Once	
  I	
  le\	
  with	
  this	
  incredible	
  realizaIon,	
  “it’s	
  all	
  that	
  simple.”	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  
wonderful	
  moment	
  of	
  clarity.	
  	
  I	
  stopped	
  by	
  for	
  the	
  Wed	
  evening	
  sibng.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  so	
  warmly	
  received.	
  	
  We	
  sat	
  in	
  
sazen	
  (Zen	
  meditaIon)	
  for	
  three	
  periods.	
  	
  Soan	
  usually	
  reads	
  a	
  passage	
  from	
  my	
  favorite	
  book,	
  “ The	
  Mother	
  of	
  
the	
  Buddhas.”	
  	
  We	
  also	
  do	
  interviews.	
  	
  Soan	
  is	
  a	
  Zen	
  teacher	
  and	
  I	
  worked	
  on	
  some	
  koans	
  (Zen	
  teaching	
  stories)	
  
with	
  him	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  	
  In	
  years	
  past	
  whenever	
  I	
  would	
  come	
  in	
  all	
  stressed	
  out	
  he’d	
  quote	
  Mumon:	
  	
  “Every	
  day	
  
a	
  good	
  day.”	
  	
  	
  It	
  is	
  the	
  truth.	
  	
  Sit	
  with	
  that	
  no	
  maVer	
  what	
  the	
  circumstance.

Steve	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  great	
  Ime	
  catching	
  up	
  with	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  We	
  didn’t	
  do	
  any	
  business.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  two	
  old	
  friends	
  that	
  
had	
  some	
  precious	
  Ime	
  together.	
  	
  	
  	
  I	
  stayed	
  over	
  at	
  his	
  place	
  and	
  visited	
  with	
  my	
  sister	
  in	
  law	
  Millie	
  (Lin’s	
  sister).	
  	
  
She	
  looked	
  great	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  fun	
  to	
  sit	
  and	
  talk.	
  	
  Millie	
  and	
  I	
  really	
  like	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  I	
  reassure	
  her	
  that	
  Steve	
  is	
  
always	
  wrong	
  and	
  Steve	
  feels	
  like	
  I’m	
  taking	
  sides,	
  but	
  then,	
  he’s	
  always	
  wrong.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  works.

Millie	
  and	
  Steve	
  took	
  off	
  early	
  for	
  work	
  and	
  I	
  stayed	
  behind	
  to	
  do	
  some	
  paperwork.	
  	
  “Open	
  Enrollment”	
  for	
  my	
  
COBRA	
  was	
  job	
  #1.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  been	
  sibng	
  on	
  it	
  for	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  weeks	
  and	
  today	
  was	
  the	
  day,	
  Dec	
  4.	
  	
  I	
  opened	
  the	
  
envelope	
  and	
  looked	
  over	
  the	
  forms.	
  	
  It	
  asked	
  me	
  to	
  check	
  off	
  two	
  boxes,	
  sign	
  it	
  and	
  send	
  it	
  in.	
  	
  The	
  due	
  date	
  was 	
  
Dec	
  4.	
  	
  That	
  upped	
  the	
  interest	
  level	
  so	
  I	
  called.	
  	
  A\er	
  navigaIng	
  all	
  the	
  menus,	
  making	
  all	
  the	
  right	
  choices,	
  
presented	
  by	
  very	
  concerned	
  and	
  friendly	
  computer	
  voices,	
  I	
  spoke	
  to	
  a	
  real	
  human	
  (big	
  assumpIon).	
  	
  I	
  asked	
  
                                                                                                  88
about	
  the	
  deadline	
  and	
  she	
  confirmed	
  that	
  the	
  form	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  postmarked	
  Dec	
  4.	
  	
  	
  I	
  asked,	
  “What	
  happens	
  if	
  
it’s	
  late?”.	
  	
  She	
  said,	
  “You	
  lose	
  your	
  insurance.”	
  	
  That	
  upped	
  the	
  interest	
  level	
  yet	
  again.	
  	
  I	
  checked	
  and	
  signed	
  	
  
that	
  som'	
  bitch	
  and	
  got	
  my	
  ass	
  to	
  the	
  Post	
  Office,	
  	
  kissed	
  my	
  GPS,	
  sent	
  that	
  leVer	
  postmarked,	
  cerIfied,	
  return	
  
receipt.	
  	
  	
  I	
  even	
  get	
  a	
  picture	
  of	
  the	
  delivery	
  man	
  smiling	
  to	
  the	
  guy	
  he	
  hands	
  the	
  leVer	
  to.	
  	
  	
  Being	
  without	
  Health	
  
Care	
  sucks.	
  	
  Everyone	
  should	
  have	
  it,	
  all	
  the	
  Ime,	
  just	
  because	
  they	
  are	
  human,	
  just	
  like	
  me	
  and	
  you.

My	
  next	
  stop	
  was	
  Boca	
  Raton	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  dear	
  friend	
  Mitch	
  and	
  his	
  lovely	
  wife	
  Fran.	
  	
  Mitch	
  is	
  the	
  teacher	
  at	
  the	
  
Southern	
  Palm	
  Zen	
  Center.	
  	
  He’s	
  a	
  wonderful	
  friend	
  and	
  fellow	
  New	
  Yorker,	
  a	
  Long	
  Islander	
  to	
  boot.	
  	
  I	
  did	
  many	
  
sesshins	
  with	
  his	
  group	
  as	
  well.	
  	
  My	
  Zen	
  teacher	
  of	
  ten	
  years,	
  Tenshin	
  Roshi	
  would	
  also	
  come	
  out	
  to	
  Boca	
  to	
  lead	
  
sesshins	
  with	
  Mitch.	
  	
  Mitch	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  upbeat	
  human	
  being	
  on	
  the	
  planet	
  earth.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  fake,	
  it’s	
  real.	
  	
  I	
  perk	
  up	
  
a	
  few	
  levels	
  when	
  I’m	
  with	
  him.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  several	
  people	
  at	
  Yokoji	
  that	
  remember	
  him	
  and	
  when	
  I	
  said	
  I	
  visited	
  
him	
  they	
  perked	
  up	
  too.	
  	
  It’s	
  magic!	
  	
  I	
  stayed	
  the	
  night	
  in	
  their	
  wonderful	
  home.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  always	
  very	
  generous	
  
with	
  me.

The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  went	
  with	
  Mitch	
  to	
  Saturday	
  morning	
  Zen	
  service.	
  	
  A\er	
  meditaIon	
  Mitch	
  gave	
  a	
  great	
  dharma	
  
talk.	
  	
  He	
  gave	
  a	
  twist	
  on	
  the	
  Sissyphus	
  story	
  where	
  Zeus	
  always	
  made	
  sure	
  there	
  was	
  music	
  playing	
  while	
  he	
  
pushed	
  his	
  rock	
  up	
  the	
  hill.	
  	
  That	
  music	
  is	
  what	
  keeps	
  the	
  path	
  open	
  to	
  all	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  Can	
  you	
  hear	
  it?	
  	
  A\er	
  the	
  
service	
  we	
  all	
  had	
  some	
  bagels.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  an	
  honored	
  guest.	
  	
  I	
  invited	
  them	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  my	
  home,	
  Yokoji.	
  

That	
  a\ernoon	
  I	
  took	
  off	
  for	
  Jupiter	
  (Florida).	
  	
  My	
  cousin,	
  Tricia	
  lives	
  there	
  with	
  her	
  husband	
  Joe.	
  	
  They	
  have	
  four	
  
children	
  	
  Kelsey,	
  Jack,	
  Sam	
  and	
  Ben.	
  	
  They	
  have	
  an	
  ageing	
  but	
  weirdly	
  endearing	
  dog,	
  Riley.	
  	
  He	
  just	
  prances	
  
around	
  with	
  a	
  ball	
  in	
  his	
  mouth.	
  	
  I	
  remember	
  when	
  Riley	
  was	
  young	
  and	
  loved	
  it	
  when	
  you	
  pulled	
  out	
  the	
  ball	
  
and	
  threw	
  it.	
  	
  He	
  would	
  get	
  it	
  and	
  the	
  game	
  would	
  start	
  over	
  again.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  almost	
  never	
  without	
  it.	
  	
  He	
  sIll	
  has	
  
the	
  ball	
  constantly	
  in	
  his	
  mouth	
  but	
  one	
  gets	
  the	
  feeling	
  he’s	
  forgoVen	
  why	
  it’s	
  there.	
  

Kelsey	
  is	
  now	
  looking	
  at	
  colleges	
  for	
  next	
  year.	
  	
  Isn’t	
  that	
  exciIng!	
  	
  Jack	
  is	
  threatening	
  to	
  get	
  his	
  license	
  to	
  drive.	
  	
  I 	
  
had	
  a	
  lot	
  fun	
  with	
  Jack	
  once	
  he	
  told	
  me	
  he’s	
  	
  a	
  “Peer	
  Minister”	
  at	
  Church.	
  	
  Knowing	
  Jack	
  from	
  way	
  back	
  can	
  only	
  
lead	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  suspicion	
  that	
  there’s	
  a	
  scam	
  at	
  work.	
  	
  I	
  gave	
  him	
  the	
  benefit	
  of	
  the	
  doubt	
  but	
  we	
  had	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  fun	
  
with	
  it.	
  	
  Sam	
  is	
  turning	
  into	
  a	
  real	
  guitarist,	
  (very	
  cool).	
  	
  His	
  guitar	
  will	
  soon	
  be	
  gently	
  weeping	
  with	
  his	
  own	
  
music.	
  	
  Ben	
  is	
  the	
  mischief	
  maker.	
  He	
  took	
  the	
  crown	
  from	
  Jack	
  a	
  while	
  back.	
  	
  There’s	
  a	
  family	
  sound	
  that	
  Ben	
  
lives	
  for.	
  	
  It’s	
  spelled	
  “Ben”	
  	
  but	
  it’s	
  pronounced	
  “Beh’	
  en”.	
  	
  The	
  second	
  syllable	
  drops	
  in	
  tone.	
  	
  Everyone	
  knows	
  
how	
  to	
  say	
  it	
  and	
  Ben	
  knows	
  how	
  to	
  evoke	
  it.	
  	
  He	
  just	
  makes	
  mischief	
  and	
  waits	
  for	
  his	
  target	
  to	
  say	
  “Beh’	
  en”.	
  	
  	
  
He	
  scores	
  big	
  when	
  he	
  gets	
  the	
  whole	
  family	
  saying	
  it	
  together.

We	
  went	
  to	
  two	
  basketball	
  games.	
  	
  Jack	
  and	
  Ben	
  are	
  both	
  on	
  teams.	
  It	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  winning	
  day	
  for	
  the	
  Joyce’s.	
  	
  The	
  
best	
  part	
  of	
  sports	
  is	
  to	
  teach	
  kids	
  how	
  to	
  win	
  and	
  lose.	
  	
  They	
  were	
  not	
  aVached	
  to	
  it	
  in	
  the	
  least.	
  	
  They	
  enjoy	
  
playing.	
  	
  Ben’s	
  team	
  had	
  a	
  great	
  last	
  minute	
  rally	
  and	
  came	
  within	
  a	
  point	
  of	
  victory.

Tricia	
  and	
  Joe’s	
  family	
  always	
  brings	
  me	
  home	
  to	
  the	
  Catholic	
  Church.	
  	
  It’s	
  central	
  in	
  their	
  lives	
  and	
  it	
  works.	
  	
  I	
  
love	
  going	
  to	
  Mass	
  with	
  them.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  a	
  “Giving	
  Tree”	
  where	
  each	
  parishioner	
  could	
  pick	
  a	
  gi\	
  for	
  needy	
  
families	
  for	
  Christmas.	
  	
  The	
  Church	
  was	
  full	
  of	
  bikes	
  and	
  wrapped	
  gi\s.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  their	
  Church.	
  	
  It	
  feels	
  very	
  
welcoming	
  and	
  the	
  rituals	
  are	
  all	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  me	
  from	
  the	
  very	
  beginning.	
  	
  Kelsey,	
  Jack	
  and	
  Sam	
  are	
  now	
  old	
  enough	
  
to	
  go	
  to	
  Church	
  alone.	
  	
  So	
  it’s	
  Me,	
  Tricia,	
  Joe	
  and	
  Ben.	
  	
  All	
  throughout	
  the	
  service	
  Ben	
  does	
  his	
  best	
  to	
  distract	
  
me.	
  	
  He	
  scores	
  big	
  when	
  he	
  gets	
  me	
  to	
  say	
  the	
  wrong	
  thing	
  at	
  the	
  wrong	
  Ime.	
  	
  


                                                                                                   89
I	
  had	
  a	
  great	
  Ime	
  with	
  my	
  cousins.	
  	
  Next	
  it	
  was	
  off	
  to	
  NY.	
  	
  My	
  first	
  stop	
  was	
  my	
  sister	
  Anne	
  and	
  her	
  husband,	
  
Don.	
  	
  They	
  live	
  in	
  Freeport.	
  	
  Their	
  daughter,	
  Meaghan,	
  now	
  23(?)	
  was	
  also	
  home.	
  They	
  have	
  another	
  daughter	
  
Melissa	
  living	
  away	
  from	
  home.	
  	
  In	
  other	
  words,	
  a	
  mature	
  family.	
  	
  Anne	
  is	
  my	
  heart	
  and	
  soul.	
  	
  She	
  is	
  two	
  years	
  
older	
  than	
  me.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  early	
  years	
  we	
  reminded	
  each	
  other	
  to	
  say	
  our	
  prayers.	
  	
  We	
  would	
  someImes	
  go	
  to	
  church	
  
when	
  only	
  the	
  few	
  faithful	
  would	
  go,	
  	
  during	
  the	
  week	
  when	
  it’s	
  above	
  and	
  beyond	
  the	
  requirement.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  
Catholic	
  Church	
  you	
  have	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  Mass	
  once	
  a	
  week	
  or	
  you	
  go	
  the	
  hell	
  for	
  all	
  eternity.	
  	
  That’s	
  a	
  big	
  incenIve.	
  	
  	
  
There	
  weren’t	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  liVle	
  children	
  that	
  would	
  walk	
  to	
  church	
  on	
  their	
  own	
  and	
  sit	
  in	
  a	
  pew	
  for	
  an	
  hour	
  of	
  
prayer.	
  	
  We	
  did.	
  	
  That’s	
  our	
  connecIon.	
  	
  Don	
  is	
  a	
  hard	
  working	
  reIred	
  NYC	
  Fireman	
  and	
  self	
  made	
  cra\sman.	
  	
  
He’s	
  constantly	
  working	
  on	
  projects.	
  	
  The	
  best	
  I’ve	
  found	
  to	
  help	
  him	
  with	
  his	
  projects	
  is	
  to	
  stay	
  out	
  of	
  	
  his	
  way.	
  	
  	
  I	
  
got	
  him	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  his	
  ongoing	
  war	
  with	
  squirrels.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  persistent	
  criVers	
  that	
  love	
  abcs.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  
telling	
  Don	
  to	
  make	
  his	
  peace	
  with	
  them;	
  to	
  “Give	
  Peace	
  a	
  Chance.”	
  	
  But	
  he’s	
  not	
  buying	
  it.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  war!	
  	
  
Meaghan	
  is	
  working	
  as	
  an	
  EMT	
  on	
  an	
  ambulance;	
  helping	
  people	
  that	
  really	
  need	
  to	
  be	
  cared	
  for	
  NOW.	
  	
  How	
  
cool	
  is	
  that!!!!

The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  brother	
  Tommy,	
  his	
  wife	
  Anali	
  and	
  their	
  11?	
  year	
  old	
  son	
  Tommy	
  Jr.	
  	
  	
  Tommy	
  is	
  into	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                             	
  
WWF	
  wrestling.	
  	
  I	
  always	
  keep	
  myself	
  tuned	
  in	
  a	
  bit	
  so	
  I	
  can	
  “talk	
  wrestling”.	
  	
  I	
  even	
  have	
  a	
  favorite,	
  Ray	
  Mysterio.	
  
He	
  always	
  wears	
  a	
  mask	
  and	
  is	
  known	
  for	
  his	
  theatrical	
  spin	
  around	
  the	
  post	
  that	
  knocks	
  his	
  opponent	
  into	
  the	
  
next	
  county.	
  	
  It’s	
  very	
  cool	
  but	
  he	
  always	
  loses.	
  	
  The	
  weather	
  was	
  freezing	
  when	
  I	
  got	
  there.	
  	
  We	
  stayed	
  in	
  for	
  
Chinese	
  food	
  and	
  had	
  a	
  nice	
  evening	
  together	
  gebng	
  caught	
  up	
  in	
  the	
  moment.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  really	
  great	
  to	
  spend	
  
Ime	
  just	
  relaxing	
  and	
  enjoying	
  the	
  company.	
  	
  Tommy	
  wasn’t	
  feeling	
  all	
  that	
  well	
  so	
  he	
  missed	
  school.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  
see	
  all	
  the	
  stuff	
  I	
  sent	
  him	
  from	
  Asia.	
  

The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  went	
  on	
  to	
  find	
  my	
  High	
  School	
  buddy	
  Dave.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  Woodstock	
  together	
  and	
  were	
  quite	
  
inseparable	
  in	
  our	
  teens	
  and	
  twenIes	
  unIl	
  I	
  got	
  married.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  on	
  my	
  first	
  date	
  with	
  Lin	
  to	
  visit	
  him	
  in	
  Vermont.	
     	
  
He’s	
  homeless	
  now.	
  	
  All	
  his	
  life	
  he	
  worked	
  as	
  a	
  Ile	
  seVer.	
  	
  He’s	
  a	
  hard	
  worker	
  that	
  always	
  paid	
  his	
  way	
  but	
  never	
  
thought	
  about	
  tomorrow.	
  	
  It’s	
  tomorrow.	
  	
  I	
  ran	
  into	
  him	
  at	
  his	
  favorite	
  coffee	
  shop.	
  	
  We	
  spent	
  the	
  a\ernoon	
  
together.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  Dave.	
  	
  Our	
  connecIon	
  is	
  permanent.	
  	
  I	
  wish	
  there	
  was	
  something	
  I	
  could	
  do	
  for	
  him	
  beyond	
  this	
  
distant	
  friendship.	
  	
  He	
  deserves	
  beVer	
  but	
  we	
  live	
  in	
  a	
  country	
  that	
  really	
  doesn’t	
  care.	
  	
  As	
  my	
  sixth	
  grade	
  
teacher,	
  Sister	
  Helen	
  Vincent,	
  loved	
  to	
  say,	
  “Mr.	
  Riley,	
  acIons	
  speak	
  louder	
  than	
  words.”	
  	
  No	
  one	
  should	
  ever	
  be	
  
homeless	
  in	
  a	
  ChrisIan	
  country.	
  	
  Shame	
  on	
  us.

I	
  had	
  dinner	
  with	
  an	
  old	
  friend.	
  	
  This	
  past	
  year	
  was	
  the	
  40th	
  anniversary	
  of	
  our	
  High	
  School	
  graduaIon.	
  Because	
  I	
  
was	
  in	
  Singapore	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  able	
  to	
  aVend	
  our	
  reunion.	
  	
  I	
  reconnected	
  to	
  several	
  old	
  friends.	
  	
  I	
  knew	
  Karl	
  McDonald	
  
since	
  I	
  was	
  five	
  years	
  old.	
  	
  We	
  met	
  at	
  Pumpernickels	
  restaurant	
  which	
  was	
  run	
  by	
  one	
  of	
  our	
  classmates,	
  ArIe	
  
Glad.	
  	
  He’s	
  owned	
  the	
  place	
  since	
  he	
  was	
  23.	
  	
  He’	
  s	
  now	
  the	
  consummate	
  restaurateur.	
  	
  	
  Karl	
  and	
  I	
  caught	
  up	
  on	
  
our	
  lives.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  great	
  Ime	
  to	
  reconnect.	
  	
  All	
  the	
  fantasies	
  are	
  dead	
  and	
  now	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  survey	
  the	
  wreckage.	
  	
  
That	
  sounds	
  harsh	
  but	
  it’s	
  actually	
  quite	
  beauIful.	
  	
  Once	
  you	
  see	
  it	
  you’re	
  free.	
  	
  There’s	
  no	
  more	
  polishing	
  the	
  
turd,	
  you	
  just	
  flush	
  and	
  move	
  on.	
  	
  We	
  grew	
  up	
  in	
  a	
  beauIful	
  town	
  that	
  had	
  everything	
  a	
  young	
  boy	
  could	
  want	
  
but	
  we	
  were	
  both	
  raised	
  by	
  seriously	
  wounded	
  people.	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  forgive	
  and	
  be	
  forgiven.	
  	
  We	
  toasted	
  our	
  
renewed	
  friendship.	
  	
  Perhaps	
  we’ll	
  get	
  away	
  for	
  a	
  week	
  someplace	
  and	
  celebrate	
  our	
  freedom.

My	
  next	
  stop	
  was	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  sister	
  Beth.	
  	
  She	
  lives	
  in	
  a	
  quiet	
  place	
  on	
  the	
  Long	
  Island	
  Sound.	
  	
  The	
  sound	
  of	
  it	
  
rocks	
  me	
  to	
  sleep.	
  Beth	
  is	
  a	
  healer.	
  	
  She	
  works	
  out	
  of	
  her	
  home	
  and	
  teaches	
  healing.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  love	
  saying	
  that.	
  	
  I’m	
  
proud	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  brother	
  of	
  a	
  healing	
  sister.	
  	
  Her	
  children,	
  Traci	
  and	
  John	
  were	
  my	
  first	
  niece	
  and	
  nephew.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  
see	
  both	
  of	
  them.	
  	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  express	
  how	
  much	
  I	
  love	
  them.	
  	
  They	
  know	
  how	
  much	
  I	
  do.	
  	
  Traci	
  was	
  in	
  the	
  
                                                                                                    90
hospital.	
  	
  She	
  has	
  some	
  crazy	
  health	
  karma	
  going	
  on.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  understand	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  want	
  to	
  make	
  it	
  go	
  away	
  and	
  I	
  
can’t.	
  	
  She	
  has	
  a	
  beauIful	
  daughter,	
  Kathryn.	
  	
  I	
  video	
  taped	
  her	
  and	
  Beth	
  (grandma)	
  singing	
  “Oh	
  What	
  a	
  BeauIful	
  
Morning!”	
  and	
  other	
  songs	
  that	
  will	
  soon	
  be	
  featured	
  on	
  YouTube,	
  stay	
  tuned.

My	
  next	
  stop	
  was	
  NYC	
  to	
  visit	
  with	
  my	
  sister	
  Pat.	
  	
  I	
  also	
  arranged	
  to	
  meet	
  with	
  a	
  group	
  of	
  old	
  friends	
  from	
  my	
  
first	
  Buddhist	
  group,	
  NSA.	
  	
  A\er	
  my	
  diagnosis	
  I	
  reconnected	
  with	
  an	
  old	
  friend	
  Barry	
  Harrow.	
  	
  He	
  lives	
  in	
  
Monterrey	
  and	
  comes	
  to	
  NYC	
  o\en.	
  	
  That’s	
  where	
  we	
  both	
  pracIced	
  together.	
  	
  He	
  arranged	
  the	
  get	
  together.	
  	
  
The	
  group	
  was	
  a	
  real	
  blast.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  1970’s	
  we	
  were	
  inseparable.	
  	
  This	
  group	
  marched	
  in	
  parades,	
  put	
  on	
  massive	
  
cultural	
  events	
  in	
  ciIes	
  all	
  across	
  the	
  country.	
  	
  We	
  chanted,	
  “Nam	
  Myoho	
  Renge	
  Kyo”	
  for	
  hours	
  on	
  end.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  
believed	
  we	
  were	
  working	
  for	
  a	
  beVer	
  world.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  well	
  worth	
  the	
  effort.	
  

The	
  next	
  morning	
  I	
  took	
  a	
  train	
  with	
  my	
  brother	
  John	
  to	
  Brewster.	
  	
  It’s	
  on	
  the	
  verge	
  of	
  rural	
  New	
  York.	
  	
  His	
  home	
  
is	
  quite	
  beauIful	
  overlooking	
  a	
  big	
  reservoir.	
  	
  John	
  was	
  my	
  big	
  brother	
  growing	
  up.	
  	
  He	
  guided	
  me	
  with	
  his	
  
upright	
  character.	
  	
  Now	
  he’s	
  my	
  friend,	
  someImes	
  in	
  need.	
  	
  There’s	
  something	
  special	
  about	
  two	
  old	
  souls	
  sibng	
  
in	
  a	
  comfortable	
  living	
  room	
  by	
  a	
  fire	
  in	
  December.	
  	
  

We	
  took	
  an	
  early	
  train	
  to	
  NYC	
  to	
  aVend	
  our	
  annual	
  family	
  Christmas	
  get	
  together.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  where	
  I	
  get	
  to	
  see	
  
everyone	
  all	
  at	
  once	
  and	
  say	
  a	
  hearty	
  Merry	
  Christmas	
  to	
  all	
  my	
  loved	
  ones.	
  	
  My	
  Aunt	
  Isabelle	
  is	
  89.	
  	
  She’s	
  sturdy	
  
as	
  can	
  be.	
  	
  She	
  told	
  me	
  she	
  loved	
  reading	
  my	
  posts	
  except	
  for	
  the	
  “toilet	
  humor”.	
  	
  LiVle	
  does	
  she	
  know	
  that	
  every	
  
Ime	
  I	
  put	
  in	
  my	
  off	
  color	
  stuff	
  there’s	
  a	
  liVle	
  angel	
  on	
  my	
  right	
  shoulder.	
  	
  She	
  says,	
  “You	
  know,	
  Aunt	
  Isabelle	
  will	
  
be	
  reading	
  this.	
  	
  You	
  should	
  be	
  ashamed	
  of	
  yourself!”.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  stop	
  right	
  there	
  and	
  delete	
  it	
  but	
  for	
  the	
  other	
  
shoulder.	
  	
  The	
  liVle	
  devil	
  is	
  just	
  sIcking	
  that	
  fork	
  in	
  my	
  neck	
  saying,	
  	
  “come	
  on,	
  this	
  is	
  your	
  best	
  stuff!	
  	
  Aunt	
  
Isabelle	
  needs	
  to	
  lighten	
  up	
  anyway.	
  	
  Put	
  it	
  in	
  there	
  and	
  she’ll	
  get	
  over	
  it.”	
  	
  Despite	
  the	
  obvious	
  flaw	
  in	
  his	
  logic	
  I	
  
always	
  give	
  in	
  because	
  he’s	
  got	
  a	
  really	
  sharp	
  fork.	
  	
  Forgive	
  me,	
  Aunt	
  Isabelle,	
  the	
  devil	
  made	
  me	
  do	
  it.	
  

Aunt	
  Anne	
  is	
  a	
  reIred	
  nurse.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  my	
  saving	
  grace	
  during	
  my	
  treatments.	
  	
  I	
  loved	
  to	
  call	
  her	
  and	
  go	
  over	
  
what	
  the	
  doctors	
  told	
  me	
  or	
  review	
  some	
  test	
  results.	
  	
  She	
  tells	
  it	
  to	
  me	
  straight.	
  	
  She	
  loves	
  me	
  a	
  lot	
  and	
  love	
  her	
  
right	
  back	
  with	
  all	
  my	
  heart.

The	
  whole	
  affair	
  was	
  pure	
  joy	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  saw	
  nephews,	
  nieces,	
  brothers,	
  sisters	
  in	
  a	
  fine	
  celebraIon	
  of	
  the	
  season.	
  	
  
I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  sister	
  Pat’s	
  home.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  a	
  tradiIon	
  where	
  we	
  decorate	
  the	
  tree	
  and	
  I	
  make	
  spagheb	
  and	
  
meatballs.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  messy	
  job.	
  	
  Victoria	
  almost	
  did	
  the	
  whole	
  tree	
  single	
  handedly.	
  	
  She’s	
  my	
  17	
  yr	
  old	
  niece.	
  	
  She	
  
just	
  got	
  accepted	
  to	
  American	
  University	
  in	
  DC.	
  	
  We’re	
  all	
  very	
  proud	
  of	
  her.	
  	
  No	
  one	
  more	
  than	
  me.	
  	
  For	
  some	
  
reason	
  when	
  she	
  and	
  her	
  brother,	
  Sasha	
  came	
  into	
  our	
  lives	
  I	
  “coincidentally”	
  ended	
  up	
  	
  going	
  to	
  NY	
  all	
  the	
  Ime.	
  	
  
I	
  determined	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  best	
  uncle	
  I	
  could	
  possibly	
  be	
  to	
  them.	
  	
  I’ve	
  done	
  my	
  best	
  and	
  they	
  can	
  be	
  the	
  judge.

When	
  I	
  got	
  home	
  to	
  Yokoji	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I’d	
  been	
  away	
  for	
  a	
  long,	
  long	
  Ime.	
  	
  It	
  took	
  a	
  lot	
  to	
  get	
  	
  back	
  into	
  the	
  swing	
  
of	
  things.	
  	
  A	
  large	
  group	
  came	
  that	
  day	
  from	
  all	
  over	
  the	
  world.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  here	
  for	
  a	
  Japanese	
  style	
  three	
  month	
  
training	
  period	
  (Ango).	
  	
  In	
  Japanese	
  Zen	
  there	
  are	
  two	
  main	
  schools,	
  Soto	
  and	
  Rinzai.	
  	
  This	
  group	
  belongs	
  to	
  the	
  
Soto	
  School.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  doing	
  their	
  first	
  Sotoshu	
  (Soto	
  Sect)	
  Ango	
  in	
  North	
  America.	
  	
  Students	
  from	
  Europe	
  and	
  
South	
  and	
  North	
  America	
  are	
  here	
  for	
  the	
  training.	
  	
  There’s	
  more	
  people	
  here	
  than	
  I	
  can	
  ever	
  remember.	
  	
  The	
  
energy	
  is	
  wonderful	
  with	
  everyone	
  dedicated	
  to	
  maintaining	
  this	
  very	
  special	
  place.	
  	
  Our	
  normal	
  pracIce	
  here	
  is	
  
very	
  much	
  like	
  the	
  way	
  Zen	
  is	
  pracIced	
  in	
  Japan.	
  	
  However,	
  seeing	
  the	
  precision	
  of	
  their	
  ritual	
  life	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
  were	
  
a	
  bunch	
  of	
  slackers.	
  


                                                                                                      91
Christmas	
  came	
  very	
  quickly	
  and	
  I	
  had	
  rented	
  a	
  house	
  right	
  on	
  Mission	
  Beach	
  in	
  San	
  Diego.	
  	
  I	
  figured	
  that	
  was	
  
the	
  best	
  way	
  to	
  get	
  to	
  see	
  everyone.	
  	
  Simon,	
  the	
  tenzo	
  (cook)	
  from	
  Yokoji	
  came	
  the	
  first	
  night.	
  	
  Doshi	
  and	
  Pat	
  
came	
  with	
  some	
  great	
  homemade	
  chicken	
  soup.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  joined	
  by	
  my	
  support	
  group	
  buddies,	
  Jack	
  and	
  Mukul.	
  	
  
It	
  was	
  definitely	
  “men’s	
  night”.	
  	
  	
  I	
  won’t	
  say	
  anything	
  more,	
  confidenIality	
  and	
  all	
  that.	
  	
  On	
  Christmas	
  Eve	
  we	
  
were	
  joined	
  by	
  my	
  daughter	
  Jessica.	
  	
  Christmas	
  Day	
  everyone	
  showed	
  up.	
  	
  My	
  son,	
  Conor	
  and	
  his	
  partner,	
  
Candace;	
  	
  Lin	
  and	
  Tom	
  with	
  Tom’s	
  mom;	
  	
  Seisen,	
  Ando,	
  Jodie,	
  Zoey	
  and	
  Kokyo	
  from	
  the	
  Sweetwater	
  Zen	
  Center;	
  
Jack	
  and	
  his	
  daughter	
  Elyssia;	
  Genny	
  and	
  Rich	
  Solomon	
  spent	
  the	
  night	
  with	
  us.	
  	
  We	
  just	
  ate	
  Ill	
  we	
  dropped.	
  	
  It	
  
was	
  a	
  great	
  day.	
  

I	
  cleared	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  place	
  on	
  the	
  26th.	
  	
  Ron	
  Evans	
  and	
  Jon	
  Wreschinsky	
  from	
  my	
  support	
  group	
  came	
  by	
  for	
  
breakfast.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  friend	
  Florencia.	
  	
  She	
  gave	
  me	
  several	
  “ TherapeuIc	
  Touch”	
  healing	
  sessions	
  when	
  I	
  
was	
  first	
  diagnosed.	
  	
  She’s	
  been	
  a	
  good	
  friend	
  for	
  over	
  ten	
  years.	
  	
  She	
  just	
  had	
  a	
  stroke	
  and	
  is	
  confined	
  to	
  a	
  
nursing	
  home.	
  	
  Her	
  spirit	
  is	
  good	
  but	
  she’s	
  in	
  great	
  need	
  of	
  simple	
  support.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  really	
  glad	
  to	
  just	
  sit	
  with	
  her.

	
  I	
  	
  visited	
  with	
  Cathy	
  on	
  my	
  way	
  back	
  home.	
  	
  We	
  always	
  exchange	
  gi\s	
  at	
  some	
  point.	
  We	
  went	
  to	
  visit	
  with	
  her	
  
friends	
  Tina,	
  Tim	
  and	
  ScoV.	
  	
  We	
  played	
  a	
  simple	
  game	
  called	
  “Apples	
  to	
  Apples”.	
  	
  I’m	
  not	
  a	
  big	
  game	
  guy	
  and	
  I	
  
was	
  very	
  saIsfied	
  that	
  I	
  didn’t	
  come	
  in	
  last.	
  	
  That’s	
  the	
  extent	
  of	
  my	
  aspiraIons	
  when	
  it	
  comes	
  to	
  games.

The	
  next	
  day	
  I	
  visited	
  with	
  my	
  friend	
  Joe	
  Berk.	
  	
  He	
  had	
  a	
  bad	
  motorcycle	
  accident	
  and	
  was	
  using	
  a	
  walker	
  to	
  get	
  
around.	
  	
  The	
  prognosis	
  looks	
  good	
  but	
  he’s	
  been	
  through	
  a	
  lot	
  so	
  far	
  and	
  has	
  quite	
  a	
  ways	
  to	
  go	
  toward	
  a	
  full	
  
recovery.	
  	
  He’s	
  been	
  a	
  good	
  friend	
  throughout	
  my	
  ordeal.	
  	
  He’s	
  travelled	
  quite	
  a	
  distance	
  on	
  several	
  occasions	
  to	
  
keep	
  me	
  company	
  in	
  my	
  hours	
  of	
  need.	
  	
  I’m	
  really	
  glad	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  spend	
  some	
  Ime	
  with	
  him.

My	
  New	
  Year’s	
  tradiIon	
  daIng	
  back	
  to	
  1999/2000	
  has	
  been	
  to	
  aVend	
  the	
  Sesshin	
  (Zen	
  silent	
  retreat)	
  at	
  Yokoji.	
  	
  It	
  
lasts	
  four	
  days	
  leading	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  New	
  Year.	
  	
  I’ve	
  always	
  been	
  the	
  reflecIve	
  type	
  and	
  it’s	
  best	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  be	
  around	
  
similar	
  people.	
  	
  New	
  Year’s	
  Eve	
  was	
  amazing.	
  We	
  end	
  the	
  sesshin	
  by	
  going	
  around	
  in	
  a	
  closing	
  council.	
  	
  Everyone	
  
gets	
  their	
  turn	
  to	
  say	
  what	
  they	
  experienced.	
  	
  I	
  simply	
  expressed	
  my	
  deep	
  graItude	
  to	
  see	
  2010.	
  	
  I	
  yelled,	
  “Amen,	
  
Hallelujah!!”	
  	
  Does	
  anyone	
  know	
  how	
  fortunate	
  they	
  are	
  to	
  be	
  here?	
  	
  	
  We	
  do	
  a	
  ritual	
  where	
  we	
  write	
  down	
  all	
  
the	
  things	
  we	
  want	
  to	
  let	
  go	
  of	
  from	
  the	
  past	
  year.	
  	
  We	
  burn	
  the	
  paper	
  in	
  a	
  fire	
  while	
  chanIng	
  in	
  a	
  circle.	
  	
  It’s	
  
Ime	
  for	
  me	
  to	
  let	
  go	
  of	
  all	
  of	
  it.	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  to	
  hang	
  to	
  anymore.	
  	
  I	
  put	
  it	
  all	
  in	
  the	
  fire.

The	
  full	
  moon	
  was	
  so	
  bright	
  we	
  hardly	
  needed	
  a	
  flashlight.	
  	
  The	
  air	
  was	
  perfectly	
  sIll.	
  	
  Zen	
  robes	
  and	
  a	
  hat	
  were	
  
all	
  we	
  needed	
  to	
  keep	
  us	
  warm.	
  	
  We	
  took	
  turns	
  hibng	
  the	
  large	
  bell	
  and	
  bowing	
  to	
  all	
  eternity.	
  	
  We	
  celebrated	
  
the	
  New	
  Year	
  with	
  a	
  service	
  in	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall.	
  	
  A\erwards	
  we	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  dining	
  hall	
  and	
  shared	
  a	
  good	
  meal	
  
with	
  a	
  champagne	
  toast.	
  	
  I	
  always	
  lead	
  everyone	
  in	
  “Auld	
  Lang	
  Syne”.	
  	
  It’s	
  one	
  of	
  my	
  favorite	
  songs.	
  	
  No	
  one	
  quite	
  
knows	
  what	
  it	
  means,	
  but	
  the	
  heart	
  hears	
  every	
  word.	
  

The	
  following	
  day	
  we	
  wrote	
  down	
  our	
  aspiraIons	
  for	
  the	
  coming	
  year	
  and	
  threw	
  them	
  into	
  the	
  fire.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  
warm	
  and	
  sunny	
  day.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  memorial	
  site	
  of	
  Yokoji’s	
  founders.	
  	
  The	
  honorary	
  founder	
  was	
  Doun	
  
Senji.	
  	
  His	
  son,	
  Shuhomi	
  Roshi,	
  was	
  with	
  us	
  and	
  he	
  officiated	
  at	
  his	
  service.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  chanted	
  sutras	
  and	
  offered	
  
incense	
  to	
  his	
  ashes.	
  	
  Shuhomi	
  Roshi	
  	
  said	
  his	
  father	
  lost	
  his	
  mother	
  when	
  he	
  was	
  young.	
  	
  He	
  was	
  given	
  to	
  a	
  
temple	
  and	
  treated	
  harshly.	
  	
  He	
  went	
  on	
  to	
  overcome	
  a	
  hard	
  early	
  life.	
  The	
  hardship	
  propelled	
  him	
  on	
  his	
  
journey.	
  	
  I	
  know	
  about	
  that	
  struggle.	
  	
  Out	
  of	
  his	
  ashes	
  we	
  stood	
  to	
  dedicate	
  our	
  lives	
  to	
  compassion	
  and	
  
kindness.	
  	
  Before	
  he	
  died	
  he	
  told	
  his	
  son:	
  1)	
  do	
  virtuous	
  things	
  unnoIced	
  and	
  2)	
  when	
  you	
  die	
  you	
  go	
  naked.	
  	
  We	
  
later	
  found	
  out	
  that	
  Shuhomi	
  Roshi	
  has	
  stage	
  4	
  cancer.	
  	
  There’s	
  nothing	
  here	
  to	
  cling	
  to	
  at	
  all.	
  	
  Nothing	
  goes	
  with	
  
                                                                                                92
you.	
  	
  Go	
  empty	
  handed	
  with	
  no	
  strings	
  aVached.	
  	
  Release	
  the	
  bonds	
  of	
  greed,	
  anger	
  and	
  ignorance	
  and	
  leave	
  
this	
  world	
  naked.

As	
  I	
  look	
  back	
  at	
  2009	
  I	
  can	
  only	
  say	
  it	
  has	
  been	
  extraordinary.	
  	
  I	
  renewed	
  my	
  determinaIon	
  to	
  live	
  my	
  life	
  with	
  
both	
  eyes	
  open.	
  	
  What	
  came	
  to	
  me	
  was	
  totally	
  unexpected	
  and	
  wonderful.	
  	
  Yet	
  it	
  was	
  simply	
  just	
  waking	
  up	
  
every	
  day	
  and	
  doing	
  life.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  it	
  all;	
  happiness,	
  sadness,	
  joy,	
  despair,	
  anger,	
  boredom,	
  loneliness,	
  excitement,	
  
laughter	
  and	
  tears.	
  	
  None	
  of	
  that	
  maVers	
  anymore.	
  	
  It’s	
  like	
  a	
  passing	
  wind,	
  a	
  storm	
  that	
  comes	
  and	
  goes;	
  blue	
  
skies	
  and	
  calm	
  waters.	
  	
  When	
  put	
  in	
  its	
  proper	
  place,	
  I	
  am	
  free.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  to	
  push	
  any	
  of	
  it	
  away.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  
to	
  crave	
  the	
  things	
  I	
  once	
  loved.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  simply	
  enjoy	
  this	
  transient	
  life,	
  coming	
  and	
  going.	
  	
  	
  I	
  can	
  love	
  all	
  the	
  
amazing	
  people	
  that	
  have	
  chosen	
  to	
  be	
  close	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  savor	
  the	
  memory	
  of	
  all	
  those	
  that	
  have	
  been	
  le\	
  
behind.	
  	
  Every	
  day	
  IS	
  a	
  good	
  day.	
  	
  Should	
  auld	
  acquaintance	
  be	
  forgot	
  and	
  never	
  brought	
  to	
  mind….we’ll	
  drink	
  a	
  
cup	
  of	
  kindness	
  yet,	
  for	
  the	
  sake	
  of	
  auld	
  lang	
  syne.	
  	
  Let	
  your	
  heart	
  leap	
  into	
  it.	
  	
  I	
  fearlessly	
  embrace	
  2010.

From	
  what	
  do	
  I	
  run

My	
  home	
  is	
  nowhere	
  to	
  find

I	
  am	
  free	
  to	
  roam.

LeTng	
  it	
  go
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Saturday,	
  February	
  13,	
  2010

It’s	
  the	
  last	
  day	
  of	
  “Drum	
  Roll	
  Week.”	
  	
  I	
  came	
  down	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  on	
  Tuesday	
  to	
  do	
  my	
  blood	
  work.	
  	
  Wednesday	
  I	
  
had	
  an	
  appointment	
  with	
  my	
  urologist	
  for	
  an	
  unrelated	
  maVer.	
  	
  On	
  Thursday	
  I	
  got	
  my	
  CT	
  Scan.	
  	
  Today	
  is	
  Friday	
  
and	
  I	
  see	
  my	
  oncologist	
  at	
  4:00	
  PM.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  strange	
  week	
  leading	
  up	
  to	
  an	
  uncertain	
  prognosis.	
  	
  It’s	
  hard	
  to	
  believe	
  
that	
  I’m	
  coming	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  fourth	
  anniversary	
  of	
  my	
  diagnosis.	
  	
  Looking	
  back	
  I	
  realize	
  I’ve	
  done	
  a	
  good	
  job	
  with	
  
my	
  life.	
  	
  This	
  disease	
  can	
  put	
  things	
  into	
  focus	
  if	
  you	
  can	
  keep	
  your	
  head	
  straight.	
  	
  Throughout	
  most	
  of	
  my	
  life	
  I	
  
doubted	
  the	
  straightness	
  of	
  my	
  head.	
  	
  I	
  always	
  thought	
  I	
  over-­‐quesIoned	
  life.	
  	
  However,	
  in	
  doing	
  that	
  I’ve	
  
realized	
  that	
  life	
  is	
  all	
  about	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  quesIons.	
  	
  When	
  faced	
  with	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  it,	
  the	
  quesIons	
  have	
  already	
  
been	
  asked,	
  there’s	
  no	
  need	
  to	
  review	
  the	
  basics;	
  	
  “why	
  me?,	
  what’s	
  it	
  all	
  about?;	
  if	
  only	
  this	
  or	
  that.”	
  	
  Those	
  
quesIons	
  have	
  all	
  been	
  exhausted	
  and	
  revealed	
  to	
  be	
  what	
  they	
  always	
  were,	
  fruitless	
  whining.	
  	
  Don’t	
  get	
  me	
  
wrong,	
  whining	
  has	
  its	
  place	
  especially	
  when	
  there’s	
  someone	
  that	
  cares	
  for	
  you	
  willing	
  to	
  listen.	
  	
  It	
  can	
  do	
  a	
  lot	
  
to	
  let	
  out	
  a	
  good	
  whine.	
  	
  We	
  like	
  to	
  call	
  that	
  love.	
  

I’m	
  in	
  Starbucks	
  enjoying	
  a	
  green	
  tea	
  a\er	
  overdosing	
  on	
  coffee	
  at	
  Denny’s	
  this	
  morning.	
  	
  I	
  called	
  my	
  friend	
  from	
  
the	
  Unitarian	
  Men’s	
  Fellowship,	
  Mike	
  Dorfi.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  our	
  weekend	
  retreat	
  in	
  the	
  San	
  Bernardino	
  Mountains	
  
every	
  April.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  a	
  closing	
  circle	
  on	
  Sunday	
  where	
  every	
  man	
  gets	
  to	
  say	
  his	
  truth.	
  	
  Last	
  year	
  my	
  truth	
  was	
  a	
  
good-­‐bye	
  song.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  with	
  these	
  men	
  for	
  twenty	
  years.	
  	
  We	
  grew	
  up	
  together,	
  supported	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  
vowed	
  together	
  to	
  live	
  from	
  the	
  heart.	
  	
  They	
  all	
  were	
  in	
  tears	
  and	
  surrounded	
  me	
  with	
  their	
  love.	
  	
  Now	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  
call	
  and	
  say,	
  “but	
  I’m	
  not	
  dead	
  yet.”	
  	
  It	
  looks	
  like	
  I’ll	
  make	
  it	
  again	
  this	
  year.	
  	
  Time	
  for	
  a	
  new	
  song.

I	
  don’t	
  know	
  what	
  to	
  expect.	
  	
  I	
  le\	
  Singapore	
  with	
  some	
  hard	
  back	
  pain	
  I	
  aVributed	
  to	
  sleeping	
  on	
  a	
  cheap	
  IKEA	
  

                                                                                                      93
maVress	
  for	
  five	
  months.	
  	
  Some	
  of	
  it	
  went	
  away	
  but	
  some	
  remained.	
  	
  Cancer	
  pain	
  is	
  supposed	
  to	
  be	
  persistent	
  
and	
  gradually	
  get	
  worse.	
  	
  My	
  pain	
  is	
  in	
  my	
  lower	
  region	
  but	
  it	
  comes	
  and	
  goes,	
  shi\s	
  from	
  one	
  area	
  to	
  the	
  next.	
  	
  
My	
  doctor	
  said	
  it’s	
  in	
  the	
  right	
  place	
  but	
  the	
  coming	
  and	
  going	
  is	
  “atypical.”	
  	
  I	
  hang	
  onto	
  words	
  like	
  that.	
  	
  In	
  truth	
  
I’m	
  taking	
  more	
  ibuprofen	
  than	
  I	
  was,	
  parIcularly	
  at	
  night.	
  	
  My	
  basic	
  consItuIon	
  has	
  changed	
  liVle	
  except	
  for	
  
that.	
  	
  I	
  can	
  imagine	
  ever	
  increasing	
  pain	
  just	
  as	
  easily	
  as	
  shrinking	
  tumors	
  from	
  my	
  successful	
  Singapore	
  
treatments.	
  	
  I’ll	
  get	
  more	
  informaIon	
  in	
  about	
  three	
  hours.	
  	
  Till	
  then	
  I’ll	
  wait	
  and	
  wonder.	
  	
  This	
  waiIng	
  could	
  be	
  
maddening	
  but	
  instead	
  it	
  just	
  sits	
  there.	
  	
  I’ve	
  done	
  it	
  too	
  many	
  Imes	
  to	
  let	
  it	
  get	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  I’ve	
  had	
  more	
  bad	
  news	
  
then	
  good.	
  	
  In	
  fact	
  I	
  haven’t	
  had	
  any	
  good	
  news	
  since	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  iniIal	
  treatment	
  in	
  2006	
  when	
  they	
  declared	
  
me	
  cured	
  and	
  sent	
  me	
  off	
  with	
  my	
  colostomy	
  and	
  a	
  lollipop.	
  	
  Maybe	
  I’m	
  due	
  but	
  cancer	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  disease	
  that	
  
lends	
  itself	
  to	
  good	
  news.	
  	
  Good	
  news	
  in	
  my	
  case	
  is	
  called	
  a	
  miracle.	
  	
  Maybe	
  I’m	
  due.

I	
  had	
  lunch	
  this	
  week	
  with	
  an	
  old	
  friend	
  that	
  just	
  went	
  through	
  a	
  round	
  of	
  cancer	
  treatments.	
  	
  She’s	
  been	
  told	
  it’s	
  
all	
  cleared	
  out.	
  	
  She	
  had	
  a	
  theory	
  on	
  why	
  it	
  happened.	
  	
  She	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  boVom	
  of	
  an	
  old	
  emoIonal	
  wound	
  and	
  
now	
  it’s	
  all	
  gone.	
  	
  I	
  heard	
  with	
  the	
  ears	
  of	
  a	
  professor	
  listening	
  to	
  his	
  first	
  year	
  student.	
  	
  Cancer	
  is	
  so	
  much	
  more	
  
than	
  all	
  that.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  so	
  many	
  cures,	
  theories	
  and	
  treatments.	
  	
  Everyone	
  wants	
  to	
  control	
  the	
  uncontrollable.	
  	
  
I’ve	
  tried	
  a	
  bunch	
  of	
  them	
  and	
  I	
  sIll	
  drink	
  my	
  magic	
  water,	
  take	
  my	
  daily	
  supplements	
  and	
  pray.	
  	
  Everyday	
  I	
  wake	
  
up	
  and	
  thank	
  God	
  for	
  this	
  day,	
  grateful	
  to	
  see,	
  hear	
  and	
  breathe.	
  	
  It’s	
  simpler	
  now.	
  	
  “ Twenty	
  more	
  years,	
  God;	
  
Twenty	
  more	
  years.”	
  	
  This	
  hard	
  line	
  between	
  worlds	
  is	
  so\er	
  now	
  and	
  my	
  prayers	
  are	
  like	
  talking	
  to	
  old	
  friends	
  
instead	
  of	
  glorious	
  deiIes.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  expect	
  anything,	
  I	
  just	
  want	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  my	
  old	
  friends	
  know	
  what	
  I	
  want.	
  	
  
They	
  assure	
  me	
  they	
  do.

Life	
  at	
  Yokoji	
  has	
  become	
  a	
  good	
  rouIne.	
  	
  When	
  I	
  return	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  I	
  realize	
  that	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  hard	
  to	
  live	
  a	
  
useful	
  life	
  here	
  in	
  the	
  city.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  useful	
  at	
  the	
  monastery.	
  	
  The	
  Japanese	
  Ango	
  (training	
  period)	
  that	
  we	
  are	
  
hosIng	
  seems	
  to	
  be	
  going	
  well.	
  	
  Everyone	
  was	
  amazed	
  at	
  how	
  great	
  the	
  weather	
  was	
  for	
  January.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  peaking	
  
at	
  50	
  and	
  sunny	
  almost	
  every	
  day.	
  	
  Two	
  feet	
  of	
  snow	
  brought	
  that	
  liVle	
  fantasy	
  to	
  a	
  screeching	
  halt.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  
situated	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  a	
  mile	
  long	
  dirt	
  road	
  several	
  miles	
  off	
  the	
  highway.	
  	
  We	
  own	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  snow	
  plows	
  and	
  a	
  
tractor.	
  	
  The	
  main	
  job	
  for	
  the	
  first	
  snow	
  is	
  to	
  remind	
  us	
  of	
  just	
  how	
  they’ve	
  been	
  neglected.	
  	
  The	
  snow	
  was	
  too	
  
heavy	
  and	
  only	
  4	
  wheel	
  drive	
  vehicles	
  could	
  get	
  in	
  or	
  out.	
  	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  go	
  and	
  polled	
  the	
  guys	
  doing	
  the	
  road	
  if	
  
they	
  thought	
  my	
  1992	
  Lexus	
  would	
  make	
  it	
  out.	
  	
  Jim,	
  the	
  young	
  Englishman	
  was	
  confident	
  that	
  with	
  a	
  push	
  or	
  
two	
  we’d	
  make	
  it.	
  	
  Gerhart,	
  the	
  pracIcal	
  German	
  was	
  convinced	
  we	
  were	
  doomed.	
  	
  We	
  put	
  the	
  chains	
  on	
  the	
  
Lexus	
  and	
  took	
  off.	
  	
  A\er	
  about	
  a	
  third	
  of	
  a	
  mile	
  that	
  felt	
  like	
  Mr.	
  Toad’s	
  Wild	
  Ride	
  the	
  car	
  came	
  to	
  an	
  abrupt	
  halt.	
  	
  
We	
  weren’t	
  moving	
  	
  much	
  with	
  four	
  people	
  pushing.	
  	
  I	
  did	
  learn	
  that	
  the	
  Lexus	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  front	
  wheel	
  drive	
  
vehicle.	
  	
  The	
  chains	
  were	
  merely	
  decoraIve.	
  	
  	
  The	
  Abbot,	
  Tenshin,	
  came	
  in	
  from	
  the	
  other	
  way	
  and	
  with	
  his	
  great	
  
wisdom	
  said,	
  “ This	
  was	
  not	
  a	
  good	
  idea.”	
  	
  Thanks,	
  Yoda.	
  	
  	
  We	
  pushed	
  the	
  car	
  off	
  the	
  road	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  
cabin.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  make	
  another	
  aVempt	
  in	
  a	
  few	
  days.

The	
  major	
  deadline	
  for	
  gebng	
  out	
  was	
  my	
  flight	
  on	
  Friday	
  for	
  my	
  annual	
  Brother’s	
  trip.	
  	
  Every	
  year	
  I	
  get	
  together	
  
with	
  my	
  brothers	
  John,	
  Brian	
  and	
  Tom.	
  	
  We	
  meet	
  somewhere	
  warm,	
  usually	
  in	
  Mexico	
  and	
  do	
  the	
  male	
  bonding	
  
                                                                                                   94
thing.	
  	
  Brian	
  took	
  over	
  a	
  small	
  business	
  this	
  January	
  and	
  said	
  he	
  couldn’t	
  get	
  away.	
  	
  We	
  decided	
  to	
  move	
  the	
  trip	
  
to	
  his	
  home	
  state	
  of	
  Colorado.	
  	
  So	
  basically	
  I	
  le\	
  the	
  cold,	
  snowy	
  mountain	
  to	
  join	
  my	
  brothers	
  for	
  a	
  trip	
  to	
  
colder,	
  snowier	
  mountains.	
  

The	
  day	
  came	
  to	
  leave.	
  	
  Jim	
  and	
  I	
  walked	
  down	
  to	
  the	
  car.	
  	
  We	
  didn’t	
  get	
  it	
  to	
  move	
  more	
  than	
  a	
  few	
  inches.	
  	
  I	
  
borrowed	
  a	
  car	
  for	
  the	
  week	
  assuring	
  it’s	
  owner	
  that	
  my	
  car	
  would	
  become	
  available	
  any	
  day	
  now.	
  	
  Strangely,	
  he	
  
bought	
  it.	
  

I’m	
  really	
  glad	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  Colorado.	
  	
  During	
  the	
  holiday	
  season	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I	
  saw	
  all	
  my	
  friends	
  and	
  family.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  just	
  
great.	
  	
  The	
  only	
  ones	
  I	
  didn’t	
  get	
  to	
  see	
  were	
  “the	
  Colorado	
  Rileys”.	
  	
  Don’t	
  they	
  sound	
  like	
  a	
  hardy	
  bunch?	
  	
  It	
  was	
  
wonderful	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  niece	
  Shelby	
  and	
  nephew	
  Shaun.	
  	
  My	
  sister-­‐in-­‐law,	
  Laurie	
  is	
  trying	
  to	
  set	
  up	
  the	
  books	
  for	
  
Brian’s	
  new	
  venture.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  able	
  to	
  help	
  her	
  out	
  a	
  bit	
  with	
  that.	
  

As	
  soon	
  as	
  I	
  landed	
  I	
  realized	
  I	
  forgot	
  something	
  very	
  important.	
  	
  My	
  iniIal	
  treatment	
  for	
  rectal	
  cancer	
  le\	
  with	
  
me	
  with	
  a	
  buV	
  that	
  is	
  less	
  than	
  completely	
  reliable.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  too	
  bad	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  Ime.	
  	
  In	
  fact,	
  it	
  got	
  a	
  lot	
  beVer	
  
in	
  Asia.	
  	
  I	
  used	
  to	
  have	
  to	
  wear	
  “protecIve	
  undergarments”	
  to	
  bed.	
  	
  Somehow,	
  all	
  the	
  curry,	
  rice	
  and	
  secret	
  
spices	
  really	
  worked	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  Now	
  I	
  just	
  need	
  to	
  strategically	
  paste	
  panty-­‐liners	
  in	
  my	
  underwear	
  and	
  all	
  is	
  good	
  
with	
  the	
  world.

Usually,	
  I’m	
  not	
  shy	
  about	
  all	
  this	
  but	
  I	
  figured	
  no	
  one	
  needs	
  to	
  know	
  what	
  they	
  really	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  know.	
  	
  Lord	
  
knows,	
  I	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  know	
  what’s	
  in	
  your	
  underwear.	
  	
  	
  I	
  told	
  my	
  brother	
  that	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  go	
  to	
  a	
  drugstore	
  
when	
  he	
  gets	
  a	
  chance.	
  	
  We	
  didn’t	
  get	
  a	
  chance	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  back	
  from	
  the	
  airport.	
  	
  Instead	
  I	
  had	
  to	
  listen	
  to	
  an	
  
excruciaIng	
  occasional	
  conversaIon	
  about	
  who	
  will	
  go	
  do	
  what	
  to	
  get	
  everything	
  we	
  need,	
  one	
  of	
  which	
  
included	
  bringing	
  Kevin	
  to	
  the	
  drug	
  store.	
  	
  I	
  didn’t	
  like	
  the	
  sound	
  of	
  this.	
  	
  Naturally,	
  it	
  made	
  the	
  most	
  sense	
  to	
  
everyone	
  but	
  me	
  that	
  I	
  should	
  go	
  with	
  Laurie	
  and	
  Shelby,	
  the	
  only	
  females	
  in	
  this	
  group	
  of	
  seven.	
  	
  At	
  this	
  point	
  I	
  
surrendered	
  to	
  the	
  cosmic	
  joke	
  my	
  old	
  friends	
  seem	
  to	
  enjoy.	
  	
  	
  Shelby	
  had	
  to	
  get	
  some	
  things	
  for	
  a	
  school	
  project	
  
and	
  luckily	
  needed	
  her	
  Mom’s	
  help.	
  	
  So	
  I	
  quickly	
  slinked	
  off	
  alone	
  in	
  the	
  direcIon	
  of	
  the	
  pharmacy	
  and	
  made	
  a	
  
quick	
  turn	
  into	
  the	
  feminine	
  secIon.	
  	
  Browsing	
  about	
  that	
  aisle	
  always	
  feels	
  wrong.	
  	
  I	
  go	
  to	
  CVS	
  back	
  home	
  and	
  I	
  
know	
  exactly	
  what	
  the	
  box	
  looks	
  like.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  walk	
  and	
  with	
  a	
  quick	
  flick	
  of	
  the	
  wrist	
  it’s	
  in	
  my	
  basket.	
  	
  Not	
  so	
  here.	
  	
  
I	
  have	
  to	
  read	
  the	
  labels	
  while	
  trying	
  to	
  go	
  unnoIced.	
  	
  I	
  looked	
  like	
  a	
  real	
  concerned	
  but	
  confused	
  shopper.	
  	
  	
  I	
  got	
  
what	
  I	
  needed	
  and	
  ran	
  to	
  the	
  counter	
  hoping	
  there	
  wasn’t	
  a	
  line.	
  	
  I	
  think	
  I	
  got	
  out	
  without	
  anyone	
  noIcing.	
  	
  I’m	
  
probably	
  wrong	
  but	
  who’s	
  going	
  to	
  ask,	
  “Hey,	
  Uncle	
  Kevin,	
  what	
  are	
  the	
  panIliners	
  for?”	
  	
  If	
  she	
  did	
  noIce	
  she	
  
needs	
  this	
  explanaIon.	
  	
  Otherwise,	
  her	
  lasIng	
  impression	
  of	
  dear	
  old	
  Uncle	
  Kevin	
  could	
  be	
  forever	
  scarred.

The	
  mountains	
  were	
  beauIful,	
  snow	
  and	
  all.	
  	
  Brian	
  brought	
  us	
  to	
  a	
  place	
  where	
  we	
  could	
  snow	
  shoe	
  and	
  have	
  
some	
  real	
  Rocky	
  Mountain	
  fun.	
  	
  That	
  lasted	
  about	
  15	
  minutes.	
  	
  	
  John	
  and	
  I	
  knew	
  we	
  had	
  veto	
  power.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  
always	
  willing	
  to	
  watch	
  Tommy	
  and	
  Brian	
  play	
  their	
  winter	
  games.	
  	
  	
  No	
  one	
  needed	
  too	
  much	
  encouragement	
  to	
  
just	
  get	
  back	
  in	
  the	
  warm	
  car.	
  	
  The	
  trip	
  was	
  wonderful.	
  	
  Brian	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  those	
  guys	
  that	
  loves	
  to	
  feed	
  people.	
  	
  We	
  
went	
  out	
  for	
  day	
  trips	
  and	
  just	
  enjoyed	
  our	
  brotherhood.	
  	
  We	
  are	
  deep	
  down	
  brothers.	
  
                                                                                                     95
So	
  now	
  it’s	
  Friday	
  of	
  Drum	
  roll	
  Week	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  a	
  few	
  hours	
  before	
  my	
  appointment	
  	
  	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  visit	
  Florencia.	
  	
  
She’s	
  on	
  old	
  friend	
  that	
  recently	
  suffered	
  a	
  stroke.	
  	
  She’s	
  in	
  an	
  assisted	
  living	
  facility	
  recuperaIng.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  slow	
  
process	
  with	
  no	
  guarantees	
  of	
  how	
  much	
  of	
  her	
  old	
  self	
  she’ll	
  regain.	
  	
  It’s	
  very	
  frustraIng	
  for	
  her.	
  	
  I	
  determined	
  
to	
  see	
  her	
  as	
  much	
  as	
  I	
  can.	
  	
  Time	
  is	
  the	
  only	
  thing	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  give	
  that’s	
  worth	
  anything	
  to	
  her.	
  	
  We	
  always	
  go	
  for	
  a 	
  
drive	
  somewhere.	
  	
  It	
  hardly	
  maVers	
  where,	
  it’s	
  away	
  from	
  there.	
  	
  We	
  got	
  a	
  hot	
  drink	
  at	
  the	
  Coffee	
  Bean.	
  	
  I	
  only	
  
had	
  an	
  hour	
  because	
  of	
  my	
  doctor	
  appointment.	
  	
  She	
  asked	
  if	
  I	
  wanted	
  her	
  to	
  go	
  with	
  me	
  for	
  support.	
  	
  When	
  I	
  
answered	
  I	
  was	
  struck	
  by	
  how	
  much	
  I’ve	
  had	
  to	
  face	
  on	
  my	
  own.	
  	
  All	
  the	
  treatments,	
  the	
  visits	
  full	
  of	
  bad	
  news,	
  
looking	
  at	
  these	
  gruesome	
  Scans	
  showing	
  a	
  disease	
  that	
  only	
  knows	
  one	
  direcIon.	
  	
  I’ve	
  done	
  it	
  all	
  with	
  a	
  sIff	
  
upper	
  lip	
  and	
  smile	
  on	
  my	
  face.	
  	
  You	
  never	
  your	
  own	
  strength	
  unIl	
  you	
  have	
  to	
  use	
  it.

I	
  dropped	
  Florencia	
  off	
  and	
  started	
  on	
  my	
  way	
  to	
  see	
  Dr	
  Fred	
  Millard,	
  my	
  oncologist.	
  	
  I	
  became	
  aware	
  of	
  a	
  feeling	
  
of	
  fear	
  in	
  my	
  stomach.	
  	
  I	
  turned	
  off	
  the	
  radio	
  and	
  let	
  it	
  speak	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  like	
  a	
  puppy	
  hearing	
  it’s	
  first	
  loud	
  
thunder.	
  	
  I	
  gave	
  it	
  all	
  my	
  aVenIon.	
  	
  My	
  mind	
  and	
  body	
  are	
  scared.	
  	
  We’ve	
  spent	
  this	
  whole	
  life	
  together	
  
convinced	
  this	
  will	
  last	
  forever.	
  	
  We	
  were	
  quite	
  nimble	
  at	
  ignoring	
  that	
  liVle	
  voice	
  of	
  doom.	
  	
  I	
  understand	
  so	
  much	
  
more	
  now	
  about	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  fear	
  and	
  emoIon.	
  	
  It’s	
  just	
  a	
  feeling	
  and	
  doesn’t	
  need	
  to	
  consume	
  everything.	
  	
  	
  
It’s	
  important	
  to	
  embrace	
  it	
  without	
  lebng	
  it	
  get	
  out	
  of	
  hand.	
  

Dr	
  Fred	
  came	
  in	
  and	
  a\er	
  iniIal	
  greeIngs	
  he	
  said	
  some	
  things	
  have	
  changed.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  cancer	
  center	
  change	
  is	
  
usually	
  bad.	
  	
  He	
  showed	
  me	
  tumors	
  that	
  have	
  grown	
  and	
  a	
  few	
  new	
  ones	
  have	
  emerged	
  in	
  the	
  lung.	
  	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  
look	
  good	
  for	
  the	
  treatment	
  I	
  received	
  in	
  Singapore.	
  	
  We	
  talked	
  about	
  opIons	
  and	
  I’ll	
  have	
  some	
  choices	
  to	
  make	
  
over	
  the	
  next	
  month	
  or	
  two.	
  	
  I’m	
  sIll	
  holding	
  out	
  a	
  slim	
  possibility	
  that	
  the	
  vaccine	
  could	
  do	
  something	
  posiIve.	
  	
  
The	
  scan	
  he	
  was	
  using	
  for	
  comparison	
  was	
  taken	
  back	
  in	
  May.	
  	
  It	
  is	
  possible	
  that	
  some	
  good	
  could	
  come	
  of	
  it	
  yet.	
  	
  
However	
  it’s	
  Ime	
  for	
  serious	
  consideraIon	
  of	
  the	
  opIons.	
  	
  To	
  that	
  end	
  a	
  new	
  oncologist	
  will	
  be	
  calling	
  me.	
  	
  He	
  
specializes	
  in	
  colon	
  cancer	
  and	
  is	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  all	
  the	
  latest	
  trials.	
  	
  I’m	
  really	
  not	
  interested	
  in	
  doing	
  the	
  kind	
  of	
  
regimen	
  I	
  went	
  on	
  back	
  in	
  2008.	
  	
  I	
  will	
  listen	
  and	
  keep	
  an	
  open	
  mind.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  two	
  major	
  consideraIons.	
  	
  One	
  
is	
  the	
  advancement	
  of	
  medical	
  science.	
  	
  I’m	
  open	
  to	
  using	
  my	
  life	
  toward	
  helping	
  move	
  the	
  state	
  of	
  the	
  art	
  in	
  the	
  
discovery	
  of	
  the	
  cure	
  for	
  this	
  disease.	
  	
  The	
  second	
  consideraIon	
  is	
  my	
  family	
  and	
  friends.	
  	
  If	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  reason	
  to	
  
hang	
  on	
  to	
  help	
  anyone	
  that	
  hasn’t	
  yet	
  processed	
  their	
  life	
  without	
  me,	
  now	
  is	
  the	
  Ime	
  to	
  let	
  me	
  know.	
  	
  My	
  
friend	
  Tina	
  from	
  Sweetwater	
  lost	
  her	
  father	
  to	
  cancer.	
  	
  She	
  told	
  me	
  a	
  very	
  moving	
  story	
  about	
  how	
  he	
  held	
  on	
  for	
  
a	
  couple	
  of	
  years.	
  	
  That	
  made	
  a	
  big	
  difference	
  to	
  her	
  life.	
  	
  When	
  he	
  died	
  she	
  let	
  him	
  go	
  in	
  peace.	
  	
  That’s	
  really	
  my	
  
only	
  request	
  to	
  all	
  those	
  I’ve	
  loved,	
  hurt	
  or	
  otherwise	
  touched	
  with	
  my	
  life.	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  to	
  forgive	
  and	
  be	
  forgiven.	
  	
  	
  
I’ve	
  done	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  work	
  on	
  that.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  at	
  peace	
  with	
  everyone	
  in	
  my	
  world.	
  	
  I	
  invite	
  anyone	
  to	
  come	
  to	
  me	
  now	
  
and	
  share	
  whatever	
  they	
  are	
  holding	
  onto	
  that	
  I	
  may	
  do	
  what	
  I	
  can	
  to	
  help	
  you	
  let	
  it	
  go.	
  	
  I’ve	
  said	
  many	
  Imes	
  
that	
  I	
  want	
  to	
  die	
  in	
  a	
  sIll	
  pond.	
  	
  There	
  will	
  come	
  a	
  Ime	
  when	
  I	
  will	
  no	
  longer	
  welcome	
  anger	
  or	
  distress	
  into	
  my	
  
surroundings.	
  	
  So	
  do	
  it	
  now	
  while	
  I	
  can	
  help.

It’s	
  a	
  solemn	
  day	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  Life	
  goes	
  on	
  and	
  everyone	
  here	
  at	
  Yokoji	
  has	
  been	
  very	
  supporIve.	
  	
  The	
  friends	
  I’ve	
  
contacted	
  all	
  feel	
  a	
  deep	
  sense	
  of	
  connecIon	
  to	
  my	
  situaIon.	
  	
  There’s	
  no	
  way	
  to	
  describe	
  how	
  wonderful	
  it	
  is	
  to	
  
                                                                                                      96
have	
  all	
  of	
  you.	
  	
  My	
  fear,	
  depression	
  and	
  anxiety	
  about	
  death	
  cannot	
  overwhelm	
  this	
  great	
  ocean	
  of	
  equanimity	
  I	
  
feel	
  for	
  my	
  life	
  and	
  the	
  whole	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  It’s	
  extraordinary	
  and	
  when	
  each	
  of	
  us	
  leaves	
  as	
  all	
  things	
  leave,	
  it’s	
  just	
  the	
  
right	
  Ime.	
  	
  God	
  bless	
  this	
  and	
  let	
  me	
  live	
  God’s	
  will.	
  

No	
  doom	
  or	
  sadness

just	
  a	
  path	
  to	
  the	
  other

a	
  well	
  deserved	
  rest


Washed	
  away
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Monday,	
  April	
  19,	
  2010

I	
  woke	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  rain	
  this	
  morning.	
  	
  There	
  are	
  four	
  residents	
  here	
  at	
  the	
  monastery	
  that	
  have	
  birthdays	
  to	
  
celebrate	
  over	
  the	
  course	
  of	
  a	
  single	
  week.	
  	
  I	
  promised	
  to	
  make	
  everyone	
  pancakes	
  and	
  veggie	
  sausages	
  for	
  
breakfast.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  kitchen	
  early.	
  	
  Travis	
  was	
  making	
  a	
  pot	
  of	
  coffee	
  for	
  everyone.	
  	
  Paul	
  came	
  in	
  soon	
  a\er.	
  	
  He	
  
is	
  the	
  Jikido	
  (Imekeeper)	
  for	
  the	
  meditaIon	
  this	
  week.	
  	
  It’s	
  his	
  first	
  Ime.	
  	
  He	
  decided	
  to	
  shave	
  his	
  head	
  last	
  
night.	
  	
  It’s	
  a	
  new	
  look.	
  	
  I	
  mixed	
  up	
  a	
  few	
  ingredients	
  for	
  the	
  pancake	
  baVer.	
  Harvey	
  turned	
  twenty	
  today	
  and	
  
when	
  he	
  came	
  into	
  the	
  kitchen	
  I	
  wished	
  him	
  a	
  Happy	
  Birthday.	
  	
  He’s	
  here	
  for	
  a	
  month	
  to	
  saIsfy	
  a	
  curiosity,	
  a	
  
calling	
  that	
  whispers	
  to	
  mysIcs.	
  	
  He	
  said	
  he	
  felt	
  old.	
  	
  I	
  remembered	
  when	
  I	
  turned	
  twenty.	
  	
  My	
  friend	
  Dave	
  and	
  I	
  
were	
  struck	
  by	
  transiIon.	
  	
  The	
  rush	
  of	
  independence	
  was	
  now	
  commonplace.	
  	
  Where	
  do	
  we	
  go	
  from	
  here?	
  	
  I	
  
wished	
  Harvey	
  and	
  I	
  could	
  switch	
  bodies	
  for	
  a	
  week.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  play	
  like	
  there’s	
  no	
  tomorrow.	
  	
  Harvey	
  would	
  never	
  
miss	
  another	
  day	
  of	
  his	
  life.

It	
  was	
  Ime	
  to	
  sit	
  so	
  I	
  put	
  on	
  my	
  robes	
  and	
  went	
  into	
  the	
  Buddha	
  Hall.	
  	
  I	
  bowed	
  and	
  walked	
  to	
  my	
  cushion.	
  	
  
Everyone	
  came	
  in	
  and	
  the	
  room	
  seVled	
  down.	
  	
  The	
  Jikido	
  rang	
  the	
  bell	
  and	
  we	
  all	
  entered	
  into	
  silence.	
  	
  The	
  
sound	
  of	
  the	
  rain	
  and	
  the	
  subtle	
  pain	
  in	
  my	
  lower	
  back	
  started	
  things	
  off.	
  	
  Nothing	
  stands	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  rain.	
  	
  Every	
  
clinging	
  thing	
  is	
  loosed	
  unIl	
  it	
  breaks	
  free	
  to	
  start	
  its	
  journey	
  to	
  the	
  great	
  ocean.	
  	
  Even	
  the	
  clinging	
  is	
  part	
  of	
  this	
  
journey.	
  	
  Hold	
  on	
  as	
  long	
  as	
  you	
  can	
  but	
  the	
  rain	
  will	
  come	
  and	
  soon	
  you’ll	
  be	
  the	
  last	
  one	
  standing,	
  alone	
  and	
  
afraid.	
  	
  The	
  unknown	
  awaits	
  and	
  the	
  rain	
  is	
  persistent.	
  

A	
  couple	
  of	
  weeks	
  ago	
  my	
  dear	
  friend	
  Michael	
  Bauer	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  two	
  thirds	
  of	
  the	
  way	
  down	
  the	
  Baja	
  Peninsula	
  
to	
  go	
  whale	
  watching.	
  	
  He’s	
  been	
  doing	
  this	
  for	
  many	
  years.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  trying	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  Ime	
  to	
  go	
  and	
  finally	
  
this	
  was	
  it.	
  	
  Michael	
  and	
  his	
  wife	
  Sally	
  have	
  been	
  so	
  kind	
  to	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  o\en	
  stay	
  at	
  their	
  place	
  when	
  I	
  go	
  to	
  San	
  
Diego.	
  	
  The	
  trip	
  took	
  12	
  hours.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  amazed	
  how	
  beauIful	
  it	
  was.	
  	
  All	
  the	
  spring	
  flowers	
  were	
  blooming	
  and	
  the	
  
desert	
  landscape	
  was	
  green	
  and	
  colorful.	
  	
  The	
  cactus	
  are	
  huge	
  and	
  the	
  mountains	
  wonderful.	
  	
  Surprisingly	
  we	
  
didn’t	
  see	
  a	
  single	
  shoot	
  out	
  between	
  rival	
  drug	
  lords,	
  no	
  one	
  tried	
  to	
  kidnap	
  us	
  and	
  we	
  didn’t	
  have	
  to	
  bribe	
  any	
  
officials.	
  	
  I	
  guess	
  we	
  were	
  just	
  lucky.


                                                                                                     97
Late	
  that	
  night	
  we	
  got	
  to	
  the	
  Bed	
  and	
  Breakfast	
  Michael	
  stays	
  at	
  in	
  San	
  Ignacio.	
  	
  He	
  knows	
  the	
  Canadian	
  
proprietors	
  well	
  and	
  even	
  shops	
  for	
  them	
  at	
  Costco	
  to	
  bring	
  needed	
  supplies.	
  	
  We	
  slept	
  in	
  a	
  yurt	
  that	
  was	
  well	
  
put	
  together.	
  	
  The	
  only	
  glitch	
  is	
  that	
  the	
  water	
  runs	
  out	
  every	
  night.	
  	
  That’s	
  not	
  good	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  need	
  good	
  toilets	
  
especially	
  at	
  night.	
  	
  We	
  made	
  it	
  though.	
  	
  The	
  place	
  is	
  right	
  on	
  a	
  lake.	
  	
  The	
  wind	
  blows	
  at	
  night	
  and	
  the	
  wildlife	
  lets	
  
you	
  know	
  this	
  is	
  paradise.

The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  had	
  an	
  incredible	
  breakfast	
  and	
  took	
  off	
  for	
  the	
  lagoon.	
  	
  We	
  drove	
  a	
  40	
  mile	
  dirt	
  road.	
  	
  
Whenever	
  I	
  go	
  to	
  Mexico	
  with	
  Michael	
  I	
  end	
  up	
  on	
  40	
  mile	
  dirt	
  roads.	
  	
  At	
  the	
  end	
  was	
  a	
  small	
  community	
  of	
  
simple	
  cabins	
  and	
  a	
  restaurant.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  run	
  by	
  an	
  ecotourism	
  group.	
  	
  We	
  made	
  the	
  arrangements	
  and	
  got	
  on	
  a	
  15’	
  
open	
  boat	
  with	
  an	
  outboard	
  motor.	
  	
  The	
  enIre	
  lagoon	
  is	
  Ightly	
  controlled	
  to	
  protect	
  the	
  whales.	
  	
  We	
  saw	
  a	
  
group	
  of	
  dolphins,	
  birds	
  of	
  every	
  kind	
  and	
  finally	
  a	
  whale.	
  	
  This	
  lagoon	
  is	
  the	
  end	
  of	
  the	
  line	
  for	
  the	
  migratory	
  
path	
  	
  of	
  the	
  Gray	
  Whales.	
  	
  It	
  starts	
  in	
  the	
  northern	
  Pacific.	
  	
  They	
  come	
  here	
  to	
  get	
  pregnant	
  and	
  come	
  back	
  to	
  
give	
  birth.	
  	
  Most	
  of	
  whales	
  we	
  saw	
  were	
  in	
  pairs;	
  mother	
  and	
  calf.	
  	
  We	
  went	
  from	
  one	
  pair	
  to	
  another.	
  	
  We	
  got	
  
out	
  to	
  the	
  mouth	
  of	
  the	
  lagoon.	
  	
  The	
  waves	
  were	
  big	
  and	
  breaking	
  on	
  the	
  barely	
  submerged	
  sand	
  bars.	
  	
  	
  
Suddenly	
  we	
  were	
  surrounded	
  by	
  a	
  dozen	
  whales	
  all	
  circling	
  the	
  boat.	
  	
  Some	
  would	
  come	
  close	
  and	
  go	
  under	
  us.	
  	
  
Then	
  a	
  calf	
  came	
  up	
  and	
  raised	
  its	
  head	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  look	
  at	
  us	
  and	
  we	
  were	
  able	
  to	
  pet	
  it.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  wonderful	
  day.	
  

The	
  liVle	
  town	
  of	
  San	
  Ignacio	
  is	
  worth	
  the	
  trip	
  all	
  by	
  itself.	
  	
  There’s	
  an	
  old	
  church	
  and	
  a	
  town	
  square.	
  	
  Michael	
  
was	
  making	
  arrangements	
  to	
  see	
  cave	
  painIngs	
  and	
  I	
  went	
  walking	
  around.	
  	
  I	
  needed	
  to	
  use	
  the	
  bathroom	
  and	
  
there	
  was	
  a	
  place	
  that	
  adverIsed	
  this	
  service.	
  	
  I	
  walked	
  in	
  but	
  didn’t	
  see	
  it.	
  	
  An	
  old	
  man	
  pointed	
  to	
  a	
  liVle	
  dog.	
  	
  It	
  
looked	
  at	
  me	
  and	
  led	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  banjo.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  worth	
  five	
  pesos.

We	
  got	
  on	
  a	
  shorter	
  but	
  much	
  worse	
  dirt	
  road	
  to	
  the	
  cave	
  painIngs.	
  	
  We	
  met	
  our	
  guide	
  and	
  went	
  on	
  a	
  long	
  uphill	
  
hike.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  preVy	
  good	
  that	
  I’m	
  sIll	
  able	
  to	
  do	
  that.	
  	
  Michael	
  and	
  I	
  were	
  equally	
  worn	
  out	
  by	
  the	
  Ime	
  we	
  got	
  
there.	
  	
  The	
  painIngs	
  were	
  very	
  faded	
  and	
  hard	
  to	
  make	
  out.	
  	
  The	
  guide	
  had	
  nothing	
  to	
  offer	
  by	
  way	
  of	
  
explanaIon.	
  	
  When	
  we	
  got	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  car,	
  Michael	
  offered	
  our	
  guide	
  a	
  ride	
  home.	
  	
  That	
  was	
  a	
  true	
  act	
  of	
  
compassion.	
  	
  	
  We	
  travelled	
  10	
  miles	
  out	
  of	
  our	
  way.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  best	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  trip.	
  	
  We	
  passed	
  through	
  the	
  
most	
  remote	
  civilizaIon	
  I’ve	
  ever	
  seen.	
  	
  Every	
  so	
  o\en	
  we	
  passed	
  a	
  liVle	
  house	
  with	
  a	
  small	
  herd	
  of	
  goats	
  and	
  an	
  
occasional	
  vegetable	
  patch.	
  	
  The	
  whole	
  valley	
  was	
  connected	
  by	
  what	
  looked	
  like	
  a	
  garden	
  hose	
  they	
  all	
  used	
  for	
  
water.	
  	
  The	
  source	
  was	
  a	
  shallow	
  stream	
  and	
  most	
  likely	
  a	
  reliable	
  spring.	
  	
  We	
  passed	
  a	
  school	
  on	
  the	
  way.	
  	
  Our	
  
guide	
  said	
  the	
  children	
  travel	
  2	
  hours	
  by	
  mule	
  wagon	
  to	
  get	
  there.	
  	
  They	
  usually	
  stay	
  for	
  the	
  beVer	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  
week.	
  	
  	
  They	
  have	
  what’s	
  called	
  “ Telesecondarias”.	
  	
  These	
  are	
  schools	
  connected	
  by	
  satellite	
  that	
  give	
  remote	
  
instrucIon	
  to	
  secondary	
  level	
  (High	
  School)	
  students.	
  	
  	
  This	
  is	
  not	
  an	
  easy	
  place	
  to	
  make	
  a	
  living.	
  	
  Our	
  guide	
  said	
  
the	
  populaIon	
  was	
  dwindling	
  as	
  young	
  people	
  go	
  to	
  the	
  ciIes	
  for	
  opportunity.	
  	
  I	
  can’t	
  imagine	
  how	
  they	
  make	
  
that	
  transiIon.

We	
  went	
  to	
  a	
  small	
  town	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  called	
  Santa	
  Rosarita.	
  	
  It	
  features	
  a	
  church	
  designed	
  by	
  Eiffel,	
  the	
  tower	
  
guy.	
  	
  The	
  story	
  is	
  they	
  put	
  all	
  the	
  pieces	
  on	
  a	
  boat	
  and	
  it	
  was	
  mistakenly	
  delivered	
  to	
  this	
  small	
  town.	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  

                                                                                                     98
funny	
  church	
  made	
  of	
  steel	
  and	
  had	
  the	
  look	
  of	
  an	
  erector	
  set.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  watching	
  	
  Mexican	
  families	
  doing	
  church.	
  	
  It	
  
reminds	
  me	
  of	
  the	
  liVle	
  town	
  I	
  grew	
  up	
  in.	
  	
  	
  The	
  next	
  day	
  we	
  drove	
  the	
  twelve	
  hours	
  home.	
  	
  	
  It	
  was	
  a	
  great	
  trip	
  to	
  
an	
  interesIng	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  world	
  with	
  an	
  old	
  friend.	
  	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  get	
  much	
  beVer	
  than	
  that.

I’ve	
  been	
  going	
  through	
  several	
  tests	
  and	
  I	
  have	
  more	
  yet	
  to	
  do	
  before	
  I	
  see	
  Dr	
  Fanta	
  on	
  the	
  20th	
  of	
  April.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  
“Stage	
  3	
  Chronic	
  Kidney	
  Disease”.	
  	
  	
  My	
  urologist	
  said	
  the	
  tumor	
  in	
  my	
  colon	
  is	
  pressing	
  up	
  against	
  the	
  urethra	
  
that	
  goes	
  from	
  my	
  right	
  kidney	
  to	
  my	
  bladder.	
  	
  Stage	
  4	
  is	
  where	
  talk	
  of	
  dialysis	
  starts.	
  	
  They	
  are	
  planning	
  to	
  put	
  a	
  
tube	
  into	
  the	
  urethra	
  to	
  open	
  it	
  up	
  and	
  hopefully	
  save	
  the	
  kidney.	
  	
  I	
  may	
  go	
  back	
  to	
  OHI	
  to	
  cleanse	
  and	
  heal	
  a\er	
  
that.	
  

Dr	
  Fanta	
  wants	
  me	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  colonoscopy.	
  	
  I’m	
  resistant.	
  	
  A	
  couple	
  of	
  years	
  ago	
  I	
  got	
  my	
  buV	
  back	
  a\er	
  having	
  to	
  
live	
  with	
  a	
  colostomy.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  a	
  perfectly	
  working	
  buV	
  but	
  it’s	
  the	
  only	
  one	
  I	
  got.	
  	
  Two	
  hands,	
  two	
  kidneys,	
  
two	
  eyes,	
  one	
  buV;	
  it’s	
  a	
  real	
  design	
  flaw	
  in	
  my	
  opinion.	
  	
  I	
  could	
  use	
  a	
  back	
  up	
  buV	
  right	
  about	
  now.	
  	
  	
  The	
  only	
  
purpose	
  of	
  a	
  colonoscopy	
  that	
  I	
  can	
  see	
  is	
  to	
  find	
  new	
  tumors.	
  	
  As	
  far	
  as	
  I’m	
  concerned,	
  they	
  can	
  get	
  in	
  back	
  of	
  
the	
  line	
  and	
  take	
  their	
  best	
  shot.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  some	
  mature	
  ornery	
  bastards	
  to	
  deal	
  with.	
  	
  If	
  I	
  get	
  past	
  them	
  I’ll	
  take	
  the	
  
rest	
  of	
  you	
  liVle	
  whippersnappers	
  on.	
  	
  I	
  just	
  don’t	
  want	
  to	
  go	
  under	
  for	
  a	
  colonoscopy	
  and	
  find	
  myself	
  with	
  a	
  
colostomy.	
  	
  Been	
  there,	
  done	
  that.	
  	
  Somehow	
  a	
  doctor	
  looking	
  at	
  me	
  and	
  saying,	
  “Oops,	
  my	
  bad”	
  doesn’t	
  quite	
  
cut	
  it.	
  	
  Of	
  course,	
  they	
  never	
  say	
  that	
  for	
  insurance	
  reasons.	
  	
  It’s	
  always	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  admission	
  process	
  that	
  I	
  take	
  
full	
  responsibility	
  for	
  anything	
  that	
  happens	
  while	
  I’m	
  unconscious.	
  	
  I	
  can’t	
  blame	
  them.	
  

Dr	
  Fanta	
  felt	
  the	
  cancer	
  is	
  moving	
  slowly	
  enough	
  that	
  we	
  should	
  take	
  our	
  Ime	
  and	
  get	
  the	
  treatment	
  plan	
  right.	
  	
  
I’m	
  going	
  to	
  see	
  a	
  geneIcist.	
  	
  They	
  will	
  take	
  some	
  blood	
  and	
  their	
  analysis	
  will	
  narrow	
  the	
  list	
  of	
  chemo	
  agents	
  to	
  
those	
  that	
  work	
  best	
  for	
  my	
  individual	
  condiIon.	
  	
  There’s	
  some	
  I	
  won’t	
  do;	
  I’d	
  rather	
  die.	
  	
  The	
  remaining	
  list	
  is	
  
gebng	
  preVy	
  short.	
  	
  We	
  applied	
  to	
  get	
  back	
  on	
  the	
  trial	
  drug	
  I	
  was	
  on	
  previously.	
  	
  They	
  don’t	
  usually	
  allow	
  that	
  
but	
  it’s	
  worth	
  asking.	
  	
  AvasIn	
  is	
  another	
  one	
  I’ve	
  been	
  on	
  that	
  doesn’t	
  cause	
  too	
  many	
  problems.	
  	
  All	
  this	
  may	
  
not	
  do	
  anything	
  but	
  to	
  be	
  honest,	
  we’re	
  just	
  buying	
  Ime	
  and	
  there’s	
  a	
  limit	
  to	
  how	
  much	
  I’m	
  willing	
  to	
  pay	
  in	
  
terms	
  of	
  discomfort	
  and	
  further	
  erosion	
  of	
  physical	
  health.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  the	
  rain	
  and	
  know	
  the	
  final	
  storm	
  is	
  coming.	
  

Every	
  day	
  now	
  I	
  take	
  painkillers;	
  simple	
  ones	
  like	
  Tylenol	
  and	
  Vicodin.	
  	
  They	
  work	
  well	
  during	
  the	
  day.	
  	
  At	
  night	
  
someImes	
  I	
  get	
  significant	
  pain	
  in	
  my	
  lower	
  hip.	
  	
  I	
  start	
  popping	
  pills	
  to	
  get	
  to	
  sleep	
  and	
  be	
  comfortable.	
  	
  I	
  lose	
  
count	
  of	
  what	
  I’m	
  taking	
  and	
  wonder	
  when	
  it’s	
  too	
  much.	
  	
  A	
  quiet	
  death	
  in	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  the	
  night	
  seems	
  like	
  a	
  
decent	
  way	
  to	
  go.	
  	
  It	
  doesn’t	
  scare	
  me	
  at	
  all.	
  	
  Pop	
  another	
  one,	
  I	
  like	
  the	
  buzz	
  and	
  the	
  relief.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  just	
  the	
  Ip	
  of	
  
the	
  iceberg.	
  

SomeIme	
  ago	
  my	
  audiologist	
  told	
  me	
  about	
  “black	
  ointment”.	
  	
  It’s	
  another	
  voodoo	
  cure	
  that	
  his	
  wife	
  used	
  and	
  
cleared	
  up	
  her	
  cancer.	
  	
  Everyone’s	
  got	
  a	
  story.	
  However,	
  it’s	
  harmless	
  so	
  I	
  used	
  it.	
  	
  Some	
  months	
  back	
  I	
  was	
  
having	
  some	
  pain	
  in	
  my	
  genital	
  area.	
  	
  I	
  applied	
  this	
  stuff	
  and	
  the	
  pain	
  went	
  away.	
  	
  My	
  audiologist	
  believes	
  it	
  sucks	
  
out	
  cancer	
  cells.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  believe	
  anything	
  anymore.	
  	
  But	
  I	
  did	
  experience	
  relief.	
  	
  So	
  I	
  asked	
  our	
  Tenzo	
  (cook)	
  Jishin,	
  
if	
  she	
  could	
  help	
  me	
  apply	
  it	
  for	
  my	
  current	
  pain.	
  	
  She	
  was	
  a	
  nurse.	
  	
  We	
  put	
  it	
  on	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  days	
  ago.	
  	
  It	
  creates	
  
                                                                                                        99
a	
  sore	
  and	
  a\er	
  a	
  week	
  a	
  scab	
  falls	
  off.	
  	
  	
  It	
  hurts	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  days.	
  	
  Say	
  a	
  liVle	
  prayer	
  for	
  me	
  that	
  it	
  works.	
  	
  Hey!	
  Stop	
  
reading	
  and	
  say	
  a	
  prayer!

I	
  started	
  everyone	
  here	
  doing	
  council	
  pracIce	
  on	
  Saturday	
  evenings.	
  	
  Last	
  night	
  for	
  some	
  reason	
  they	
  all	
  focused	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                        	
  
their	
  aVenIon	
  on	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  felt	
  like	
  I	
  sucked	
  up	
  all	
  the	
  wind	
  but	
  they	
  did	
  relate	
  how	
  my	
  condiIon	
  affected	
  their	
  lives.	
  
It	
  was	
  very	
  beauIful.	
  	
  Reality	
  is	
  the	
  only	
  teacher	
  for	
  all	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  Being	
  in	
  a	
  place	
  where	
  there’s	
  less	
  distracIon	
  and	
  a 	
  
strong	
  emphasis	
  on	
  silence	
  really	
  amplifies	
  the	
  teaching.	
  	
  Sickness	
  and	
  death	
  are	
  great	
  teachers.	
  	
  The	
  residents	
  
here	
  are	
  making	
  the	
  most	
  of	
  it.	
  

It’s	
  April	
  13th,	
  my	
  birthday,	
  and	
  I	
  woke	
  up	
  to	
  a	
  beauIful,	
  bright,	
  bone	
  chilling	
  morning.	
  	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  Buddha	
  
Hall	
  for	
  7AM	
  Sazen.	
  	
  On	
  the	
  way	
  Harvey	
  gave	
  me	
  a	
  Birthday	
  hug.	
  	
  Travis	
  was	
  walking	
  from	
  the	
  kitchen	
  with	
  a	
  hot	
  
cup	
  of	
  coffee.	
  	
  I	
  asked	
  him	
  if	
  there	
  was	
  a	
  pot	
  made	
  and	
  he	
  handed	
  me	
  his	
  cup	
  and	
  said	
  Happy	
  Birthday.	
  	
  Such	
  acts	
  
of	
  kindness.	
  	
  We	
  sat	
  for	
  an	
  hour	
  and	
  finished	
  with	
  our	
  morning	
  service.	
  	
  When	
  we	
  were	
  done	
  everyone	
  wished	
  
me	
  a	
  Happy	
  Birthday	
  again	
  and	
  I	
  yelled,	
  “I	
  made	
  it!!!”	
  	
  Fi\y	
  nine	
  years	
  and	
  sIll	
  going.	
  

I	
  went	
  down	
  to	
  San	
  Diego	
  the	
  next	
  day	
  for	
  more	
  medical	
  appointments.	
  	
  Doshi	
  and	
  Pat	
  put	
  me	
  up	
  and	
  
volunteered	
  to	
  do	
  it	
  again	
  next	
  week.	
  	
  I	
  feel	
  very	
  comfortable	
  in	
  their	
  home.	
  	
  Jessica	
  is	
  working	
  at	
  finding	
  a	
  condo	
  
to	
  purchase	
  for	
  the	
  both	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  I	
  would	
  like	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  home	
  in	
  San	
  Diego.	
  	
  The	
  bebng	
  money	
  is	
  that	
  someday	
  I	
  
will	
  need	
  to	
  move	
  out	
  of	
  Yokoji	
  as	
  my	
  needs	
  exceed	
  the	
  monastery’s	
  capacity.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  really	
  the	
  first	
  Ime	
  I	
  
haven’t	
  had	
  a	
  place	
  to	
  call	
  my	
  own.	
  	
  It’s	
  disorienIng	
  for	
  me.	
  	
  That’s	
  not	
  necessarily	
  a	
  bad	
  thing.	
  	
  I	
  enjoy	
  visiIng	
  
my	
  friends	
  but	
  I	
  don’t	
  like	
  living	
  out	
  of	
  a	
  suitcase	
  and	
  I	
  do	
  like	
  having	
  a	
  home.	
  

On	
  Thursday,	
  April	
  15th,	
  I	
  had	
  a	
  pre-­‐op	
  visit	
  to	
  go	
  over	
  all	
  the	
  do’s	
  and	
  don’ts	
  of	
  preparing	
  for	
  my	
  procedure.	
  	
  I	
  
feel	
  like	
  an	
  old	
  pro	
  in	
  pre	
  op.	
  	
  My	
  other	
  appointment	
  was	
  with	
  a	
  geneIcist	
  to	
  see	
  if	
  there	
  is	
  any	
  paVern	
  in	
  my	
  
family	
  history	
  to	
  indicate	
  that	
  his	
  is	
  the	
  result	
  of	
  my	
  DNA.	
  	
  That	
  would	
  give	
  my	
  family	
  some	
  insight	
  on	
  how	
  to	
  
prevent	
  the	
  same	
  thing	
  from	
  happening	
  to	
  them.	
  	
  It	
  could	
  also	
  guide	
  my	
  oncologist	
  to	
  fine	
  tune	
  a	
  treatment	
  plan	
  
for	
  me.	
  	
  Her	
  conclusion	
  a\er	
  going	
  over	
  my	
  family	
  history	
  is	
  that	
  it’s	
  not	
  a	
  geneIc	
  disorder.	
  	
  I	
  already	
  knew	
  that.	
  	
  
This	
  is	
  karmic,	
  very	
  karmic.

On	
  Friday	
  I	
  went	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  San	
  Bernardino	
  Mountains	
  to	
  aVend	
  my	
  Men’s	
  Fellowship’s	
  Annual	
  Renewal	
  
Weekend.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  doing	
  this	
  event	
  every	
  year	
  since	
  1990.	
  	
  I	
  give	
  and	
  receive	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  support	
  here.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  
dedicated	
  ourselves	
  to	
  being	
  open	
  to	
  each	
  other’s	
  lives.	
  	
  A\er	
  all	
  this	
  Ime	
  the	
  trust	
  and	
  love	
  is	
  palpable.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  up	
  
there	
  early	
  and	
  a\er	
  seVling	
  in,	
  I	
  went	
  to	
  the	
  lodge	
  to	
  greet	
  and	
  meet	
  all	
  the	
  old	
  Imers	
  and	
  newcomers	
  to	
  the	
  
event.	
  	
  We’re	
  an	
  aging	
  Fellowship.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  in	
  my	
  late	
  thirIes	
  when	
  I	
  joined.	
  	
  Most	
  of	
  the	
  men	
  were	
  my	
  age.	
  	
  
Twenty	
  years	
  later,	
  most	
  of	
  the	
  men	
  are	
  my	
  age.	
  	
  For	
  some	
  reason	
  we	
  haven’t	
  been	
  very	
  successful	
  in	
  aVracIng	
  
younger	
  men.	
  

Most	
  of	
  the	
  men	
  I	
  only	
  see	
  at	
  this	
  event.	
  	
  Several	
  are	
  my	
  close	
  friends	
  and	
  many	
  are	
  in	
  between.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  share	
  a	
  
commitment.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  vowed	
  to	
  be	
  as	
  honest	
  and	
  caring	
  in	
  our	
  interacIons	
  as	
  we	
  possibly	
  can.	
  	
  We	
  try	
  hard	
  to	
  
                                                                                                          100
drop	
  the	
  measurements	
  that	
  men	
  typically	
  use;	
  status,	
  wealth;	
  sexuality	
  and	
  power.	
  	
  The	
  weekend	
  is	
  built	
  on	
  a	
  
process	
  this	
  liVle	
  organizaIon	
  has	
  created	
  over	
  the	
  years	
  to	
  open	
  up	
  our	
  hearts.	
  	
  We	
  find	
  a	
  safe	
  refuge	
  here	
  to	
  
relax	
  and	
  make	
  ourselves	
  vulnerable	
  and	
  open	
  to	
  each	
  other.	
  	
  I	
  love	
  to	
  watch	
  it.	
  	
  I’ve	
  become	
  a	
  leader	
  in	
  the	
  
group	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  	
  Four	
  of	
  us	
  volunteered	
  to	
  share	
  on	
  Saturday.	
  	
  We	
  had	
  a	
  bit	
  less	
  than	
  ten	
  minutes	
  each	
  to	
  
relate	
  our	
  lives	
  to	
  the	
  theme.	
  	
  The	
  theme	
  was	
  about	
  our	
  path	
  in	
  life.	
  	
  The	
  Bible	
  story	
  of	
  Jonah	
  was	
  told	
  in	
  parts	
  
throughout	
  the	
  weekend	
  as	
  a	
  tool	
  for	
  reflecIon.	
  	
  Jonah	
  was	
  given	
  a	
  task	
  by	
  God.	
  	
  He	
  decided	
  to	
  run	
  away	
  from	
  it	
  
and	
  took	
  a	
  cruise	
  instead.	
  	
  A	
  storm	
  nearly	
  destroyed	
  the	
  vessel	
  unIl	
  the	
  other	
  passengers	
  and	
  crew	
  threw	
  Jonah	
  
overboard.	
  	
  I	
  big	
  fish	
  swallowed	
  him	
  and	
  a\er	
  some	
  Ime	
  spit	
  him	
  out	
  where	
  he	
  was	
  supposed	
  to	
  be.	
  

My	
  friends	
  shared	
  very	
  deep	
  and	
  painful	
  experiences	
  of	
  where	
  they	
  were	
  or	
  had	
  been.	
  	
  Everyone	
  was	
  touched	
  
very	
  deeply.	
  	
  On	
  Saturday	
  the	
  main	
  task	
  is	
  to	
  bring	
  men	
  to	
  a	
  place	
  of	
  deep	
  empathy	
  and	
  silent	
  compassion.	
  	
  The	
  
sharings	
  were	
  very	
  emoIonal.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  up	
  and	
  said,	
  “And	
  now	
  on	
  the	
  lighter	
  side,	
  I	
  have	
  terminal	
  cancer!”	
  	
  I	
  got	
  a	
  
very	
  odd	
  laugh,	
  it	
  was	
  an	
  odd	
  joke.	
  	
  SomeImes	
  I	
  feel	
  like	
  my	
  life	
  has	
  been	
  an	
  odd	
  joke.	
  	
  I	
  wasn’t	
  sure	
  about	
  what	
  I	
  
was	
  going	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  unIl	
  Friday	
  night.	
  	
  We	
  break	
  up	
  into	
  small	
  groups	
  for	
  the	
  weekend	
  to	
  facilitate	
  inImate	
  
discussion.	
  	
  All	
  the	
  men	
  put	
  out	
  their	
  personal	
  challenges	
  of	
  losing	
  their	
  way	
  and	
  how	
  it	
  affected	
  them	
  and	
  those	
  
they	
  loved.	
  

I	
  aVended	
  the	
  Saturday	
  morning	
  meditaIon.	
  	
  It’s	
  where	
  I	
  sort	
  out	
  what	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  said.	
  	
  I	
  told	
  the	
  story	
  of	
  the	
  
woman	
  I	
  fell	
  in	
  love	
  with	
  and	
  how	
  that	
  love	
  impacted	
  my	
  life	
  and	
  those	
  around	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  always	
  felt	
  a	
  deep	
  
connecIon	
  to	
  God.	
  	
  That	
  dates	
  back	
  to	
  my	
  earliest	
  years.	
  	
  I	
  lived	
  my	
  life	
  determined	
  to	
  be	
  true	
  to	
  myself.	
  	
  While	
  
this	
  relaIonship	
  was	
  a	
  very	
  deeply	
  felt	
  love,	
  it	
  was	
  a	
  secret	
  love.	
  	
  All	
  my	
  energy	
  was	
  put	
  into	
  it	
  and	
  no	
  maVer	
  
where	
  I	
  moved	
  or	
  how	
  many	
  women	
  I	
  dated;	
  she	
  was	
  where	
  my	
  heart	
  wanted	
  to	
  be.	
  

My	
  lifelong	
  intenIon	
  has	
  always	
  been	
  to	
  wake	
  up	
  to	
  the	
  source	
  of	
  my	
  being.	
  	
  Throughout	
  my	
  life,	
  I	
  met	
  every	
  
challenge	
  with	
  a	
  prayer.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  determined	
  to	
  use	
  adversity,	
  humiliaIon,	
  humor	
  and	
  pain	
  for	
  my	
  awakening.	
  	
  
However,	
  I	
  was	
  lost.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  not	
  being	
  true	
  to	
  myself	
  and	
  others.	
  	
  	
  Cancer	
  was	
  perhaps	
  the	
  only	
  thing	
  that	
  could	
  
have	
  woke	
  me	
  up.	
  	
  I	
  came	
  out	
  of	
  hiding	
  and	
  introduced	
  her	
  to	
  my	
  friends	
  and	
  family.	
  	
  I	
  made	
  amends	
  to	
  all	
  those	
  
                                                                                                                                                                               	
  
my	
  deceit	
  had	
  harmed.	
  	
  We	
  commiVed	
  to	
  marriage.	
  	
  She	
  had	
  to	
  come	
  out	
  as	
  well.	
  	
  That	
  meant	
  leaving	
  her	
  family.	
  
The	
  news	
  that	
  my	
  cancer	
  had	
  returned	
  was	
  a	
  hard	
  blow	
  to	
  both	
  of	
  us.	
  	
  She	
  made	
  the	
  arrangements	
  to	
  leave	
  but	
  
her	
  family	
  turned	
  it	
  around	
  and	
  convinced	
  her	
  to	
  leave	
  me	
  instead	
  and	
  stay	
  home.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  swallowed	
  by	
  the	
  fish	
  
and	
  brought	
  down	
  to	
  a	
  depth	
  of	
  hell	
  I	
  never	
  knew	
  existed.	
  	
  There	
  was	
  no	
  light,	
  no	
  path,	
  and	
  no	
  hope.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  dying	
  
and	
  now	
  I	
  was	
  to	
  die	
  alone	
  in	
  a	
  very	
  dark	
  place.

If	
  you	
  need	
  to	
  review	
  the	
  story	
  since	
  then,	
  you	
  have	
  my	
  wriIngs.	
  	
  My	
  job	
  was	
  to	
  leave	
  the	
  men	
  in	
  the	
  belly	
  of	
  the	
  
whale.	
  	
  I	
  did	
  my	
  job.	
  	
  That	
  a\ernoon	
  I	
  led	
  a	
  workshop	
  on	
  meditaIon	
  and	
  encouraged	
  the	
  men	
  that	
  aVended	
  to	
  
consider	
  incorporaIng	
  that	
  pracIce	
  into	
  their	
  lives.	
  	
  I	
  know	
  that	
  for	
  me,	
  this	
  daily	
  pracIce	
  has	
  been	
  criIcal	
  to	
  my	
  
survival.	
  	
  Since	
  that	
  dark	
  Ime	
  I	
  have	
  lived	
  a	
  life	
  of	
  vow	
  and	
  repentance.	
  	
  I	
  don’t	
  have	
  Ime	
  for	
  anything	
  else.	
  	
  I	
  
received	
  this	
  terrifying	
  blessing	
  that	
  put	
  the	
  impermanence	
  of	
  life	
  right	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  my	
  face.	
  	
  As	
  humans	
  we	
  can’t	
  

                                                                                                  101
face	
  that.	
  	
  Everyone	
  was	
  focused	
  on	
  what	
  to	
  do	
  now	
  that	
  reIrement	
  was	
  at	
  hand.	
  	
  How	
  could	
  they	
  find	
  their	
  
path	
  a\er	
  all	
  these	
  years	
  of	
  doing	
  their	
  jobs?	
  	
  I	
  related	
  more	
  to	
  the	
  men	
  over	
  eighty	
  years	
  old.	
  	
  They	
  don’t	
  have	
  
that	
  issue	
  anymore.	
  	
  Together,	
  we	
  were	
  looking	
  over	
  the	
  edge.	
  	
  The	
  next	
  stage	
  is	
  not	
  what	
  to	
  do,	
  what	
  to	
  study,	
  
what	
  instrument	
  to	
  play	
  or	
  where	
  to	
  travel.	
  	
  It’s	
  the	
  calling	
  of	
  every	
  stage	
  of	
  life.	
  	
  Who	
  am	
  I?	
  	
  If	
  that	
  quesIon	
  isn’t	
  
front	
  and	
  center,	
  you	
  are	
  lost.	
  	
  All	
  the	
  money,	
  status	
  and	
  “valuable”	
  things	
  you	
  fill	
  up	
  your	
  Ime	
  with	
  won’t	
  
prepare	
  you	
  for	
  your	
  ulImate	
  final	
  chapter.	
  	
  Let	
  reality	
  be	
  your	
  teacher.	
  	
  Look	
  around,	
  the	
  last	
  chapter	
  could	
  be	
  
wriVen	
  right	
  a\er	
  you	
  read	
  this	
  sentence.	
  	
  Who	
  are	
  you?

We	
  close	
  on	
  Sunday	
  with	
  a	
  sacred	
  circle.	
  	
  Men	
  get	
  up	
  to	
  share	
  their	
  experience.	
  	
  I	
  read	
  a	
  poem	
  given	
  to	
  me	
  by	
  my	
  
dear	
  friend	
  and	
  fellow	
  Irishman,	
  Fergal.	
  	
  It	
  was	
  about	
  a	
  man	
  that	
  escaped	
  a	
  death	
  sentence	
  like	
  mine	
  and	
  now	
  
every	
  day	
  was	
  gravy.	
  	
  The	
  poem	
  is	
  enItled	
  “Gravy”.	
  	
  I	
  sang	
  my	
  favorite	
  Karaoke	
  song,	
  “ That’s	
  Life!”	
  	
  The	
  last	
  few	
  
Imes	
  I	
  sang	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  a	
  crowd	
  I	
  noIced	
  that	
  my	
  lungs	
  are	
  ever	
  more	
  tentaIve.	
  	
  My	
  brain	
  puts	
  it	
  all	
  in	
  gear	
  but	
  
the	
  parts	
  are	
  not	
  up	
  for	
  the	
  job	
  like	
  before.	
  	
  I	
  got	
  it	
  done,	
  but	
  they	
  are	
  lebng	
  me	
  know	
  the	
  curtain	
  is	
  not	
  as	
  high	
  
as	
  it	
  once	
  was.	
  	
  Last	
  year	
  I	
  sang	
  my	
  goodbye	
  song	
  and	
  didn’t	
  expect	
  to	
  be	
  here	
  this	
  year.	
  	
  The	
  group	
  was	
  deeply	
  
touched	
  by	
  my	
  song.	
  	
  This	
  year,	
  a	
  few	
  men	
  got	
  together	
  and	
  sang	
  to	
  the	
  tune	
  of	
  “Hello	
  Dolly”,	
  “Hello	
  Kevin”.	
  	
  It	
  
was	
  funny	
  and	
  moving.	
  	
  How	
  I	
  love	
  these	
  men.	
  	
  We	
  all	
  go	
  down	
  the	
  mountain	
  wide	
  open.	
  	
  The	
  clouds	
  and	
  trees	
  
all	
  look	
  a	
  liVle	
  more	
  like	
  clouds	
  and	
  trees	
  than	
  they	
  did	
  on	
  the	
  way	
  up.	
  	
  I’m	
  so	
  grateful	
  that	
  I	
  spent	
  my	
  life	
  always	
  
looking	
  for	
  a	
  deeper	
  experience	
  of	
  me.	
  	
  I	
  used	
  to	
  think	
  I	
  was	
  a	
  crazy	
  fool.	
  	
  Now	
  I’m	
  in	
  love	
  with	
  this	
  crazy	
  fool.

On	
  the	
  way	
  home	
  I	
  spoke	
  to	
  my	
  daughter	
  Jessica	
  on	
  the	
  phone.	
  	
  She’s	
  going	
  to	
  take	
  me	
  to	
  my	
  “procedure”	
  on	
  
Tuesday.	
  	
  She	
  volunteered	
  to	
  come	
  in	
  to	
  see	
  my	
  oncologist	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  This	
  is	
  supposed	
  to	
  be	
  where	
  we	
  go	
  over	
  
opIons.	
  	
  I’ve	
  been	
  doing	
  this	
  alone	
  and	
  the	
  thought	
  of	
  her	
  being	
  with	
  me	
  was	
  very	
  foreign	
  and	
  scary.	
  	
  I	
  spent	
  last	
  
night	
  with	
  my	
  friend	
  Cathy.	
  	
  She	
  caught	
  me	
  up	
  on	
  the	
  final	
  season	
  of	
  “Lost”.	
  	
  It’s	
  our	
  favorite	
  show.	
  	
  In	
  the	
  
morning	
  we	
  sat	
  around	
  the	
  table	
  and	
  she	
  told	
  me	
  something	
  about	
  Jessica.	
  	
  I	
  neglected	
  to	
  tell	
  Jessica	
  about	
  my	
  
last	
  round	
  of	
  bad	
  news.	
  	
  She	
  learned	
  from	
  her	
  cousin.	
  That	
  hurt	
  her.	
  	
  I	
  have	
  this	
  ingrained	
  and	
  misguided	
  fatherly	
  
duty	
  to	
  protect	
  her	
  from	
  all	
  bad	
  news.	
  	
  	
  She	
  wants	
  to	
  help	
  me	
  but	
  she	
  doesn’t	
  know	
  how	
  to	
  break	
  through	
  my	
  
resistance.	
  	
  Today	
  I’m	
  seeing	
  that	
  she’s	
  all	
  grown	
  now	
  and	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  this.	
  	
  My	
  vision	
  has	
  been	
  that	
  I	
  
would	
  just	
  die	
  in	
  my	
  mountain	
  cabin	
  all	
  neat	
  and	
  Idy.	
  	
  There	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  great	
  big	
  memorial	
  service	
  and	
  my	
  kids	
  
would	
  be	
  spared	
  all	
  the	
  pain	
  of	
  losing	
  their	
  Dad.	
  	
  They	
  would	
  end	
  up	
  with	
  enough	
  money	
  to	
  get	
  a	
  decent	
  start	
  on	
  
their	
  lives.	
  	
  Apparently,	
  I	
  have	
  to	
  go	
  back	
  inside	
  the	
  whale	
  so	
  she	
  can	
  take	
  me	
  to	
  the	
  other	
  shore.	
  	
  I’m	
  a	
  bit	
  lost.

No	
  more	
  shampoo
posted	
  by	
  Kevin	
  Riley	
  on	
  Tuesday,	
  June	
  15,	
  2010

It’s	
  a	
  quiet	
  late	
  morning	
  and	
  I’m	
  sibng	
  in	
  Doshi’s	
  living	
  room.	
  	
  I	
  had	
  my	
  procedure	
  yesterday.	
  	
  Jessica	
  picked	
  me	
  
up	
  and	
  took	
  me	
  to	
  see	
  Dr	
  Fanta	
  in	
  the	
  morning.	
  	
  Because	
  of	
  the	
  a\ernoon	
  surgery	
  I	
  couldn’t	
  eat	
  anything	
  all	
  day.	
  	
  
I’m	
  always	
  surprised	
  how	
  easy	
  that	
  is.	
  	
  I’m	
  gebng	
  addicted	
  to	
  pain	
  pills.	
  	
  It’s	
  not	
  a	
  strong	
  addicIon,	
  just	
  a	
  love	
  of	
  
the	
  buzz.	
  	
  I	
  was	
  actually	
  looking	
  forward	
  to	
  gebng	
  knocked	
  out	
  later	
  on.

I	
  thought	
  Dr	
  Fanta	
  was	
  going	
  to	
  lay	
  out	
  my	
  treatment	
  opIons.	
  	
  It	
  didn’t	
  work	
  out	
  that	
  way.	
  	
  The	
  geneIc	
  test	
  he	
  
wanted	
  couldn’t	
  be	
  done	
  on	
  the	
  old	
  sample	
  from	
  2006.	
  	
  He	
  needs	
  a	
  beVer	
  one.	
  	
  He	
  convinced	
  me	
  that	
  I	
  should	
  
get	
  a	
  colonoscopy.	
  	
  That’s	
  another	
  opportunity	
  to	
  get	
  knocked	
  out.	
  	
  When	
  people	
  are	
  pubng	
  tubes	
  in	
  me	
  where	
  

                                                                                                   102
they	
  don’t	
  belong	
  I	
  see	
  no	
  reason	
  on	
  earth	
  to	
  be	
  conscious.	
  	
  

Jessica	
  took	
  the	
  visit	
  very	
  well	
  and	
  I	
  was	
  glad	
  to	
  have	
  her	
  with	
  me.	
  	
  She’s	
  my	
  liVle	
  girl	
  that	
  now	
  has	
  the	
  
unenviable	
  task	
  of	
  caring	
  for	
  me,	
  her	
  dying	
  parent.	
  	
  	
  It’s	
  Ime	
  for	
  he