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					   INDIANA UNIVERSITY - PURDUE UNIVERSITY INDIANAPOLIS
                UCOL 110: First Year Success Seminar for Student-Athletes

      Using Your Present to Create Your Future
                                         Fall 2010, Course Number 3671

"The fundamental purpose of intercollegiate athletics is the education of student-athletes in both the
classroom and on the field or court. Success as a student as well as an athlete is the only acceptable standard
for the future of college sports."
                                                                                                Dr. Myles Brand
                                            Former President of the National Collegiate Athletic Association

“I coached life. The same things that enable you to be a good player can also enable you to be a good student,
a good father, a good business person, etc.”
                                                                                                    Lou Holtz
                      Former Notre Dame Football Coach and Member of the College Football Hall of Fame

“This class brings out the best in you as a student, as an athlete, and—most importantly—as a person. It
helped me more than anything during my freshman year in college, not only with my studies, but also with my
sport and my transition from home to college. I learned more from people in this class than I have learned in
the past 18 years of my life. Without this class, I would have been LOST.”

                                                    These are direct quotations from four former members of this class.


  Faculty Mentor           Student Mentor           Academic Advisor             Librarian                   Career Counselor
 Dr. Drew Appleby           Tyler Fritcha             George Davis              Eric Snajdr                   Colleen Rusnak
  Psychology Dept           Men’s Soccer            Athletic Department           Library             Academic and Career Planning Office
     LD 120 C                                           UL 4115M                UL 3135 B                         UC 3042
      274-6767                  809-0217                 278-0349                278-2778                         274-6257
dappleby@iupui.edu*      tfritcha@umail.iu.edu      gwdavis@iupui.edu        esnajdr@iupui.edu               crusnak@iupui.edu

*E-mail me at this address, not through Oncourse.

Time  Day  Room: 11:00 to 12:45  Wednesday  Room 3001 in Taylor Hall

Course Credit: Two semester hours

Texts: 2010-2011 IUPUI Student-Athlete Planner (available from the Athletic Department)
       Spring 2011 IUPUI Schedule of Classes and Academic Information (available in October)

Course Description
A learning community is a class designed to enable a group of first-year students to form social bonds with one another and with the
members of their instructional team (i.e., to develop a community) in an atmosphere created to help them acquire (i.e., to begin
learning) the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors they will need to succeed in both their new educational environment and in the
career they plan to enter after their formal education ends.


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Advantages of Participation in a Learning Community and a Learning Block
 Getting to know a group of your fellow student-athletes (not just your teammates) quickly
 Learning to study together and support one another in your linked classes
 Becoming familiar with a small group of faculty and staff who are very supportive of first-year student-athletes
 Learning how to get the most from your college experience by becoming aware of IUPUI’s resources and opportunities

Why This Class Is a Thematic Learning Community and What Is Its Theme?
This is a special class known as a Thematic Learning Community, which requires its students to enroll in a block of four classes (this
class, W131 English Composition, R110 Fundamentals of Speech Communication, and B104 Psychology as a Social Science) that
provide the foundation for the exploration of a common theme. The theme of this class is Using Your Present to Create Your Future.
This means you will design (Create) a systematic strategy to explore the career to which you currently aspire (Your Future) and to
discover the ways in which you can take advantage of your undergraduate opportunities (Your Present) so you can successfully enter
and succeed in your chosen career when you have completed your formal education. The most heavily weighted assignment in this class
is a Professional Development Plan (PDP) you will create by completing a series of short assignments designed to enable you to answer
the questions in the following outline.
A. For what career am I currently preparing, and what are the answers to the following questions I discovered by becoming aware of
     the many components of my career on O*NET (http://online.onetcenter.org/)? Cut and paste information from O*NET that you need
     to answer questions 2 to 7 below and be sure to give proper credit to the source of this information so you do not commit plagiarism.
     1. For what specific career am I preparing, and what are the three most important reasons for why I want to enter this career?
     2. What specific level of education or training must a person in this occupation attain?
     3. What is the basic description of this occupation and what specific tasks and work activities must a person in this occupation be
          able to perform?
     4. What tools and technologies must a person in this occupation be able to use?
     5. What knowledge, skills, and abilities must a person in this occupation possess?
     6. What interests, characteristics (i.e., work styles), and work values does a person in this occupation possess?
     7. What wages does a person in this occupation earn, what is the projected growth for this occupation in the future, and what are
          the related occupations to this occupation?
B. What classes will I enroll in during my undergraduate education at IUPUI that will provide me with the opportunities to learn,
     practice, or develop the following components of my career? Address each of the parts of each of the components you listed in the
     previous section and identify at least one class that will enable you to successfully attain this part. Before you address the following
     four components of your intended career, visit an academic advisor in the major you have declared or intend to declare, show this
     person the list of the parts of the components of your intended career (from Section A), and ask for advice about what specific
     classes and extracurricular activities will provide you with opportunities to develop the parts of these components.
     1. the tasks and work activities I will perform in my career
     2. the tools and technologies I will use in my career
     3. the knowledge, skills, and abilities I must be able to demonstrate in my career
     4. the interests, characteristics, and work values I must exhibit in my career
C. What extracurricular activities (i.e., outside-the-classroom experiences) will I engage in during my undergraduate education at
     IUPUI that will provide me with the opportunities to learn, practice, or develop the following components of my career? (Address
     each of the parts of each of the components you listed in Section A, and identify at least one extracurricular activity that will help
     you to successfully attain each of these parts.)
     1. the tasks and work activities I will perform in my career
     2. the tools and technologies I will use in my career
     3. the knowledge, skills, and abilities I must be able to demonstrate in my career
     4. the interests, characteristics, and work values I must exhibit in my career
D. What must my resume look like at the end of my undergraduate career so I can successfully gain employment in the career for
     which I am preparing (if I can enter my career with a bachelor’s degree) or gain admission to the graduate or professional program
     that will prepare me to enter my career (e.g., law school or medical school)? Use your knowledge of the components of your desired
     career (from Section A of this report) and the classes and extracurricular activities you must engage in to develop the components of
     your career (from Sections B and C) to create the resume you want to have at the end of your undergraduate career at IUPUI.
     1. Begin your resume by creating the headings for each of its sections (i.e., name and contact information, career objective,
          education, etc.) based on the information you received from the Career Counselor’s presentation during the 4th week of class.
     2. Complete the sections of your resume with the information you obtained while writing Sections A, B, and C of your PDP.
     3. Seek advice from Colleen Rusnak or another career counselor in the Office of Academic and Career Planning about how to
          improve the quality of your resume, report the advice you were given, explain how you will use this advice to improve your
          resume, and use the advice you received to create a more compelling and polished resume.
     4. Bring your resume to class and allow your classmates to review it and provide suggestions about how to improve it.
     5. Produce two copies of the final draft of your resume on the basis of the feedback from your classmates. Submit one copy as the
          final document of your PDP. Mount the other copy on a poster board, and decorate your poster with items that reflect the


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         person you are now, the ways in which you will use your undergraduate education to prepare for your career, and the person
         you want to become when you enter your chosen profession.
    6.   Participate in a poster session with your classmates to which you have invited an “honored guest” who is genuinely interested in
         and/or supportive of your academic, athletic, and/or career progress, who will interact with the other attendees, and who will
         remain for a substantial portion of the poster session. You will introduce yourself and your guest—and explain your guest’s
         interest in your academic and/or career progress—at the beginning of the poster session. Suggestions for guests include your
         coach, a member of the Athletic Department, the advisor of a student organization to which you belong, one of your professors,
         your academic advisor in your major department, or one or both of your parents. You may invite more than one “honored
         guest.” You may not invite teammates, roommates, friends or other people who simply “know” you as an “honored guest.”

Student Learning Outcomes: The successful completion of the IUPUI Student-Athlete Learning Community will enable its students to:
 Become aware of the differences between high school and college and the impact these changes can have on student-athletes
 Develop a supportive community of staff, faculty, and fellow students
 Identify and appreciate the diverse nature of your classmates and instructional team
 Develop crucial academic skills such as time management, study skills, and the ability to follow written and oral instructions
 Become familiar with the physical layout of the campus (e.g., buildings, offices, and facilities).
 Practice and strengthen the communication skills of writing, speaking, reading, and listening
 Understand and use critical thinking skills in the context of the university environment
 Learn IUPUI’s code of academic honesty and become aware of the advantages of acting in an honest manner
 Use campus information technology resources to support academic work and campus connections
 Identify and utilize resources and services of the university that can support student learning
 Become familiar with the physical layout and electronic resources of the library
 Begin to develop realistic career plans and become familiar with the resources of the Academic and Career Planning Office
 Develop or strengthen educational planning and organizational skills
 Learn to pay attention to, comprehend, and follow written and oral instructions in a successful manner
 Use feedback to improve academic performance
 Succeed as a student and as a Division One athlete at IUPUI

The Three Most Important Principles of Undergraduate Learning (PULs) for Student-Athletes to Achieve in UCOL 110
1. Faculty at IUPUI have worked hard since 2002 to create a statement of the knowledge and skills we want all our undergraduate
    students to develop and strengthen while they are at IUPUI, and we have named this statement our Principles of Undergraduate
    Learning (go to http://www.iport.iupui.edu/selfstudy/tl/puls/ for a complete description of the PULs). We have had a period of time
    since 2002 for faculty and students to become comfortable with this statement. Some faculty have implemented the PULs, and we
    have some good examples of how they have done so. Now we want to become more systematic by insuring that all our students have
    sufficient opportunities to strengthen all the PULs. Therefore, a sampling plan has been developed to help faculty, students, parents,
    the public, and our accrediting association actually see that IUPUI is a place where students are learning these things. Our faculty
    have been asked to engage in the following three steps to accomplish this sampling plan.
    a. Identify the three the PULs you believe are most important for your students to accomplish in your course.
    b. Designate one of these PULs as the one that you emphasize most in your course (Major Emphasis), designate another as the one
         to which you give second most emphasis (Moderate Emphasis), and designate the third as the one to which you give third most
         emphasis (Minor Emphasis).
    c. Use either existing assignments or create new methods to collect data to determine how successfully your students have
         accomplished these PULs by the end of your course.
2. The strategies I will use in this class to accomplish these three assessment tasks appear in the following table. I will use the data I
    collect during these three tasks to modify UCOL 110 in ways that will enable its future students to achieve its three most important
    PULs even more successfully.

     IUPUI’s Principle of       Specific Objective of this PUL              What will you do to accomplish this PUL in this
     Undergraduate              Targeted in this Class                      class, and how will your instructor assess how well
     Learning (PUL)                                                         you have accomplished it?
     Major Emphasis                                                         You will submit 15 Weekly Papers, which will be
                                                                            graded with the 10-point rubric created by the instructor.
     Language and Visual         Develop effective writing skills           Your ability to meet the criteria contained in this rubric
     Communication Skills                                                   with be used to assess how well you accomplished this
                                                                            PUL in UCOL 110.




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      Moderate Emphasis           Enhance your personal life by
                                  identifying a realistic potential             You will create a 12-page Professional Development
      Integration and             occupation and creating a strategy to         Plan (PDP) and exhibit this plan during the Poster
      Application of              use your undergraduate curricular and         Session held on the final day of class. Your grades on
      Knowledge                   extracurricular opportunities to develop      your PDP and your Poster will be used to assess how
                                  the knowledge and skills necessary to         well you accomplished this PUL in UCOL 110.
                                  enter and thrive in that occupation.
      Minor Emphasis                                                            You will collaborate with your classmates on several
                                  Collaborate civilly and effectively as a      tasks (i.e., your COR report, the poster session, Chef
      Understanding Society       member of a diverse group to                  D’s College Student Cookbook, and the class music
      and Culture                 accomplish several complex tasks.             CD.) Your instructor will combine your scores on these
                                                                                tasks into a Collaboration Score to assess how well you
                                                                                accomplished this PUL in UCOL 110.

What You Will Do in This Class
 Submit weekly papers (WPs), consisting of a homework assignment (HWA), a summary of a campus opportunity/resource report
  (COR) given by a team of your peers the previous week, and an accurate determination of your current grade in this class.
 Submit completed individual portions of your PDP.
 Present a PowerPoint COR report with a group of your peers, and provide the class with music and lunch before your report.
 Take field trips to important campus resources.
 Engage in a variety of activities designed to enhance your academic adaptation to IUPUI.
 Collaborate with your peers on several projects.
 Submit a complete PDP composed of all 13 of your individual PDP sections.
 Create a poster composed of all the individual sections of your PDP that will illustrate how you will use your undergraduate
  education to prepare yourself for your future career and participate in a poster session with the rest of your classmates on the final
  day of class.

Daily Classes Procedures
Each 105-minute class period (except field trips) will consist of the following components:
 a pre-class 10-minute informal “social time” hosted by those who will present the scheduled COR report
 the submission of a WP
 the submission of a component of your PDP
 a COR report
 informal presentations by the Advisor and the Student Mentor
 a lecture, discussion, or activity to promote academic success and/or a sense of community in first-year students

Field Trips
There will be two field trips: one to the Office of Academic and Career Planning and one to the Library. Some field trips will include
specific assignments, and others will provide opportunities for students to gather information that will enable them to complete HWAs.

The Format for WPs
 WPs must be word-processed on only one side of one sheet of standard size (8.5 x 11) paper. You may make the font as small and
    the margins as wide as you like. Be sure your name and other identifying information are on all WPs.
 Each WP will conclude with (a) the total number of points possible, (b) your total points, (c) your % of the total points possible, and
    (d) your current letter grade based on your % of total points possible. Use the Oncourse grade book to obtain this information.
 A sample WP is included in this syllabus. Follow its format exactly.
 Keep all your graded WPs in case the instructor’s grading record differs from yours.
 Be sure to save all your WPs on a disk so you can complete the final homework assignment.
 An important student-learning outcome of this class is to demonstrate educational comprehension, planning, and organizational
    skills. Be sure you (a) fully understand the assignments so you complete them in the correct manner, (b) allow yourself sufficient
    time to complete your assignments, (c) anticipate potential problems (e.g., back up your computer files on more than one disk) so
    you do not lose your assignments, and (d) keep yourself organized so you can submit your assignments on time.

The Criteria for Evaluating WPs
Your WPs will be evaluated with the following ten criteria. A WP will be awarded five points if it meets all ten criteria, four points if it
meets nine, three points if it meets eight, two points if it meets seven, one point if it meets six, and zero points if it meets five or fewer.
1. It must be submitted at the beginning of the class on the date it is due.
2. It must be word-processed on one side of one sheet of 8.5 x 11 inch unlined paper.


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3.   It must have the homework assignment number and the date in the upper left hand corner of the page and your name, UCOL 110,
     and the instructor's name must appear in the upper right hand corner of the page.
4. It must have centered, boldface headings for each part of your WP and COR report summary that are identical (i.e., word-for-word)
     to the example WP included in the syllabus.
5. HWA questions must appear in your WP exactly (i.e., word-for-word) and completely as they appear in the syllabus. This includes
     the questions and any clarifying information that accompanies them.
6. It must contain no more than one grammar, spelling, capitalization, or punctuation error.
7. Each WP must contain complete and correct information that reflects an accurate understanding of the material covered in the class
     or in the reading assignments.
8. The Purpose section that precedes the COR Report Summary must convince me that you gave the assignment serious thought and
     came to some specific conclusions about how the assignment will help you to perform well at IUPUI. This is the most important part
     of your WP because it will allow me to determine whether you simply answered the questions to complete the assignment or if you
     completed it in a serious manner that enabled you to gain something meaningful from it. Give this section very serious thought.
9. The COR Report Summary section must contain the name of the campus opportunity or resource that was reported on the previous
     week, the COR’s director, location, hours, and purpose. It must also contain the names of the COR reporters, their hometowns, high
     schools, majors, hobbies, and career aspirations.
10. The My Current Letter Grade in This Class section will contain the total points you have earned, the total points possible at that
     time, the percentage of the total points you have earned, and your letter grade based on that percentage. You must also give a
     specific explanation of what you have done or not done to earn your current grade and a specific explanation of what you are going
     to do or not do in the future to increase your performance. For example, do not simply say I am going to study harder. Explain a
     specific study strategy you are going to use to improve your grade (e.g., I am going to use the spelling and grammar checker of my
     word processor to make sure I do not lose any more points for misspelling words in my future WPs).
Complete the Weekly Paper Self Scoring Sheet and staple it as the cover page of your WP. Submit your paper to your Student Mentor
when you arrive in class. WPs submitted after 11:00 are considered late. The Student Mentor will evaluate the first five criteria, and the
Instructor will grade the final five. You may redo your 1st and 2nd WPs if you would like to regain any points you lost. You must
resubmit your 1st WP at the beginning of the 4th class meeting and your 2nd WP at the beginning of the 5th class meeting. To receive
credit, your re-submission must include the following three parts stapled together in the following order:
1. a cover sheet with a bulleted list of the errors on your original WP and how you corrected these errors in your resubmitted WP
2. your original, graded WP
3. your corrected WP

The Campus Opportunity/Resource (COR) Reports
Teams of students will volunteer to investigate the opportunities and/or resources provided by an IUPUI office or facility (O/F) (see the
daily class schedule for these O/Fs). Each team—which must be composed of members of different athletic teams—will report their
findings in a brief (10 minutes or less) in-class report that is accurate, organized, creative, and effective in its ability to communicate its
contents to the class. Each team will make an appointment with the director or representative of their O/F to obtain an interview to
answer the following questions: (1) What is the purpose of this O/F? (2) What services are provided to students by this O/F? (3) What is
the best way for a first-year student-athlete to take advantage of this O/F? Before the class period begins, the team will use PowerPoint
to project the subject of the COR on the board, followed by its director, location, hours of operation, and purpose. The presenters’
names, hometowns and high schools, sports, majors, career plans, extracurricular activities and/or hobbies, and a description of the food
they brought to class will follow this information on separate PowerPoint slides. Your classmates will be responsible for summarizing
the information you present in their WPs, so be sure your COR report is clear and organized. Send your PowerPoint to the whole class as
an attachment to an Oncourse message before the class in which you present it. Be CREATIVE! You and your classmates will become
bored if the same type of report is presented week after week. Each report will be rated by the Academic Advisor and the Student
Mentor with the COR Report Rating Sheet included in this syllabus. Your score for this report will be the average of these two ratings
rounded off to the nearest whole number. Review this rating sheet carefully so you understand how your report will be graded. Each
COR report will be worth a maximum of 20 points. Pre-Class Social Time: Each COR report team will be responsible for hosting a 10-
minute pre-class social time that will begin at 10:50 sharp. This will include providing lunch for the entire class and appropriate musical
accompaniment. Each COR team will have $50 to purchase the food for this event. The food served during these lunches should reflect
the nationality/ethnicity of the COR reporters (e.g., Polish, Mexican, Native American, African American, etc.) so the class can become
familiar with the diverse nature of its students or be made from recipes that appear in Chef D’s College Student Cookbook. The COR
reporters will also provide plates, napkins, forks, and spoons. Each student in the class is responsible for bringing her/his own beverage.
The instructor will reimburse students for these purchases if they provide him with original store receipts. The quality of this event will
be graded as part of the 20 points that can be earned with a COR report.

Collaborative Projects
All students will contribute to the following collaborative projects, which are worth 10 points each. All students will volunteer to serve
on a committee that will plan and carry out one of these projects.
 The continuing creation of Chef D’s College Student Cook Book written by the 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007,
     2008, and 2009 student-athlete learning communities. Each student will contribute a recipe to the cookbook that meets the majority

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    of Chef D’s criteria for college student recipes (cheap, healthy, easy, fast, and delicious), which must be approved by the instructor
    in regard to its ability to meet these criteria. Two points will be awarded for each criteria met.
   The creation of a two-disk CD mix with a creative title (e.g., Then & Now, Slow & Fast, Rock & Rap, Study & Party). Each student
    will contribute one song. Any remaining space on the CDs will be filled with songs chosen by the whole class.

How Your 13 Individual PDPs, Completed PDP, and Poster Will Be Graded
Your 13 Individual PDPs are worth 5 points each (65 total points). These points will be determined on the basis of the following criteria.
 2 points for Completeness and Accuracy (Does your PDP contain complete and accurate information in all its sections gained from
   credible sources or does it appear to have been thrown together hastily and based only on the personal opinions of the author?)
 2 point for Precision and Style (Is your PDP free from grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization errors? Does it have the
   appearance of a professionally written document or does it appear to have been hastily thrown together the night before it was due?)
 1 point for Timeliness of Submission (Was your PDP submitted at 11:00 on the day that it was due?)
Your final PDP is worth 35 points. These points will be determined on the basis of the following criteria.
 15 points for Completeness (Does your PDP contain complete information in all four sections?)
 15 points for Accuracy (Do the answers in your PDP reflect accurate information gained from credible sources or does it appear to
   have been thrown together hastily and based on the personal opinions of the author?)
 5 points for Precision and Style (Is your PDP free from grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization errors? Does it have the
   appearance of a professionally written document or does it appear to have been hastily thrown together the night before it was due?)
Your poster is worth 50 points. These points will be determined on the basis of the following criteria.
 20 points  professional appearance of your resume and poster
 10 points  appropriateness and professionalism of your appearance.
 10 points  presence of an invited guest who is interested in your academic and/or career progress, who will interact with the other
   attendees, and who remains for the majority of the poster session. (You will introduce yourself and your guest—and explain your
   guest’s interest in your academic and/or career progress—at the beginning of the poster session.)
 10 points  quality of your contribution to the catering of the poster session.

Final Grade Criteria
The total number of points you earn (out of the 400 possible points) in the following ways will determine your final grade:
    150 points for writing the 15 10-point WPs
    100 points for the PDP (5 points for each of the 12 PDP individual sections and 40 points for the completed PDP)
     50 points for the poster session
     50 points for exhibiting civil and responsible behavior in the classroom
     20 points for presenting the COR report
     10 points for contributing an acceptable recipe to Chef D’s College Student Cookbook
     10 points for contributing the song to the class CD project
     10 points for submitting all your WPs on the final day of class
Your final grade in this class will be determined with the following scale. Go to the Oncourse gradebook each week to check on your
current grade, and use this information to complete the final section of each of your WPs.
     A+ = 373-400 points (93.3%)               B = 320-332 points (80%)                C- = 266-279 points (66.6%)
     A = 360- 372 points (90%)                 B- = 306-319 points (76.6%)             D+ = 253-265 points (63.3%)
     A- = 346-359 points (86.6%)               C+ = 293-305 points (73.3%)             D = 240-252 points (60%)
     B+ = 333-345 points (83.3%)               C = 280-292 points (70%)                F = 239 or fewer points

The Attendance Policy
Because the mission of IUPUI is to provide its students with a quality education, class attendance is considered essential. You are
expected to attend all scheduled class meetings because absence results in the loss of instruction and classroom interaction. You should
enroll in only those courses you are willing and able to attend. Although attendance is not a specific grade criterion in this class, the
timely submission of assignments is. If you are absent when an assignment is due, you will not be penalized for missing the class, but the
instructor will not award you full credit for an assignment that is submitted past its deadline. Please refer to the Final Grade Criteria
section of this syllabus to determine the impact of class absence on your grade. It is important to remember that you are responsible for
all information presented in class, regardless of your attendance. University regulations require instructors to report the dates of last class
attendance of students who receive financial aid and who discontinue class attendance without officially withdrawing.

What Is an Excused Absence, and What Does an Excused Absence Allow a Student to Do?
An excused absence allows a student to miss a class for a reason that the instructor believes is legitimate (e.g., when the student’s team is
traveling to an away game). However, an excused absence does not allow a student to submit an assignment after its official due date. In
other words, an excused absence allows you to be absent, but it does not allow you to avoid completing and submitting the assignment
due on the day you were absent. If you have a legitimate excuse to miss a class when an assignment is due (e.g., an illness), it is your
duty to complete that assignment before its due date and to arrange with one of your classmates to deliver it to class on the day you are

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absent. As student-athletes, your classes are your first priority, so do not schedule other obligations (e.g., doctor’s appointments,
meetings with your coaches, etc.) during the 105 minutes this class meets each Wednesday of this semester.

Creating and Maintaining a Civil Classroom Atmosphere
It is the responsibility of college faculty to create and maintain a civil classroom atmosphere in which members of their classes treat each
other with mutual respect. One crucial outcome of this type of atmosphere is the establishment of a classroom in which attention and
energy is focused on teaching and learning, rather than on frustration, conflict, and distrust. Students do not enjoy learning from teachers
who disrespect them, and teachers do not enjoy teaching students whose behavior is disrespectful to them or their fellow students. I have
always treated my students with dignity, respect, and fairness. I do not play favorites, I do not belittle my students, I show up for my
classes on time, and I am prepared to teach when I arrive in the classroom. I hold all my students in high esteem, regardless of how well
they perform in my classes, and I try my best to communicate this to them through both my words and my actions. I do everything in my
power to conduct myself in the manner of a professional educator because I realize that I serve as a role model for many of my students
who seek education or psychology as their profession. Two of my most important duties as a college professor are (1) to give my
students a clear idea of the types of behaviors that can interfere with the teaching and learning process in my classroom and (2) to make a
sincere effort to decrease or eliminate these behaviors whenever possible. Research that my colleagues, my students, and I have
conducted over the past 20 years has identified the following set of student behaviors that can have a detrimental effect upon my ability
to teach and your ability to learn. I want you to know what these behaviors are so you can avoid engaging in them. I also want you to
know that if you decide to engage in these behaviors, it will be my responsibility to stop you from doing them.
 Exhibiting academically dishonest behaviors (e.g., cheating, plagiarizing, or helping another student to cheat or plagiarize).
 Talking to your fellow students when the instructor or your fellow students are attempting to communicate with the class.
 Doing things in class other than what is expected (e.g., text messaging, reading a newspaper, or doing homework for another class).
 Behaving as if you are bored by or uninterested in the class material (e.g., slouching in your seat or falling asleep).
 Coming to class unprepared (i.e., without completing the assignment that is due).
 Intentionally refusing to participate in classroom activities.
 Failing to comprehend and/or follow instructions due to a lack of attention.
 Treating your fellow students or instructor with disrespect (e.g., with insults, sarcasm, threats, or disrespectful facial expressions).
 Coming to class late, leaving class early, or packing up your books before the official end of the class.
 Making distracting noises or movements.
 Allowing your cell phone to ring in class or, worse yet, answering it and engaging in a telephone conversation during class.
 Sitting in the back of the classroom when there are seats available in the front.
 Asking questions that are off the topic that is being discussed or that have already been answered.

Academic Honesty
Seven years ago, over half of the members of this class engaged in serious acts of academic dishonesty. This profoundly disappointing
situation led me to ponder this problem for several months and to write the following short essay. We will cover academic honesty in this
class, but I want to introduce you to the topic now and communicate to you how seriously I feel about it. Five minor cases of academic
dishonesty have occurred during my last five classes, all of which I dealt with quickly and effectively.

Two thousand years ago, the Greek philosopher Seneca said, “We live in an age where successful crime is called virtue.” Students who
believe and act upon the two following assumptions are staging a similar ethical tragedy on today’s college campuses.
 A teacher who wants students to learn and who trusts them to work hard in order to do so is dull and naïve.
 A student who can beat the educational system by cheating and learning nothing is exciting and clever.
Your reputation is your most prized possession, and you must continually ask yourself, “How will I be remembered?” College is the
perfect place to examine the nature of your character and to begin the creation of the person you want to become. I urge you to take
advantage of this priceless opportunity to transform yourself into the person who will be remembered in the way you wish to be
remembered. The three essential steps in this creative process are as follows.
 Understanding our university’s code of academic honesty.
 Making the decision to act in an academically honest manner.
 Behaving in an academically honest manner in all your classes.

A Very Important Concept in Academic Honesty: The Difference Between Collaboration and Collusion
It is vitally important for you to understand the difference between the concepts of collaboration and collusion in this class and in all
your other classes. When students collaborate on an academic assignment, they work together on the assignment, but they create and
submit different, individually produced products when the assignment is completed. Collaboration is a valuable skill in the classroom, in
the workplace, and on the athletic field where it is called teamwork. Collusion is similar to collaboration in that students work together
on an assignment, but the results of collusion are very different. When students collude on an academic assignment, they work together
on the assignment, but they produce essentially the same product. In most cases, one student creates the product (e.g., writes a report)
and other students simply copy the report verbatim or change it in minor ways in an attempt to hide that fact that they have simply copied
another student’s work and claimed it as their own. In this situation, the student who copies the product from its actual author is guilty of

                                                                      7
plagiarism and the student who allowed her/his classmate to copy the assignment is guilty of facilitation of academic dishonesty.
Collusion has occurred in this class several times in the past. Please do not allow it to happen again.

Instructional Team and Student Expectations
The members of the instructional team have the following expectations of the student-athletes enrolled in this class.
 To be present, punctual, prepared, attentive, and willing to participate positively and constructively during each class.
 To understand and abide by the procedures, regulations, and schedules described in this syllabus.
 To behave in the dignified, respectful, and academically honest manner of mature and responsible IUPUI student-athletes.
The students-athletes enrolled in this class may have the following expectations of the members of its instructional team.
 To be present, punctual, prepared, and enthusiastic during each class in which they play a role.
 To be genuinely concerned about their students’ ability to perform well in this class
 To uphold the procedures, regulations, and schedules described in this syllabus.
 To behave in the dignified, respectful, and academically honest manner of professional university educators.

Seven “Bottom Line” Rules for Success in This Class
This is not a difficult class, but it is a class that requires hard and smart work, just like the hard and smart work required for you to
perform well athletically. If you are willing to abide by the following seven very basic rules, you are likely to perform well and earn a
high grade in this class.
1. Come to class, come to class on time, and stay for the entire class period.
2. Work hard.
3. Follow directions.
4. Act in an academically honest manner.
5. Submit assignments when they are due.
6. Use your instructor’s feedback to improve the quality of your work.
7. Collaborate civilly, effectively, and honestly with your instructor, your advisor, your student mentor, and your fellow students.


                                                 Daily Class Schedule
Abbreviations
COR = Campus Opportunity/Resource Report
ICA = In-Class Activity
FT = Field Trip
WP = Weekly Paper due the following week
PDP = Professional Development Plan Assignment due the following week

                                                           Week 1: August 25
                                                         Understanding the class
COR = None
ICAs
 Introduction to this class and its theme
 Introductions of all class members
 Assignment of teams to create the cook book and the CD
 Begin to sign up for COR reports
WP#1 = What final grade do you want to earn in this class? Describe exactly what you must do to earn this grade by listing and
explaining the Final Grade Criteria from page 6 of this syllabus. Prove that this WP is worth 10 points by describing why it meets each
of the 10 criteria for a 5-point WP that appear on pages 3 and 4 of this syllabus.
PDP #1 = Title Sheet and Section A1
                                                          Week 2: September 1
                                       Challenges and fears of IUPUI freshmen student-athletes
COR = The Psychology Resource Center
ICAs
 How do student-athletes perceive the academic and athletic differences between high school and college?
 Fears, concerns, and stressors of former learning community students, and how they used this class to deal with them.
WP#2
 Which of the seven academic differences between high school and college will be the most challenging to me, and how will I
     overcome this challenge in order to become a successful Division 1 student-athlete?
 Which of the seven athletic differences between high school and college will be the most challenging to me, and how will I
     overcome this challenge in order to become a successful Division 1 student-athlete?



                                                                     8
  What is my greatest fear, concern, or stressor about being a freshman student-athlete at IUPUI? How will I use at least two specific
   aspects of this class (e.g., people, COR reports, strategies, assignments, field trips, etc.) to help me overcome, manage, or decrease
   this fear, concern, or stressor?
PDP #2 = Sections A2 and A3

                                                           Week 3: September 8
                       Good grief! I just read it last night, and now that I’m taking the test, I can’t remember it.
COR = The Writing Center
ICA = How do we remember and why do we forget?
WP#3 = Describe the three stages of human memory, and explain something you learned about each stage that can help you to develop a
specific strategy to learn more successfully in your classes and earn higher grades.
Optional WP = You may resubmit WP #1 next week if you did not receive full credit for it the first time.
 You may resubmit WP #1 if you have corrected it on the basis of the advice and feedback you received.
 You may regain all the points you lost on WP #1 by submitting a stapled package that includes (1) a cover sheet that explains each
    of your changes, (2) your original WP #1 with its written feedback, and (3) your new, corrected WP #1.
 You must submit all three of these documents in the correct order for your WP #1 rewrite to be evaluated.
PDP #3 = Sections A4 and A5

                                                         Week 4: September 15
                       How do I create an effective resume that will enable me to enter the career of my choice?
ICA = Presentation on how to create an effective student-athlete resume given by Colleen Rusnak from the Office of Academic and
Career Planning
WP#4 = Create your current resume on the basis of the information provided by Colleen
Optional WP = You may resubmit WP #2 next week if you did not receive full credit for it the first time.
 You may resubmit WP #2 if you have corrected it on the basis of the advice and feedback you received.
 You may regain all the points you lost on WP #2 by submitting a stapled package that includes (1) a cover sheet that explains each
    of your changes, (2) your original WP #2 with its written feedback, and (3) your new, corrected WP #1.
 You must submit all three of these documents in the correct order for your WP #2 rewrite to be evaluated.
PDP #4 = Sections A6 and A7
                                                         Week 5: September 22
                                                  Hey! What happened to all my time?
COR = The Math Assistance Center
ICA = Time management strategies for student-athletes
WP#5
 Write all your game/match/meet times and dates (including road trip times/dates) and the test dates and assignment deadlines from
    the syllabi in all of your classes in your IUPUI Student-Athlete Planner. Estimate the amount of time necessary to prepare for each
    of your tests and assignments, choose dates when you should begin working on them, and mark those dates in your calendar.
    Identify your busiest week of the semester, and create two very specific strategies you can use to decrease your stress and increase
    your academic performance during this week.
 Do I ever procrastinate? If I do, which procrastination style portrays me most accurately, and what specific strategy from the time
    management handout can I use to decrease this type of procrastination?
PDP #5 = Sections B1 and B2

                                                           Week 6: September 29
                     Memory 101: Exploring the relationship between your memory and your test performance
COR = The Speakers’ Lab
ICA = How to study for and take multiple-choice tests successfully
WP#6 = Identify and explain six thinking skills that can be measured with multiple-choice questions. Explain how you can use your
understanding of this type of test question to create a study strategy that can help you to improve your performance on your B104 tests.
PDP #6 = Sections B3 and B4
                                                             Week 7: October 6
           There’s more to an undergraduate education than memorizing terms and definitions on a set of flash cards.
COR = The Student Advocate
ICA = What is critical thinking, and why is it an important skill for IUPUI student-athletes?
WP#7 = Define the six critical thinking skills in your own words. Give a specific example of how you are using each of these skills in
your classes and a specific negative consequence if you were unable to use each of these skills. Give a specific example of how you are
using each of these skills in your sport and a specific negative consequence if you are unable to use each of these skills.
PDP#7 = Sections C1 and C2
                                                            Week 8: October 13
           Will you be able to obtain the career of your dreams or will you have to settle for the next job that opens up?
FT = Academic and Career Planning Office: Colleen Rusnak will have lunch with us and then escort us to this office

                                                                    9
WP#8 = Explain three types of resources (one printed, one electronic, and one human) in the Academic and Career Planning Office that
can help you to identify, explore, and prepare for the career of your choice.
PDP #8 = Section C3 and C4

                                                             October 25
                                      Priority Advanced Registration for Student-Athletes Begins

                                                          Week 9: October 20
                                            To cheat or not to cheat . . . That is the question.
COR = The Bepko Learning Center
ICA = The nature and consequences of academic dishonesty
WP#9 = List and explain three advantages to remaining academically honest during college and three advantages to remaining honest
during your career. (Do not answer this question by explaining how you will avoid the negative consequences of academic dishonesty.)
PDP #9 = D1 and D2
                                                              Week 10: October 27
                                                              What are the PULs?
ICA = Becoming familiar with IUPUI’s Principles of Undergraduate Learning (PULs), understanding how you can attain them, and
exploring how their successful completion can have a positive effect on your future career
WP#10 = Identify the career you are planning to enter. Identify a type of knowledge, a skill, and a characteristic (KSC) you will need to
be successful in your career. Match each of these KSCs with one of the PULs and, using the descriptions of the PULs contained in this
syllabus, explain why they match. Identify at least one class you will take during your undergraduate career that will enable you to
develop each of these KSCs.
PDP #10 = D3
                                                             Week 11: November 3
                                                        Goofus and Gallant go to college
COR = The Office of Student Account Services
ICA
 The characteristics of successful and unsuccessful college students
 Take and score The Classroom Civility Test
 Peer review of the current draft of your PDP
WP#11
 Identify two characteristics of unsuccessful college students you possess and explain how you will change them so they will not
     cause you to be a college dropout.
 Use the results of the Classroom Civility Test to identify two irritating behaviors you exhibit in your classes, explain what these
     behaviors communicate about you to your teachers, and explain how you will change them in the future so they do not continue to
     endanger your relationship with your teachers. What was your total score on this test and how does it compare with the average total
     score for the whole class? What does this say about your current level of incivility in your classes?
PDP #11 = D4
                                                            Week 12: November 10
                                         Learning your way around campus on foot and in cyberspace
ICA = Scavenger hunt! (See the instructions that appear later in this syllabus.)
WP#12 = Explain what you have been doing—and will do—in this class to your parents or primary caretakers, and ask them what they
think of it (i.e., Do they think it is a valuable experience for you?). Write a brief report that summarizes their reactions to your question.

                                                         Week 13: November 17
                         Hired or fired? Do you have the skills to enter and succeed in your future career?
COR = The Office of Counseling and Psychological Services
ICAs
 College diploma: Job guarantee or certificate of change? What you can learn from the SCANS report.
WP#13
 What will your answer be to the following job interview questions four years from now? “What specific skills are required to
   perform this job successfully? What evidence do you have that would convince me that you actually possess these skills?” (Be sure
   to specify the job for which you are applying.)
 Use the knowledge you obtained from the SCANS Report to explain how you will use each of the classes you are enrolled in this
   semester to begin to develop the skills that will be required of successfully employed people in the 21st Century.
PDP #12 = D5

    Thanksgiving vacation begins when classes end on Tuesday, November 23rd and ends
    when classes begin on Monday, November 29th. Enjoy the holiday with your family!
                                                                     10
                                                            Week 14: December 1
                       Librarial geography or how to find what you need in our wonderful—but huge—library.
FT = The Library  Eric Snajdr with have lunch with us and then escort us to the Library for our field trip.
WP#14
 Eric Snajdr will provide and grade your assignment
 Write and sign a one-page letter (on a separate sheet from your library assignment) to a student-athlete who will take this class next
     fall. Your letter must contain three paragraphs that will (1) explain the purpose of this class; (2) identify which four class
     assignments and/or activities were most valuable for you, what you learned from each of them, and how the knowledge or skills you
     learned helped you to be a more successful student-athlete; and (4) provide four helpful hints to the recipient of your letter that will
     help her/him to be a successful IUPUI student-athlete
Be as specific as possible in your letter. Don’t just write about generalities like, “This class helped me to be a better student.” Explain
specific ways in which the class helped you to be a better student (e.g., “I learned how to use an academic planner, I am now more aware
of the nature and consequences of academic dishonesty, or I learned how to study for and answer complex multiple-choice questions.”). I
will send copies of your letters to the students who enroll in this class next fall. This will be the legacy of your class passed on to the next
generation of Jaguar student-athletes, so write the kind of letter you wish you had received last summer before you took this class.
                                                            Week 15: December 8
                                                             Did this class work?
ICAs
 Evaluate the class.
 Give your instructional team some suggestions about how to improve the class for next year.
 Prepare for next week’s Poster Session by doing the following.
     o Bring your poster to class.
     o Wear what you will wear to the poster session.
     o Practice answering questions the poster session attendees may ask you.
     o Plan the catering and clean up for the poster session with your classmates.
     o Identify your guest and explain her/his interest in your academic and career progress.
WP#15 = Submit a stapled booklet of all your WPs arranged in chronological order with a creative cover sheet.
PDP = Submit a stapled copy of your completed PDP with a creative cover sheet

                                              Week 16: December 15 (10:30  12:30)
                                                         (Finals Week)
PDP = D6 (The Poster Session will take place in Room 450B of the Campus Center from 10:30 to 12:30.)
HWA for the Rest of Your College Career = Begin to apply the knowledge and skills you acquired in this class to become
 a successful Division 1 athlete,
 a savvy IUPUI student, and
 a competent member of the occupation you wish to enter.




                                                                      11
Weekly Paper #5                                                                                                    Jane Doe
September 27, 2010                                                                                                 UCOL 110
                                                                                                                   Dr. Appleby

                                                             Question

List three classes you will take in your major during your freshman year. What you will learn in each of these classes.

                                                              Answer

As a psychology major, I plan to take the following three classes during my freshman year.
1. B103 Introduction to a Major in Psychology: I will learn about the requirements to graduate with a psychology major and
    the career paths I can take as a result of earning a bachelors degree in psychology.
2. B104 Psychology as a Social Science: I will learn about the areas of psychology that are considered to be social sciences
    (e.g., social psychology, personality, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, industrial/organizational psychology, human
    development, intelligence, and health psychology).
3. B105 Psychology as a Biological Science: I will learn about the areas of specialization in psychology that are considered to
    be biological sciences (e.g., sensation, perception, motivation, and neuroscience).

                                            What is the purpose of this assignment?

This assignment gave me an opportunity to become aware of some of the classes I will take in my major and helped me
understand what I will learn in them. This will make the meetings I have with my advisor more productive because I will know
what I must take so my adviser doesn’t have to treat me like a clueless high school student who has no idea of what classes s/he
should enroll in during the next semester. Now that I know what I will learn in my classes, I feel like I am in more control of my
academic future. I get more out of classes when I know why I am taking them and what I will learn in them. This will help
prevent me from taking my classes just to get them out of the way. This will help me excel in college because I will do better in
my classes because I am beginning to understand what it takes to become a successful psychologist. This excites me, and when
I am excited about something, I always perform better.

                                                     COR Report Summary

COR: The Academic Affairs Office
Director: Dr. Samuel Krieg, Dean of Academic Affairs
Location: Room 111 of Cavanaugh Hall
Hours: 8:00 to 5:00 Monday through Friday
Purpose(s):     To direct the academic programs of the college and provide students with information about academic programs
Presenters:     Tom Elliot: Indianapolis - Pike High School - History major - plays soccer, likes reggae music, and wants to be
                a corporate lawyer who works for Eli Lilly
                Sara Jones: Brownsburg - Brownsburg High School - Nursing major - collects teddy bears, plays piano, and
                wants to work at Riley Hospital as an intensive care nurse

                                         What is my current letter grade in this class?

15    =   Total points I have earned at this time
20    =   Total points possible at this time
75%   =   The % of the total points I have earned at this time computed by dividing my points by the total points possible
C+    =   My current letter grade based on the percentages included in the grading scale on page 5 of this syllabus

          Am I satisfied with my current grade? If I am not, what have I done or not done in the past to lose points?
          What specific strategies will I use in the future to make sure I no longer lose points for the same reasons?

I am not satisfied with my current grade of C+ because I want to earn a final grade of A in this class. I have lost points in the
past because I turned in one of my WPs late, I had more than one spelling error in one of my WPs, I did not include a Purpose
section in one of my WPs, and I answered only half of one of the homework questions because I did not include the entire
question from the syllabus. In the future, I will turn all my WPs in on time, I will use the spell check in Word, I will always
include a Purpose section, and I will copy the entire question word-for-word from the syllabus into my WP.




                                                                12
                                                  Name: ______________________________________________




                    Weekly Paper (WP) Self-Scoring Sheet
Complete this sheet for each of your WPs by circling the Yes or No to the left of each of the 10 grading
criteria. Estimate how many points you will earn on each WP by completing the worksheet on the bottom of
this page. Staple this completed sheet to the front of each of your WPs before you submit them.



Yes No This WP was submitted at the beginning of the class on the date when it was due.


Yes No This WP was word-processed on only one side of only one sheet of 8.5 x 11 inch unlined paper.


Yes No The WP number followed by today’s date appear in the upper left hand corner of this WP. My name,
       UCOL 110, and the instructor's name appear in the upper right hand corner of this WP.

Yes No This WP has centered, boldface headings for each of its sections that are identical in both content and
       format to the example WP included in the syllabus.

Yes No The HWA questions appear in this WP exactly (i.e., word-for-word) as they appear in the syllabus.
       This includes the questions and any clarifying information that accompanies them.

Yes No This WP contains no more than one grammar, spelling, capitalization, or punctuation error. I used the
       grammar and spell check programs in my word processor to check this.

Yes No This WP contains complete and correct information that reflects an accurate understanding of the
       material covered in the class or in the reading assignments.

Yes No I used the Purpose section of this WP to convince the instructor that I gave this assignment serious
       thought and came to some specific conclusions about how it will help me perform well at IUPUI.

Yes No The COR Report Summary section of this WP contains the name of the campus opportunity or resource
       that was reported on the previous week and the COR’s director, location, hours, and purpose. It also
       contains the COR reporters’ names, hometowns, high schools, majors, hobbies, and career aspirations.

Yes No The My Current Letter Grade in this Class section of this WP contains the total number of points I
       have earned, the total points possible at this time, the percentage of the total points I have earned, and
       my current letter grade based on this percentage. If I am not satisfied with my current grade, I gave a
       specific explanation of what I have done or not done to earn this grade and a specific description of
       what I am going to do or stop doing to increase my performance in this class in the future.



                                        _____ = Total number of Yeses




                                                        13
       IUPUI’s Principles of Undergraduate Learning
The Principles of Undergraduate Learning are the essential ingredients of the undergraduate educational
experience at IUPUI. These principles form a conceptual framework for all students' general education and
permeate the curriculum in the major field of study as well. More specific expectations for IUPUI's graduates are
determined by the faculty in a student's major field of study. Together, these expectations speak to what graduates
of IUPUI will know and what they will be able to do when they complete their degrees.

Core Communication and Quantitative Skills
 Definition: The ability to express and interpret information, perform quantitative analysis, and use information
   resources and technology (which are the foundational skills necessary for all IUPUI students to succeed).
 Students demonstrate this ability when they are able to (1) express ideas and facts to others effectively in a
   variety of formats, particularly written, oral, and visual formats; (2) comprehend, interpret, and analyze ideas
   and facts; (3) communicate effectively in a range of settings; (4) identify and propose solutions for problems
   using quantitative tools and reasoning; and (5) make effective use of information resources and technology.

Critical Thinking
 Definition: The ability to engage in a process of disciplined thinking that informs beliefs and actions.
 Students demonstrate this ability when they are able to apply the process of disciplined thinking by remaining
    open-minded, reconsidering previous beliefs and actions, and adjusting his or her thinking, beliefs and actions
    based on new information to (1) remember, (2) understand, (3) apply, (4) analyze, (5) evaluate, and (6) create
    knowledge, procedures, processes, or products to discern bias, challenge assumptions, identify consequences,
    arrive at reasoned conclusions, generate and explore new questions, solve challenging and complex problems,
    and make informed decisions.

Integration and Application of Knowledge
 Definition: The ability to use information and concepts from studies in multiple disciplines in their intellectual,
    professional, and community lives.
 Students demonstrate this ability when they are able to (1) enhance their personal lives; (2) meet professional
    standards and competencies; (3) further the goals of society; and (4) work across traditional course and
    disciplinary boundaries.

Intellectual Depth, Breadth, and Adaptiveness
 Definition: The ability to examine and organize disciplinary ways of knowing and to apply them to specific
    issues and problems.
 Students demonstrate this ability when they are able to (1) show substantial knowledge and understanding of at
    least one field of study; (2) compare and contrast approaches to knowledge in different disciplines; (3) modify
    one's approach to an issue or problem based on the contexts and requirements of particular situations.

Understanding Society and Culture
 Definition: The ability to recognize their own cultural traditions and to understand and appreciate the diversity
   of the human experience.
 Students demonstrate this ability when they able to (1) compare and contrast the range of diversity and
   universality in human history, societies, and ways of life; (2) analyze and understand the interconnectedness of
   global and local communities; and (3) operate with civility in a complex world.

Values and Ethics
 Definition: The ability to make sound decisions with respect to individual conduct, citizenship, and aesthetics.
 Students demonstrate this ability when they are able to (1) make informed and principled choices and to
   foresee consequences of these choices; (2) explore, understand, and cultivate an appreciation for beauty and
   art; and (3) understand ethical principles within diverse cultural, social, environmental, and personal settings.


                                                         14
                              The Scavenger Hunt
Description: The scavenger hunt will begin promptly at 11:00 on the date that appears in
the Daily Class Schedule. You will be assigned to a team and, using a digital camera, take
pictures of your group at certain places or with specific items around campus.

Teams: The Academic Advisor will divide the class into five teams of five members
each. These teams will be distributed to the class the week prior to the scavenger hunt.

Rules:
1. Teams may begin their search upon arrival in class. Each team must have a digital
   camera and will be given a list of items or locations to find.
2. To complete the search, the group must find each item or location on the list and take a
   group picture using the digital camera.
3. The photographer should differ for each item or location.
4. Campus maps, the UC manual, and campus bulletin are the only acceptable forms of
   aid during the search.

Possible Search Items and Locations:

With Eric Snajdr in the Library
With Colleen Rusnak in the Office of Academic and Career Planning
The front of the Union Building (where Counseling and Psychological Services is located)
The Psychology Resource Center
One of the Writing Centers
The Speakers Lab
The Math Assistance Center
Dr. A’s Office
Mrs. Sauer’s Office
Mrs. T’s Office
Denise O’Grady’s Office
The Sun Dial
The Big Metal Ants
The Fountain
The Campus Post Office
The JagTag Office
The room where our poster session will be held

The team that finishes first with a complete set of pictures is the winner.




                                              15
The Greatest Fears, Concerns, or Stressors of Learning Community (LC) Students When They First Came to IUPUI
and How They Used Information From Their Learning Community to Manage or Overcome These Fears and Concerns

The final assignment in one of my recent Student-Athlete Learning Communities was to (1) describe the two greatest fears, concerns, or
stressors (FCSs) they experienced when they first entered IUPUI and (2) explain how they used what they learned in their Learning
Community to overcome or manage these FCSs. I performed a content analysis on their responses and organized the results by printing their
FCSs in bold face followed by bulleted lists of what they reported they had learned in the class to help them overcome or manage them. The
number in parenthesis after each line indicates how many students gave that response.

I was afraid I’d get lost or be unable to find things (e.g., my classes) on such a big campus. (22)
         I learned from field trips, COR reports and the teacher, advisor, mentor, and librarian where things are located on campus and that
          IUPUI has many resources to help new students do well (e.g., the Writing Center and the Bepko Learning Center). (19)
         I learned about the underground tunnels so I can get to my classes without freezing to death during the winter. (3)
I was afraid I would be a failure (e.g., not know how to study, get low grades, or not be able to deal with the pressure). (17)
         I learned how to study for and take multiple-choice tests more successfully. (6)
         I strengthened my study skills. (3)
         I learned how to take lecture notes more effectively. (2)
         I learned how to drop a class if I am failing it or use the Grade Replacement Policy to take a class over again. (2)
         I learned how my memory works and how to use this knowledge to study more effectively.
         I discovered that IUPUI provides tutors to help you in difficult classes.
         I learned to be more organized.
         I learned that if I get into trouble, I can find a way out of it.
I was afraid that I wouldn’t “fit in” (i.e., get to know anyone or make any new friends). (15)
         Being in several classes with the same people helped me to make friends more easily. (5)
         I had a chance to meet new people and really talk in a relaxed atmosphere. (3)
         I learned that you have to get involved in campus activities if you want to have a “whole” college experience. (2)
         I made some close friends in my Learning Community who made me feel more like I belong.
         I have developed a sense of “belonging” in this class.
         I learned that my Learning Community is like a little family in a big school.
         I learned that I can make plenty of new friends at IUPUI.
         I learned how to communicate with my friends and teachers with e-mail.
I didn’t know where go or who to go to if I needed help or had a question. (12)
         I was introduced to a lot of very nice and helpful people (my teacher, advisor, mentor, librarian, and fellow students). (3)
         I found out about Mentors and how they can help new students do well in their classes and adjust to IUPUI. (3)
         I became thoroughly acquainted with the University College Student Manual, which answers just about any question about IUPUI
          that a new student could possibly have. (2)
         I learned that there are people at IUPUI who really care about you and want you to do well.
         Having a teacher, an advisor, and a mentor to talk to in an informal way was comforting.
         I learned that I had someone to talk to if I was in trouble.
         With the help my mentor and advisor, I was able to balance my school life and my work life.
I didn’t know how to manage my time very well. (8)
         I learned time management skills. (8)
I was afraid college teachers would have no mercy and that I’d only a number and not a person to them. (3)
         I gained the confidence to discover that college teachers are very nice and understanding people. (2)
         It was nice to have a friendly and approachable teacher who genuinely wants his students to do well at IUPUI.
I was afraid that the schoolwork would be much harder or very different than it was in high school. (5)
         I learned what critical thinking is and how to became a better critical thinker. (3)
         The assignments in this class helped me to learn the level of excellence that is expected of me as an IUPUI student.
         I learned about academic dishonesty and why it is to my advantage to be academically honest.
I didn’t know what classes to take. (2)
         I now have a better sense of where I am going in the future.
         I learned the value of having an academic advisor who can help you plan your classes.
I was afraid I would get lost in the shuffle and just be a number because IUPUI is such a big place. (2)
         I learned to overcome some of shyness by participating in the class discussions.
         My Learning Community helped me feel that IUPUI really does care about its students and their success.
I was afraid I wouldn’t know what was going on. (2)
         This course helped me to learn how to get involved in campus activities.
         I learned about campus events and how to take advantage of them (e.g., Exam Jams)
I didn’t know how to use the library. (1)
         I learned about how to use the Library and its electronic resources.




                                                                     16
 What Student-Athletes Can Expect to Learn in My Learning Community

The final assignment in my recent Student-Athlete Learning Communities was to write a letter to a student-athlete who will
enroll in the class next fall. The purpose of this assignment was for my current student-athletes to identify the three most
important things they learned in the class so that my future students-athletes can know what to expect. I performed a content
analysis of their letters and found that their responses could be organized into the following 20 categories, which are followed
by the number of responses that fell into each category. I have underlined the key terms in each category.

I learned about all of IUPUI’s campus resources that have been created to help me become a successful college student (e.g.,
the Bepko Learning Center, the Speakers Lab, the Writing Center, the Academic and Career Advising Office, the Financial Aid
Office, the Student Advocate’s Office, Counseling and Psychological Services, and Exam Jams)  16

I learned my Learning Community is filled with nice people, many of whom have become my good friends  7

I learned how to manage my time better  6

I learned how to use the Library and how to find my way around in it  6

I learned what it takes to be a successful college student (e.g., study skills)  5

I learned how to register for classes by myself on the computer  4

I learned about the Student-Athlete Mentor Program  3

I learned how to volunteer at Riley Hospital  3

I learned about the tunnels under campus so I won’t freeze in the winter  3

I learned about all the helpful people on campus who want you to be a successful student  2

I learned how to find things on campus  2

I learned I am not alone in my fears and concerns about being a college student (e.g., What should I major in, where can I park,
where are my classes, and will I know anybody?)  2

I learned how to be a critical thinker  2

I learned how to be a better and more precise writer  1

I learned how to work as part of a team (e.g., when we worked together to gave our COR reports in class)  1

I learned what is expected of student-athletes (e.g., that the student comes first in student-athlete)  1

I learned about what is happening on campus  1

I learned about my own skills and abilities  1

I learned how to find out who I am and who I want to become  1

I learned that you can learn and have fun at the same time  1




                                                                 17
                     The Ten Top Reasons Why Newly Hired College
                    Graduates Are Reprimanded, Disciplined, or Fired
                                                  Drew C. Appleby, PhD
                          Director of Undergraduate Studies in the IUPUI Department of Psychology

Students receive abundant advice about the types of knowledge and skills they should acquire during their undergraduate
education that will prepare them to enter the workforce after they graduate. However, they usually receive very little advice
about the types of behaviors they should learn to avoid during their undergraduate education that could cause them to fail
(i.e., to be reprimanded, disciplined, or fired by their supervisors) once they are employed.

The first six, boldfaced and underlined items on the following list—arranged in decreasing order of frequency—are those that
employers say are the most common reasons why they fire newly hired college graduates. All ten items on the list are reasons
employers give for reprimanding or disciplining new college hires. This information is taken from a recent article written by
Gardner (2007) for Michigan State’s Collegiate Employment Research Institute, which can be accessed online at:
http://ceri.msu.edu/publications/pdf/brief1-07.pdf

1.    Unethical Behavior
2.    Lack of Motivation or Work Ethic
3.    Inappropriate Use of Technology
4.    Failure to Follow Instructions
5.    Being Late for Work
6.    Missing Assignments or Deadlines
7.    Ineffective in Teams
8.    Unable to Communicate Verbally in an Effective Manner
9.    Unable to Communicate in Writing in an Effective Manner
10.   Failure to Take Initiative

As your instructor in a career-oriented Thematic Learning Community whose theme is “Using Your Present to Create Your
Future,” it is vitally important for me to provide you with this information and to construct my class in ways that will (1) make
you aware of these behaviors, (2) bring your attention to those of these behaviors you exhibit, (3) provide you with an
opportunity to construct a strategy to consciously and deliberately avoid engaging in these behaviors in the future, and (4)
create an environment in which you will be rewarded when you successfully avoid engaging in these behaviors.

Although employers and college professors are often very different people, it is amazing how similar they are in terms of the
expectations they have of those who are under their supervision (i.e., their employees and their students). For example:
 Employers do not want their employees to engage in unethical behaviors such as stealing things from the company (i.e.,
    theft) and professors do not what their students to engage in unethical behaviors such as stealing the words and ideas of
    others without giving them appropriate credit (i.e., plagiarism).
 Employers do not want their employees to be late to work and professors do not want their students to be late to class.
 Neither employers nor professors want their employees or students to surf the Web, text message, or check E-mail,
    Facebook, or MySpace when they are supposed to be concentrating on their work or in their classes.

The most important message college students can take from this information is that they should consciously and deliberately use
their undergraduate education to not only help them develop the knowledge and skills that will enable them to obtain jobs, but
also to learn to avoid the undesirable behaviors that can cause them to lose the jobs they obtain. One way they can do this is to
intentionally seek out instructors who “set the bar high” by expecting students to perform in the same competent, responsible,
ethical, and civil ways that their future employers will demand. Students should avoid classes taught by instructors who do not
require their students to work hard, who give high grades for mediocre work, who allow students to turn in late assignments,
who ignore students who text message or surf the Net in class, who do not require students to work collaboratively, who tolerate
student absence or tardiness, or who place no emphasis or value on academic integrity. The lessons students learn from these
instructors can produce the types of on-the-job behaviors that may lead to reprimands from their supervisors or, worse yet,
termination from the jobs they believe they were preparing for during their undergraduate education. One of the ways in which I
“set the bar high” in this class is by having the Academic Advisor and Student Mentor observe you during each class and then
use the checklist on the following page to provide you with feedback about your in-class behaviors. You will use this feedback
at mid-term to create a report in which you (1) identify the undesirable in-class behaviors you have engaged in and (2) create a
strategy to decrease these behaviors during the second half of the semester. You will continue to receive this feedback during
the second half of the semester, and I will use this second set of feedback to determine 12.5% of your final grade.

                                                                18
                   Student-Athlete Learning Community
                 Checklist of Undesirable Classroom Behaviors

Student’s Name: ________________________________________________________ Date: ____________

Evaluator’s Name: ______________________________________________________

Instructions for Evaluators: Circle the letter to the left of each behavior you observe the student engage in during class
on the day of this evaluation. Note multiple instances of the same behavior by placing the number of times this behavior
occurred to the left of the circled letter.


1.   Unethical Behavior
     a. Engaging in academic dishonesty (e.g., cheating, plagiarizing, or helping other students to cheat or plagiarize).

2.   Lack of Motivation or Work Ethic
     a. Behaving as if bored by the material presented in class (e.g., slouching in seats, yawning, or falling asleep).
     b. Doing things in class other than what is expected (e.g., staring out the window, checking the clock, reading a
        newspaper, or doing homework for another class).
     c. Leaving class early or packing up books before the official end of the class.

3.   Inappropriate Use of Technology
     a. Text messaging; surfing the Web; or checking E-mail, Facebook, or MySpace.
     b. Allowing a cell phone to ring in class.

4.   Failure to Follow Instructions
     a. Not following written or verbal directions.

5.   Being Late for Work
     a. Coming to class late.

6.   Missing Assignments or Deadlines
     a. Coming to class unprepared (i.e., without completing the assignment that is due).

7.   Ineffective in Teams
     a. Intentionally refusing to participate in classroom activities.
     b. Showing disrespect to other class members (e.g., with insults, sarcasm, threats, or scornful facial expressions).

8.   Unable to Communicate Verbally in an Effective Manner
     a. Talking to fellow students when the instructor or other students are trying to communicate with the class.
     b. Asking questions that are off the topic being discussed or that have already been answered.
     c. Making noises or movements that distract others from relevant presentations or conversations.

9.   Unable to Communicate in Writing in an Effective Manner
     a. Failing to use feedback to improve the quality of writing assignments (i.e., committing the same formatting,
        spelling, and grammatical errors in multiple assignments even after these errors have been brought to your
        attention previously by the instructor and/or student mentor).

10. Failure to Act in a Responsible Manner
    a. Not accepting responsibility for mistakes or failures (i.e., blaming others rather than accepting responsibility for
        errors or bad decisions and being unwilling to create strategies to improve future performance).


                     Total Number of Undesirable Behaviors Exhibited During This Class Period: _______


                                                           19
                                      COR Report Rating Scale
COR Reporter: _____________________________________________________________________

COR Report Subject: ________________________________________________________________

COR Report Evaluator: _____________________________________________________ Date: ______________
Instructions: Please rate each of the following features of the COR report by filling in the line next to that feature with a
number from the rating scale below each feature that best described the quality of that part of the report.

Ratings for Individual COR Reporters

_____    Was this person present at 10:50 and prepared to help with the set up of the COR and social time?
         Yes = 1       No = 0

_____    Was this person’s introductory slide complete and creative?
         Yes = 1       No = 0

_____    Was this person able to present her/his part of the COR report without having to read from her/his PowerPoint slides?
         Completely = 2        Somewhat = 1         Had to Read from the Slides =

_____    Was this person able to present her/his portion of the COR report in a clear, interesting, and organized manner?
         Yes = 2       Somewhat = 1         No = 0

_____    Did it appear that this person had participated fully in the creation, organization, and practice of the COR report?
         Yes = 2        Maybe = 1        No = 0

_____    How would you rate the quality of the food and food-related items provided by this person?
         Excellent = 2    Good = 1          Nothing Provided = 0

                                      Total Individual Score (out of 10 possible) ______

Ratings for the Entire COR Report Team

_____    Was the COR report clear, organized, and understandable?
         Absolutely = 3     Mostly = 2        Somewhat = 1        Not at All = 0

_____    Was the COR report creative or was it just a group of students talking about a campus resource?
         Very Creative = 2    Somewhat Creative = 1          Boring = 0

_____    Did each member of the team present her/his fair share of the COR report?
         Absolutely = 3      Mostly = 2       Somewhat = 1           No = 0

_____    Did the COR report last no longer than 10 minutes?
         Yes = 2     1 to 3 minutes over time = 1       More than 3 minutes over time = 0

                                        Total Team Score (out of 10 possible) _______

                                 Total Individual + Team Score (out of 20 possible) _______

Please write constructive comments to help this person and/or team present an even more effective report in the future.




                                                                 20

				
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