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					FORMER FORT ORD • MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA
 MILITARY MUNITIONS RESPONSE PROGRAM




     PROGRAMMATIC WORK PLAN
                          VOLUME 1 OF 2




                                  U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS
PREPARED FOR:
                                  SACRAMENTO DISTRICT




                                  PARSONS
PREPARED BY:
                                  FORMER FORT ORD PROJECT OFFICE




                CONTRACT NUMBER: DACA05-00-D-0003
                   MAY 2001 – ORIGINAL EDITION DATE
                MAY 2004 – SECOND EDITION WITH UPDATES
FORMER FORT ORD • MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA
 MILITARY MUNITIONS RESPONSE PROGRAM




     PROGRAMMATIC WORK PLAN
                        VOLUME 2 OF 2


                           MAY 2004




                                U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS
PREPARED FOR:
                                SACRAMENTO DISTRICT




                                PARSONS
PREPARED BY:
                                FORMER FORT ORD PROJECT OFFICE




                CONTRACT NUMBER: DACA05-00-D-0003
                                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                                                                  Page
TABLE OF CONTENTS...................................................................................................................... i
LIST OF APPENDICES.................................................................................................................... xii
LIST OF FIGURES .......................................................................................................................... xiii
LIST OF TABLES ............................................................................................................................ xiv
LIST OF ACRONYMS...................................................................................................................... xv
REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................ xxiv
GLOSSARY..................................................................................................................................... xxvi
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION................................................................................................... 1-1
                       1.1         Introduction.................................................................................................. 1-1
                       1.2         Purpose......................................................................................................... 1-1
                       1.3         Scope............................................................................................................ 1-1
                       1.4         Work Plan Content....................................................................................... 1-1
                       1.5         Changes to the Work Plan............................................................................ 1-2
                       1.6         Site Location ................................................................................................ 1-4
                       1.7         Former Fort Ord History .............................................................................. 1-4
                       1.8         Topography/Geology ................................................................................... 1-4
                                   1.8.1       Topography ................................................................................. 1-4
                                   1.8.2       Geology ....................................................................................... 1-5
                       1.9         Climate ......................................................................................................... 1-5

CHAPTER 2 TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT PLAN................................................................ 2-1
                       2.1         Introduction.................................................................................................. 2-1
                                   2.1.1      General ........................................................................................ 2-1
                                   2.1.1.1 Definitions................................................................................... 2-1
                                   2.1.2      Coordinate with Local Agencies ................................................. 2-2
                                   2.1.3      Organize Support Facilities and Test Communications
                                              Equipment ................................................................................... 2-2
                                   2.1.4      Hire and Assemble Work Force .................................................. 2-3
                                   2.1.5      Public Awareness Activities........................................................ 2-4
                       2.2         Field Operations........................................................................................... 2-4
                                   2.2.1      General Site Practices.................................................................. 2-7
                                   2.2.2      Work Hours................................................................................. 2-7
                                   2.2.3      Site Access .................................................................................. 2-7
                                   2.2.4      Handling of MEC........................................................................ 2-7
                                   2.2.5      Safety Training/Briefing ............................................................. 2-7
                                   2.2.6      Environmental Awareness........................................................... 2-8
                                   2.2.7      Safety and Environmental Violations ......................................... 2-8
                                   2.2.8      Work Clothing and Field Sanitation............................................ 2-8
                                   2.2.9      Compliance with Plans and Procedures ...................................... 2-9
                                   2.2.10     Preparation of Work Areas.......................................................... 2-9
                                   2.2.11     Field Sanitation and Wash Point ............................................... 2-11

                                                                             i
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                              May 2004
                2.3     Site Operations in Sequential Order........................................................... 2-11
                        2.3.1         Preparatory Inspection and Environmental Survey................... 2-11
                        2.3.2         Placement of Border Markers ................................................... 2-11
                        2.3.3         Vegetation Removal.................................................................. 2-13
                        2.3.4         MEC Operations Construction Support .................................... 2-14
                        2.3.5         Divide the Operating Area into Individual Grids...................... 2-14
                        2.3.6         Surface Searches ....................................................................... 2-15
                        2.3.7         Geophysical Sampling Procedures............................................ 2-17
                        2.3.8         MEC Investigation Operations.................................................. 2-17
                2.4     Demolition Operations ............................................................................... 2-19
                        2.4.1         Demolition of MEC................................................................... 2-19
                2.5     Records....................................................................................................... 2-22
                2.6     Treatment of Small Arms Ammunition ..................................................... 2-22
                2.7     Removal and Treatment of Scrap Metal .................................................... 2-23
                2.8     Restoration ................................................................................................. 2-23
                2.9     Quality Control Inspections ....................................................................... 2-23
                        2.9.1............................................................................................................ 2-23
                2.10    After Action Report.................................................................................... 2-24
                        2.10.1        Composition .............................................................................. 2-24

CHAPTER 3 EXPLOSIVES MANAGEMENT PLAN............................................................... 3-1
                3.1     Introduction.................................................................................................. 3-1
                3.2     Regulatory References ................................................................................. 3-1
                3.3     Responsibilities ............................................................................................ 3-1
                        3.3.1       Field Operations Manager........................................................... 3-1
                        3.3.2       UXOQCS .................................................................................... 3-1
                        3.3.3       UXOSO ....................................................................................... 3-2
                        3.3.4       Vehicle Driver............................................................................. 3-2
                3.4     Acquisition ................................................................................................... 3-2
                        3.4.1       Requisitions................................................................................. 3-2
                3.5     Receipt ......................................................................................................... 3-2
                        3.5.1       Receipt Discrepancies ................................................................. 3-2
                3.6     Storage ......................................................................................................... 3-2
                3.7     Security ........................................................................................................ 3-6
                        3.7.1       Exterior Construction .................................................................. 3-6
                        3.7.2       Hinges and Hasps........................................................................ 3-6
                        3.7.3       Locks ........................................................................................... 3-6
                        3.7.4       Signage/Placarding...................................................................... 3-6
                        3.7.5       Lightning Protection.................................................................... 3-6
                        3.7.6       Emergency Notification List ....................................................... 3-6
                        3.7.7       Compatibility............................................................................... 3-7
                        3.7.8       Key Control................................................................................. 3-7
                        3.7.9       Inspection .................................................................................... 3-7
                3.8     Inventory ...................................................................................................... 3-7
                        3.8.1       Usage Inventory ........................................................................ 3-15
                        3.8.2       Monthly Inventory .................................................................... 3-15
                        3.8.3       Discrepancies ............................................................................ 3-15
                        3.8.4       Procedures for Return to Storage of Explosives Not Expended 3-15
                        3.8.5       Disposal of Remaining Explosives ........................................... 3-15
                3.9     Transportation ............................................................................................ 3-15


                                                                  ii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                    May 2004
                           3.9.1    General Highway Transport ...................................................... 3-16
                           3.9.2    Federal Installations/On-Site..................................................... 3-21
                           3.9.3    Off-Site Transportation of Explosives Over Public Highway... 3-21
                           3.9.4    General Placarding Requirements............................................. 3-22
                           3.9.5    Documentation .......................................................................... 3-22
                           Attachment 1 - Material Data Sheets

CHAPTER 4 EXPLOSIVES SITING PLAN............................................................................... 4-1
                  4.1      Introduction.................................................................................................. 4-1
                  4.2      Explosives Storage Magazines..................................................................... 4-1
                           4.2.1      Types(s) of Magazines ................................................................ 4-1
                           4.2.2      Net Explosives Weight (NEW) and Hazard Division ................. 4-1
                           4.2.3      Quantity Distance Criteria for Siting .......................................... 4-2
                  4.3      Ordnance and Explosives Areas................................................................... 4-3
                           4.3.1      Minimum Separation Distances .................................................. 4-3
                           4.3.2      Demolition Areas (Intentional Detonations) ............................... 4-3
                  4.4      Foot Print Areas ........................................................................................... 4-3
                           4.4.1      Engineering Controls .................................................................. 4-3
                           4.4.2      Blow-in Place .............................................................................. 4-4
                           4.4.3      Collection Points ......................................................................... 4-4
                           4.4.4      Consolidated Shots...................................................................... 4-4
                           4.4.5      Confirmatory Methods ................................................................ 4-4

CHAPTER 5 GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION PLAN........................................................ 5-1
                  5.1      Objectives..................................................................................................... 5-1
                  5.2      Site Description............................................................................................ 5-1
                           5.2.1     Topography ................................................................................. 5-1
                           5.2.2     Vegetation ................................................................................... 5-2
                           5.2.3     Geologic Conditions.................................................................... 5-2
                           5.2.4     Soil Conditions............................................................................ 5-3
                           5.2.5     Groundwater Conditions ............................................................. 5-3
                           5.2.6     Geophysical Conditions .............................................................. 5-4
                           5.2.7     Site Utilities................................................................................. 5-4
                           5.2.8     Man-Made Features Potentially Affecting Geophysical Investigations
                                      ..................................................................................................... 5-4
                           5.2.9     Site-Specific Dynamic Events Affecting Geophysical Investigations
                                      ..................................................................................................... 5-4
                           5.2.10    Overall Site Accessibility and Impediments ............................... 5-5
                           5.2.11    Potential Worker Hazards ........................................................... 5-5
                  5.3      Geodetic Surveying...................................................................................... 5-5
                  5.4      Brush Clearing ............................................................................................. 5-6
                  5.5      Geophysical Investigation Performance Goals ............................................ 5-6
                           5.5.1     MEC Detection............................................................................ 5-6
                           5.5.2     Performance Goal Modification.................................................. 5-6
                           5.5.3     Horizontal Accuracy ................................................................... 5-6
                           5.5.4     False Positives............................................................................. 5-6
                           5.5.5     False Negatives ........................................................................... 5-6
                  5.6      Geophysical Investigation Methods............................................................. 5-7
                           5.6.1     Equipment ................................................................................... 5-7


                                                                   iii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                    May 2004
                         5.6.2     Test Plot (Site-Specific Geophysical Prove-Out)........................ 5-9
                         5.6.3     Geophysical Navigation Methods ............................................... 5-9
                         5.6.4     Survey Procedures..................................................................... 5-15
                 5.7     Personnel.................................................................................................... 5-18
                         5.7.1     Project Geophysicist.................................................................. 5-18
                         5.7.2     Field Geophysicist/Geophysical Technicians ........................... 5-19
                         5.7.3     QC Geophysicist ....................................................................... 5-19
                         5.7.4     Data Processors ......................................................................... 5-19
                         5.7.5     Geophysical Team Structure and Management......................... 5-20
                 5.8     Production Rates ........................................................................................ 5-20
                 5.9     Data Resolution and Data Density ............................................................. 5-20
                 5.10    Geophysical Data Processing and Records Management .......................... 5-21
                         5.10.1    Field Records Management....................................................... 5-21
                         5.10.2    Field Data Storage..................................................................... 5-21
                         5.10.3    Processing of Geophysical Data................................................ 5-21
                         5.10.4    Methodology for Picking Anomalies ........................................ 5-22
                 5.11    Data Delivery ............................................................................................. 5-23
                 5.12    Instrument Standardization ........................................................................ 5-23
                         5.12.1    Positioning Equipment Checks ................................................. 5-23
                         5.12.2    Geophysical Sensor Checks ...................................................... 5-24
                         5.12.3    Six-line Test .............................................................................. 5.24
                         5.12.4    Instrument Drift Checks............................................................ 5.25
                 5.13    Anomaly Reacquisition.............................................................................. 5-25
                 5.14    Dig Sheet Development ............................................................................. 5-25
                 5.15    Feed-Back Process (Comparison of dig-sheet predictions with
                         ground truth)............................................................................................... 5-26
                 5.16    Final Report and Maps ............................................................................... 5-26


CHAPTER 6 SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN ................................................................. 6-1
                 6.1     Purpose......................................................................................................... 6-1
                 6.2     Applicability................................................................................................. 6-1
                 6.3     Unknown Filler ............................................................................................ 6-1
                 6.4     Staff Organizational Structure and Responsibilities .................................... 6-2
                         6.4.1      General ........................................................................................ 6-2
                         6.4.2      Responsible Parsons Safety and Health Personnel...................... 6-2
                         6.4.3      Employee Safety Responsibilities............................................... 6-2
                 6.6     Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment ........................................................ 6-5
                         6.6.1      Safety Hazards ............................................................................ 6-5
                         6.6.2      Biological Hazards ...................................................................... 6-9
                         6.6.3      Physical Hazards ....................................................................... 6-20
                         6.6.4      Chemical Hazards ..................................................................... 6-32
                         6.6.5      Chemical Warfare Munitions .................................................... 6-32
                         6.6.6      Task Hazard Analysis ............................................................... 6-33
                 6.7     Medical Monitoring ................................................................................... 6-33
                 6.8     Training...................................................................................................... 6-44
                         6.8.1      Site Specific Training................................................................ 6-44
                         6.8.2      Tailgate Safety Meetings........................................................... 6-45
                         6.8.3      Supervisor Meetings.................................................................. 6-45
                         6.8.4      Training Documentation ........................................................... 6-45


                                                                  iv
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                   May 2004
                        6.8.5            Hazard Communication Training.............................................. 6-45
                        6.8.6            Blood borne Pathogen Training ................................................ 6-46
                        6.8.7            Visitor Training......................................................................... 6-46
                        6.8.8            Ergonomic Training .................................................................. 6-46
                6.9     Personal Protective Equipment .................................................................. 6-46
                        6.9.1            Level D Protective Ensemble.................................................... 6-46
                        6.9.2            Upgrading PPE.......................................................................... 6-47
                6.10    Site Control ................................................................................................ 6-47
                6.11    Decontamination and Personnel Hygiene .................................................. 6-48
                        6.11.1           Potable Water ............................................................................ 6-48
                        6.11.2           Toilet Facilities.......................................................................... 6-48
                        6.11.3           Washing Facilities..................................................................... 6-48
                6.12    Environmental and Personal Monitoring ................................................... 6-49
                6.13    Emergency Response and Contingency Procedures .................................. 6-49
                        6.13.1           Identifying Potential Emergencies ............................................ 6-49
                        6.13.2           Emergency Response Responsibilities...................................... 6-49
                        6.13.3           On-Site Emergency Response Services .................................... 6-50
                        6.13.4           Off-Site Emergency Response Services.................................... 6-50
                        6.13.5           Route to Hospital....................................................................... 6-50
                        6.13.6           Emergency Response Training.................................................. 6-52
                        6.13.7           Emergency Equipment .............................................................. 6-52
                        6.13.8           Communication Devices ........................................................... 6-53
                        6.13.9           General Emergency Procedures ................................................ 6-53
                        6.13.10 Contingency Plans..................................................................... 6-56
                        6.13.11 Chemical Spills ......................................................................... 6-63
                6.14    Logs, Reports and Record Keeping............................................................ 6-58
                        6.14.1           Logbook .................................................................................... 6-58
                        6.14.2           Safety Log ................................................................................. 6-58
                        6.14.3           Training Log.............................................................................. 6-59
                        6.14.4           Equipment Maintenance............................................................ 6-59
                        6.14.5           Record Keeping......................................................................... 6-59
                        6.14.6           Accident Reporting ................................................................... 6-59
                6.15    Standard Operating Procedures, Engineering Controls, and Safe Work Practices
                        .................................................................................................................... 6-60
                        6.15.1           General Safety........................................................................... 6-60

CHAPTER 7 LOCATION SURVEYS AND MAPPING PLAN................................................ 7-1
                7.1     General ......................................................................................................... 7-1
                7.2     Location Surveys.......................................................................................... 7-3
                        7.2.1       Control Points.............................................................................. 7-3
                        7.2.2       MRS Site Boundaries.................................................................. 7-4
                        7.2.3       Operating Grids........................................................................... 7-4
                        7.2.4       MM Items Encountered............................................................... 7-5
                        7.2.5       Other Items as Required.............................................................. 7-6
                        7.2.6       Safety........................................................................................... 7-6
                        7.2.7       Equipment ................................................................................... 7-6
                        7.2.8       Accuracy ..................................................................................... 7-6
                        7.2.9       Quality Control............................................................................ 7-6
                7.3     Geographical Information System (GIS) ..................................................... 7-6
                        7.3.1      GIS Hardware............................................................................... 7-6


                                                                  v
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                    May 2004
                        7.3.2    Software ....................................................................................... 7-7
                        7.3.3    File Formats and Requirements.................................................... 7-7
                        7.3.4    Metadata Requirements................................................................ 7-7
                        7.3.5    GIS Data Directory Structure....................................................... 7-8
                        7.3.6    Data Distribution.......................................................................... 7-8
                        7.3.7    General Map Requirements.......................................................... 7-8
                        7.3.8    Documentation ............................................................................. 7-8
                        7.3.9    Staffing......................................................................................... 7-9
                        7.3.10   Quality Control............................................................................. 7-9
                7.4     Database Management ................................................................................. 7-9
                        7.4.1    Hardware ...................................................................................... 7-9
                        7.4.2    Software ..................................................................................... 7-10
                        7.4.3    Structure and Design .................................................................. 7-10
                        7.4.4    Data Capture Methods................................................................ 7-11
                        7.4.5    Data Distribution........................................................................ 7-11
                        7.4.6    Staffing....................................................................................... 7-11
                        7.4.7    Database User Administration ................................................... 7-12
                        7.4.8    Database Backup Routines ........................................................ 7-12
                        7.4.9    Database Users Manual ............................................................. 7-12
                        7.4.10   Digital Image Catalog................................................................ 7-12
                        7.4.11   Quality Control .......................................................................... 7-12

CHAPTER 8 WORK, DATA AND COST MANAGEMENT PLAN........................................ 8-1
                8.1     Purpose and Approach ................................................................................. 8-1
                        8.1.1     Earned Value Management System ............................................ 8-1
                        8.1.2     Baseline Development................................................................. 8-2
                        8.1.3     Project Execution and Reporting................................................. 8-5
                        8.1.4     Material and Subcontract Management....................................... 8-6
                        8.1.5     Change Control ........................................................................... 8-7
                        8.1.6     System Surveillance .................................................................... 8-7
                        8.1.7     Procedures ................................................................................... 8-8
                8.2     System Concepts and Use ............................................................................ 8-8
                        8.2.1     Overview ..................................................................................... 8-8
                        8.2.2     Data Update................................................................................. 8-9
                        8.2.3     Monthly Reporting Cycles ........................................................ 8-10
                        8.2.4     Variance Analysis Thresholds................................................... 8-10
                        8.2.5     Variance Analysis ..................................................................... 8-11
                        8.2.6     Cost Variance ............................................................................ 8-11
                        8.2.7     Schedule Variance..................................................................... 8-11
                        8.2.8     At-Completion Variance ........................................................... 8-11
                        8.2.9     Monitoring Corrective Action................................................... 8-11
                        8.2.10    Variance Reporting ................................................................... 8-11
                        8.2.11    Trend Analysis .......................................................................... 8-12
                        8.2.12    Estimate at Completion (EAC) ................................................. 8-12
                8.3     Project Organization................................................................................... 8-13
                        8.3.1     Subcontractors........................................................................... 8-13
                8.4     Work Schedule........................................................................................... 8-13
                8.5     Manpower Requirements ........................................................................... 8-14
                        8.5.1     Travel and Per Diem ................................................................. 8-14
                        8.5.2     Equipment, Materials and Supplies........................................... 8-15


                                                               vi
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                             May 2004
                           8.5.3           Meetings.................................................................................... 8-15

CHAPTER 9 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PLAN.................................................................. 9-1
                  9.1      Policy ........................................................................................................... 9-1
                  9.2      Scope............................................................................................................ 9-1
                  9.3      Responsibility............................................................................................... 9-1
                           9.3.1        Corporate Manager of Procurement............................................ 9-1
                           9.3.2        Program Manager........................................................................ 9-1
                           9.3.3        Logistician................................................................................... 9-2
                           9.3.4        Supervisors.................................................................................. 9-2
                           9.3.5        Individuals................................................................................... 9-2
                  9.4      Property Types and Classification................................................................ 9-2
                  9.5      Equipment Lease or Purchase ...................................................................... 9-4
                  9.6      Property Management .................................................................................. 9-4
                  9.7      Loss, Damage and Destruction of Government Property............................. 9-4
                  9.8      Internal Audit and Compliance Review ....................................................... 9-5
                  9.9      Acquisition ................................................................................................... 9-5
                  9.10     Receiving ..................................................................................................... 9-6
                  9.11     Identification of Government Property ........................................................ 9-6
                  9.12     Tagging ........................................................................................................ 9-7
                  9.13     Records......................................................................................................... 9-7
                           9.13.1       Records for Material ................................................................... 9-8
                  9.14     Storage ......................................................................................................... 9-8
                  9.15     Movement .................................................................................................... 9-8
                  9.16     Maintenance of Government Property ......................................................... 9-8
                  9.17     Consumption ................................................................................................ 9-8
                  9.18     Utilization & Scrap ...................................................................................... 9-9
                  9.19     Physical Inventories ..................................................................................... 9-9
                  9.20     Reports ....................................................................................................... 9-10
                  9.21     Subcontractor Control ................................................................................ 9-10
                  9.22     Disposition of Government Property ......................................................... 9-11
                           9.22.1       Screening for Excess/Internal Transfer ..................................... 9-11
                           9.22.2       Transfer to Government ............................................................ 9-11
                  9.23     Contract Property Close-Out...................................................................... 9-11
                  9.24     Government Property Transferred to Parsons............................................ 9-12

CHAPTER 10 SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PLAN................................................................. 10-1


CHAPTER 11 QUALITY CONTROL PLAN ............................................................................. 11-1
                  11.1     Introduction................................................................................................ 11-1
                  11.2     Organization............................................................................................... 11-1
                           11.2.1     General ...................................................................................... 11-1
                           11.2.2     Authority and Responsibility .................................................... 11-2
                           11.2.3     Personnel Selection, Indoctrination, and Training .................... 11-4
                           11.2.4     Evaluation of QCP Implementation .......................................... 11-4
                  11.3     Quality Program ......................................................................................... 11-4
                           11.3.1     Preparation, Review, and Acceptance of QCP.......................... 11-4
                           11.3.2     Preparation, Review, and Approval of Project Procedures ....... 11-4
                           11.3.3     Control of QCP and Project Procedures.................................... 11-5

                                                                    vii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                       May 2004
                        11.3.4    Geophysical Survey QC ............................................................ 11-5
                        11.3.5    Geophysical Survey QA.......................................................... 11-10
                11.4    Contract Review....................................................................................... 11-10
                        11.4.1    Contract Administration.......................................................... 11-10
                        11.4.2    Subcontract/Supplier Administration...................................... 11-10
                11.5    Design Control ......................................................................................... 11-11
                        11.5.1    General .................................................................................... 11-11
                        11.5.2    Design and/or Technical Documentation Verification............ 11-11
                        11.5.3    Technical Baseline Control ..................................................... 11-11
                        11.5.4    Review of Subcontractor Submittals....................................... 11-11
                11.6    Document Control.................................................................................... 11-12
                        11.6.1    General .................................................................................... 11-12
                        11.6.2    Document Distribution and Retrieval ..................................... 11-12
                        11.6.3    Field Records Management..................................................... 11-12
                        11.6.4    Field Data Storage................................................................... 11.13
                11.7    Procurement Control ................................................................................ 11-13
                        11.7.1    Preparation of a Subcontract or a Purchase Order .................. 11-13
                        11.7.2    Reviews ................................................................................... 11-13
                        11.7.3    Subcontractor/Supplier Evaluation ......................................... 11-13
                        11.7.4    Verification of Supplier Products and Services ...................... 11-14
                11.8    Government/Contractor Furnished Equipment ........................................ 11-14
                        11.8.1    General .................................................................................... 11-14
                        11.8.2    Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) .............................. 11-14
                        11.8.3    Contractor Furnished Equipment (CFE) ................................. 11-14
                11.9    Inspection and Test Control ..................................................................... 11-14
                        11.9.1    Engineering Review ................................................................ 11-14
                        11.9.2    Inspection and Test Plan ......................................................... 11-14
                        11.9.3    Qualification of Test Laboratory............................................. 11-15
                        11.9.4    Final Inspection and Tests....................................................... 11-15
                        11.9.5    Records.................................................................................... 11-15
                        11.9.6    Equipment Maintenance and Tests ......................................... 11.16
                11.10   Measuring and Test Equipment................................................................ 11-17
                        11.10.1 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment ............................. 11-17
                        11.10.2 Equipment Control .................................................................. 11-17
                        11.10.3 Instrument Calibration ............................................................ 11-18
                        11.10.4 UXOQC Inspections/Surveys ................................................. 11-18
                        11.10.5 QC Seeded Items..................................................................... 11-18
                        11.10.6 Equipment Maintenance and Tests ......................................... 11-18
                        11.10.7 Preventive Maintenance .......................................................... 11-19
                        11.10.8 Equipment Spare Parts ............................................................ 11-18
                11.11   Nonconforming Items or Activities and Corrective Actions.................... 11-19
                        11.11.1 Identification ........................................................................... 11-19
                        11.11.2 Resolution, Corrective Action, and Verification..................... 11-19
                        11.11.3 Material and Item Nonconformances...................................... 11-20
                        11.11.4 Review and Disposition of Nonconformances........................ 11-20
                        11.11.5 Trend Analysis and Preventive Action.................................... 11-21
                        11.11.6 Lessons Learned...................................................................... 11-21
                11.12   Handling, Storage, and Preservation ........................................................ 11-22
                        11.12.1 General .................................................................................... 11-22
                        11.12.2 Handling of Design Documents .............................................. 11-22
                        11.12.3 Handling of Materials and Items............................................. 11-22

                                                              viii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                             May 2004
                        11.12.4 Handling.................................................................................. 11-22
                        11.12.5 Storage..................................................................................... 11-22
                        11.12.6 Preservation............................................................................. 11-23
                11.13   Records and Publications ......................................................................... 11-23
                        11.13.1 Identification ........................................................................... 11-23
                        11.13.2 Authentication ......................................................................... 11-23
                        11.13.3 Storage..................................................................................... 11-23
                        11.13.4 Logs and Records.................................................................... 11-23
                        11.13.5 Publications ............................................................................. 11-24
                11.14   Audits and Surveillances.......................................................................... 11-26
                        11.14.1 Audit Planning ........................................................................ 11-26
                        11.14.2 Audit Personnel....................................................................... 11-26
                        11.14.3 Audit Execution ...................................................................... 11-27
                        11.14.4 Audit Reporting....................................................................... 11-27
                        11.14.5 Review and Approval of Recommended Action Response .... 11-27
                        11.14.6 Verification of Closeout Action .............................................. 11-27
                        11.14.7 Surveillances/QC Audits......................................................... 11-28
                        11.14.8 Stop Work ............................................................................... 11-28
                        11.14.9 Records.................................................................................... 11-28
                11.15   Training.................................................................................................... 11-28
                        11.15.1 General .................................................................................... 11-28
                        11.15.2 Qualification Requirements..................................................... 11-29
                        11.15.3 Training for UXO Personnel ................................................... 11-29
                        11.15.4 Training for Non-UXO Personnel........................................... 11-30
                        11.15.5 Training Requirements............................................................ 11-30
                11.16   Statistical Techniques............................................................................... 11-31
                        11.16.1 General .................................................................................... 11-31
                11.17   Quality Improvement ............................................................................... 11-32
                        11.17.1 General .................................................................................... 11-32
                        11.17.2 Goal and Objectives ................................................................ 11-32
                        11.17.3 Customer Feedback................................................................. 11-32
                        11.17.4 Improvements.......................................................................... 11-32
                        11.17.5 Servicing ................................................................................. 11-32

CHAPTER 12 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PLAN..................................................... 12-1
                12.1    Introduction................................................................................................ 12-1
                12.2    Goals .......................................................................................................... 12-1
                12.3    Environmental Coordination...................................................................... 12-1
                12.4    Protection and Conservation of Natural Resources.................................... 12-1
                        12.4.1       Threatened and Endangered Species......................................... 12-2
                        12.4.2       Protection and Conservation of T&E Species........................... 12-3
                        12.4.3       Protection of T&E Species........................................................ 12-3
                12.5    Vegetation Clearance ................................................................................. 12-4
                12.6    Sensitive Communities............................................................................... 12-4
                12.7    Wetlands..................................................................................................... 12-4
                12.8    Protection and Conservation of Cultural and Archaeological Resources .. 12-5
                12.9    Pollution Prevention and Waste Minimization .......................................... 12-5
                        12.9.1       Hazardous Materials Management............................................ 12-5
                        12.9.2       Hazardous Waste Management ................................................. 12-5
                        12.9.3       Wastewater Generation ............................................................. 12-7


                                                                 ix
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                   May 2004
                        12.9.4     Air Emissions ............................................................................ 12-7
                        12.9.5     Solid Waste ............................................................................... 12-8
                12.10   Protection and Restoration of UXO Work Areas....................................... 12-8
                        12.10.1 Protection of Personnel and Work Areas .................................. 12-8
                        12.10.2 Restoration of Work Areas........................................................ 12-9

CHAPTER 13 INVESTIGATIVE DERIVED WASTE PLAN .................................................. 13-1
                13.1    Introduction................................................................................................ 13-1
                13.2    Waste Segregation and Containerization ................................................... 13-1
                13.3    Sampling and Analytical Strategy.............................................................. 13-2
                13.4    Storage of IDW .......................................................................................... 13-3
                13.5    Manifesting and Transportation of IDW.................................................... 13-3
                13.6    Disposal of IDW ........................................................................................ 13-3




                                                                x
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                May 2004
                                    LIST OF APPENDICES

Appendix A              Task Order Scope of Work

Appendix B              Site Maps

Appendix C              Local Points of Contact

Appendix D              Contractor Forms

Appendix E              Critical Staff Resumes

Appendix F              Basic Safety Concepts and Considerations for MEC Treatment Operations

Appendix G              Standard Operating Procedures

Appendix H              Data Item Descriptions

Appendix I              Material Safety Data Sheets

Appendix J              Lead Management Plan

Appendix K              Respiratory Protection Program




                                                   xi
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
                                                LIST OF FIGURES

No.                                                             Title                                                             Page

2-1             Project Organization Chart......................................................................................... 2-6
2-2             The Former Fort Ord Clean-up Process Flow Diagram ........................................... 2-12

3-1             OE Sector Explosive Purchase/Receipt/Transportation
                   Authorization List................................................................................................ 3-4
3-2             OE Sector Magazine Data Card ................................................................................. 3-5
3-3             Explosives Usage Form............................................................................................ 3-17
3-4             Emergency Response Information ........................................................................... 3-18
3-5             Motor Vehicle Inspection......................................................................................... 3-20

6-1             Poison Ivy/Poison Oak/Poison Sumac ..................................................................... 6-10
6-2             Photograph of Tick................................................................................................... 6-11
6-3             Decision Diagram for Stings from Insects ............................................................... 6-15
6-4             Photograph of Western Rattlesnake ......................................................................... 6-16
6-5             Photograph of Black Widow Spider......................................................................... 6-18
6-6             Photograph of Brown Recluse Spider ...................................................................... 6-18
6-7             Directions to Community Hospital of Monterey Pennisula ..................................... 6-51
6-8             Emergency Contacts................................................................................................. 6-52

7-1             Removal Action Grid Layout..................................................................................... 7-5

8-1             Work Breakdown Structure........................................................................................ 8-3
8-2             Parsons Integrated Control System (PICS) Flow Chart ............................................. 8-9




                                                                  xii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                May 2004
                                                 LIST OF TABLES
No.                                                            Title                                                            Page

3-1             General Placarding Requirements.............................................................................. 3-8
3-2             General Placarding Requirements.............................................................................. 3-8
3-3             Storage Compatibility Groups for Explosives and Ammunition ............................... 3-9
3-4             Storage Compatibility Chart..................................................................................... 3-14

4-1             Net Explosives Weight (NEW) and Hazard Division ................................................ 4-2

5-1             Commercially Available and Industry Accepted Geophysical
                   Detection Technologies ..................................................................................... 5-12

6-1             Responsibilities of Parsons Team Members, Ft. Ord, California............................... 6-3
6-2             Snake Identification Features ................................................................................... 6-17
6-3             Suggested Frequency of Psychological Monitoring for Fit
                   and Acclimatized Workers ................................................................................ 6-26
6-4             Work/Rest Schedule Based on WBGT Reading ...................................................... 6-27
6-5             Progressive Clinical Symptoms of Hypothermia ..................................................... 6-29
6-6             Hazard Analysis by Site Activity ............................................................................. 6-34
6-7             Minimum Number of Facilities................................................................................ 6-49

7-1             Database QC Action and Responsibilities ............................................................... 7-13

8-1             Daily Activity Schedule ........................................................................................... 8-15

11-1            The Structure of Project Procedures......................................................................... 11-5
11-2            Geophysical QC Steps.............................................................................................. 11-6
11-3            Parsons Design Validation Engineering Procedures .............................................. 11-11
11-4            List of Document Types for the Document Control Log ....................................... 11-12

12-1            List of Threatened and Endangered Species at the Former Ft. Ord ......................... 12-2




                                                                 xiii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                              May 2004
                                     LIST OF ACRONYMS

GENERAL
This appendix contains a list of acronyms used in this Programmatic Work Plan.

ACGIH                   American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists

ACWP                    Actual Cost of Work Performed

AR                      Army Regulation

ASP                     Ammunition Supply Point

ASR                     Archives Search Report

BAC                     Budget at Completion

BATF                    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms

BCWS                    Budgeted Cost of Work Scheduled

BCWP                    Budgeted Cost of Work Performed

BGS                     Below Ground Surface

BIP                     Blow In Place

BIL                     Bill of Lading

BLM                     Bureau of Land Management

BRAC                    Base Realignment and Closure Commission

C                       Centigrade

CA                      Control Accounts

CAM                     Control Account Managers

CAP                     Contractor Acquired Property

CAR                     Corrective Action Request

CBB                     Contract Budget Base

CDC                     Centers for Disease Control

CDL                     Commercial Drivers License




                                                    xiv
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                  May 2004
CEHNC                   U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville Division,
                        Huntsville, Alabama

CERCLA                  Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability
                        Act

CESPK                   U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District Office

CETC                    Comprehensive Estimate to Complete

CFE                     Contractor Furnished Equipment

CFR                     Code of Federal Regulations

CHOMP                   Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula

CIH                     Certified Industrial Hygienist

CMV                     Commercial Motor Vehicle

COC                     Chain-of-Custody

COR                     Contracting Officer’s Representative

CPI                     Cost Performance Index

CPM                     Critical Path Method

CPR                     Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation

CSHP                    Corporate Safety and Health Program

C/SSR                   Cost and Schedule Status Report

CV                      Cost Variance

CWM                     Chemical Warfare Munitions

DCAA                    Defense Contract Audit Agency

DCMA                    Defense Contracting Management Agency

DENR                    Directorate of Environmental and Natural Resources

DFAR                    Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation

DID                     Data Item Description

DMCS                    Document and Material Control System




                                                   xv
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
DOD/DD                  Department of Defense

DOT                     Department of Transportation

DQO                     Data Quality Objective

DRMO                    Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office

DRO                     Del Ray Oaks

DS                      Demolition Supervisor

EAC                     Estimate at Completion

EE/CA                   Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis

EM                      Engineer Manual

EMM                     Earth Moving Machinery

EOD                     Explosive Ordnance Disposal

EPA (USEPA)             Environmental Protection Agency

EPP                     Environmental Protection Plan

ESL                     Explosive Storage Location

ETC                     Estimate to Complete

EVMS                    Earned Value Management System

EZ                      Exclusion Zone

FAA                     Federal Aviation Administration

FAR                     Federal Acquisition Regulation

FEIS                    Final Environmental Impact Statement

FG                      Field Geophysicist

FGCC                    Federal Generic Control Committee

FIFO                    First In First Out

FM                      Formations

FOM                     Field Operations Manager




                                                   xvi
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                     May 2004
FORA                    Fort Ord Reuse Authority

GFE                     Government Furnished Equipment

GFM                     Government Furnished Material

GIP                     Geophysical Investigation Plan

GIS                     Geographic Information System

GP                      Government Property

GPI                     Government Property Identification Number

GPS                     Global Positioning System

GS/SS                   Grid Stats/Site Stats

GT                      Geophysical Technicians

HAZWOPER                Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response

HE                      High Explosive

HH                      Hand Held

HIV                     Human Immunodeficiency Virus

HMP                     Habitat Management Plan

HTML                    Hypertext Markup Language

HTW                     Hazardous Toxic Waste

IA                      Impact Area

ID                      Identification

IDW                     Investigative Derived Waste

IMP                     Information Management Plan

IMS                     Integrated Master Schedule

JSIDS                   Joint Service Intrusion Detection System

JTR                     Joint Travel Regulation

Kg                      Kilograms



                                                    xvii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                            May 2004
KO                      Contracting Officer

LCL                     Laboratory Control Samples

M&TE                    Measuring & Test Equipment

MEC                     Munitions Explosive Concern

MDL                     Method Detection Limit

mm                      Millimeter

MM                      Military Munitions

MOFB                    Miniature Open Front Barricade

MPM                     Most Probable Munition

MR                      Management Reserve

MRA                     Multi-Range Area

MRD                     Missouri River District

MSD                     Minimum Safe Distance

MSDS                    Material Safety Data Sheets

MS/MSD                  Matrix Spikes/Matrix Spike Duplicate

MSL                     Mean Sea Level

NAD                     North American Datum

NAS                     Network Analysis System

NEW                     Net Explosive Weight

NFPA                    National Fire Protection Association

NIDA                    National Institute of Drug Manufacturers Association

NIST                    National Institute of Standards & Technology

OBS                     Organizational Breakdown Structure

OE                      Ordnance and Explosives

ODDS                    Ordnance Detection and Discrimination Study



                                                  xviii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                               May 2004
OSHA                    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

OSIC                    On-Scene Incident Commander

PAO                     Public Affairs Office

PARCC                   Precision, Accuracy, Representativeness, Completeness, Comparability

PC                      Personnel Commuter

PDOP                    Position Dilution of Precision

PDN                     Project Design Notes

PHSO                    Project Health & Safety Officer

PICS                    Parsons Integrated Control System

PM                      Program Manager

PMB                     Performance Measurement Baseline

POC                     Point of Contact

POM                     Presidio of Monterey

POM-A                   Presidio of Monterey Annex

POM-PAO                 Presidio of Monterey Public Affairs Office

PPE                     Personal Protective Equipment

PQL                     Practical Quantitation Limit

PWP                     Programmatic Work Plan

QA                      Quality Assurance

QCP                     Quality Control Plan

QC                      Quality Control

QCM                     Quality Control Manager

RAM                     Responsibility Assignment Matrix

RCRA                    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

RFP                     Request for Proposal




                                                   xix
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
RFQ                     Request for Quotation

RMSF                    Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

RT/DGPS                 Real Time/Differential Global Positioning System

RPD                     Relative Percent Difference

SAP                     Sampling & Analysis Plan

SHM                     Safety and Health Manager

SHP                     Safety and Health Program

SOW                     Scope of Work

SR                      Site Reconnaissance

SHP                     Safety and Health Program

SSHP                    Site Specific Health and Safety Plan

SSOP                    Site Specific Prove-Out

SSWP                    Site Specific Work Plan

SUXOS                   Senior UXO Supervisor

SV                      Schedule Variance

SWP                     Safe Work Practices

SZ                      Support Zone

T&E                     Threatened & Endangered

TCPI                    To Complete Performance Index

TCRA                    Time Critical Removal Action

TEU                     Technical Escort Unit

TLV                     Threshold Limit Values

TM                      Technical Manuals

TO                      Task Order

TSCA                    Toxic Substances Control Act




                                                    xx
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                           May 2004
TPP                     Technical Project Planning

UB                      Undistributed Budget

USACE                   United States Army Corps of Engineers

USEASCH                 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Huntsville Office

USNAVSCLEOD             U.S. Naval School Explosive Ordnance Disposal

UXO                     Unexploded Ordnance

UXOSO                   Unexploded Ordnance Safety Officer

UXQCS                   Unexploded Ordnance Quality Control Specialist

VAC                     Variance at Completion

VAR                     Variance Analysis Report

WAD                     Work Authorization Document

WBGT                    Wet Bulb Global Temperature

WBS                     Work Breakdown Structure

WDCMP                   Work, Data and Cost Management Plan

WO                      Work Orders

WP                      White Phosphorus or Work Plan, depending upon context




                                                     xxi
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                May 2004
                                   LIST OF REFERENCES

AR 190-11                      Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition and Explosives
AR 200-1                       Environmental Protection and Enhancement
AR-200-2                       Environmental Effects of Army Actions
AR 385-10                      Army Safety Program
AR 385-16                      System Safety Engineering and Management
AR 385-40                      Accident Reporting and Records
 w/CESPK supplement
AR 385-64                      Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
ASTM E329                      Standard Specification for Agencies Engaged in the Testing and/or
                               Inspection of Materials Used in Construction
DA PAM 385-64                  Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
DOD 4145.26-M                  Contractors Safety Manual for Ammunition and Explosives
DOD 4160.21-M                  Defense Reutilization and Marketing Manual
DOD 6055.9-STD                 DOD Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
TM9-1300-200                   Ammunition General
TM9-1300-206                   Ammunition and Explosives Standards
TM9-1300-214                   Military Explosives
TM60A-1-1-31                   EOD Disposal Procedures
DD Form 1149                   Shipment of Government Property
DD Form 1662                   Government Property
DFARS 245                      Government Property
DOD 4161.2-M                   Government Property
EM 385-1-1                     Safety and Health Requirements Manual
EP 1110-1-18                   OE Response
EM 1110-1-4009                 Ordnance and Explosives Response
ER 385-1-92                    Safety and Occupational Health Document Requirements for
                               Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions
ER 1110-1-12                   Engineering and Design, Quality Management
FAR Part 45                    Government Property
ATFP 5400.7                    Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms Explosives Laws and Regulations
27 CFR Part 55                 Commerce in Explosives
29 CFR 1910                    OSHA General Industry Standards
29 CFR 1926                    OSHA Construction Standards
40 CFR Parts 260-300           EPA Protection of Environment


                                                     xxii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
49 CFR Parts 100-199           Dept. of Transportation
49 CFR Part 383.5              Dept. of Transportation
HNC-ED-CS-S-97-3               Safety Submission for On-Site Demolition Container for UXO
HNC-ED-CS-S-98-1               Appropriate Safety Distances
HNC-ED-CS-S-98-7               Use of Sandbags for Mitigation of Fragmentation and Blast Effects
                               Due to Intentional Detonation of Munitions
                               U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District,. April 1997.
                               Installation-wide Multi-species Habitat Management Plan for
                               Former Fort Ord, California.
                               U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento District,. May 1997.
                               Wetland Restoration Plan for Unexploded Ordnance Removal
                               Activities at Former Fort Ord.
HNC-IGD 02-03                  Procedures for Assessing Munitions with Unknown Fillers,
                               Ordnance and Explosives Center of Expertise (OE-CX) Interim
                               Guidance Document 02-03
FAR 7.401                      Acquisition considerations
SF 364                         Report of Discrepancy




                                                  xxiii
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
                                               GLOSSARY

Construction Support -              Support provided by qualified UXO personnel during construction
                                    activities at potential MEC sites to reduce the potential for exposure
                                    to MEC. When a determination is made that the probability of
                                    encountering MEC is low (i.e., current or previous land use leads to
                                    an initial determination that MEC may be present), only MEC safety
                                    support is required. When a determination is made that the
                                    probability of encountering MEC is moderate to high (current or
                                    previous land use leads to an initial determination that MEC was
                                    employed or disposed of in the area of concern), UXO teams are
                                    required to conduct subsurface MEC clearance of the known
                                    construction footprint either in conjunction with the construction
                                    contractor or prior to construction intrusive activities. The level of
                                    effort will be determined on a case-by-case basis in coordination
                                    with the OE MCX and EP 75-1-2.
Exclusion Zone -                    A safety zone established around an MEC work area. Only project
                                    personnel and authorized, escorted visitors are allowed within the
                                    exclusion zone. Examples of exclusion zones are safety zones
                                    around MEC intrusive activities and safety zones where MEC is
                                    intentionally detonated. (DDESB-KO, 27 January 1990)
Explosive -                         Includes items designed to cause damage to personnel or material
                                    through explosive force that may be accomplished by bombs,
                                    warheads, missiles, projectiles, rockets, antipersonnel and antitank
                                    mines, demolition and spotting charges, grenades, torpedoes and
                                    depth charges, high explosives and propellants, fuses from practice
                                    items, and all similar and related items or components explosive in
                                    nature.
Geophysical Reacquire -             The Geophysical Reacquire method involves utilizing both a
                                    positioning method (i.e., GPS, ultrasonic, or tape from corners) and
                                    geophysical instruments to reacquire and pinpoint anomaly locations
                                    selected by the geophysical processors.             The geophysical
                                    instruments include the original instrument used for the digital
                                    survey of the grid and the analog instrument being utilized by the
                                    UXO teams for intrusive activities. The intended result of this
                                    method is to pinpoint the location where the intrusive teams will find
                                    the subsurface item causing the anomaly.
GPS Relocation –                    GPS Relocation involves reacquiring anomaly locations selected by
                                    the geophysical processors, using a GPS instrument to find the
                                    selected location. An RTK (sub-centimeter accuracy) GPS is used
                                    for the relocation. Geophysical instruments are not used to pinpoint
                                    the anomaly using this method. The GPS relocation method will be
                                    used in areas that have a large number of anomalies (>250 per 100 x
                                    199 ft, area). The intended result of this method is to place a flag as
                                    close to the anomaly as possible with the intrusive team pinpointing
                                    the anomaly location with an analog geophysical instrument.



                                                      xxiv
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                   May 2004
Military Munitions -                Ammunition products and components produced/used by armed
                                    forces for defense and security.
Military Munitions Response         Department of Defense-established program that manages the
Program -                           environmental, health and safety issues presented by munitions of
                                    explosives concern.
Minimum Separation                  The distance greater than the hazard distance for the Most Probable
Distance -                          Munitions from intentional (K50)/unintentional (K328) detonations.
Most Probable Munition -            The MEC item that has the greatest hazard distance based on
                                    calculations of the explosion effects of the MEC item anticipated to
                                    be found on the site. Typically, the Most Probable Munition is the
                                    MEC item with the greatest fragmentation or overpressure distance
                                    based on the type of MEC items that were historically used at the
                                    site.
Munitions and Explosives of         MEC consists of either (1) or (2) below:
Concern (MEC) -                     (1) Ammunition, ammunition components, chemical or biological
                                    warfare materiel or explosives that have been abandoned, expelled
                                    from demolition pits or burning pads, lost, discarded, buried, or
                                    fired. Such ammunition, ammunition components and explosives
                                    are no longer under accountable record control of any DOD
                                    organization or activity. (HQDA Policy Memorandum “Explosives
                                    Safety Policy for Real Property Containing Conventional OE”)
                                    (2) Explosive Soil. See definition under “Explosive Soil.” (ER 1110-
                                    1-8153).
Munitions Debris -                  Remnants of munitions.
Munitions Response Area             Defense site area known to or suspected of containing UXO, DMM
(MRA) -                             or MC that consists of one or more MRSs.
Munitions Response Site -           Location(s) in MRA requiring munitions response.

Munitions and Explosives of         Performing MEC searches within portions of a site to determine the
Concern Sampling -                  presence of MEC.

Range-related Debris -              All other scrap that is not munitions debris.
Reconnaissance -                    An activity conducted to determine whether areas identified as
                                    potential OE areas (suspected OE sites or other areas of concern
                                    such as areas in between OE sites) will require sampling for OE.
                                    The data gathered during reconnaissance activities will be used to
                                    evaluate the need for further OE-related investigations (e.g., OE
                                    sampling). In general, reconnaissance will include conducting a site
                                    walk to identify visual evidence of OE. Some intrusive investigation
                                    may be performed during reconnaissance based on results of the
                                    visual search.
Safety Zone -                       Normally a 200-foot wide area extending from the boundary and
                                    running the length of an OE clearance site that borders other OE
                                    sites. The buffer zone is a “safe” zone in the event personnel or

                                                       xxv
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                 May 2004
                                    EMM inadvertently enter the adjacent OE site.

Small Arms Ammunition               Replaces Small Arms.
(SAA) -
Unexploded Ordnance (UXO)           Military munitions that have been primed, fuzed, armed, or
-                                   otherwise prepared for action, and have been fired, dropped,
                                    launched, projected or placed in such a manner as to constitute a
                                    hazard to operations, installation, personnel, or material and remain
                                    unexploded either by malfunction, design, or any other cause. (40
                                    CFR 266.201)
UXO Operations                      The clearance of structures, pads, and roads prior to and during
Construction Support -              destruction and removal.




                                                      xxvi
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                   May 2004
                                             CHAPTER 1
                                          INTRODUCTION

1.1       INTRODUCTION

     This Programmatic Work Plan (PWP) describes the procedures, methods, and resources Parsons and
its subcontractors will use while performing Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP) at the
former Fort Ord (Fort Ord), California. Authorization for performance of this work is contained in Task
Order 0001 under contract DACA05-00-D-0003, which was issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Sacramento District (CESPK) 14 July 2000.

1.2       PURPOSE

     The purpose of this PWP is to define management, operations, safety and environmental protection
procedures/methods that Parsons will use to perform work associated with subsequent Task Orders. This
PWP is the basic document with site specific work plan(s) (SSWP) being implemented as addendums to
the PWP.

1.3       SCOPE

     This PWP is intended to be an all-inclusive document that has been specifically tailored to the
requirements of the anticipated Task Orders under this contract. All site operations will be executed in
accordance with this plan and the applicable SSWP. Any deviation from this plan requires the prior
approval of both Parsons and the CESPK Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR), as well as
completion of the Field Work Variance Form (FVF) (Appendix D).

1.4       WORK PLAN CONTENT

      This PWP consists of the below listed sub-plans:

      •    Technical Management Plan: Describes the approach, methods and procedures employed in
           the performance of MMRP operations at Fort Ord.

      •    Explosives Management Plan: Provides details for the management of explosives, acquisition,
           receipt, storage, security, inventory and transportation.

      •    Explosive Siting Plan: Includes explosive safety criteria for planning and siting explosives
           operations.

      •    Geophysical Investigation Plan: Provides details of the approach, methods and operational
           procedures to be documented and employed in the performance of geophysical investigations.

      •    Site Safety and Health Plan: Provides requirements for medical monitoring and training,
           personal protective equipment, site control and emergency response, and incorporates Parsons’
           Safety and Health Program including Hazard Analysis and Risk assessments.

      •    Location Surveys, Mapping and GIS Plan: Describes the methods, equipment and accuracy
           required for location surveys, mapping and the elements of a GIS plan.


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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
      •    Work, Data and Cost Management Plan: Describes procedures for the management and control
           of work and cost.

      •    Property Management Plan: Describes how property will be requisitioned, received, managed
           and inventoried.

      •    Sampling and Analysis Plan: Provides guidance for evaluating and characterizing sites where
           MMRP may potentially be present.

      •    Quality Control Plan: Describes the approach, methods and operational procedures to be
           employed in the performance of quality control (QC). These procedures include: design,
           document and procurement control, Government Furnished Equipment, non-conformance,
           audits, training and quality improvement.

      •    Environmental Protection Plan: Provides the approach, methods and operational procedures
           employed in the protection of the environment.

      •    Investigative Derived Waste Plan: Provides approach, methods and operational procedures used
           in handling the various non-chemical weapons materials (CWM) derived waste.

1.5       CHANGES TO THE WORK PLAN

     This PWP was prepared after careful study and evaluation and is based on the best available
information at the time. During execution of this plan, unforeseen circumstances or events may require
modification of this plan.

    This PWP is submitted as a "Primary Document" as defined in the Fort Ord Federal Facility
Agreement (FFA), dated June 1990. The Fort Ord FFA contains specific requirements for document
submission and review. The PWP, although submitted as a primary document, will implement a modified
document review process defined below:

      •    Under no circumstances will any change to this plan be executed unless specifically approved
           by both the Parsons Program Manager (PM) and the CESPK COR.

      •    FVFs (see Appendix D), as specified in the CESPK-Parsons contract, will be used for changes
           or modifications to the PWP. The PM will provide a complete description of the circumstances
           and factors surrounding the need to change/modify, recommend a course of action, and identify
           the impact the change or modification will have on the project.

      •    Draft FVFs will be prepared by Parsons and distributed to CESPK for review and approval.
           Following approval Parsons will distribute the signed FVF to Base Realignment and
           Closure/Department of Environmental Resources (BRAC/DENR), U.S. Environmental
           Projection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) for
           discussion at the next Base Closure Team (BCT) meeting. Following approval of the
           provisions in the draft FVF by the BCT, Parsons will prepare the final FVF and incorporate the
           change/modification into the PWP.

      •    Approved changes/modifications will be published as slip changes to this document with an
           amendment cover letter. Changes/modifications to the PWP will be provided to the agencies.



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
        •    When seven (7) FVFs are issued for a specific chapter of the PWP, the entire chapter will be
             rewritten to incorporate the provisions of all the FVFs issued and the updated chapter will be
             provided to the agencies for review. At this time, additional changes/modifications to the
             specific chapter may also be considered for incorporation. The BCT may also request that a
             chapter or the entire PWP be modified to address significant changes.

        •    Approved changes will be communicated to site personnel prior to implementation.

                                             Note
      If the circumstances requiring the change involve safety or quality, the PM will
      suspend all work affected by the unforeseen condition or activity until the cause is
      investigated and approved written procedures are in place.

1.6         SITE LOCATION

     Fort Ord is an Army installation located along the Pacific Ocean in northern Monterey County,
approximately 100 miles south of San Francisco (Appendix B, Map 1). The facility occupies
approximately 28,000 acres, or 43 square miles, adjacent to Monterey Bay (a national marine sanctuary)
and the cities of Marina, Seaside, Sand City, Del Rey Oaks and Monterey (Appendix B, Map 2). The
Southern Pacific Railroad and State Highway 1 cross the western section of Fort Ord, separating the
beachfront from the majority of the installation. Fort Ord is bound on the east by undeveloped land.

      Of the total Fort Ord acreage, 73% (approximately 20,000 acres) is in unincorporated Monterey
County, 15% (approximately 4,100 acres) is within the Seaside city limits, 12% (approximately 3,400
acres) is within the Marina city limits and 1.3% (approximately 357 acres) is within the Del Rey Oaks
city limits.

1.7         FORMER FORT ORD HISTORY

      Fort Ord was established as a training and staging facility for infantry troops in 1917 when the U.S.
Government purchased 15,809 acres near what is now East Garrison (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Huntsville Division, 1993). Fort Ord was used as a maneuver area and field target range for the 11th
Cavalry and the 76th Field Artillery, which were then stationed at the Presidio of Monterey (POM). In
1933, the installation was designated Camp Ord and only minor improvements were made prior to 1938.
By August 1940, Camp Ord was designated Fort Ord, and the post was expanded to more than 20,000
acres. During World War II, the post served as a staging area for many fighting divisions and units,
including a permanent training center for several amphibious units. Following World War II, Fort Ord
became the home of the 4th Infantry Division and, in 1957, was designated the United States Army
Training Center, Infantry. In 1974, the training center was deactivated and the 7th Infantry Division
(converted to a light infantry division in 1983) occupied the installation until 1993, when the division was
deactivated. Fort Ord was officially closed in September 1994. Map 3 (Appendix B) provides boundaries
for sites of confirmed and suspected MMRP use.

1.8         TOPOGRAPHY/GEOLOGY

1.8.1       Topography

     The terrain along the west/coastal boundary of Fort Ord is beach and coastal dunes. The eastern
portion of the installation is hilly with slopes in excess of 15 to 30 percent. Wildcat Ridge is the highest


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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
point within Fort Ord at approximately 900 feet above mean sea level. The most developed part of the
installation can be found in the northwest where it is much flatter with slopes of only 0 to 10 percent.

1.8.2   Geology

     The geology of Fort Ord is characterized by older, consolidated rock exposed at the ground surface
near the southern base boundary, and poorly consolidated deposits overlying the consolidated material
near the northern base boundary. Mesozoic granite and metamorphic rocks, Miocene sedimentary rocks
of the Monterey Formation and upper Miocene to lower Pliocene marine sandstone of the Santa Margarita
Formation make up the consolidated base material found underneath Fort Ord. The overlying
unconsolidated deposits include Plio-Pleistocene alluvial fan, lake, and fluvial deposits of the Paso Robles
Formation; Pleistocene eolian and fluvial sands of the Aromas Sand; Pleistocene to Holocene valley fill
deposits consisting of poorly consolidated gravel, sand, silt, and clay; Pleistocene and Holocene dune
sands; Recent beach sand; and Recent alluvium (U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville,
1997a).

     Throughout the entire site of Fort Ord are iron-cemented, magnetized nodules that have most likely
originated from the Santa Margarita formations. These nodules give off a magnetic signature and are
recorded as magnetic rocks.

     Many minor earthquake faults exist in the region around Fort Ord. Although these faults have been
inactive during the past 10,000 years, the potential exists for future activity. The active San Andreas
Fault is within 25 miles of the installation. Running the entire length of California, the San Andreas can
be considered a major fault and is capable of triggering devastating earthquakes. At Fort Ord, the
potential for earthquake damage to occur is moderate to very high. Having the potential for liquefaction,
the coastal dune zone is most susceptible to damage. Additionally, landslides could occur along the
shoreline dune cliffs and along the steep slope found in the eastern part of the base.

1.9     CLIMATE

     The climate in the Monterey Bay region is mild. Summers are usually cool, with fog and low clouds
forming overnight, and then dissipating during the day. Fog may cause delays when conducting removal
actions at Fort Ord because explosive detonations may have to be postponed until there is adequate
visibility.

     The mean summer temperature of the area ranges from 52 to 65 degrees (º) Fahrenheit (F). During
the winter, mean temperatures range from 43º F to59º F.

    Precipitation in the region averages about 17 inches annually and gradually increases near the inland
mountain ranges. The heaviest rainfall occurs from November through February.

     Winds are generally less than 16 miles per hour and even under extreme conditions, such as during
winter storms, winds rarely exceed 30 miles per hour. Typically, winds blow onshore, although during
the spring and summer, it is not unusual for an offshore flow to develop, which produces a strong easterly
breeze.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
                                             CHAPTER 2
                              TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

2.1          INTRODUCTION

     This plan outlines the procedures Parsons and its subcontractors will use to perform MMRP
activities such as: site preparation, geophysical mapping and MEC cleanup operations at Fort Ord,
California. This plan is based on information obtained during Parsons’ operations at Fort Ord, U.S.
Army guidance and Data Item Descriptions (DIDs). Work will be performed within the following
regulatory framework:

        1.    These actions are in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
              Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), Section 120 and the National Contingency
              Plan, Sections 40CFR Part 300 and these response actions are being taken to address
              threat to public health or welfare or the environment.

        2.    DOD is the removal response authority with respect to incidents involving DOD military
              weapons and munitions or weapons and munitions under the jurisdiction, custody or
              control of DOD as identified by 40 CFR Section 300.120(c) and (d) and 175(b)(4).

        3.    In compliance with the above, no Federal, State or Local permits are required nor need to
              be obtained for the detonation of MEC on-site per 40CFR300.400(e).

        4.    The provisions of 29 CFR 1910.120 (OSHA Hazardous Waste and Emergency
              Operation) applies to this site.

2.1.1        General

     Parsons will perform operations at the Fort Ord site in a systematic manner using proven
operating techniques, methods and procedures. This plan describes the methods Parsons will use to
accomplish these activities.

2.1.1.1 Definitions

    The following definitions were used in developing this plan and are applicable to its
execution:

        •     Accuracy: Accuracy is the degree of agreement of a measurement or the average of
              several measurements with an accepted reference or "true" value; it is a measure of bias
              in the system.

        •     Precision: Precision is the degree of mutual agreement among individual measurements
              of a given parameter under the same conditions.

        •     Completeness: Completeness is a measure of the amount of valid data obtained from a
              measurement system compared to the amount that could be expected to be obtained
              under normal conditions.



                                                    2-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
        •    Representativeness: Representativeness expresses the degree to which data accurately
             and precisely represents a characteristic of a population, parameter variations at a
             sampling point, a process condition or an environmental condition. Careful choice and
             use of appropriate methods in the field ensure that samples are representative. This is
             relatively easy with water or air samples, given that the components of these media are
             homogeneously dispersed. In contrast, soil and sediment contaminants are unlikely to
             be evenly distributed, hence it is important for the sampler and analyst to exercise good
             judgment when collecting and analyzing a sample.

        •    Comparability: Comparability expresses the confidence with which one data set can be
             compared to another.

2.1.2       Coordinate with Local Agencies

     All coordination with the Government is through the CESPK. The PM coordinates with the
following agencies:

        •    Local utility companies, vendors and suppliers to coordinate for goods and services
             required for supporting operations

        •    Local Employment Office to coordinate screening and hiring of any local labor

        •    When directed by CESPK, The BRAC/DENR Environmental Coordinator (coordinated
             with CESPK counterpart).

2.1.3       Organize Support Facilities and Test Communications Equipment

      Parsons will use existing facilities provided by CESPK and the installation for its program and
field offices and the storage of operating equipment and explosives. These facilities are adequate
for the anticipated performance of the task orders, however may need to be expanded on
subsequent task orders.

2.1.3.1 Field Office and Storage Facilities

     Parsons will maintain its program and field office and equipment storage in facilities located
on Fort Ord. These facilities consist of permanent structures under the control of Fort Ord and
contain running water, sanitary sewers, telephone service and electrical power. Temporary
structures (trailers) for field office personnel can also be utilized.

2.1.3.2 Explosive Storage

     Parsons will store explosives in existing approved above-ground magazines located in the
Explosive Storage Location (ESL). Bulk explosives and initiating explosives will be stored in
separate magazines with high security padlocks securing each magazine. The magazine containing
the bulk high explosives is additionally secured by Joint Service Intrusion Detection System
(JSIDS) monitored by the Federal Police unit located on Fort Ord.




                                                   2-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
2.1.3.3 Communications Equipment

     Parsons maintains, inspects and tests all required site communications equipment, which
consists of landlines, radio net and cellular telephones. On-site personnel perform daily operational
checks of communications equipment and emergency notification procedures. These inspections
and tests ensure that the equipment is serviceable and provides reliable communications during
operational activities. Equipment inspected includes:

        •    Hard-wire telephones
        •    Microwave telephones
        •    Internet access
        •    Radio communication equipment
        •    Cellular telephones

2.1.4       Hire and Assemble Work Force

      Parsons will subcontract and/or hire local personnel to schedule and perform maintenance on
equipment and perform routine clerical and administrative duties. The laborers perform duties on-
site and work with a UXO Technician for MEC avoidance. As part of its hiring practices, Parsons
requires all personnel to undergo a substance abuse test. All employees, regardless of position,
must successfully pass the substance abuse screening to be or to remain employed by Parsons.

    Parsons schedules the arrival of personnel in a manner that is consistent with cost
management principals. Arrival is timed to ensure that upon deployment personnel immediately
become productively and continuously engaged in training and operations.

2.1.4.1 Site Specific Training for Personnel

     As part of the mobilization process Parsons performs site-specific training for all new
personnel assigned to this project upon arrival. The purpose of this training is to ensure that all
supervisors and site personnel fully understand: 1) the procedures and methods Parsons uses to
perform operations at the Fort Ord site; 2) their individual duties and responsibilities and 3) any
and all safety and environmental practices/procedures associated with operations. Lesson Plans
will be forwarded to CESPK for review. Training topics/issues and training responsibilities are as
follows:

        •    Supervisors receive detailed training on this PWP, associated sub-plans and their
             individual responsibilities.

        •    Site personnel receive training on the Site Specific Health and Safety Plan (SSHP)
             (SUXOS) and the Installation-Wide Multi-species Habitat Management Plan for Former
             Fort Ord (HMP) from the UXOSO and Project Biologist respectively.

        •    The UXO Technicians receive the above training along with quality control
             standards/Schonstedt/EM61/GPS training from the QCM and Project Geophysicist. The
             SUXOS provides in-processing, operational briefings on policies, duties and
             responsibilities to the UXO Technicians and, the UXO Supervisors monitor all field
             work to ensure the SSWP is adhered to.




                                                 2-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
        •    All non-UXO qualified personnel will receive a MEC Recognition Course presented by
             the UXOSO.

        •    All UXO personnel will receive a MEC refresher course covering the ordnance known
             and suspected to be present at the site. This training is given by the UXOSO.

2.1.5       Public Awareness Activities

     Parsons may be required to participate in public awareness activities such as public meetings
and media events. Parsons is fully cognizant of the requirement that all public announcements and
requests for information be forwarded through the COR, the BRAC/DENR MMRP PM. Parsons
will not make available or publicly disclose any data generated or reviewed under this contract or
any subcontract unless specifically authorized by the COR and the BRAC/DENR MMRP PM.
When approached by any person or entity requesting information about the subject of the contract,
Parsons will refer the requester to the COR for response.

2.2         FIELD OPERATIONS

     Parsons and its subcontractors perform the following activities in the order listed unless
operational necessity or the SSWP dictates otherwise:

      1. Preparatory Inspection of the project site to determine the presence of environmental
         sensitive areas as detailed in DID OT-FTO-12, (see Appendix H), degree and type of
         vegetation cover, MEC and scrap contamination, the best geophysical instrument to be
         used and where, construction support and restoration;

      2. Conduct site border survey marker installation; (Chapter 7)

      3. Removing vegetation by a combination of manual and mechanical cutting or prescribed
         burning to gain access into the site; which may include fence removal and MEC
         construction support; (Chapter 2)

      4. Grid Survey; (Chapter 7)

      5. Conduct surface removal of MEC or analog removal as directed by the SSWP or TCRA,
         which will include demolition operations and Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC)
         seeding; (Chapter 2)

      6. Conduct a digital geophysical survey. This may also be performed as an analog survey;
         (Chapter 5)

      7. Process geophysical data and create pick/dig list; (Chapter 5)

      8. Geographic reacquire or GPS relocation of anomalies; (Chapter 5)

      9. Conduct MEC removal and demolition; (Chapter 2)

      10. QC-1- digitally check excavations and re-excavate and digitally recheck excavations (QC-
          1a) if necessary;




                                                   2-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
    11. QC-2 – digital step down and data processing. Reacquire anomalies and re-excavate if
        necessary;

    12. QC-3 – Analog, re-excavate if necessary;

    13. Analog and digital QA and re-excavate if necessary;

    14. Site Restoration; which may include fence replacement and MEC removal boundary
        survey (Chapter 2)

    15. Preparation of an After Action Report. (Chapter 2)

     An organization chart for Parsons is provided as Figure 2-1 on the following page. The
following subparagraphs describe the general work practices that Parsons follows during all
operations and the specific procedures and methods Parsons uses to perform the activities listed
above.




                                                2-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                        May 2004
                                                                                                       USA CE
                                                                                                                                                                  S. Damle
                                                                                                     Sac r amento
                                                                                                                                                                 QA Manager
                                                                                                       Dis tr ic t




                                                                                                                                                                    QC
                                                                   Brad Ols on                                                                      A ndr eas Kothleitner, QC Manager
                                                                                                Gar y W . Grif f ith, PM
                                                                  A r nold Marks                                                                            Ralph V ahle, UXO
                                                                                                Ev ely n Rudek, TTL
                                                                       SSHO                                                                                  Mike Coon, UXO
                                                                                                                                                             TBD, Geophy s ic s




                                                                        GIS/Data                                                                                           A dminis tr ation
 Field Oper ations                Sc ienc es                                                             Subc ontr ac tor s                 Pr ojec t Controls                                                  Pr oc ur ement
                                                                       Management                                                                                           and Support




                                                                                                                               USA
                 Dav id Br ow n                Cr aig Mur r ay                                                                                              Dav id Bonino
                                                                                   A ndr ew Hands                        Env ironmental                                                   Jennif er Brow n*
                   OE Field                        Projec t                                                                                                Projec t Controls
                                                                                    GIS Manager                         OE Loc ation and                                                    A dminis trator
                  Operations                   Geophy s ic is t                                                                                               Spec ialis t
                                                                                                                           Remov al


                                                                                                                              Timber line                     Mar k Buell
                  Bill Stohler                                                        Tina Ma                                                                                             Jonathan Duv al
                                                                                                                              V egetation                   Projec t Control
              Field Ops Support                                                      SQL Ser v er                                                                                         Tec hnic al W riter
                                                                                                                               Remov al                        Engineer

                                                  A ntonelis , K.
                                                                                     Lieng Pham                                 CCS                                                      Jennif er Brow n*
                                                                                                                                                             Holly Hegler
                                                                                     GIS Sy s tems                         Surv ey ing and                                               Doc ument Contr ol
                                                                                                                                                           Data Entry Cler k
                                                                                       A naly s t                             Mapping                                                          Cler k
                                               Chris Duy mic h
                                               Env ironmental
                                                 Engineer
                                                                                   GIS Data A naly s t                       FA CT
                                                                                                                                                                                               Ben Patague
                                                                                    Dav id Johns ton                     Range Res idue
                                                                                                                                                                                                Logis tic ian
                                                                                     TBD - Open                           Management
                                               Shirley Tudor                                                                                                Mac tec
                                                 Biologis t                                                                                                  RI/FS
                                                                                                                                                                                          V inc ent Chubbs
                                                                                                                           Malc om Pirnie
                                                                                   Data Entry Cler k                                                                                        Small Engine
                                                                                                                               RI/FS
                                                                                    Quy nh Pham                                                                                               Mec hanic
                                                                                                                                                          Fire Stop
                                                                                                                                                           R43- 48
                                                                                                                                                       Pres c ribed Burn
                                                                                   Sharon Tr outman                       Fir s t A larm
                                                                                    Geo Databas e                       MRA -IA Sec ur ity
                                                                                       A naly s t




                                                                          2-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                                May 2004
2.2.1       General Site Practices

     All operational activities at Fort Ord are performed under the supervision and direction of
qualified UXO Technicians. Non-UXO qualified personnel are prohibited from entering exclusion
zones or performing operations unless they are physically accompanied and supervised by an UXO
Technician. Non-UXO teams consisting of at least two personnel, i.e. geophysical, biological
survey, etc., conducting non-intrusive operations in areas that have been surface swept, do not need
a UXO Escort at the discretion of the UXOSO. Throughout operations, Parsons will adhere to the
following general practices:

2.2.2       Work Hours

     Operations are conducted during daylight hours only. Parsons works four 10-hour days with
five 8-hour days as an option. In no case will hourly personnel work more than ten hours in any
one day, or more than forty hours in any one week unless specifically authorized by the COR.

2.2.3       Site Access

        Parsons strictly controls access into operating areas and limits access to only those
personnel necessary to accomplish the specific operations or those who have a specific purpose and
authorization to be on the site. During MEC operations Parsons works with BRAC and the CESPK
Safety Specialist when working outside the Impact Area to control access when public access roads
cannot be closed.

2.2.4       Handling of MEC

     Only qualified UXO Technicians handle MEC items. Laborers and other non-UXO qualified
site personnel are emphatically instructed and carefully supervised to ensure that they do not
handle any MEC item. Ordnance scrap is not handled or touched unless a UXO Technician has
checked it first and declared it free of hazardous explosive components.

2.2.5       Safety Training/Briefing

      Three distinct safety meetings and briefings are conducted daily: the general briefing, the
tailgate safety briefing and the supervisor meeting. All visitors to the site also receive a safety
briefing and orientation. Additionally, if at any time degradation of safety or a safety issue
warrants review, the Field Operations Manager (FOM), UXOSO or SUXOS may hold a safety
stand-down.

        •    Daily General Briefings: The UXOSO and SUXOS conduct the daily general briefing
             for all personnel at the support compound prior to beginning work. The briefing covers
             general hazards for the project and any new safety issues or hazards identified since the
             last briefing. A written record of this briefing is kept by the UXOSO with each
             individual in attendance signing the training record.

        •    Daily Tailgate Safety Briefings: The supervisor in charge of each operating team
             conducts a tailgate safety briefing with his team prior to commencing work. A written
             record of this training and the signatures of personnel attending the training are
             maintained. The training focuses on the specific hazards anticipated at the team’s work



                                                   2-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
             site during that day’s operations and the safety measures used to eliminate or mitigate
             those hazards. It also refers to other teams and operations within the area whose
             proximity may have safety ramifications. If during the workday the team’s location
             changes within a site or from site-to-site, corresponding changes in ingress/egress routes
             and emergency evacuation routes will also be reviewed during a tailgate safety briefing.
             The UXOSO and UXO Quality Control Specialist (UXOQCS) randomly monitor these
             sessions.

        •    Daily Supervisors Safety Meetings: The FOM and UXOSO will hold a weekly safety
             briefing for all supervisors. This meeting focuses on safety and operational issues and
             any needed/required safety or operational refresher training. Although scheduled
             weekly, these meetings may be held anytime there is a significant change in site hazards
             or upon modification of site safety procedures.

        •    Visitor(s) Safety Briefings: Site visitors must receive a safety briefing prior to entering
             the operating area and must be escorted at all times by an UXO Technician, UXOSO,
             UXOQC, SUXOS or the CESPK Site Safety Representative. The Visitor’s Site Safety
             Briefing is documented and maintained by the UXOSO.

2.2.6       Environmental Awareness

     There are numerous species of flora and fauna at Fort Ord that are endangered, threatened or
protected. These species are reviewed during site-specific training, which covers recognition
features and correct procedures to follow when these species are encountered. Protective measures
and procedures are reviewed to ensure all personnel remain current as the remediation effort
progresses and the work teams change locations and encounter these species. The primary means
of minimizing impact on any of these species is avoidance. When avoidance is not possible MEC
operations will be conducted giving as much consideration to non-disturbance as is consistent with
safely accomplishing the objectives of the remediation project. The PM coordinates through the
CESPK Safety Specialist and the BRAC/DENR MMRP PM whenever the cutting of trees or
vegetation is required or intrusive work is necessary in or near pools, ponds or wetlands. Safety
and operational briefs will promote environmental awareness for supervisory personnel throughout
the duration of Parson’s operations.

2.2.7       Safety and Environmental Violations

     Safety violations or unsafe acts will be immediately reported to the UXOSO. Failure to
comply with safety rules/regulations or failure to report violations may result in immediate
termination of employment. Reckless interference with sensitive species or disregard for
environmental issues is likewise not tolerated and may lead to termination of employment. Any
and all environmental violations/issues will be reported to the PM and the FOM and be
documented by the on site Biologist. Any restoration required will be performed under the
supervision of the on-site Biologist and BRAC/DENR.

2.2.8       Work Clothing and Field Sanitation

      Personnel will wear work clothing appropriate for the conditions encountered on the particular
site. In most cases this is Level D Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), which consists of:




                                                    2-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
        •    Coveralls are supplied by Parsons. When personnel is exposed to high concentrations of
             poison oak or at the discretion of the UXO Supervisor, SUXOS or the UXOSO,
             personnel must wear coveralls taped at the ankles. Should excessive contamination
             occur, coveralls may be changed during the course of the workday.

        •    Footwear will consist of sturdy leather laced (for ankle support) work boots with lug
             soles and eight inches in height for protection from stakes and snakes Brush team
             personnel will wear steel toed boots when using chain saws.

        •    Hand protection will consist of leather or canvas work gloves when appropriate. Rubber
             inner or outer gloves may be required when dealing with poison oak or during other
             activities where increased protection is required.

        •    Safety glasses, face shields, respirators, hearing protection, hard hats and protective
             chaps or aprons are available and will be worn when engaged in activities where their use
             is prudent or required.

      Each team is outfitted with field decontamination equipment consisting of portable eyewash
kits, containers of wash water, paper towels, soap, rubbing alcohol and poison oak anti-irritants;
containers for contaminated clothing and trash collection and a ground cloth. Prior to beginning
operations each day, these items must be in place and ready for use in the vicinity of the team’s
work area as needed. Good housekeeping and decontamination measures will be practiced.
Equipment cleaning/decontamination will be performed by the individual operators on a daily
and/or weekly basis as required.

     There will be shower facilities located at the field support office compound. Those teams
engaged in operations where significant encounters with poison oak occur must shower before
departing the support compound. This requirement changes from site to site and is used on an as-
needed basis. Soap and towels are provided and towels used for this purpose will only be used one
time before laundering.

2.2.9       Compliance with Plans and Procedures

      Parsons conducts operations at the Fort Ord site in a systematic manner using proven
operating methods, techniques and procedures. Operations are anticipated to be on going
simultaneously at multiple sites.     All of these activities are conducted under the direction,
supervision and observation of qualified supervisory and safety personnel and in compliance with
approved plans and established procedures. When operational parameters change, with a
corresponding requirement to change procedures or routines, careful evaluation of such changes are
conducted by on-site supervisory personnel in close liaison with the CESPK Safety Specialist prior
to implementation. Parsons submits the recommended change to the CESPK Safety Specialist who
approves/disapproves any new course of action or desired change in procedures, with justification
for it. Such changes are implemented in a manner that ensures safety and uniformity of procedures
and end-product quality on the part of the various teams.

2.2.10 Preparation of Work Areas

    Procedures for preparation of the work areas vary from site to site. Prior to initiating work on
a new site a Preparatory Inspection is conducted. The persons attending this inspection will be the



                                                   2-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
FOM, SUXOS, UXOSO, UXOQC, on-site Biologist and CESPK Safety Specialist. This
inspection will be documented by the UXOQC or the Field Office Administrator. The purpose of
this inspection is to determine what preparatory measures are needed.

     •    This Preparatory inspection is used to identify any environmental sensitive areas, degree
          of vegetation present, MEC/scrap levels and restoration requirements.

     •    Clearance of Access Routes. In some cases, dirt roads and tracks and potential lead
          issues into a site may require repair or fill. This is accomplished after approval from
          BRAC through CESPK. If additional equipment is required it is obtained through a
          contractor or from other organizations on the installation. It is anticipated that the
          requirements of EM 385-1-1 paragraph 21.I will not apply to this contract as an adequate
          road system is already in place and the construction of additional access and haul roads
          will not be required.

     •    Access routes and firebreaks are searched and cleared of all surface and near surface (six
          inches below ground surface {bgs}) MEC prior to the commencement of grid activities
          to ensure safe ingress/egress routes for all authorized personnel and emergency vehicles
          that may be needed on site.

     •    Requests for additional fencing, gates or sign postings at site entranceways are submitted
          through the CESPK Safety Specialist. Requests for closure of recreational pathways or
          off-road trails where public passage into or around a site might be of concern during
          hazardous remediation activities are also submitted through the CESPK Safety Specialist.

     •    The determination of Appropriate Safety Distances on MRS Project Sites will be in
          accordance with (IAW) HNC-ED-CS-S-98-1, DOD 6055.9-STD and EM 1110-1-4009.
          The UXOSO will establish the Most Probable Munition (MPM) for each site. The MPM
          will be determined by reviewing the ASR and other prior investigation reports. The
          maximum fragmentation distance for the MPM will become the minimum separation
          distance (MSD) for non-project personnel at the site. The MSD will be requested
          through the CESPK Site Safety Specialist from HNC-ED-CS-S personnel.

     •    Area Burning. Parsons will subcontract prescribed area burns in accordance with the
          Installation Burn Plan, after approval by DENR and CESPK.

     •    Site Preparation activities will be planned and executed before field operations can
          begin, i.e., survey of individual operating grids, vegetation removal, removal of asphalt
          roads, range residue or other material that would interfere with geophysical survey
          operations.

2.2.11 Field Sanitation and Wash Point

      Portable field toilets will be placed at appropriate locations within the work area. These
portable toilets are equipped with hand washing facilities and/or other alternative hand washing
facilities and will meet the requirements of EM 385-1-1 and CFR 29 1910.120. They will be
supplied and serviced by a local vendor and moved about the area as work progresses.




                                                2-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
2.3     SITE OPERATIONS IN SEQUENTIAL ORDER

        A flow chart of the general cleanup process is presented as Figure 2-2. The following
sections discuss details related to the process unless operational necessity or the SSWP dictates
otherwise:

2.3.1   Preparatory Inspection and Environmental Survey

     An inspection of a new site is accomplished prior to any operations beginning as discussed
above. As part of the survey an environmental survey is conducted prior to the start of any other
activity. The purpose of this survey is to ascertain and document the existing environmental
condition of the area, identify any previously unforeseen or unique environmental issues and
ensure that the protection actions outlined in the Environmental Protection Plan are adequate.
During this survey the on site Biologist documents the environmental condition by recording the
location of environmental concerns on planimetric maps, taking photographs of the area and/or
recording videotape of the area(s) of concern. Additionally, the areas of concern are marked with
bright colored engineer tape. This survey is also used by the Project Geophysicist to determine
which digital geophysical equipment can be used in that particular area (Chapter 5). The survey
may also include soil sampling to identify lead hazards present at the site.

2.3.2   Placement of Border Markers

     Once the above surveys are completed the Location, Survey and Mapping subcontractor puts
in the site border markers. In all cases the surveyor is accompanied by a UXO Technician who
ensures the route is clear of MEC. In addition, the UXO Technician checks the area, using a
Schonstedt GA52Cx, prior to any intrusive activities being conducted.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003




                                                                                          Figure 2-2 - The Former Fort Ord Cleanup Process Flow Diagram

                                                                                     Site Preparation
                                                                                                                                                                                 Geophysical
                                                                                                                                                                                                                Geographic
                                                                                                                                                                                Survey Digital
                                          Border Survey                    Vegetation                        Grid Survey                       Surface Sweep                                                    Reacquire                           UXO Removal
                                                                                                                                                                                 May also be
                                            (LS&M*)                         Removal                           (LS&M*)                               (6 in.)                                                  Anomalies or GPS                        Excavations
                                                                                                                                                                                   Analog
                                                                                                                                                                                                                Relocation
                                                                                                                                                                                (Mag and Dig)




                                                                                         Construction
                                                           Fence Removal                                                        Blow in Place                   QA/QC
                                                                                            Support                                                                                              Data Processing
                                                            (If necessary)                                                          UXO                        "Seeding"
                                                                                        (If necessary)




                                                                                                                                                                                                     QA/QC
                                   2-12




                                                                                                                                                                                                                       QC-2
                                                                                                                                                Analog and                                                                                          QC-1/Digital
                                                                           After Action                                                                                         QC-3 Analog                         Step Down
                                                                                                           Site Restoration                      Digital QA                                                                                           Check
                                                                              Report                                                                                              (10%)                            100-30-20-10
                                                                                                                                                (by CESPK)                                                                                          Excavations




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    QC-1A/Digital
                                                                                               Fence
                                                                                                                               Re-excavate                      Re-excavate                                                             Check
                                                                                          Replacement                                                                                            Data Processing
                                                                                                                              (If necessary)                   (If necessary)                                                       Excavations
                                                                                          (If necessary)
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    (If necesary)




                                                          Main Flow Path                                                                                                                                              Reacquire
                                                                                                              Boundary                                                           Re-excavate                                                         Re-excavate
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Anomalies
                                                                                                               Survey                                                           (If necessary)                                                      (If necessary)
                                                          Auxiliary Flow Path                                                                                                                                      (If necessary)

                                           *LS&M = Location Survey & Mapping
May 2004
2.3.3   Vegetation Removal

     Parsons removes vegetation from the work sites to enable the analog or digital sweep teams to
thoroughly search the work areas. The FOM identifies the grids and areas that require vegetation
removal to provide access for the analog or digital sweep teams. Subcontracted brush teams
working with a UXO Escort accomplish manual brush cutting. The use of large scale motorized
clearing equipment is coordinated with the CESPK Safety Specialist. In environmentally sensitive
areas, the preferred method of removing the vegetation is by controlled burning.

2.3.3.1 Manual Brush Cutting

     Manual Brush Cutting is necessary when a prescribed burn cannot be accomplished was
incomplete or when terrain or environmental concerns make mechanical vegetation removal
undesirable or impossible. Manual brush teams working under the direction of the FOM
accomplish vegetation removal. Each brush crew (normally consisting of five laborers), has a
UXO Specialist for MEC avoidance purposes. A magnetometer is used to aid in searching the
vegetation for surface MEC prior to cutting or removing brush. The amount of brush removal
required depends on the terrain and the efficiency of the burn (if utilized). Any surface MEC
encountered by the brush team is marked with a red pin flag and left in place and notification to the
SUXOS is made.

2.3.3.2 Equipment

      The manual brush cutting team is equipped with power chippers, powered weed cutters,
chainsaws and a variety of hand tools. The Brush Foreman of each brush cutting team ensures that
personnel engaged in brush cutting activities wear protective clothing and accessories appropriate
for the equipment being operated (i.e. chainsaw chaps).

2.3.3.3 Tree Trimming

     Trees are trimmed only to the extent necessary to allow access for sweep teams. Tree
trimming is performed in a manner that minimizes damage to the tree and usually does not exceed
a height greater than six feet above the ground surface.

2.3.3.4 Brush Cutting

     Brush is cut to a level that enables reliable MEC detection without disturbing or destroying
the root structure. The preferred distance from ground level is 6 inches for both manual and
mechanical brush cutting.

2.3.3.5 Mechanical Brush Cutting

    Mechanical vegetation removal is accomplished when environmental concerns and terrain
permit. A brush team comprised of the equipment operator and a UXO Specialist, who assist in
MEC avoidance, conduct the operation under the supervision of a Brush Foreman.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
2.3.3.6 Equipment

    Mechanical brush removal may be accomplished using a Bobcat, with a rotary brush-clearing
machine or a large-scale removal machine such as the TAZ, Hydro-Ax and Brontosaurus, or any
newly developed equipment, once it has been approved for use by CESPK.

2.3.3.7 Prescribed Burns

     In environmentally sensitive areas where the removal of vegetation is significantly limited, the
preferred method of removing the vegetation is by prescribed burning. The subcontractor
establishes the Burn Plan for prescribed burns in cooperation with BRAC/DENR and CESPK.

2.3.3.8 Disposal of Brush Cutting Debris

     When significant vegetation is removed by manual cutting in habitat areas the debris may be
chipped on site. This ensures that the maximum amount of native seed is returned to the local
environment and aids in reestablishment of plant growth and reduces soil erosion. However if
large amounts of chipped debris are likely to impede rare plant growth, it will be removed off-site.
When cut vegetation contains poison oak, the feasibility of chipping the vegetation will be done on
a case-by-case basis. Any significant quantities of poison oak will not be chipped. In some
instances it will be necessary to remove the cut brush from the grid and placed in a location to
minimize interference with operations. In this instance a Bobcat with a claw attachment will be
used.

2.3.4   MEC Operations Construction Support

     If directed by the SSWP or TCRA, Parsons will plan and coordinate activities for a
subcontractor to remove asphalt roads, pads, structures, range residue, concertina wire, cyclone
fencing or other material that would interfere with geophysical survey operations. Additionally,
when necessary, a subcontractor will repair roads, fire breaks and install culverts.

2.3.5   Divide the Operating Area into Individual Grids

      Using the data contained in the Geographic Information System (GIS) the GIS Manager sub-
divides each work area into operating grids and the surveyor places wooden stakes at the corners of
each grid displaying its unique identification number which is assigned by the CESPK master grid
system. When the area is the subject of MEC removal or grid sampling operations, these divisions
are made in a manner that typically yields individual grids 100' by 100’ on a side. Some grid sizes
will vary due to site boundaries. Once the area has been sub-divided, the GIS Manager prepares a
detailed area drawing depicting the boundaries of the work area and the proposed sub-division.
This drawing is submitted to the PM, FOM and CESPK COR for review and comment. Comments
are incorporated into subsequent revisions awaiting approval.

2.3.5.1 Procedures

     Parsons site layout procedures provide an efficient and effective method to establish the
location of each operating grid and correlate this data with information contained in the Fort Ord
GIS. These procedures maximize the use of existing data to plan the site layout and to
expeditiously transfer the data to individual ground locations. The procedures Parsons will use to
lay out the individual operating grids include:


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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
        •    Using the digital cartographic products in the GIS to subdivide the work area into logical
             operating grids

        •    Electronically transferring the corner coordinates for each grid from the GIS to RTK-
             GPS receivers

        •    Transferring the digital coordinates to their actual ground locations

     This method creates a valuable link between the information contained in the GIS and the
ground locations where the work will be performed. Once this link is established, it ensures that
data collected during operations is efficiently and effectively integrated into the GIS and provides a
historic and realistic record of the location, densities and types of MEC encountered/removed.

2.3.5.2 Site Base Map

     Parsons will use Fort Ord’s current digital data to update the site base map. This data is
composed of digitized drawings of the installation, which contain the terrain feature data for the
installation and each of the work areas. The GIS Manager imports this data into ArcInfo GIS. The
imported data provides Parsons with the capability to determine the spatial coordinates of the
boundaries of each work area.

2.3.5.3 Electronically Transfer Coordinates To GPS Receivers

    Once the sub-division is approved, the GIS Manager electronically transfers the spatial
coordinates for each operating grid to a GPS receiver. The GIS Manager accomplishes this action
by:

        •    Exporting the spatial coordinates for each corner location to an ASCII file

        •    Importing the ASCII file into the GPS software package

        •    Uploading the map coordinates into the GPS Receiver as waypoints. This is
             accomplished using the transfer utility program contained in the GPS software package.

2.3.5.4 Transfer Coordinates to Ground Locations

     The final procedure for establishing the operating grids is transferring the digitally produced
spatial coordinates to their actual ground locations. To accomplish this action the surveyors’ team
navigates to each point using GPS receivers and the uploaded waypoints. At each corner of the
operating grids the team installs painted surveyor lath approximately 4 feet in length, which
identifies the grid.

2.3.6       Surface Searches

     The purpose of a surface sweep of a grid is twofold: to locate, mark, and record the location of
the surface MEC contamination contained in each grid and to consolidate and remove the scrap
metal contamination within each grid. Non-UXO personnel under the direct supervision of UXO
Technicians may perform surface sweeps. The typical span of supervision for one UXO
Technician is three to five sweepers, which ensures positive control and safety.



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
2.3.6.1 Sweep Team Structure

The sweep team may consist of either all UXO Technicians or a mix of UXO and non-UXO
personnel. The following is the structure and composition of a typical Sweep Team:

     •    One UXO Supervisor (Tech III) who directs and supervises all team activities, confirms
          the identification of all MEC encountered, and maintains the sweep team journal.

     •    One UXO Specialist (Tech II) who assists the UXO Supervisor, identifies all MEC
          encountered, and records the location of the items located

     •    Four additional UXO Specialists, UXO Assistants or UXO Sweepers who visually search
          the area for MEC. These personnel perform their duties under the direction and
          supervision of the UXO Supervisor.

2.3.6.2 Visual Surface Sweep Team Procedures

    All surface sweep operations are performed under the direct supervision of a qualified UXO
Supervisor. The UXO Supervisor assembles the sweepers into a sweep line and directs their
movement across the survey grid.

     •    Sweepers are spaced approximately 5 feet apart and, at the direction of the UXO
          Supervisor, move through the grid on line and abreast

     •    Whenever an item is encountered, the individual calls out "hold the line," and holds up
          their hand. The line stops while the UXO Specialist inspects the object to determine if it
          is MEC or scrap and marks the item with the appropriate colored pin flag. The line will
          not move again until directed by the UXO Supervisor

     •    As the team moves forward using the grid stakes as the sweep lane boundary, the person
          on the opposite end of the line marks the limit of the sweep lane with pin flags. These
          flags become the guide for the return sweep and define the limits of the previously
          cleared lane. This procedure is continued until the grid is completely swept

     •    The UXO Supervisor follows behind the sweep line inspecting and verifying the
          identification of the flagged items and recording data on the type, nomenclature and
          location of the MEC

     •    Upon completion of the grid sweep the sweep team, under the direct supervision of the
          UXO Supervisor, recovers and stockpiles metal scrap at a designated location. Items
          marked with red pin flags are left in place for the MEC removal team

2.3.6.3 Near Surface Sweep Team Procedures

     Clearance of surface debris for digital geophysical survey operations may require a 6 inch
subsurface sweep with a magnetometer to remove all metallic objects. The team composition
would be identical to normal MEC sweep operations. The procedures to be utilized by the team are
identical to those listed in section 2.3.8.2.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
2.3.7       Geophysical Sampling Procedures

     Establishing Data Quality Objectives (DQO) will be undertaken in each Task Order for all
geophysical sampling operations. During the Technical Project Planning (TPP) process, personnel
representing each data user will define the data needed to satisfy the project objectives. Sampling
operations consist of those activities identified in the TPP process to “document data needs”
required to thoroughly investigate each site to locate and/or sample both surface and sub-surface
MEC. The OESAP (Chapter 10 of the PWP) provides additional details of geophysical sampling
procedures. Selected sites will be sampled, in coordination with CESPK and BRAC, using either
or both analog and digital geophysical survey instruments incorporating procedures outlined in the
OESAP.

2.3.8       MEC Investigation Operations

      Search operations consist of those activities required to thoroughly investigate each operating
grid to locate and/or sample both surface and sub-surface MEC.

     UXO Teams are normally composed of a UXO Supervisor and up to five UXO Specialists
(maximum six). UXO teams perform all search operations and operate under the direct supervision
of a SUXOS. A UXOSO closely monitors the safety of the UXO Teams. The following
subparagraphs describe the equipment and procedures the individual UXO Teams use to search the
individual grids and to excavate sub-surface anomalies.

2.3.8.1 Equipment

        The equipment requirements for this activity include:

        •    Various digital geophysical instruments, e.g., EM61, EM61 HH, G858 or other
             appropriate instruments tested and evaluated by the Ordnance Detection and
             Discrimination Study (ODDS);

        •    Schonstedt (Model GA-52/CX) magnetometers or other appropriate instruments tested
             and evaluated by ODDS;

        •    Pre-marked baselines that are used to subdivide the grid into individual search lanes;

        •    Rope reels containing nylon rope/twine (used to mark individual search lanes);

        •    Assorted colored pin flags that are used to mark MEC items and anomalies;

        •    Miscellaneous common hand tools (i.e. shovels, trowels etc.);

        •    Forms and logbooks to record activities and MEC encountered;

        •    Laptop computer;

        •    X-Ray; and

        •    Personal Data Assistants (PDAs).



                                                    2-17
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
     Other equipment as authorized by Parsons may be utilized to search for MEC or to excavate
the subsurface anomalies during MEC removal or sampling. Should additional or new equipment
and procedures not addressed in this PWP be added to the Fort Ord MMRP. An SOP pertaining to
the use of the new equipment will be developed and submitted for approval prior to use.

2.3.8.2 Analog Magnetometer Searches

     Schonstedt magnetometer sweeps, i.e., mag and dig, is particularly effective in areas where
vegetation and terrain limit the use of larger digital systems. Mag and dig approaches should also
be used when there is insufficient difference between MEC at the site and other metallic fragments
and debris such that digital discrimination is ineffective.

     The UXO Supervisor directs personnel to establish individual search lanes approximately 3
feet wide and to begin searching each lane using a Schonstedt Model GA-52/CX magnetometer.
UXO Technicians start at one end of each lane and move forward toward the opposing base line.
During the forward movement, the technician moves the magnetometer back and forth from one
side of the lane to the other. Both forward movement and the swing of the magnetometer is
performed at a pace, which ensures the entire lane is searched and that the instrument is able to
appropriately respond to sub-surface anomalies. Whenever a subsurface anomaly or metallic
surface object is encountered, the technician halts and investigates the anomaly. Only in MRS sites
where the team is performing less than a four-foot removal and with approval of the CESPK OE
Safety Specialist, will the anomaly be flagged and left in place if below the removal depth.
Throughout this operation the UXO Supervisor closely monitors individual’s performance to
ensure these procedures are being performed with due diligence and attention to detail.

2.3.8.3 Excavation of Digitally Acquired Anomalies

     The intrusive investigation teams will be provided with the PDAs and appropriate digital
forms to fill in relevant data related to their intrusive investigation and excavate all anomalies.
Annotations for MEC and MD that can be positively identified will include site name, instrument
used, etc., and will list easting, northing (in local NAD 1983 State Plane Coordinates, California
Zone IV, Feet coordinates), grid number, instrument response and units, source type of response,
description, weight, depth, and have a space for subsequent action taken. If distance from flag,
orientation or inclination is required, it will be specified in the SSWP.

     If the anomaly yields a non-MEC item or fragments or pieces of MEC items that are not intact
and cannot be positively identified, the approximate weight and depth will be recorded, but the type
of MEC associated with, the distance and direction away from the flag and the inclination and
declination will not be recorded. In the event the anomaly is not at the point marked on the ground,
the search team will search a three-foot radius around the flag. All anomalies that cannot be
reacquired (false-positives) will be reported. The flag will be left in place and removed by the
Geophysical QC Requisition Team.

2.3.8.4 Near Surface Anomalies

     Near surface anomalies are those sub-surface anomalies, which can be excavated using hand
tools and are within six inches of the surface. Throughout the excavation the UXO Technician uses
a magnetometer to check and verify the location of the anomaly. When the overburden has been




                                                2-18
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
removed to within six inches of the anomaly the UXO Technician removes the remaining earth
using a trowel or other small digging implement.

2.3.8.5 Backhoe Excavations

     Some anomalies are more deeply buried and require excavation using heavy equipment (i.e.
backhoe). For these excavations, the UXO Supervisor coordinates equipment requirements with
the SUXOS and FOM. Prior to the arrival of the heavy equipment, the UXO Supervisor ensures
that a cleared entrance and egress path is available for the heavy equipment. Once on site the
heavy equipment is used to excavate the earth overburden to a depth not closer than 12 inches from
the suspect anomaly. The distance to the anomaly will be checked during the excavation with a
hand-held magnetometer. A UXO Technician using hand tools removes the final one-foot of
overburden. Refer to Appendix G, Backhoe Operations SOP.

2.3.8.6 Excavations in Suspected Hantavirus Areas

      Prior to excavating any area suspected of containing Hantavirus (i.e. rodent nest areas) the
UXO Supervisor has these areas properly treated with a solution of bleach and water. During
application of this solution and operations performance personnel strictly adhere to the procedures
listed in the SSHP.

2.3.8.7 Excavations Using the Miniature Open Front Barricade (MOFB)

     In areas where the MSD for intrusive work cannot be met due to close proximity of the
anomaly to the site boundary the miniature open-front barricade (MOFB) will be used. The use of
the MOFB applies to those excavation operations required to decide if the MEC is to be detonated
in place or moved to another location. Refer to Appendix G, MOFB SOP. Note: The largest
munition the MOFB was designed for is the 81mm M374 mortar.

2.3.8.8 Analysis of Ordnance Items with X-Ray

      When appropriate, the UXOSO or SUXOS will use an x-ray technique to analyze “light
skinned” munitions, i.e., rifle grenades and anti-tank rockets, to determine if the item is ordnance
related scrap or MEC. This reduces the number of demolition operations required which in turn
reduces the exposure of site personnel, the public and the environment to demolition operations.

     An x-ray log will be maintained on all x-rayed items. This log will include nomenclature of
item, date, time, location and pulses. See Appendix G for log. The UXOSO will maintain the log.

2.4     DEMOLITION OPERATIONS

     Parsons treats materials and debris generated and/or recovered during operations on-site at
Fort Ord using established and approved procedures.

2.4.1   Demolition of MEC

     All MEC containing explosives or hazardous material determined to be too hazardous to move
are treated in-place by detonation utilizing standard electric firing procedures as outlined in
Technical Manual (TM) 60A-1-1-31, Demolition Procedures. If these methods of treatment are
determined to be impractical, the CESPK Safety Specialist will request local military Explosive


                                                2-19
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
Ordnance Disposal (EOD) support. The following paragraphs describe the procedures Parsons
uses to detonate MEC at the Fort Ord site.

2.4.1.1 Frequency

      Parsons conducts treatment of MEC as required and with the concurrence of the on-site
CESPK Safety Specialist. Demolition operations begin in the work site when all non-essential and
non-UXO personnel are out of the fragmentation zone of the ordnance being detonated. MEC that
is safe to move may be consolidated to reduce the number of demolition operations.

2.4.1.2 Supervision and Control

     Parsons’ organization for the Fort Ord site includes the UXOSO and the subcontractors
SUXOS, who are on site at all-times during demolition operations. All roads/trails that provide
access to demolition sites will have roadblocks established during operations. The operation is
performed under the direction and supervision of the SUXOS who is charged with the
responsibility of ensuring that the procedures contained in this work plan and referenced
documents are followed. The UXOSO monitors compliance with the safety measures contained in
the work plan and associated documents and in the event of non-compliance, is vested with the
authority to stop or suspend operations.

2.4.1.3 Safe Separation Distances

     Prior to the start of demolition activities the SUXOS and UXOSO verify that the area around
the demolition site is clear of all non-UXO personnel and verify with the field office administrative
office that all required notifications have been made. Default Separation Distances will be based
on the most recent version of DOD 6055.9. Depending on the type of munition(s) being destroyed
and with approval of the CESPK Safety Specialist, the fragmentation distance may be increased or
decreased based on data obtained from HND-ED-CS-S personnel. Personnel remaining on-site are
limited to those personnel needed to safely and efficiently prepare the item(s) for destruction.

2.4.1.4 Engineering Controls

     Parsons will comply with the installations desires to reduce noise, blast and possible
fragmentation effects from demolition operations. Engineering controls or other measures to
suppress the blast and/or fragments effects will be used to reduce the required separation distance.
Engineering controls will be determined on a site-specific, munition-specific basis. In the event a
MEC item is in proximity to the installation boundary/residential area, a decision on the type of
engineering control will be made using the guidance and checklist in EM 1110-1-4009, Section 11-
10 and with the input from the FOM, SUXOS, UXOSO and CESPK Safety Specialist.

2.4.1.5 Equipment

      Standard electric and non-electric demolition equipment will be used. As improvements to
ignition sources are introduced to the market they will be tested, with prior approval from the
CESPK Safety Specialist, for possible use on this project.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
2.4.1.6 Evacuation and Site Control

     Prior to initiation of demolition operations all non-essential personnel are evacuated from the
demolition site. Prior to priming the demolition charges all avenues of ingress are physically
blocked by guard personnel. Radio communications are maintained between the demolition team,
road guards, supervisory personnel and the field office administrative office. Avenues of ingress
are not opened without the express permission of the UXOSO. A constant state of vigilance is
maintained by all personnel to detect any intrusion into the MSD zone or over-flights of aircraft.
While preparing MEC for detonation the SUXOS and UXOSO ensure that the number of personnel
on-site is kept to the minimum required to safely accomplish the mission. Authority to initiate
demolition operations rests solely with the FOM. The FOM can authorize the SUXOS to conduct
routine demolition operations. This individual is responsible for ensuring that all personnel have
been evacuated from the area, that all personnel have been accounted for, that all pertinent parties
have been notified of an impending demolition shot and that the area is secure prior to authorizing
the detonation of explosive charges. Prior to priming demolition shots the Demolition Team’s
UXO Supervisor directs all non-essential personnel except the UXOSO and CESPK Safety
Specialist to leave the area.

2.4.1.7 Explosive Accountability, Storage & Transportation

     Parsons uses government-furnished explosives and explosive storage facilities. Storage of
explosives is in strict compliance with DOD 6055.9-STD, Ammunition and Explosives Safety
Standards. Detailed procedures for the issue, turn-in and transportation of explosives are contained
in Chapter 3 of this work plan. In addition to these procedures, Parsons strictly enforces the
following:

     •    Issue of explosives is limited to those quantities needed to perform a specific operation.

     •    Strict accountability of explosives is maintained at all times.

     •    Only UXO Technicians are issued and transport explosive materials.

     •    All vehicles transporting ammunition and explosives are properly inspected prior to
          loading explosives onto the vehicle.

     •    Vehicle engine is not running when loading or unloading explosives.

     •    The vehicle is chocked.

     •    Beds of vehicles have either a plastic bed liner, dunnage or sandbags to protect the
          explosives from contact with the metal bed and fittings.

     •    Vehicles transporting explosives have a first aid kit, two- (2) ea. 10 BC fire extinguishers
          and communications capability.

     •    Compatibility requirements when transporting explosives and MEC are observed.

     •    Vehicle operators have valid operator permits.




                                                  2-21
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
      •    Maximum speed for vehicles transporting explosives is the posted speed limit or less if
           the situation so dictates.

      •    Personnel do not ride in the cargo compartment with explosives or MEC.

2.4.1.8 Demolition Procedures

     Parsons uses the procedures contained in TM 60A-1-1-31 to treat MEC. MEC will be treated
by detonation in place whenever necessary. Items that can be, will be moved for consolidated
shots. Engineering controls such as soil cover, sand bags, blast attenuation devices and on-site
ordnance demolition container (ODC) will be utilized as necessary. More detailed procedures for
preparation of demolition firing trains, firing of demolition charges, and post operation procedures
are contained in the Demolition Operations SOP.

     When multiple UXO items are encountered that preclude individual detonation (i.e. the items
are so close together that one shot would interfere with the others), when feasible, they will be
explosively linked using detonating cord.

                                            NOTE
        In the event that a MEC item is located, which cannot be treated in place due to its
location, is too hazardous to move to another location or cannot be identified, the UXOSO will
notify the CESPK Safety Specialist. The CESPK Safety Specialist will review the situation and
make a recommendation or notify U.S. Army EOD and request their assistance.

2.4.1.9 Post Demolition Inspection

      Upon completion of demolition operations two UXO Technicians selected by the UXO
Supervisor will vsually inspect each shot location. One of these personnel performs a visual
inspection of the demolition site(s) while the second person stands by at a safe distance prepared to
render assistance in the event of an emergency. Upon completion of this inspection and providing
that there are no residual hazards the SUXOS and UXOSO can then authorize the resumption of
site operations.

2.5       QUALITY CONTROL SEQUENCE

     Parsons and its subcontractors perform the QC sequence (including QC-1, QC Analog, QC
Seeded Items and QA Analog) as referenced in Chapter 11 unless operational necessity, the SSWP
or Time Critical Removal (TCRA) dictates otherwise.

2.6       TREATMENT OF SMALL ARMS AMMUNITION

     All small arms ammunition recovered during the project is stored in an explosive storage
magazine within the ESL and allowed to accumulate until sufficient quantity is obtained to ensure
transportation off site is economically feasible. At that time Parsons will subcontract the
appropriate agency to burn the small arms to ensure all explosives are removed from the cartridge
casings, at that point the expended brass casings will be recycled.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
2.7     REMOVAL AND TREATMENT OF SCRAP METAL

     Within or adjacent to each operating grid the UXO Supervisor establishes temporary ordnance
scrap and other scrap collection points. During operations ordnance scrap and other scrap that are
free of explosives (i.e. fragments, parachutes, etc) are placed at these collection points. Upon
completion of operations the materials in these temporary collection points are loaded onto a
vehicle for transfer to the central collection/segregation point located in the ammunition supply
point. For other IDW scrap see Chapter 13.

2.7.1   Inspection and Segregation

      A UXO Specialist and the UXO Supervisor inspect each questionable piece of scrap prior to
its being placed in the grid collection pile. The scrap is then inspected a second time by the UXO
Technician loading the scrap collection vehicle; and then a third time by the UXO Technician.

      The scrap is segregated according to metal type and ordnance type and placed in “Lock
Boxes.” These boxes remain locked at all times and the keys are controlled by the UXOQCS.
Once a container, (ranging in size from 4 x 6 foot bins to 40-yard roll-off boxes) is full, it is ready
for shipment. Venting of questionable scrap will be performed to expose filler and verify ordnance
type.

2.7.2   Chain of Custody

     Once a container is full a seal is placed on the container and the seal number recorded on a
seal register. The seal register contains the date, box/container number, material type, date of
shipment and shipping document number and a “load Number”. FACT International then picks-up
the load and the driver signs the chain of custody form and delivers the load to the subcontractors
melting/ shredding facility. The unprocessed scrap is not sold to brokers or other scrap dealers,
thereby ensuring control from cradle to grave.

2.8     RESTORATION

     Upon completion of all site operations the site will be returned as close as possible to its
original configuration. It may be necessary to perform erosion control measures as needed
depending on the recommendations in the initial environmental assessment. The level of site
restoration will be dependent upon site-specific reuse and HMP guidelines. Specific guidelines will
be included in the Site Specific Work Plan for each individual site.

2.9     QUALITY CONTROL INSPECTIONS

     Parsons utilizes procedures for controlling and measuring quality of all work performed
during site activities. All QC activities are performed and documented in accordance with
applicable professional and technical standards, Parson’s requirements and specific project goals
and objectives. All site activities are monitored and documented for precision, accuracy and
completeness. Definitive procedures are listed in Chapter 11.

2.9.1   Records

     Parsons QC personnel maintain a daily journal of activities and formal written reports of
inspections and re-inspections. The UXOQCS reports to the Quality Control Manager (QCM) on


                                                  2-23
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
quality matters. As the key QC person on-site the UXOQCS has responsibility for the overall
quality of work performed on site; responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

       •    Developing QC procedures to implement the QC Plan.

       •    Verifying implementation of corrective actions.

       •    Initiating actions to identify and prevent the occurrence of nonconformance relating to
            the services and QCP.

       •    Discontinuing nonconforming work if necessary.

       •    Coordinating with District’s QA representative for daily activities.

       •    Coordinating with the QCM to ensure that QC procedures are being followed and are
            appropriate in demonstrating data validity sufficient to meet DQOs.

       •    Recommending actions to be taken in the event of QC failures, to the PM and QCM.

       •    Reporting non-compliance with QC criteria to the PM and QCM.

       •    Conducting inspections of UXO portions of GIS database.

       •    Preparing and submitting a daily QC report, see report at end of chapter. (This report is
            due to CESPK the following workday.)

       •    Conducting daily QC audits/inspections.

    Additionally, the UXOQCS has the authority to suspend project activities when a condition
adverse to quality is identified. The PM and FOM will be notified when such action is required.

2.10       AFTER ACTION REPORT

      Parsons submits an after action report upon the completion of each job site. These reports
contain a compilation of all data pertaining to a specific work area. Due to the large number of job
sites encompassed by this contract, it is imperative that a separate after action report be submitted
after completion of each site. The requirements for the after action reports are listed in Appendix
H, DID OT-FTO-30 and the applicable Task Order.

2.10.1 Composition

     Each after action report includes a description of the site location, authorization for work
performed and information regarding the work accomplished on the site including summary of
MEC encountered and a summary of QC results. These after action reports contain, at a minimum,
the following information:

       •    All original survey and mapping data.

       •    Detailed accounting of all disposed MEC and MEC related materials.



                                                    2-24
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •    A description by grid or larger geographic area that either.

          −    All potential MEC items located by magnetometer were excavated.

          −    Whether some potential MEC items located by magnetometer were, upon direction
               by the CESPK Safety Specialist, not removed, in this instance the grid number,
               coordinates and circumstances will be documented.

     •    Daily journals of all activities associated with the job site.

     •    A recapitulation of exposure data. (This shall include total number of man-hours worked
          on-site.)

     •    All scrap turn-in documentation.

     •    All Quality Control documentation.

     •    Color photographs depicting major action items and MEC discoveries.

     •    A financial breakdown of all labor hours expended and associated costs.

    In addition, the final version of each after action report will be submitted, uncompressed, on a
CD ROM in a portable document format (PDF) along with a linked table of contents; tables;
photographs; graphs and figures included and suitable for viewing on the Internet.




                                                   2-25
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
                                          CHAPTER 3
                            EXPLOSIVE MANAGEMENT PLAN

3.1         INTRODUCTION

     The purpose of this plan is to provide the minimum procedures and safety and health
requirements applicable to the acquisition, storage, accountability and transportation of demolition
material and MEC.

3.2         REGULATORY REFERENCES

     Procedures and information contained in this document were obtained from the below-listed
references:

        •    CEHNC Safety Concepts and Basic Considerations for UXO
        •    ATF P 5400.7, ATF-Explosives Law and Regulations
        •    USACE EM 385-1-1, Safety and Health Requirements Manual
        •    DOD 4145.26-M, Contractors’ Safety Manual for Ammunition and Explosives
        •    DOD 6055.9-STD, DOD Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
        •    DA PAM 385-64, Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
        •    AR 385-64, Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
        •    AR 385-10, The Army Safety Program
        •    AR 385-16, System Safety Engineering and Management
        •    EM 1110-4009, Ordnance and Explosives Response
3.3         RESPONSIBILITIES

3.3.1       Field Operations Manager

     The FOM is responsible for determining the specific site requirements for licensing,
permitting and placarding. Additionally, he is responsible for acquiring the initial quantity and
type of demolition material, approve all subsequent requests for demolition material, and conduct
periodic inspections of the magazine storage areas and their contents.

3.3.2       UXOQCS

     The UXOQCS is responsible for the inspection and auditing of the entire operation and
reporting any findings to the PM and FOM. These inspections will include the acquisition
procedure, documentation, storage, and transport.




                                                  3-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
3.3.3       UXOSO

    The UXOSO is responsible for ensuring the handling, storage, transport and use of demolition
material is in accordance with the approved work plan, SOPs, and federal and state regulations.

3.3.4       Vehicle Driver

     The vehicle driver will at a minimum be a UXO Technician II qualified and have a valid
driver’s license. This is to ensure that the driver is both experienced with and knowledgeable of
demolition material. For additional transportation requirements see section 3.9.

3.4         ACQUISITION

3.4.1       Requisitions

    Requisitions will be made by the FOM described above in a timely manner. The initial
acquisition must be in place prior to beginning intrusive activities and all subsequent shipments
must be on site in order to ensure there is no break in operations. Prior to ordering demolition
materials, the Parsons OE Sector Purchase/Receipt Authorization List (Figure 3-1) must be
completed and forwarded to the explosive distributor(s), along with a copy of the Parsons and
UXO subcontractor’s Bureau of Alcohol and Tobacco (BATF) License.

3.5         RECEIPT

     Only those individuals named on the authorization list may sign for explosives from the
shipper. In order to ensure that the quantity shipped is the same as the quantity listed on the
shipping documents, the FOM will inventory the shipment prior to signing for it. If the FOM is
unavailable a designee from the OE Sector Purchase/Receipt Authorization list will sign for the
shipment.

3.5.1       Receipt Discrepancies

     Upon receipt, the type, quantity and lot number of each item will be checked against the
manifest and entered on the Magazine Data Card (Figure 3-2). In the event there is a discrepancy
between the amount shipped and the amount received, the FOM will immediately contact the
explosive supplier and inform them of the discrepancy. It then is the responsibility of the supplier
to rectify the situation and inform Parsons of the results. The supplier must then correct their
documents and forward them to the site. In any event, only the amount received will be entered on
the Magazine Data Card, which will be kept in the magazine and annotated for each transaction.

3.6         STORAGE

     CESPK currently has explosive magazines in the Fort Ord Explosive Storage Location (ESL)
(Map 4, Appendix B). Parsons will use the existing magazines for explosive storage and comply
with local storage and compatibility criteria and procedures when using government facilities. If
Parsons is required to establish additional explosive storage and no magazines are available in the
Fort Ord ESL, Parsons will:

        •   Use portable approved BATF Type 2 structures.



                                                 3-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     •   Locate, install and maintain the magazines to comply with the magazine criteria and
         quantity distance requirements established in DOD 6055.9-STD, DOD Ammunition and
         Explosives Safety Standards.

     •   Install sufficient magazines to comply with the explosive compatibility requirements, (i.e.,
         bulk explosives, initiating explosives).

     •   Establish security, such as fencing and/or guards, to prevent unauthorized access and/or
         theft, as required.

     •   Submit amendment to Explosives Safety Submission IAW DOD Explosives Safety Board
         Memorandum dated 27 January 1998, Subject: Guidance for Clearance Plans.




                                                 3-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
             Figure 3-1: OE Sector Explosives Purchase/Receipt/Transportation
                                    Authorization List
Address and County: (Home Office)

Address and County: (Home Office)

Federal License #:                                Expiration Date:

  The following individuals are agents, employees, or representatives of the undersigned, and are
             authorized to order or acquire explosive materials on behalf of Parsons
   Name and Home Address            Driver’s License No.      Soc. Sec. Number      Place of Birth




   The undersigned certifies the foregoing information to be true and correct to the best of his
knowledge and belief, and that he will communicate any additions or deletions to the foregoing list
                                           to Parsons


          Parsons OE Sector Manager                                     Date




                                                 3-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
                          Figure 3-2: OE Sector Magazine Data Card




                                             3-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                     May 2004
3.7        SECURITY

        Physical security of the Fort Ord ESL is provided by the installation.

3.7.1      Exterior Construction

     The exterior and doors are to be of not less than 1/4-inch steel and lined with at least two
inches of hardwood. Magazines with top openings will have lids with water-resistant seals, or
which overlap the sides by at least one inch when in a closed position.

3.7.2      Hinges and Hasps

     Hinges and hasps will be attached to doors by welding, riveting, or bolting (nuts on inside of
door). Hinges and hasps will be installed so they cannot be removed when the doors are closed and
locked.

3.7.3      Locks

     Each door will be equipped with appropriate padlocks fastened in separate hasps and staples.
Padlocks must have at least five tumblers or five blades, and a case-hardened shackle of at least
3/8-inch diameter. Padlocks will be protected with not less than 1/4-inch steel hoods constructed
so as to prevent sawing or lever action on the locks, hasps, and staples.

3.7.4      Signage/Placarding

      ATF and DOD require that all magazines be appropriately posted for content hazard class, fire
fighting hazard, and an emergency notification list. Magazines will be placarded in accordance
with DOD 4145.26M and DA PAM 385-64. In most instances, this will require a Fire Division
Class 1 for the recovered MEC magazines and a Fire Division Class 3 for the demolition material,
excluding detonators, which are Fire Division Class 4. If in doubt and unable to obtain guidance
from a reputable source, label the contents with the next highest hazard. In the event there are two
fire division or hazard class items in the same magazine, the higher hazard division/class placard
should be used.

3.7.5      Lightning Protection

    Appropriate lightning protection will be installed in accordance with EM 1110-1-4009,
Chapter 11.

3.7.6      Emergency Notification List

     An emergency notification list containing the names, telephone numbers and local addresses
of the individuals to be notified in the event of an emergency will be posted on the outside and
inside of the magazine door. These individuals should be the same individuals authorized to sign
for explosives.




                                                    3-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
3.7.7   Compatibility

      Explosive compatibility will be maintained in accordance with DA PAM 385-64. Table 3-3
lists the various storage compatibility groups and Table 3-4 is the storage compatibility chart. In
certain instances, it may be necessary to store incompatible items in the same magazine. If this
should occur, a waiver will be requested, and the incompatible items will be physically separated
by a barricade, such as sandbags, within the magazine. This situation should be an interim
occurrence and avoided if at all possible.

3.7.8   Key Control

     Magazines will remain locked except when receipts and issues are being made. Keys will be
kept by the FOM and the UXOCQS.

3.7.9   Inspection

     At the start of each workday, a physical check will be made of the magazine storage area to
ensure security has not been compromised.

3.8     INVENTORY

      Upon receipt and verification of explosive demolition material, the Magazine Data Card is
filled out and kept in the magazine on top of the listed item. A duplicate copy is maintained by the
UXOQCS.




                                                 3-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
                         Table 3-1: General Placarding Requirements

Category of material (Hazard class or division number                            Placard Design
     and additional description, as appropriate)               Placard name      Section Ref. (§)
1.1                                                        Explosives 1.1           172.523
1.2                                                        Explosives 1.2           172.524
1.3                                                        Explosives 1.3           172.525
2.3                                                        Poison Gas               172.532
4.3                                                        Dangerous When Wet       172.528
6.1 (PG I, inhalation hazard only)                         Poison                   172.542
7 (Radioactive Yellow III label only)                      Radioactive              172.544


                          Table 3-2: General Placarding Requirements

Category of material (Hazard class or division number                            Placard Design
     and additional description, as appropriate)               Placard name      Section Ref. (§)
1.4                                                        Explosives 1.4           172.523
1.5                                                        Explosives 1.5           172.524
1.6                                                        Explosives 1.6           172.525
2.1                                                        Flammable Gas            172.532
2.2                                                        Non-Flammable Gas        172.528
3                                                          Flammable                172.542
Combustible liquid                                         Combustible              172.544
4.1                                                        Flammable Solid          172.546
4.2                                                        Spontaneously            172.547
                                                           Combustible
5.1                                                        Oxidizer                 172.550
5.2 (Other than organic peroxide, Type B, liquid or        Organic peroxide         172.552
solid, temperature controlled).
6.1 (PG I or II, other than Zone A or B inhalation         Poison                   172.554
hazard).
6.1 (PG III)                                               Keep Away from Food      172.553
6.2                                                        (None)
8                                                          Corrosive                172.558
9                                                          Class 9                  172.560
ORM-D                                                      (None)




                                                     3-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
                                   Table 3-3




                                       3-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003               May 2004
                                   Table 3-3 (Continued)




                                            3-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                           May 2004
                                   Table 3-3 (Continued)




                                            3-11
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                           May 2004
                                   Table 3-3 (Continued)




                                            3-12
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                           May 2004
                                   Table 3-3 (Continued)




                                            3-13
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                           May 2004
                              Table 3-4: Storage Compatibility Chart

Groups      A      B      C        D    E     F       G     H      J      K      L     N        S

   A        X      Z

   B        Z      X      Z        Z    Z     Z       Z                                X        X

   C               Z      X        X    X     Z       Z                                X        X

   D               Z      X        X    X     Z       Z                                X        X

   E               Z      X        X    X     Z       Z                                X        X

   F               Z      Z        Z    Z     X       Z                                 Z       X

   G               Z      Z        Z    Z     Z       X                                 Z       X

   H                                                        X                                   X

   J                                                               X                            X

   K                                                                      Z

   L

   N               X      X        X    X     Z       Z                                X        X

   S               X      X        X    X     X       X     X      X                   X        X


Notes:

1. The marking “X” at the intersection of the above chart indicates that these groups may be
   combined in storage. Otherwise, mixing is either prohibited or restricted per Note 2 below.
2. The marking “Z” at an intersection of the above chart indicates that, when warranted by
   operational considerations or magazine non-availability, and when safety is not sacrificed,
   these groups may be combined in storage.
3. The marking “U” on the above chart indicates that leaking toxic chemical munitions of one
   agent type, i.e., GB, with or without explosive components, may be stored together in one
   magazine specifically designated for storage of leakers of that agent type.
4. Equal numbers of separately packaged components of complete rounds of any single type of
   ammunition may be stored together. When so stored, compatibility is that of the assembled
   rounds; i.e., WP Filler in Group H, HE Filler in Groups D, E, or F, as appropriate.
5. Group K required not only separate storage from other groups, but also requires that munitions
   having different toxic chemical agent fillers be stored separately from each other.
6. Ammunition designated “PRACTICE: by NSN and nomenclature may be stored with the fully
   loaded ammunition it stimulates.



                                               3-14
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
3.8.1       Usage Inventory

      Following each occurrence of a receipt or issue of explosive material, the FOM will conduct a
joint inventory in conjunction with the demo team leader, drawing out or returning the explosives.
Only those items issued/returned will be inventoried. The two sets of Magazine Data Cards will be
appropriately annotated.

3.8.2       Monthly Inventory

     Monthly, the FOM, UXOQCS and the CESPK Safety Specialist will conduct an inventory and
record results on the two sets of Magazine Data Cards.

3.8.3       Discrepancies

     In the event there is a discrepancy during any inventory, the item will be recounted a
minimum of two additional times. If a discrepancy still exists, the PM, CESPK COR, and BATF
will be notified. A written report will be prepared and submitted within 24 hours of the discovery.

3.8.4       Procedures for Return to Storage of Explosives Not Expended

    Explosives that were issued for use but were not needed will be returned daily to the
magazines at the completion of disposal operations. The Demolition Team Leader will return the
unused explosives to the storage magazine and revise the Magazine Data Card and Explosives Use
Record (Figure 3-3).

3.8.5       Disposal of Remaining Explosives

     Parsons is required by BATF to account for all explosives purchased and used. At project
completion, all unused explosives will either be disposed of by detonation, or custody and
accountability transferred to an incoming contractor or the government. If required, an economic
analysis for different alternatives will be made.

3.9         TRANSPORTATION

     Transportation of explosives or MEC will comply with all Federal, state, and local
regulations. Permits are not required under CERCLA for on-site or on Federal installation
transportation of explosives or MEC. Off-site transportation of explosives or MEC will not be
done until coordination and approval has been received from the PM, CESPK COR and DENR.
Off-site shipment of explosives or MEC will be made using commercial carriers approved to
transport ammunition and explosives. For off-site shipment:

        •   Explosives will be packaged in accordance with 49 CFR parts 172 and 173, if possible; if
            not possible the explosives will be transported in such a manner as to not move or touch
            other explosive items.

        •   Drivers will be provided with Special Instructions for Vehicle Drivers (Figure 3-4).

        •   Vehicles will be inspected using Motor Vehicle Inspection (Figure 3-5) and, if applicable,
            be properly placarded




                                                    3-15
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
        •   Compatibility requirements will be observed.

        •   The load shall be well braced and, except when in closed vans, covered with a fire
            resistant tarpaulin.

3.9.1       General Highway Transport

     In most instances, the following data is sufficient to meet the requirements for explosive
transport.

3.9.1.1 Commercial Motor Vehicle Definition and Requirements (CFR49 Part 383.5)

     Commercial motor vehicle (CMV) means a motor vehicle, or a combination of motor
vehicles, used in commerce to transport passengers or property if the motor vehicle and including
one or more of the following:

        •   Has a gross combination weight rating of 11,794 or more kilograms (26,001 pounds or
            more), inclusive with a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 4,536
            kilograms (10,000 pounds).

        •   Has a gross vehicle weight rating of 11,794 or more kilograms (26,001 pounds or more).

        •   Is designed to transport 16 or more passengers including the driver.

        •   Is of any size and is used in the transportation of materials found to be hazardous for the
            purpose of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act, and which requires the motor
            vehicle to be placarded under the Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR part 172,
            subpart E.)




                                                    3-16
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
                                   Figure 3-3: Explosive Usage Form




           Team Number:                         Date:                         Project Name:

                                                Work Areas & Grid Numbers:
           Team Leader:

          Explosives Issued                             Signature of Team Leader:
          Item                          Quantity              Lot Number                   Checkers Initials




          Explosives Expended                           Signature of Team Leader
          Item                          Quantity              Lot Number                   Checkers Initials




          Explosives Returned                           Signature of SUXOS:
          Item                          Quantity              Lot Number                   Checkers Initials




         The signatures in each section of this document indicate that the items listed in that section were
          in fact issued, expended, or returned to storage and that the quantities listed were verified through
         a physical count.




                                                            3-17
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                  May 2004
                         Figure 3-4: Emergency Response Information




                                           3-18
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                      May 2004
                  Figure 3-4: Emergency Response Information (Continued)




                                            3-19
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                           May 2004
                               Figure 3-5: Motor Vehicle Inspection
                This form must be filled out for any vehicle carrying explosives, prior to loading.
               This form is for use on site only, if traveling on public highways use DD Form 626

DRIVERS NAME                                               LICENSE NUMBER
COMPANY
TYPE OF VEHICLE                                            VEHICLE NUMBER
INSPECTION DATE/TIME                                       INSPECTOR

PART INSPECTED                                  SAT.    UNSAT.                       COMMENT
HORN
STEERING SYSTEM
WIPERS
MIRRORS
FIRE EXTINGUISHERS (10 ABC, 2 EACH)
REFLECTORS
EMERGENCY FLASHERS
LIGHTS
ELECTRIC WIRING
FUEL SYSTEM
EXHAUST SYSTEM
BRAKE SYSTEM
SUSPENSION
CARGO SPACE
TIRES, WHEELS, RIMS
TAILGATE
TARPAULIN

INSPECTION RESULTS (INSPECTOR INITIAL)
                                      ACCEPTED:
                                       REJECTED:

                                                  REMARKS




DRIVERS SIGNATURE/DATE                                             INSPECTORS SIGNATURE/DATE




                                                    3-20
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                      May 2004
3.9.2       Federal Installations/On-Site

Transportation of explosives and MEC on-site and on Federal installations will comply with the
following:
        •   Vehicles will be inspected per occurrence and will be properly placarded.

        •   Explosives will be transported in closed vehicles whenever possible. When using an open
            vehicle, explosives will be covered with a flame resistant tarpaulin (except when
            loading/unloading).

        •   Vehicle engine will not be running. Wheel chocks and brakes set when loading/unloading
            explosives.

        •   Beds of vehicles will have either dunnage, plastic bed liner or sandbags to protect the
            explosives from contact with the metal bed and fittings.

        •   Vehicles transporting explosives will have a first aid kit, two 10 ABC rated fire
            extinguishers, and communications capabilities.

        •   Initiating explosives, such as detonators, will remain separated from other high explosives
            during loading, unloading, and while on vehicles.

        •   Compatibility requirements will be observed.

        •   Operators transporting explosives will have a valid drivers’ license.

        •   Drivers will comply with posted speed limits, but will not exceed a safe and reasonable
            speed for conditions. Vehicles transporting explosives off-road will not exceed 25 mph.

3.9.3       Off-Site Transportation of Explosives over Public Highway

3.9.3.1 DOT Certificate of Registration

      As long as only 1.4 explosives or less than 55 net explosive weight (NEW) of 1.1, 1.2, or 1.3
explosives are transported by personnel, DOT certificates of registration for individuals involved in
the transportation of demolition materials are not required.

3.9.3.2 CDL Requirements

      As long as site personnel are not using vehicles that weigh more than 26,000 pounds and are
not transporting any materials that must be placarded under the DOT Hazardous Materials
Regulations (i.e., they are only transporting 1.4 explosives), then the vehicle being used need not
be classified as a CMV and the operator of the vehicle need not have a Commercial Driver’s
License (CDL). This is the typical situation for site personnel since they usually transport
relatively small quantities of 1.4 demolition materials. However, if a CDL is required, the FOM
will ensure that the requisite license/permits are obtained.




                                                    3-21
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
3.9.3.3 Mixed Packaging Requirements

     Explosives of compatibility Group S may be packed with explosives of all other explosive
compatibility groups except A and L. To determine the compatibility of the materials typically
transported by site personnel, refer to the Material Safety Data Sheets. A currently listing of all
Material Safety Data Sheets is maintained by the UXOSO.

3.9.4      General Placarding Requirements

     Fort Ord is designated a CERCLA site, however should placarding ever be required it will be
done according to 49 CFR 172.504. The placard requirements listed below will apply to explosives
transportation if applicable:

        (a) Except as otherwise provided, each bulk packaging, freight container, unit load device,
        transport vehicle or rail car containing any quantity of a hazardous material must be placarded
        on each side and each end with the type of placards specified in Tables 3-1 and 3-2, in
        accordance with other requirements and exceptions.”

        (c) Exceptions for less than 454 kg (1,001 pounds). Except for bulk packaging and hazardous
        materials subject to § 172.505, when hazardous materials covered by Table 3-2 of this section
        are transported by highway or rail, placards are not required on:

             (1) A transport vehicle or freight container which contains less than 454 kg (1,001 lbs.)
             aggregate gross weight of hazardous materials covered by Table 3-2 of paragraph (e) of
             this section; or

             (2) A rail car loaded with transport vehicles or freight containers, none of which is
             required to be placarded.”

     The exceptions provided in paragraph (c) provided above do not prohibit the display of
placards in the manner prescribed in this subpart, if not otherwise prohibited (see § 172.502), on
transport vehicles for freight containers that are not required to be placarded.

3.9.5      Documentation

     Any time explosives are being transported completed copies of documents described below,
will be in the vehicle.

        Instructions for Motor Vehicle owners (Emergency Response Information) Figure 3-4

     Only those items that are being transported will be entered in the form with the applicable
qty/units and weight columns completed. It is imperative that the NEW limitations of 55 lbs. not
be exceeded. All required data will be entered on the front and the Guide 50 block should be
checked on the back of the form.

        Explosives Purchase/Receipt/Transport Authorization List - Figure 3-1

     The form will be completed ensuring the pertinent data for all those transporting explosives is
included on the form. As with the other required forms, this one will be part of the transport




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
paperwork. Only the route shown will be used unless there is an emergency or the route is
blocked.

     Any deviation from the planned route will be reported to and coordinated with the FOM.

     Motor Vehicle Inspection Checklist - Figure 3-4

     The form is to be completed prior to placing any explosives in the vehicle and will accompany
the shipment.

BATF Permit/License - A copy of the current BATF license will accompany the vehicle and be
readily available.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
                                             CHAPTER 4
                                    EXPLOSIVE SITING PLAN

4.1         INTRODUCTION

     This plan outlines the procedures Parsons will use to perform MEC identification and
treatment operations at Fort Ord, California and describes the safety criteria to be employed.

4.2         EXPLOSIVES STORAGE MAGAZINES

    Parsons will use government-supplied explosives storage facilities at Fort Ord. If the storage
magazines are not available or Parsons is required to install additional magazines, commercial
Type 2 magazines will be leased.

4.2.1       Types(s) of Magazines

    The ESL has standard earth covered and above ground magazines for storage of explosives. If
commercial magazines are required, Parsons will use a portable apparatus approved by the BATF
Type 2, outdoor, box magazines. Parsons will:

        •    Locate, install, and maintain the magazines to comply with the magazine criteria and
             quantity distance requirements established in DOD 6055.9-STD, Department of Defense
             Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards.

        •    Install three magazines in order to comply with explosive compatibility requirements
             (i.e., bulk explosives, initiating explosives, and MEC waiting demilitarization).

        •    Establish security, such as fencing and/or guards, to prevent unauthorized access and/or
             theft.

        •    Establish magazines that are bullet-resistant, fire-resistant, weather-resistant, theft-
             resistant, and ventilated. These will be supported to prevent direct contact with the
             ground. The ground around them will slope away for drainage or other adequate drainage
             will be provided.

        •    Attach hinges and hasps to doors by welding, riveting, or bolting (nuts on inside of door).
             Hinges and hasps will be installed so they cannot be removed when the doors are closed
             and locked. Doors will also be equipped with appropriate padlocks.

4.2.2       NEW and Hazard Division
     The typical contents of the ESL, including the NEW and Hazard Division of stored explosives
are presented in Table 4-1 below.




                                                    4-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
                       Table 4-1: NEW and Hazard Division of Stored Explosives

                                                                                       Distance (in feet) From
                                           Hazard                    Net Exp.
    Mag. Type             Contents                      Amount                       Inhabited       Public Traffic
                                            Div.                     Wt. (Lbs)
                                                                                      Bldgs.*            Rt.*
High Explosive        Demolition              1.1     1,536 ea.       1,920
                      Charge, M112
                      Demolition              1.1     6,843 ft.       3,422
                      Charge, M186


                      Detonating Cord         1.1     43,715 ft.        350
                      Perforator              1.1     234 ea.             29
                                                      Total           5,721             1,250              750
                                                      NEW
OE Storage            OE Items                1.1     NA                  50            1,250              750
Initiating Explosives Blasting Cap,           1.1     400 ea.            1.2
                      Elect.
                      Blasting Cap,           1.1     195 ea.             10
                      Non Elect.
                      Detonator, Non          1.1     2 ea.             N/A
                      Elect.
                      Blasting Time           1.4     20,450 ft.        55.2
                      Fuse
                      Time Fuse               1.4     1,203 ea.          0.1
                      Igniter
                      Shotgun Primer,         1.4     92 ea.             0.5
                      #209
                                                      Total               67            1,250              750
                                                      NEW
* From DoD 6055.9-STD, Table 9-1


    4.2.3    Quantity Distance Criteria for Siting

          The quantity distance criteria for siting of building and public traffic routes relative to the ESL
    is included in Table 4-1 and illustrated on Map 4 located in Appendix B. DOD 6055.9-STD will
    be used to establish any additional magazines. Quantity distance maps will be provided in site-
    specific work plans for particular MRS sites.



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    Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
4.3     MEC AREAS

     MEC areas will change as locations for investigation change. The work plan will be updated
and designate new areas prior to beginning any intrusive operations.

4.3.1   Minimum Separation Distances
     The MSD for the public during intrusive operations will be the default distances if the type of
MEC is unknown; the maximum fragmentation distance for the MPM, as calculated by CEHNC’s
Engineering Directorate, Structural Branch; or, when conditions and MEC hazards permit, the
MSD may be reduced to fit the situation; but in no case will the distance for that density be less
than 1/600 ft2, K50 overpressure, or 200 feet, whichever is greater. These standards are as listed in
DOD 6055.9-STD dated 5 July 2000.

     If the MSD for unintentional detonations cannot be maintained as an exclusion zone, either
engineering controls will be used to reduce the distance required or an area-specific approval will
be obtained to use a smaller distance based on the 1/600 ft2 fragmentation distance. In the event
that the MSD cannot be maintained even after engineering controls have been implemented the
UXOSO/FOM will notify the CESPK Safety Specialist immediately.

4.3.2   Demolition Areas (Intentional Detonations)

      MEC will be treated in the areas where the item(s) are encountered. A safe separation distance
for all personnel will be established. If the MEC is unknown the distances will be a minimum of
1,250 feet or the maximum fragment range provided in Table C5.T1 of DOD 6055.9-STD based on
the item diameters. If the MEC is known the distance will be the maximum fragmentation distance
for the MPM, as calculated by CEHNC’s Engineering Directorate, Structural Branch, the K328
overpressure distance, or 200 whichever is greater.

4.4     FOOT PRINT AREAS

    Foot print areas for intrusive and demolition operations will be established and the work plan
updated on a task order by task order basis.

4.4.1   Engineering Controls

     In areas where an acceptable fragmentation distance cannot be achieved, items safe to move
may be moved to another area as long as the movement does not require transportation on public
roads. If movement to another area is not possible, other methods of mitigation, such as berms,
tamping, or sandbag barricades (in accordance with HNC-ED-CS-S-98-7) will be employed to
reduce the fragmentation hazard. If these methods of disposal are determined to be impractical,
Parsons will notify the on-site CESPK Safety Specialist.

4.4.2   Blow-in Place

      Prior to initiation of demolition operations all non-essential personnel are evacuated from the
exclusion zone. Prior to priming the demolition charges all avenues of ingress will be physically
blocked by guard personnel. Radio communications are maintained between all involved parties at
all times. Avenues of ingress are not to be opened without the express permission of the FOM. A
constant state of vigilance will be maintained by all personnel to detect any intrusion into the



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
fragmentation zone or over flights of aircraft. Upon completion of disposal operations, the Disposal
Team’s UXO Technician III and the UXOSO will visually inspect each disposal shot. The
Technician III will perform a visual inspection of the disposal site(s). The UXOSO will standby at
a safe distance and be prepared to render assistance in the event of an emergency. Upon
completion of this inspection and providing that there are no residual hazards, the SUXOS will
authorize the resumption of site operations.

4.4.3       Collection Points
     Items that are unsafe to move will be disposed of in the location where they are encountered.
Items containing residues and items requiring demilitarization may be stored in the MEC explosive
magazine and added to future-planned demolition shots.

4.4.4       Consolidated Shots
     Items that are safe to move (unfuzed or unfired) may be consolidated to one location within
that day’s survey area to reduce the number of demolition shots and fragmentation contamination.
MEC that is safe to move may be consolidated to reduce the number of shots. All movement of
MEC will be coordinated with and approved by the on-site CESPK Safety Specialist. Consolidated
shots will be in accordance with the CEHNC report “Procedures for demolition of Multiple Rounds
(Consolidated Shots) on Ordnance and Explosives (OE) Sites.” A copy of the report will be
available on-site for reference.

4.4.5       Confirmatory Methods

        In order to reduce the number of shots one of the following methods may be used:

        •    X-Ray – thin-skinned items will be x-rayed in accordance with the x-ray SOP to
             determine if they are live or inert.

        •    Shaped Charge – small conical charges will be used to determine if the item is
             completely inert.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
                                             CHAPTER 5
                           GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION PLAN

     The following subsections detail the Geophysical Investigation Plan (GIP) for MEC
identification and treatment operations at Fort Ord. The plan has been developed in accordance
with CESPK Data Item Description OT-FTO-05.

5.1         OBJECTIVES

     The objective of the geophysical investigation is to accurately locate and record the locations
of geophysical anomalies that potentially represent MEC in the subsurface. The geophysical
investigation will be conducted in accordance with this document, the findings of the Parsons/USA
Ordnance Detection and Discrimination Study (ODDS) (USA Environmental, 2000), SSWP, and if
performed, results of site-specific prove-outs (SSPOs).

5.2         SITE DESCRIPTION

     The following subsections describe general site description characteristics applicable to the
geophysical operations at Fort Ord. A more detailed description of individual sites will be included
in SSWPs prepared prior to work at each site. Topics not addressed below that will be included in
each SSWP will include:

        •    Specific Area to Be Investigated;

        •    Past, Current and Future Use of Specific Sites;

        •    Anticipated UXO Type, Composition and Quantity; and

        •    Actual Depth of Ordnance Distribution at Fort Ord.

5.2.1       Topography

     The predominant topography of Fort Ord reflects morphology typical of the dune sand
deposits that underlie the western and northern portions of the base. In these areas, the ground
surface slopes gently west and northwest, draining toward Monterey Bay. Elevations at Fort Ord
range from approximately 900 feet above mean sea level (MSL) near Impossible Ridge on the east
side of the base, to sea level at the beach. The topography in the southeastern third of the base is
notably different from the rest of the base. This area has relatively well-defined, eastward-flowing
drainage channels within narrow, moderately-to-steeply sloping canyons. In general, all types of
grade can be expected including relatively flat areas, shallow grades, moderate slopes and steep
slopes.

5.2.2       Vegetation

    Central maritime chaparral is the most extensive natural community of vegetation at Fort Ord,
occupying approximately 12,500 acres in the south-central portion of the base. Oak woodlands are




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
also widespread and occupy the next largest area, about 5,000 acres. Grasslands, primarily in the
southeastern and northern portions of the base, occupy approximately 4,500 acres.

5.2.3       Geologic Conditions

     Fort Ord lies within the coast-ranges geomorphic province, and generally reflects the
transitional condition characterized by the coast-ranges; older, consolidated rock is exposed at the
ground surface near the southern base boundary and becomes buried under a northward-thickening
sequence of poorly consolidated deposits to the north. Fort Ord and the adjacent areas are
underlain by one or more of the following units:

        •    Mesozoic granitic and metamorphic rocks

        •    Miocene marine sedimentary rocks of the Monterey Formation

        •    Upper Miocene to lower Pliocene marine sandstone of the Santa Margarita Formation
             (and possibly the Pancho Rico and/or Purisima Formations)

        Locally, these units are overlain and obscured by geologically younger sediments, including:

        •    Plio-Pleistocene alluvial fan, lake, and fluvial deposits of the Paso Robles Formation

        •    Pleistocene eolian and fluvial sands of the Aromas Sand

        •    Pleistocene to Holocene valley fill deposits consisting of poorly consolidated gravel,
             sand, silt, and clay

        •    Pleistocene and Holocene dune sands

        •    Recent beach sand

        •    Recent alluvium

     The most significant effects of the geologic conditions at Fort Ord are associated with the
Santa Margarita Formation. This formation includes units containing significant amounts of iron
matrix mineralization that manifest as magnetic concretions. These magnetic concretions are
spherical, range from 1 to 3 cm in diameter, and are present throughout Fort Ord. The effect of the
Santa Margarita Formation on the geophysical sensors is based on the local condition of the
concretion-bearing units. At Fort Ord, depending on the specific site, the unit can be exposed to
the surface, be present beneath the surface, or be eroded away.

    While poorly documented throughout the facility, the condition of the Santa Margarita
Formation affects the geophysical mapping process in three ways:

            1. When exposed to the surface, magnetic concretions cause anomalies in the geophysical
               data. It is anticipated that EM methods are less significantly affected as compared to
               magnetic methods.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
        2. When buried, the effects of concretions are anticipated to range from minor to severe,
           depending on the depth of burial (soil overburden thickness) and the concentration of
           items.
        3. When the Santa Margarita formation is eroded away the effects of the concretions can
           be severe. As the concretions are resistant to erosion, the erosion of the formation can
           leave large accumulations of these items in the remaining soil that can result in large
           anomalies in the data.

5.2.4   Soil Conditions

     At Fort Ord, the soil is sandy and prone to movement under the influences of water and wind,
potentially causing MEC to either migrate off site or to be buried deeper than would normally be
expected for the MEC type. Post-range development also may have occurred in certain areas,
potentially resulting in cuts and/or fills which would also alter the depth at which MEC is present.

5.2.5   Groundwater Conditions

     Fort Ord straddles two distinct groundwater basins, the Salinas and Seaside basins. Fort Ord
includes the southwestern edge of the Salinas basin and the eastern portion of the smaller Seaside
basin. The Salinas basin underlies the northern and southeastern portions of the base, and the
Seaside basin underlies the southern and southwestern areas.

      The Salinas groundwater basin is relatively large and extends well beyond the boundaries of
Fort Ord. At Fort Ord, the Salinas basin is composed of relatively flat-lying to gently dipping
poorly consolidated sediments. Although relatively simple structurally, the sediments are
stratigraphically complex, reflecting a variety of depositional environments. Aquifers within the
Salinas basin at Fort Ord, from top to bottom, include the unconfined A-aquifer, the confined
Upper 180-foot aquifer, the confined and unconfined Lower 180-foot aquifer, and the confined
400-foot and 900-foot aquifers. These aquifer names reflect local historical water levels and are not
directly correlated to present water levels at Fort Ord.

     Groundwater extractions by the City of Marina, Fort Ord; and by irrigation wells in the
Salinas Valley, have historically induced seawater intrusion into the Lower 180-foot and the 400-
foot aquifers. Seawater intrusion continues to affect these aquifers. Intrusion into the Upper 180-
foot aquifer appears to be limited to the vicinity of the beach at Fort Ord. The extraction (by the
City of Marina) of drinking water from the lower 180 and 400-foot aquifers has been terminated.
Drinking water for the Marina area is now extracted from the 900-foot and 1,500-foot aquifers.

5.2.6   Geophysical Conditions

     The geophysical conditions at Fort Ord are affected by factors described above such as
geology, vegetation and topography as well as the distribution of MEC and MEC related scrap
across the site. Parsons’ experience at the site indicates that background geophysical
signals/gradients vary depending on specific site conditions. In general, background noise during
electromagnetic surveys has been in the range of 1-3 millivolts. Background magnetic gradients
have been in the range of 1-3 nanoTeslas.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
5.2.7   Site Utilities

     Surface and subsurface utilities related to prior military operations are present across the Fort
Ord site. Utilities anticipated at various sites primarily include underground and overhead
communication and power cables and wires, but may also include other infrastructure such as
sewer and drainage pipes. The presence and possible impact of known utilities at each site and
mitigation procedures will be described in the SSWPs.

5.2.8   Man-Made Features Potentially Affecting Geophysical Investigations

     Man-made features at the Fort Ord site include but are not limited to buildings, fences, roads,
range targets and utilities. The presence and possible impact of man-made features will be
assessed and mitigation procedures developed for each site in the SSWPs. The primary mitigation
procedure will be to remove the features from the survey area. In cases where this is not an option,
an alternative plan will be developed.

5.2.9   Site-Specific Dynamic Events Affecting Geophysical Investigations

    Dynamic events such as rain, lightning and solar flares may affect geophysical data collection.
Procedures for geophysical survey operations when these events occur are as follows:

5.2.9.1 Rain

      The effect of rain on geophysical operations is primarily dependent on the
instrument/technology being utilized and the physical site conditions (terrain and vegetation).

        Instrument/Technology - Most of the instruments commercially available are relatively
        water resistant. Additional measures will be taken by the survey teams (such as covering
        connections with plastic sheeting) to reduce the possibility of moisture impacting the
        instrument’s electronics. When possible, survey teams will operate the instruments under
        very light rain conditions (drizzling). If the rain persists and the survey team leader
        determines that there is a potential for an impact to the data quality or that moisture could
        be getting into the instrument, field operations will cease and the Project Geophysicist will
        be notified. Operations will continue once the rain has ceased or has reduced to a drizzle.

        Site Conditions – At sites where footing for the operators becomes difficult because of wet
        terrain or vegetation, operations will cease until the area is deemed safe by the SSHO. The
        determination to stop will be made by the field team leader or the SSHO and the Project
        Geophysicist will be notified.

5.2.9.2 Lightning

     Because all geophysical instruments can serve as conduits for lighting, any observed lightning
in the area will be considered a safety hazard and survey activities will be stopped until all
lightning activity has ceased. Site personnel and equipment will be taken to a safe area. The
determination of the presence of lighting can be made by any site personnel who will then
immediately contact the SSHO. The SSHO will make the determination as to when geophysical
operations are stopped and when they can resume.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
5.2.9.3 Solar Flares

      Solar flares are sun-generated atmospheric phenomena, typically occurring in the afternoon,
which may temporarily generate sufficient high magnitude magnetic noise so as to make
magnetometers, often gradiometers, and occasionally electromagnetic sensors unusable for the
duration of the event. Solar flares are typically readily observable by the instrument operators
(throughout the area) as rapidly fluctuating signal readings with no apparent cultural or survey
source. The Project Geophysicist will be alert to solar flares and temporarily cease data collection
until static testing shows a cessation of the solar activity. The Project Geophysicist will log the
time intervals when solar flare activity is observed to help determine whether any data have been
affected.

5.2.10 Overall Site Accessibility and Impediments

     Site accessibility across Fort Ord varies from easy to very difficult. Site accessibility will be
assessed individually for each area and discussed in the SSWPs. Conditions likely to affect
accessibility include the proximity to roads, terrain, vegetation and sensitive environmental
habitats. Procedures for obtaining access to sites will also be presented in the SSWPs.

5.2.11 Potential Worker Hazards

      The primary hazards associated with geophysical operations at the site include slips, trips and
falls, UXO, vegetation (poison oak) and wildlife (Western Rattlesnakes, Mountain Lions, Bobcats).
Site personnel will follow all aspects of the SSHP. The SSHP is presented as Chapter 6. Potential
hazards and proposed safety measures particular to each site will be discussed in the SSWPs.

5.3       GEODETIC SURVEYING

      Geodetic surveying of the site will be performed by a Parsons subcontractor prior to Parsons’
initiation of geophysical mapping operations. The sites will be surveyed with grids usually 100
foot by 100 foot, depending on the goals of the survey and type of instrument being used. The
corners of the grids will be placed on or near even NAD 83 California State Plane Zone IV
coordinates. Each grid will be identified by its southwestern corner stake. Additional mapping and
surveying information is provided in Chapter 7 of this Work Plan.

5.4       BRUSH CLEARING

     Brush clearing will be performed by a subcontractor to Parsons. The method of brush clearing
will vary from manual clearance using chainsaws, brush cutters, and other handheld tools to heavy
machinery or controlled burns. Protocols and methods for brush clearing are referenced in
Appendix G Vegetation Removal SOP. These protocols and methods will take into account the
following:

      •    Goals of the geophysical survey;

      •    Vegetation;

      •    Terrain;




                                                 5-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
        •    Instrument(s) being used for the survey; and

        •    Threatened species present on the site (wildlife and plants).

5.5         GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION PERFORMANCE GOALS

5.5.1       MEC Detection

      The performance goal for Fort Ord geophysical investigations will be to detect all items in the
subsurface that can be detected given the particular instrument and the site-specific conditions
(terrain, vegetation, cultural). There will be no “data gaps” between survey lines unless previously
mutually agreed upon or resulting from unmovable obstacles. Section 5.9 addresses the maximum
allowable distance between sequential survey lines.

5.5.2       Performance Goal Modification

     If Parsons believes that the specified performance goals cannot be met for a specific site on
Fort Ord, alternative goals will be proposed in the SSWP for that site for the Contracting Officer’s
consideration.

5.5.3       Horizontal Accuracy

     The accuracy goal for locating geophysical anomalies within the survey grids is ± 0.5 feet in
the along track direction (i.e. in the direction that the data were collected) and ± 1.0 feet in the
across track (x, y) direction (i.e. in the between-lane direction).

5.5.4       False Positives

     “False Positives” result when an anomaly is detected at a given location, declared as MEC or
otherwise posted to a “dig sheet,” and no basis for the anomaly is found upon excavation. False
positives can be a result of low threshold selection of anomalies (i.e. extremely conservative
anomaly picking), spikes in the data not successfully removed during processing, instrument jolts
resulting from terrain, and inhomogeneities in the sub-surface. False positives are unavoidable and
do not affect the data quality in terms of removing MEC items from the subsurface. The
performance goal with respect to false positives is to minimize their occurrences while maintaining
the same MEC identification rates. The project geophysicists will use professional judgment to
minimize the possibility that potentially dangerous MEC items are left in the subsurface. In this
regard, he or she will tend to err on the conservative side by selecting anomalies having amplitudes
close to the range of background “noise,” but which have the potential to be associated with MEC.

5.5.5       False Negatives

     A false negative is defined for this project as a location where a buried metallic item is found
which was within the detection capability of the geophysical survey instrument but whose location
was not selected for intrusive investigation. False negatives can be a result of instrument failure,
operator error or data processing error. The performance goal with respect to false negatives is to
have zero occurrences over the course of the project.

     False negatives are often difficult to identify. Typically, a false negative will be found during
the reacquisition phase, where a reacquisition team notices an anomalous response from their



                                                    5-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
equipment at a location that was not previously identified. Other means of finding false negatives
include returning to the site and re-surveying the area (such as during a QA check), or by
excavating the area and exposing the soil for visual inspection.

5.6         GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION METHODS

     For each particular site, Parsons will determine the appropriate instrument configurations and
survey techniques for the geophysical mapping, including the reacquisition of geophysical
anomalies, based on:

        •   Results from prior geophysical investigations by Parsons at Fort Ord and other project
            locations;

        •   Results from the Parsons/USA Ordnance Detection and Discrimination Study (ODDS);
            and

        •   Site-specific prove-outs.

5.6.1       Equipment

     Table 5-1, created as part of the process for selecting instruments for testing during the ODDS
project (USA Environmental, 2000), shows commercially available and industry accepted
geophysical technologies and instruments. Instruments that were tested during the ODDS project
are shown italicized and underlined. Only those instruments that have been tested will be
implemented at the site. New technologies or instruments will be tested (on approval by the
government) at the ODDS site as they become available. Instruments to be used for site surveys
must have well documented technologies, have been demonstrated on the ODDS site, have peer
reviewed results and technology documentation and have been determined to be as good or equal to
existing technologies/instruments through comparison of the results obtained in the ODDS plots.
This determination will be made in conjunction with CESPK.

     Parsons intends to utilize the best available technologies particular to each site to perform the
geophysical investigations. In most cases, the results of the ODDS project will be used to
determine the most applicable instruments and technologies for specific sites. The instruments
may also be tested at site-specific geophysical prove-outs to validate the ODDS results. Instrument
selection for specific sites will be performed by the Parsons Project Geophysicist and CESPK
Geophysicist and selection criteria described in the SSWPs.

     The descriptions of several of the geophysical instruments already tested at the ODDS site, the
Geometrics G-858, the Geophex GEM-3, and the Schonstedt 52cx, and two anticipated to be used
the EM61 (1 meter x 0.5 meter) and the Foerster Minex 2FD, are included below.

5.6.1.1 G-858 Gradiometer

     The Geometrics® G-858 cesium vapor magnetometer uses cesium vapor magnetometer
sensors (self-oscillating split-beam Cesium vapor [non-radioactive Cs133] with automatic
hemisphere switching). The operating range of the instrument is between 17,000 nanoTesla (nT)
and 100,000 nT. The sensitivity of the instrument is 0.01 nT at one reading per second and 0.05 nT
at 10 readings per second (the sample rate to be used at the site). The device will be operated as a




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
gradiometer with two sensors collecting magnetic field intensity data separated by a vertical
distance of 24 inches. The difference between the two sensor-readings divided by the distance
between the sensors in feet is recorded as the magnetic gradient (per foot) at the measurement
location. A G-856 proton-precession magnetometer will be used in combination with the G-858 to
record diurnal variations of the magnetic field for post processing corrections and will log data at
five second intervals.

5.6.1.2 GEM-3

     The GEM-3 sensor is a monostatic broadband, electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor that is
designed for detecting and characterizing unexploded ordnance. The handheld or cart-mounted
GEM-3 sensor can transmit and record multiple frequencies (stepped or simultaneous) over a
bandwidth of 300 Hz to 24 kHz. The GEM-3 employs co-axial coils in a transmitter-bucking
configuration. This means that the bucking coil is tied to the transmit coil, creating a magnetic null
at the coil center wherein the receiver coil is placed. The result is a much smaller area of spatial
sensitivity, which is ideal for the high spatial resolution required for small or compact objects, such
as MEC and landmines.

The GEM-3 transmits a continuous, wideband, digital, electromagnetic (EM) waveform. The
resulting field induces a secondary current in the earth as well as in any buried metallic objects.
The set of two transmitter coils, with precisely computed dimensions and placement, creates a zone
of magnetic cavity (i.e., an area with a vanishing primary magnetic flux) at the center of the two
coils. A third receiving coil is placed within this magnetic cavity so that it senses only the weak,
secondary field returned from the earth and buried targets. All coils are molded into a single, light,
circular disk in a fixed geometry, rendering a very portable, monostatic sensor head. The
removable electronics package controls system operations and stores the digital data.

5.6.1.3 Schonstedt Gradiometers

     Schonstedt GA-52/CX gradiometers are flux-gate magnetic gradiometers, which detect
materials with ferrous iron content. The GA-52CX uses an audible tone to indicate the intensity of
the magnetic signal. The Schonstedts do not digitally record geophysical or global positioning data
and are thus called “analog” geophysical instruments.

     Schonstedt magnetometers will be used to perform “mag and flag” type surveys in areas that
cannot be surveyed using the digital techniques. They will also be used to assist in anomaly
reacquisition and analog quality control surveys.

5.6.1.4 EM61 (1 meter x 0.5 meter)

      The EM61 generates a pulsed primary magnetic field that induces eddy currents in the
subsurface. When the signal is shut off, the eddy currents decay and induce a secondary magnetic
field that is monitored by one or more receiving coils. The measurement is collected at a relatively
long time after the start of the decay so that the current induced in the ground has fully dissipated
and only the current in the metal is still producing a secondary magnetic field. The information
recorded is the time-integrated voltage induced in the receiving coil(s) by the secondary field. The
time integrated voltage is recorded on a portable data logger connected to the instrument.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
      The EM61 system uses a single transmitter coil and two concentric offset receiver coils and
makes a single measurement at one time gate. When mounted on a wheel assembly for standard
deployment, the transmitter coil and one receiver coil are located approximately 1.5 feet above the
ground, and the second receiver coil is located approximately 2.8 feet above the ground. The coil
dimensions are 3.28 feet (one meter) by 1.64 feet (1/2 meter). A single integrated voltage response
is recorded from both coils simultaneously.

       The EM61 has the capability of detecting both buried ferrous and non-ferrous metals while
being relatively insensitive to nearby cultural interferences such as fences, buildings and power
lines. The instrument can be pulled around as a trailer with an odometer mounted on the axle to
trigger the data logger, or it can be carried by a single operator with a shoulder harness.

5.6.1.5 Foerster Minex 2FD

     The Minex 2FD is a frequency domain electromagnetic analog instrument used for “mag and
flag” or “mag and dig” type surveys. The detector utilizes two different operating frequencies
simultaneously and is microprocessor controlled in operation for ground exclusion balance,
sensitivity adjustment, detection, and false alarm signals. The instrument will be tested at the
ODDS site prior to use for clearing/reacquisition at the site.
5.6.1.6 White 6000 XL Pro

The White 6000 XL Pro is an analog, frequency domain electromagnetic instrument used for
clearing excavation locations. It has automatic ground cancellation, ground tracking and variable
signal balance features. The 6000 XL Pro with a 9.5 inch Blue Max 950 Loop transmitter was
tested at the ODDS seeded site and was successful in locating buried items to a depth of 12 inches,
but not deeper. The instrument can therefore be used by the UXO Technicians as a detection tool
in conjunction with the Schonstedt magnetometers already in use in order to detect near surface,
non-ferrous metal items.

5.6.2       Test Plot (Site-Specific Geophysical Prove-Out)

     Because the ODDS was intended to be a prove-out for the Fort Ord site, site-specific
geophysical prove-outs will not generally be performed. If required because of the proposed use of
technologies/instruments that were not tested at ODDS, a prove-out will be performed for a
particular site. The prove-out will be used to demonstrate and document the capabilities of the
proposed sensors, navigation equipment, and data analysis, data management and associated
equipment and personnel to operate as an integrated system capable of meeting project
performance goals. A site-specific geophysical prove-out work plan, including the test plot design,
will be prepared and after review and approval by CESPK, shall be implemented.

5.6.3       Geophysical Navigation Methods

     A variety of positioning systems are available for use with the acquisition of geophysical data.
The types of location equipment available include:

        •   Global Positioning System (GPS)

        •   Ultrasonic Positioning Systems




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     •   Laser Positioning Systems

     •   Robotic Total Station




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003            May 2004
                                                                  Table 5-1
                                                COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE AND INDUSTRY ACCEPTED
                                                    GEOPHYSICAL DETECTION TECHNOLOGIES1


       As of January 2000
       Technology                         Effectiveness                              Implementability                          Cost          Representative                  Notes
                                                                                                                                              Instruments

Flux-Gate Magnetometers     Medium:                                     High:                                             Less than         Schonstedt 52-CX   The analog output is not usually
                                                                                                                         average in         Schonstedt 72-CX   co-registered with navigational
                            Flux-gate magnetometers have been used      Flux-gate magnetometers are light and            typical terrain.                      data.
                            as the primary detector in some highly      compact. They can be used in any
                            ranked systems.                             traversable terrain. Instruments are widely
                                                                        available from a variety of sources.

Cesium Vapor (CV)           High:                                       Medium:                                           Average in        Geometrics G-858
Magnetometers                                                                                                            typical terrain.   Geometrics G-822 Digital signal should be co-
                            CV Magnetometers has been the detector      CV Magnetometers are relatively light and        Much below                          registered with navigational data
                            used in several highly ranked geophysical   compact and can be easily used in open           average when                        for best results.
                            systems. Detects ferrous objects only.      areas. In areas of difficult terrain or          towed arrays       Scintrex Smart
                                                                        vegetation it is difficult to maintain a         can be used.       Mag
                                                                        correct navigational fix. CV
                                                                        magnetometers are widely available from a
                                                                        variety of sources.

Time-Domain (TD)            High:                                       Medium:                                           Average in                         Digital signal should be co-
Electromagnetic Metal                                                                                                    typical terrain.   Geonics EM 61    registered with navigational data
Detectors                   TD electromagnetics have been the           These instruments typically utilize a            Below average      Geonics EM 61-hh for best results.
                            detector used in several highly ranked      transceiver coil 1-meter square but small        when towed
                                                                                                                         arrays can be      Geometrics
                            systems. Detects both ferrous and non-      versions are also available. It is easy to use
                                                                                                                         used.              GTEM
                            ferrous metallic objects.                   the instrument in open areas but difficult to
                                                                                                                                            MetalMapper
                                                                        use it in areas of difficult vegetation or
                                                                        terrain. The most commonly used
                                                                        instrument is widely available.




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  Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                                                                   May 2004
Frequency-Domain (FD)       Medium:                                      High:                                           Higher than       Schiebel           The analog output is not usually
Electromagnetic Metal                                                                                                   average cost in                       co-registered with navigational
Detectors                   FD electromagnetics have NOT been the        Mine/coin detectors are light and compact.     typical terrain.    ANPSS- 12         data.
                            primary detector in any highly ranked        They can be used in any traversable terrain.   Instruments are
                            systems. However, other experience           Instruments are widely available from a        slow and can       White All Metals
                            shows that they are very good at detecting   variety of sources.                            detect very
                            small items. They are not good detectors                                                    small items.
                                                                                                                                            Detector
                            for deeply buried, single items. Detects
                            both ferrous and non-ferrous metallic
                                                                                                                                           Fisher 1266X
                            objects.
                                                                                                                                           Garrett

Multifrequency              Medium:                                      Medium:                                         Average in        GEM 2              Digital signal should be co-
electromagnetic metal                                                                                                   typical terrain.                      registered with navigational data
detectors                   The GEM 2/3 was a primary detector in        These instruments are relatively light and                        GEM 3              for best results.
                            two highly ranked systems. However,          compact and can be easily used in open
                            they were never the highest ranked           areas. In areas of difficult terrain or
                            systems. Detects both ferrous and non-       vegetation it is difficult to maintain a
                            ferrous metallic objects.                    correct navigational fix. Only a limited
                                                                         number of instruments are available.

Ground Penetrating Radar    Low:                                         Low:                                            Much higher       GSSI SIR2, SIR3,   The data output is usually viewed
                                                                                                                        than average.      SIR8, SIR10        in transects, not maps.
                            Although a number of systems utilized        These instruments are large, bulky, and        Systems are
                            ground penetrating radar as a detector,      slow. They are difficult to use in any but     slow and           Software &
                            GPR was never successful as a stand-         the easiest terrain. Instruments are widely    expensive.         Sensors
                            alone system. Detects both metallic and      available from a variety of sources.
                            non-metallic objects.



        1
         This table is based on Table 7.1, Ordnance and Explosives Response, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Headquarters) Engineer Manual 1110-1-4009, HQUSACE, 2000.

        Italicized instruments were tested during the 1999-2000 ODDS project (USA Environmental, 2000).




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  Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                                                                May 2004
5.6.3.1 Global Positioning System

     The GPS consists of 24 DOD satellites that travel approximately 11,000 miles above the
earth’s surface and complete full orbits twice a day. The satellites broadcast radio wavelengths
containing data that is collected by GPS receivers. A computer and the proper software allow GPS
receivers to determine extremely accurate positions on earth.

      Two different GPS systems may be utilized during the subject site investigations, the Trimble
GPS Total Station 4700 and the Trimble ProXRS (or comparable) systems. These GPS units
are small and lightweight with an integrated GPS receiver and radio modem. A Trimble 4000 base
station receiver situated at a known location will be used to communicate via radio signals with the
rover receivers set to the same frequency, some attached to the geophysical instruments. The
accuracy of the GPS point collected will be within 0.5 feet for the 4700 and approximately one
meter for the ProXRS.

     The ProXRS system can also be operated without a base station, receiving differential GPS
corrections from a satellite service or from Coast Guard beacons. The accuracy of the ProXRS,
although less than the 4700, has been found to be sufficient for some geophysical surveys such as
those performed for sampling purposes because actual anomaly locations are pinpointed during
reacquisition.

       The system controller/data recorder used with both systems is the Trimble TSC1. The
TSC1 is a rugged handheld unit for system control and data logging. The internal memory of the
TSC1 will be supplemented by PCMCIA cards when large amounts of data needed to be stored
(i.e. for GPS/EM61 surveys). Software used to download and convert the data for analysis with the
geophysical data includes Trimble Survey Office and Trimble Geomatics Office.

5.6.3.2 Ultrasonic Positioning Systems

     Ultrasonic positioning systems, such as the USRADS® or ULTRA® relate a detector's precise
physical location using ultrasonic, radio frequency (RF) transmission, and microcomputers. The
ultrasonic transmission fixes the location of the detector, while the RF transmissions provide data
telemetry and system synchronization. Portable or laptop computers store the collected data and
calculate the precise location of the instrument, displaying the information on the computer screen
along with the readings of the instruments. Up to 3600 readings per hour of survey time can be
acquired.

5.6.3.3 Laser Positioning Systems

     Laser positioning systems utilize lasers to determine distances and relative angles to maintain
contact with a roving prism. Similar to the ultrasonic systems, the data are stored on a laptop
computer. These types of systems are available but unlikely to be used, as most areas that are
suitable for laser positioning are also suitable for GPS, a system that does not require line of site to
the base instrument.

5.6.3.4 Robotic Total Station Systems

     Robotic Total Station (RTS) systems also utilize lasers to determine distances and relative
angles to maintain contact with a roving prism. These types of systems are also available but again




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
are unlikely to be used, as most areas that are suitable for RTS positioning are also suitable for
GPS, the preferable methodology.

     The global positioning system requires a relatively clear view from the instrument’s receiver
to the orbiting satellite system. In areas of thick canopy, where satellite signals cannot easily be
received, ultrasonic positioning systems are useful, however; these systems have a limited range
and must be repositioned frequently. The Laser Positioning and Robotic Total Station systems
depend on keeping a line-of-sight between the transmitter and receiver to accurately determine the
position of the receiver. Positioning systems will be selected on a site-specific basis and justified
in the SSWPs.

5.6.4       Survey Procedures

     Geophysical survey procedures will vary from site to site and may include full or only partial
coverage of the area. The type of survey to be performed at each site will be determined through
the following factors:

        •   Goal of site investigation (removal, risk assessment, footprint reduction);

        •   Vegetation;

        •   Terrain;

        •   Ordnance used on the site (electric vs. non-electric fusing, ferrous vs. non-ferrous
            content);

        •   Geophysical technology/instrument selected for use (to be determined from ODDS results
            or SSPO); and

        •   Navigation technology/instrument selected for use (to be determined from ODDS SSPO).

     A discussion of the above factors will be presented and specific procedures for each site
survey defined in the SSWP particular to that site.

5.6.4.1 General Procedures

     The following is a general list of procedures for carrying out the geophysical/GPS (if used)
surveys.

            1. Set up survey area as necessary using survey tapes and traffic cones for navigational
               guidance.
            2. If not using GPS, set up fiducial markers across survey area at a minimum of 50 foot
               intervals.
            3. Set up the instruments as described in their accompanying manuals.
            4. If using GPS, mount the rover antenna centered directly above the geophysical
               instrument or on the instrument operator. If mounted on the operator, accurately
               measure the horizontal distance between the center of the GPS rover and the center of
               the geophysical instrument while the operator is separated from the instrument as
               he/she will be during the survey.
            5. Activate the geophysical and GPS rover units.



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
        6. Synchronize instrument clocks (if necessary).
        7. If not using GPS, place standard metal item (10” metal nail or comparable) at the 0,25
            and 100,75 foot local coordinates of the grid block after clearing locations for
            anomalies with the survey instrument. If instrument indicates anomaly at location,
            place nail in alternate measured location along traverse line. Record the location on
            the field form.
        8. Perform instrument and QC checks as defined in the Site Specific Work Plan.
        9. Utilize instrument manuals as necessary to set up data recorders for surveys.
        10. Perform geophysical surveys as defined in the Site Specific Work Plan, ensuring that
            survey spacing, lag bars and test spikes are used as described in the plan. Follow
            instrument manual instructions specific to the instruments in use.
        11. One member of each team will be responsible for maintaining the field forms. Fill out
            field forms specified for data collection in the SSWP and record the following
            information in the field forms:

            •   Location (Test Area ID);

            •   Serial numbers of GPS rover unit (if used) and geophysical instrumentation;

            •   Quality control performed;

            •   Instrument offset times (if GPS used and logged separately from geophysical
                sensor data);

            •   Accurate locations of standard metal stakes;

            •   Time survey started;

            •   Time survey completed;

            •   Names of team members;

            •   Weather conditions;

            •   Survey directions;

            •   Sketch of surveyed area and survey path (include north arrow and approximate
                scale);

            •   Sketch locations of surface features in survey area (i.e. roads, utility poles, sewer
                covers, etc.);

            •   Data collection rate (i.e. 10 samples/sec or 1 sample/0.67 ft);

            •   Survey stake identifications (place on sketch);

            •   Any instrument peculiarities noted; and

            •   File names.



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        12. End of the day

            •   All equipment is returned to storage and the batteries are placed on charge.

            •   The field form pages are photocopied and placed in the appropriate backup folder
                or digital field forms are downloaded.

            •   The data files are given to the geophysical data processing center.

5.6.4.2 GPS/Geophysical Instrument Synchronization

     If the GPS and geophysical instruments are not directly linked, at the start of each day the
internal clocks of the geophysical equipment will be synchronized with the GPS system’s internal
clock. If during the day a difference is noted between the clocks in the geophysical equipment and
GPS equipment, then the difference will be recorded on the field forms. Because the clocks in the
GPS systems are more accurate than the clocks in the geophysical equipment, during the data
processing phase, Parsons’ geophysicists will correct the discrepancy between the time-stamped
GPS data and time-stamped geophysical data.

5.6.4.3 Geophysical Mapping Procedures for Digital Geophysical Surveys

     Parsons will use local navigation methodologies or tracking systems such as GPS or ultrasonic
positioning systems to record the location of data acquired. Vegetation and terrain conditions will
limit the areas where GPS can be used, and ultrasonic positioning systems are not yet economical
for use over large, contiguous areas. Therefore a mix of positioning systems and local navigation
methodologies may be used to successfully complete the geophysical mapping. All navigation data
will be translated to NAD 83 California State Plane, Zone IV, coordinates.

5.6.4.4 Local Navigation Methodology

     Local navigation methodologies include the use of surveyor’s tapes (or graduated static
ropes), range markers (traffic cones or high visibility tripods), information recorded on the field
forms (start and end of line stations, lane spacing, fiducial mark intervals, etc.) and information
digitally recorded in each geophysical survey data file. The geodetic coordinates of the grid
corners are used to geo-reference the geophysical data after the data have been collected.

     Surveyor’s tapes (or graduated static ropes) will be laid out in east-west or north-south
directions. Range markers are then placed along the line to be surveyed and provide the
geophysical operator with a navigation aid allowing him or her to traverse the line in linear fashion.
Fiducial data markers will be inserted manually by the operator at intervals not to exceed 50 feet.
In areas of rough terrain or thick vegetation, 25 foot intervals will be used. These markers will be
used to accurately locate each data measurement point during the post-processing stages.

      The field forms’ recorded information and fiducial marks are used to correct the geophysical
data to either compress or expand the recorded measurement locations for each line so that they
cover the actual distance traveled. This operation is required to compensate for variations in the
terrain along the survey line, which affects the rotation of the instrument’s wheels, or to
compensate for the walking speed of the operator, depending on the instrument selected. The
survey data are then rotated and translated from the local coordinate system in which they were




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
collected (where the southwest corner of the grid surveyed was assigned a coordinate of 0E, 0N) to
the NAD 83 California State Plane coordinate system.

5.7         PERSONNEL

     All geophysical investigations will be managed by qualified geophysicists meeting the
qualification requirements listed in DID OE-025, which includes OSHA hazardous waste training
according to Chapter 6, SSHP. The organizational structure of the site personnel is provided in
Chapter 2, Technical Management Plan.

5.7.1       Project Geophysicist

      The Project Geophysicist has overall responsibility for design, implementation, and
management of all geophysical investigations required for the work effort, and will be on-site full
time. The Project Geophysicist will have a degree in geology, geological engineering, or a closely
related field and a minimum of five years of directly related geophysical experience. This
individual shall be the Project Geophysicist of record.

     For certain projects, additional supervising geophysicists will be required to oversee the day-
to-day operations of the project geophysical investigations. The supervisor shall have the same
education requirements as the Project Geophysicist, except the five years minimum experience
requirement is waived, if working under the general supervision of the Project Geophysicist.

     The specific responsibilities of the Project Geophysicist include, but are not limited to the
following:

        •    Maintaining experienced personnel.

        •    Training geophysical field crews and geophysical data processors.

        •    Coordinating the field team and support personnel to ensure consistency of performance
             and maintenance of established schedules.

        •    Using experienced personnel to process and assess the quality of the geophysical and
             GPS data.

        •    Establishing a list of all equipment, computers, materials, and supplies necessary to
             perform the project.

        •    Coordinating and directing activities of all personnel on the geophysical field teams,
             including setting and enforcing the schedules required to achieve the goals for each day’s
             activities.

        •    Supervising geophysical field operations and related surveying activities, including
             directing field team activities.

        •    Monitoring technical performance of team members and subcontractors.

        •    Performing technical reviews of all deliverables of the study.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
        •    Approving contributions to any technical deliverable for any work element.

        •    Communicating with CESPK in areas of technical expertise.

        •    Supervision of geophysical data processors.

        The authority of the Project Geophysicist includes the following:

5.7.2       Field Geophysicist/Geophysical Technicians

     Parsons Field Geophysicists and Geophysical Technicians are responsible for the
administration of geophysical field activities and personnel. The Project Geophysicist, Field
Geophysicist and the Geophysical Technicians work as an integrated team to ensure the success of
the data acquisition phase of the project. The specific responsibilities of the Field Geophysicist and
the Geophysical Technicians include the following:

        •    Scheduling field crew activities in concert with the Project Geophysicist.

        •    Maintaining data-acquisition-related records and ensuring their accuracy.

        •    Logging all activities at the geophysical survey site in the field forms, or field data
             computers, and maintaining relevant files.

        •    Ensuring that all materials needed at the survey site have been obtained (e.g.,
             geophysical equipment, writing materials, tapes, diskettes, markers, etc.).

        •    Downloading of geophysical and GPS data.

        •    Performing daily and weekly QC activities as specified in the SSWP.

5.7.3       QC Geophysicist

     The QC Geophysicist reports to the QCM and will be responsible for overseeing all QC
aspects of the digital geophysical operations (see Chapter 11). The QC Geophysicists specific
responsibilities are listed in chapter 11.

5.7.4       Data Processors

     Geophysical Data Processors will have responsibility for processing geophysical data after the
data are turned in from the field teams. Specific responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

        •    Performing pre-processing of geophysical and positioning data;

        •    Performing Geosoft analysis of data;

        •    Performing database entry to track all processing steps;

        •    Performing anomaly picking; and




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                   May 2004
        •    Preparing dig list.

5.7.5       Geophysical Team Structure and Management

     The QC Geophysicist will be on-site and coordinate all activities associated with the
collection, processing, and analysis of geophysical sensor and navigation data. The structure of the
team developed to respond to individual task orders will depend on the scope and schedule of the
work. However, it is anticipated that digital geophysical data collection and processing will require
at a minimum the QC Geophysicist, one database manager, one GIS manager, one UXOQCS,
multiple data collection teams, each consisting of Field Geophysicist and Geophysical Technicians
and multiple geophysical data processors.

5.8         PRODUCTION RATES

      Production rates for geophysical mapping are highly variable, depending on many factors,
including topography, vegetation, site access, proximity of survey area to base of operations,
weather conditions, and the instrument selected for the surveys. Production rates specific to each
site will be provided in the SSWPs.

5.9         DATA RESOLUTION AND DATA DENSITY

     Parsons will utilize the optimal survey lane widths and sampling rates determined for each
instrument from the ODDS. Any variation from the parameters will be tested on the ODDS plots
or in a site-specific prove-out to validate that the detection capabilities are equal to or better than
those achieved using the ODDS parameters.

      While field data collection teams will attempt to collect data at the optimal survey lane width,
deviations from these lanes can not be avoided. For lane widths of 2 feet, the maximum allowable
distance between sequential survey lines will be 4 feet. For areas that have had 100% analog
removals completed prior to performing digital geophysical mapping, additional data does not need
to be collected to fill in data gaps if at least 98% of the accessible portion of the grid is within 2
feet of a data point and no single data gap is larger than 4 feet2.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
     The sampling rates and survey speed will be selected to achieve sufficient along line data
density. The total length of all segments along data transects that are more than 0.35 feet from a
data point (see segment labeled GAP in diagram above) will not exceed 2% of the total transect
length for a grid-block.

5.10    GEOPHYSICAL DATA PROCESSING AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT

      Geophysical data collected in the field will be processed and managed by Parsons geophysical
data processors. Processing procedures vary depending on the technology/instrument selected for
use at a particular site. The SSWP for each particular site will summarize in detail the processing
steps to be followed for the geophysical data. The following subsections summarize some of the
field records management and processing steps performed.

5.10.1 Field Records Management

     Paper and digital field records (field data forms, field note copies) will be maintained in the
on-site project office. All records will be filed such that they can be found using the date they were
created and the team who created them. Paper field forms will also be scanned for digital delivery.

5.10.2 Field Data Storage

     All geophysical data collected in the field will be stored electronically on field laptop
computers. Data from the surveys will be downloaded from data loggers at regular intervals to
ensure that the work performed will not be interrupted by a lack of storage capacity in the loggers.

5.10.3 Processing of Geophysical Data

     Specific geophysical data processing procedures will be defined in the SSWPs. A general
description of the processing is described below.

      Processing of the geophysical data involves two steps, the preprocessing phase, and the
Geosoft® Oasis Montaj (Version 5.0 or above) analysis phase. During the preprocessing phase,
Parsons’ geophysicists compare the data collected to the field notes to verify the geometry of a grid
and the location of the surveyed grid corner stakes. In some cases, the Parsons geophysicist will
use this opportunity to adjust the survey lines to the actual distance traveled. The Parsons
geophysicists will also review the data at this phase to verify that there are no data gaps in the data
set. Additionally, the field notes will be reviewed to determine if there is any interference such as
trees, structures, fences, or metal scrap that might affect the data. Such information will be entered
into the project database during this phase.

Any data collected with RTK GPS systems will be checked to ensure RTK quality was maintained
for the entire survey. Differentially corrected data will be considered acceptable for short periods
of time if the differentially corrected positions appear to be consistent with the RTK positions at
the times when the RTK quality is lost and where it is reestablished.

     Following the preprocessing phase, Project Geophysicist will conduct analysis of the
geophysical data using Geosoft. This software consists of a graphical user interface, a high-volume
database, and a cross-section of built-in data import, processing, analysis, visualization, mapping,
and integration capabilities. The Geosoft platform allows a processor to edit maps interactively,
apply dynamic linking to maps, and track the map creation process. Visual data links are used to



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
connect data in the spreadsheet, profile and map views. Data processing is achieved through the
application of Geosoft eXecutable functions (GXs), which control all aspects of the data processing
sequence and environment.

     During the Geosoft processing phase, non-GPS data will be translated from local grid
coordinates into NAD83 California State Plane Zone IV coordinates. Data corrections and filtering
will then be performed on all of the data as necessary. As discussed previously, filtering and
corrections will depend on the type of instrument used for the survey. Some examples of filtering
and corrections are:

     •    Heading corrections (compensating for slight variations in magnetic gradient with
          direction of travel).

     •    Lag corrections (compensating for time stamp delays in the data recorders).

     •    Sensor offset corrections.

     •    Diurnal corrections (adjusting for daily fluctuations in magnetic field).

     •    Leveling of the data to a common baseline.

     •    Low-pass filtering to reduce high frequency noise.

     •    Non-linear filtering (removes data spikes and data “drop-outs”).

     After all processing steps, raw data and filtered/processed data will be viewed in profile form
over top of one another to clearly see the affect the filtering and processing had on the original
data. After processing is complete, gridding and contouring of the data will be performed in
preparation for anomaly selections.

     Database entries will be performed for both preprocessing and for Geosoft analysis; the
database provides real time tracking of all data sets from the raw to final dig sheets. The database
details all stages of the processing methodology. This includes such information as the leveling
procedure, heading corrections, filters used, dates that the data were QC’d, dates that the data were
processed, the data coordinate system, the data file names, and any other information pertinent to
the processing of the data file.

5.10.4 Methodology for Picking Anomalies

     The Parsons methodology for “picking” the geophysical anomalies to be intrusively
investigated is a highly subjective process. For that reason, only trained processors working under
the oversight of the Project Geophysicist are responsible for evaluating the geophysical data and
preparing “dig lists” with anomaly “picks.”

      Following the Geosoft processing/filtering phase, the processors focus on picking all
subsurface anomalies that are above background levels. Background levels can vary depending on
the geology, the soil moisture content, and the terrain. Surface features such as fences and corner
stakes can also affect background levels. For these reasons, the processor frequently refers to the
field notes of the data collection teams so that potential subsurface anomalies are not confused with
abrupt changes in soil conditions and surface features.



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     In order to thoroughly review data during the anomaly picking process, the Parsons
geophysical teams utilize the following as ways of viewing the data and making anomaly
selections:

       •    Data tables (raw, processed/filtered)

       •    Sensor data profiles

       •    Color contours of sensor responses

       •    Overlay of data profiles on contour maps

5.11       DATA DELIVERY

     No later than three workdays after collection, Parsons will furnish each day’s raw data and no
later than five workdays after collection processed data will be transmitted to CESPK for
inspection. All data will be processed into ASCII file format. Each ASCII file format data field
will be separated by a space. Each ASCII file of processed data will contain a header describing
the type of data, grids covered in the file, when collected, where collected, data column
descriptions, data collection interval, and line spacing for each file. Corrections such as for
navigation, instrument bias, and diurnal magnetic shift shall be applied and any additional
processing will also be included in the header.

     Separate geophysical data files will be provided for grid blocks. The data will be presented in
delineated fields as x1, y1, x2, y2, and z where x1 and y1 are in NAD 1983 State Plane
Coordinates, California Zone IV, Feet and x2 and y2 are the local Cartesian grid coordinates
referenced to the southwest corner of each local grid block (or 0, 0). The z column(s) will be the
instrument reading(s) and the number of columns present will be instrumentation-dependent. Local
Cartesian coordinates will only be included when the survey navigation method uses local
coordinates.

5.12       INSTRUMENT STANDARDIZATION CHECKS

     The quality of geophysical data sets is dependent on the operational capabilities of the
equipment used. By manufacturer’s design, these instruments are calibrated at the time of
manufacture and do not require field calibration. To ensure that equipment is fully capable and
will perform in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, Parsons will perform
standardization checks. Following these checks, any equipment that is found unsuitable will be
immediately removed from service. These checks will provide QC data indicating the proper
functionality of the instruments.

5.12.1 Positioning Equipment Checks

     Positioning equipment will be checked for proper operation by placing the system’s antenna
over a known point and recording the calculated location. For GPS units using real time kinematic
(RTK) corrections from a dedicated base station, the position repeatability standard will be ± 0.5
feet. The repeatability standard for ultrasonic positioning systems will be ± 1.0 feet. The
repeatability standard for real time code corrected GPS systems is 3 feet. When code corrected
GPS units are used, the position dilution of precision (PDOP, a unit-less measure of how good the
geometry is between the satellite receiver and the satellites being used to calculate a position)



                                                    5-23
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
threshold will be set at no more than 8. This PDOP setting will ensure that positions recorded are
accurate to within ± 3 feet.

5.12.2 Geophysical Sensor Checks

     The daily instrument checks will involve three tests: a static test, a cable shake test, and an
instrument standardization test.

     The static test will involve collecting at least 1 minute of data with the equipment stationary
once per day prior to collecting data. The static test criteria is a deviation from maximum to
minimum over a one minute period of less than 1.5mV (EM61-Mk2), or 1.5 nT (G-858). If a full
analog removal has been performed on the grid the standard will be relaxed to 2.0mV (EM61-Mk2)
over a one minute period.

      The cable shake test will be performed once per day prior to data acquisition. One team
member will move the instrument cables to test for shorts and broken pin-outs, shaking the cable
starting on one end and proceeding to the other. The second team member will look for data spikes
in the instrument response during the cable shake test. If the cable-shake test results in instrument
responses above the background noise level, the faulty cables or connectors will be replaced prior
to data collection.

      The instrument standardization test will be performed at a minimum before and after
surveying each block. The instrument will be placed over a standard item near that day’s survey
location. The standard item will remain in the same location until the block of grids has been
completely surveyed. Standardization test data will be reviewed immediately following the test by
the field geophysical team as well as later by the data processors. A QC problem will be indicated
by a change of +/- 20 percent or more of the response when operated over the standard. The
background values observed during each test will be subtracted from the instrument response
before the pre-operational test is compared to the post-operational test. If a QC problem is
indicated, the Project Geophysicist will immediately be notified and a determination will be made
concerning the operability of the instrument. If the cause cannot be determined by the Project
Geophysicist in the field, the unit will be removed from the field. If the instrument is found to be
malfunctioning, it will be removed from service and replaced or repaired.

5.12.3 Six line Test

         At the beginning of a project and whenever a new terrain type is encountered, the
navigational accuracy of the combined geophysical and positioning equipment will be checked
with the six-line test. The first two lines record "background" data up and back across a single 50
foot traverse. The next two are a set of traverses (up and back) over a metal stake (10 inch nail)
driven into the ground at the 25-foot (halfway) mark. The final set of traverses will simulate
surveying up and down hills. The operator will first log data traveling at a slow pace (simulating an
uphill traverse) and then return at a significantly more rapid pace (simulating a downhill traverse).
The QC and interpretation teams will assess these measurements and make a determination that is
part of the QC record in the database for the surveyed grids as to the quality of the data as well as
the spatial accuracy of selected anomaly locations.




                                                 5-24
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
5.12.4 Instrument Drift Checks

     Instrument drift will be measured by surveying “cross-lines” of data perpendicular to the
primary direction of survey at the conclusion of each block of grids surveyed. For example, if a
block of four 100 x 100 foot grids are surveyed together in a north-south orientation, at the end of
surveying this block, a line will be surveyed across the block in an east-west direction. The data
from the east-west survey line will be compared to the north-south data in the same locations to
measure instrument drift from the beginning to the end of the survey.

5.13       ANOMALY REACQUISITION

     Following the evaluation of geophysical data, Parsons’ geophysicists prepare anomaly lists
with suspect anomaly locations for field reacquisition teams. In cases where GPS or other location
tracking devices can be used, the coordinates of the anomalies selected from the geophysical data
will be loaded into the tracking instrument. The teams will then use this instrument to guide them
to the selected anomaly location. If a tracking system cannot be used, a local coordinate, relative to
a surveyed stake location, will be used to reacquire the anomaly location. Whenever possible,
Parsons’ geophysicists will generate anomaly lists for groups of anomalies within the general
vicinity of each other, thereby minimizing the travel time of the reacquisition teams.

     A non-metallic flag marked with the anomaly ID will be placed at the anomaly coordinates.
A sweep will be conducted within a 3-foot radius of the location using the original survey
instrument. If the anomaly is detected it will be noted on the anomaly list as such and a static
reading will be collected where possible. The reacquisition team will move the flag to the
approximate location of the anomaly and the distance and direction the flag was moved will be
recorded on the anomaly list. If no anomaly is detected, the reacquisition team will note the
negative result on the anomaly list and leave the flag in the original location.

5.14       DIG SHEET DEVELOPMENT

     Once a grouping of anomalies has been reacquired, dig sheet information will be developed
by the geophysical data processors and given in digital form to the FOM for transfer to the
intrusive investigation teams. All successfully reacquired anomalies and at least 10% of
unsuccessfully reacquired anomalies will be investigated. The dig sheets will be provided to
CESPK in digital form and will contain at a minimum:

       •    Project Site;

       •    Grid Identification;

       •    Unique Anomaly ID;

       •    Predicted Anomaly Eastings and Northings in NAD 1983 State Plane Coordinates,
            California Zone IV, Feet;

       •    Maximum Amplitude of Anomaly Signal (where applicable); and

       •    Blank spaces for: Distance and Direction to Contact from Marked Location, Depth to
            Item, Description of Item, Weight of Item, General Orientation of Item.




                                                 5-25
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
5.15       FEED-BACK PROCESS (COMPARISON OF DIG-SHEET PREDICTIONS WITH
           GROUND TRUTH)

     After dig-sheets have been filled out and returned to the FOM by the intrusive teams, the
Project Geophysicist will review the results of the intrusive investigation. An assessment will be
made as to whether the item(s) found was sufficient to produce the amplitude or type of anomaly in
the data. If it is determined that the item was likely not the entire source of the anomaly, the
anomaly and anomalous area will be reacquired (if possible) and reinvestigated using the
instrument utilized during the initial survey. Anomalies of this type will be tracked separately in
the database in the event that future analysis is required.

5.16       FINAL REPORT AND MAPS

       The final report and maps to be delivered for each site will include at a minimum:

       •    Description of work performed and procedures/methods employed to perform the work.
            This will include target listings generated from digital geophysical interpretations and the
            results of the intrusive investigations of those targets.

       •    Pseudo-color maps representing the data collected.

       •    Copies of field data and final data.

       •    Copies of individual target lists and maps/drawings for each grid.

       •    A summary of QC check results.

       •    Description of problems encountered and how they were resolved.

       •    Accident exposure data, including man-hours worked, miles driven, and aircraft flights
            taken to support the work.

     Parsons will record and report on all discrepancies between original mapped locations of
anomalies as shown on the dig-sheet, and actual locations of the reacquired location. Parsons will
also report any anomalies that could not be reacquired.

    Final reports will have geophysical data analysis included based on changes to the CESPK
Scopes of Work or Data Item Descriptions.




                                                   5-26
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
                                             CHAPTER 6
                              SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN

6.1         PURPOSE

     The purpose of this SSHP is to establish general guidelines and procedures to ensure
protection of Parsons’ personnel and the public while performing operations at Fort Ord sites. The
plan assigns responsibilities, establishes procedures, and develops contingencies that may arise
while operations are performed.

6.2         APPLICABILITY

     This PWP's provisions are mandatory for all on-site activities undertaken by Parsons and its
subcontractors. All site activities will comply with applicable federal, California, and U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers (USACE) requirements. As site conditions change, this plan may need to be
modified. Such modifications will be submitted as SSHP addenda and will be numbered
sequentially. All SSHP addenda must be reviewed and approved by the Project Health and Safety
Officer. All Parsons’ personnel and subcontractors must read and understand this SSHP and sign
the Plan Acceptance Form (Attachment A) prior to the start of work at the site.

6.3         UNKNOWN FILLER

     In the event ordnance suspected of containing unknown filler is encountered, refer to
paragraph 6.6.5.

6.4         STAFF ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND RESPONSIBILITIES

6.4.1       General

     Ensuring the safe and healthful conduct of site operations is the responsibility of everyone
assigned to the site. All Parsons and subcontract personnel involved in site activities are
responsible for the following:

        •    Complying with this SSHP and all other required safety and health guidelines.

        •    Taking all necessary precautions to prevent injury to themselves and to their fellow
             employees.

        •    Continually being alert to any potentially harmful situation and immediately informing
             the UXOSO of any such identified conditions.

        •    Performing only those tasks that they believe they can do safely and have been trained to
             perform.

        •    Preventing spillage and splashing of materials to the greatest extent possible.

        •    Practicing good housekeeping by keeping the work area neat, clean and orderly.



                                                     6-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
        •    Immediately reporting all injuries, no matter how minor, to the UXOSO.

        •    Maintaining site equipment in good working order and reporting defective equipment to
             the UXOSO.

        •    Properly inspecting and using the personal protective equipment correctly.

6.4.2       Responsible Parsons Safety and Health Personnel

        Refer to Table 6-1.

6.4.3       Employee Safety Responsibilities

      Each employee is responsible for his own safety as well as the safety of those around them.
The employee shall use all equipment provided in a safe and responsible manner as directed by
their supervisor. Personnel will follow the policies set forth in this SSHP.




                                                   6-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
                                                 Table 6-1
                                  Responsibilities of Parsons Team Members
                                            Fort Ord, California
Title               General Description                    Responsibilities
Program             Reports to upper-level                 •   Prepares and organizes the background review
Manager             management. Has authority                  of the situation, the Quality Assurance Plan,
                    to direct response operations.             the SSHP, and the field team.
                    Assumes total control over             •   Obtains permission for site access and
                    site activities.                           coordinates activities with appropriate
                                                               officials.
                                                           •   Briefs the field teams on their specific
                                                               assignments.
                                                           •   Uses the Project Health and Safety Officer to
                                                               ensure that safety and health requirements are
                                                               met.
                                                           •   Serves as a liaison with public officials.

Project Health      Advises Program Manager                •   Provides technical support concerning Safety
and Safety          on all aspects of S&H and                  and Health issues.
Officer (PHSO)      Supervises the UXOSO                   •   Manages/oversees the preparation of the
                                                               SSHP.
                                                           •   Conducts field Safety and Health audits to
                                                               ensure SSHP conformance and Parsons policy
                                                               compliance.
                                                           •   Certifies that all workers have proper training.
                                                           •   Investigates each accident or reportable
                                                               incident.

Field Operations    Responsible for field team             •   Manages field operations.
Manager (FOM)       operations and safety.                 •   Oversees subcontractors’ field operations.
                                                           •   Coordinates with the UXOSO in determining
                                                               protection level.
                                                           •   Enforces site control.
                                                           •   Documents field activities.




                                                     6-3
   Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                 May 2004
                                       Table 6-1 (Continued)
                              Responsibilities of Parsons Team Members
                                         Fort Ord, California
Title               General Description             Responsibilities
UXO Health and      Reports to the PHSO on all           •   Ensures that personnel perform inspections of
Safety Officer      aspects of Safety and Health             protective equipment and clothing prior to,
                    on site. Performs day-to-day             during, and after each use.
                    H&S tasks. Stops work if             •   Ensures that protective clothing and
                    any operation threatens                  equipment are properly stored and maintained.
                    worker or public health              •   Controls entry and exit at the Access Control
                    and/or safety.                           Points.
                                                         •   Ensures personnel are monitored for signs of
                                                             stress, such as cold exposure, heat stress, and
                                                             fatigue.
                                                         •   Implements the SSHP.
                                                         •   Prior to each work event, conducts inspections
                                                             to determine if the SSHP is being followed.
                                                         •   Knows emergency procedures, evacuation
                                                             routes, and telephone numbers of the
                                                             ambulance, local hospital, poison control
                                                             center, fire department, and police department.
                                                         •   Ensures that all required equipment is
                                                             available.
                                                         •   Notifies emergency response personnel by
                                                             telephone or radio in the event of an
                                                             emergency.
                                                         •   Acts as spokesperson if OSHA inspector
                                                             arrives on site.
                                                         •   Conducts on-site training concerning pertinent
                                                             H&S issues and new concerns.
                                                         •   Reports all accidents or H&S incidents to the
                                                             PHSO.
                                                         •   Provides UXO safety oversight during
                                                             intrusive activities conducted.
                                                         •   Oversees the identification, excavation,
                                                             movement and disposal of all UXO
                                                             discovered– to ensure only the safest possible
                                                             procedures are used.

Field Team          The work party must consist          •   Safely completes the on-site tasks.
                    of at least two people.              •   Complies with Site Safety and Health Plan.
                                                         •   Notifies UXOSO/FOM or Supervisor of
                                                             suspected unsafe conditions.
                                                         •   Inspects personal protective equipment prior
                                                             to, during, and after each use.




                                                   6-4
   Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
6.6         HAZARD ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT

     Safety, biological, and physical hazards will present a risk to workers at Fort Ord sites. The
level of risk is dependent upon the type of work being done. The paragraphs that follow describe
the safety, biological, and physical hazards associated with planned activities.

6.6.1       Safety Hazards

     The major safety hazard for operations performed at Fort Ord sites is the unintended
detonation of ordnance. Other anticipated safety hazards include heavy equipment operation,
excavation safety, slip hazards, and power tool use. Procedures to minimize these hazards are
presented below.

6.6.1.1 MEC

     Ordnance and ordnance-related items will be encountered at the Fort Ord site. Personnel must
be alert for MEC and MEC and munitions debris. All field personnel must observe the following
general safety precautions:

        •    DO NOT touch or move any MEC until positive identification has been determined,
             regardless of the markings or apparent condition.

        •    DO NOT visit an ordnance site if an electrical storm is occurring or approaching. If a
             storm approaches during a site visit, leave the site immediately and seek appropriate
             shelter.

        •    DO NOT use radios or cellular phones in the vicinity of suspect MEC.

        •    DO NOT walk across an area where the ground cannot be seen. If dead vegetation or
             animals are observed, leave the area immediately due to potential contamination by
             chemical agent.

        •    DO NOT drive vehicles into areas suspected of MEC. Use clearly marked lanes.

        •    DO NOT rely on color code for positive identification of MEC nor their contents.

        •    SMOKING will only be allowed in smoking areas designated by the UXO Supervisor
             during the morning Tailgate Safety Briefing.

        •    Approach ordnance items from the side.

        •    Prohibit unnecessary personnel from visiting the site.

        •    Decontaminate the vehicle interior when deemed necessary to prevent the spread of
             poison oak oils and sap.

        •    Always assume MEC contain a live charge until it can be ascertained otherwise.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
    The following precautions are applicable to personnel performing MEC recovery and
demolition operations.

     •    All MEC will be identified independently by two (2) UXO Technicians.

     •    All MEC operations will use the "Buddy" system.

     •    Demolition operations will as a minimum conform to TM 60A-1-1-31.

     •    DO NOT dismantle, strip or handle any MEC unnecessarily.

     •    Avoid inhalation and skin contact with smoke, fumes, dust and vapors of detonations and
          residue from MEC.

     •    DO NOT attempt to extinguish burning explosives or any fire, which might involve
          explosive materials.

     •    DO NOT manipulate external features of MEC unless specifically called for in an EOD
          procedure.

     •    Incorporate appropriate property and personnel protective measures for shock and
          fragmentation when conducting MEC operations.

     •    Do not subject MEC to rough handling or transportation. Sand bag, chock and block
          appropriately.

     •    Carry explosives in an appropriate container.

     •    Hand carry no more than two items (one in each hand) at a time and then only as
          required by the operation being performed.

     •    Destroy shaped charge munitions by crushing the cone to prevent formation of the
          explosive jet.

     •    Dispose of white phosphorous (WP) munitions IAW the direction of the CESPK Safety
          Specialist.

     •    Do not transport damaged WP munitions unless fully submerged in water.

     •    Avoid unnecessary movement of armed or damaged MEC.

     •    Avoid the forward portions of munitions employing proximity fusing.

     •    Assume unknown fuses contain cocked strikers or anti-disturbance features.

6.6.1.2 Heavy Equipment

     A portion of the work may involve the utilization of backhoes to perform excavation. Injuries
can result from equipment hitting or running over personnel or from the overturning vehicles.


                                                 6-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
Vehicle and heavy equipment design and operation will be in accordance with 29 CFR parts
1926.600 through 1926.602. In particular, the following precautions shall be used to help prevent
injuries:

     •    Brakes, hydraulic lines, light signals, fire extinguishers, fluid levels, steering, tires, horn,
          and other safety devices being checked by the vehicle operator at the beginning of each
          shift.

     •    Cabs will be kept free of all nonessential items, and all loose items will be secured.

     •    Glass in windshields, windows and doors shall be safety glass. Any cracked or broken
          glass shall be replaced.

     •    Backhoes will be provided with necessary safety equipment (seat belts, rollover
          protection, emergency shut-off in case of rollover, and backup warning lights and audible
          alarms).

     •    Blades and buckets will be lowered to the ground, and parking brakes will be set before
          shutting off any heavy equipment or vehicle.

     Backhoes will not be backed up unless:

     •    The vehicle has a reverse signal alarm audible above the surrounding noise level.

     •    The vehicle is backed up under the direction of a signalman.

     The heavy equipment operator shall be trained in the operation of the vehicle. Any person
operating a motor vehicle shall possess a permit valid for the equipment being used.

6.6.1.3 Excavation Safety

     Prior to any excavation activity, efforts must be made to determine whether underground
installations (i.e., sewers, telephone, water, fuel, electric lines, etc.), will be encountered and, if so,
where such underground installations are located. The UXOSO or designee must contact the utility
companies or owners involved and inform them, within established or customary local response
times, of the proposed work. If the utility companies or owners do not respond within the period
established by law or ordinance, or if they cannot identify the locations of utilities the excavation
may proceed with caution. In this situation, detection equipment or other safe and acceptable
means to locate utilities may be used. If underground installations are exposed, OSHA requires that
they be removed, protected, or properly supported.

     No protective system is needed if the excavation is made entirely in stable rock, or if workers
enter an excavation that is less than 5 feet in depth (provided that the competent person, UXOSO,
determines that there is no potential for a cave-in). If the depth of the excavation exceeds 5 feet
than the sides of the excavation will be slope to an angle not steeper than one and one-half
horizontal to one vertical (34° measured from the horizontal). Access to and exit from an
excavation must comply with the following conditions:

     •    Trenches 4 feet or more in depth should be provided with a fixed means of egress.



                                                    6-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                  May 2004
     •    Spacing between ladders or other means of egress shall be a minimum of 25 feet
          laterally.

     •    Ladders must be secured and extend a minimum of 36 inches above the landing.

     •    Metal ladders should not be used when electric utilities are present.

6.6.1.4 Slip, Trip, and Fall Hazards

     Slip, trip and fall hazards may be encountered at the site including holes, pits, ditches, steep
grades, and uneven grades. Personnel should use caution when traversing the site.

6.6.1.5 Power Tools

     By their very nature power tools have great capability for inflicting serious injury upon site
personnel if they are not used and maintained properly. To control the hazards associated with
power tool operation, the requirements outlined in EM 385-1-1 and the safe work practices listed
below are observed when using power tools:

     •    Operations are conducted by authorized personnel familiar with the tool, its operation
          and safety precautions. Power tools must be operated in accordance with the owner’s
          manual.

     •    Power tools are inspected prior to use and defective equipment is removed from service
          until repaired.

     •    Power tools designed to accommodate guards have such guards properly in place prior to
          use.

     •    Loose fitting clothing or long hair is not permitted around moving parts.

     •    Hands, feet, etc., are kept away from all moving parts.

     •    Maintenance and/or adjustments to equipment are not to be conducted while the
          equipment is in operation.

     •    An adequate operating area is provided, allowing sufficient clearance and access for
          operation.

     •    Personnel use required protective equipment, such as gloves, chaps and steel-toed boots
          when using chainsaws.

6.6.1.6 Confined Space Entry

     Entry into permit required confined spaces are not anticipated. Should entry into a permit
required confined space be required, the PHSO will be contacted to provide guidance and training.




                                                  6-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
6.6.2       Biological Hazards

     Biological hazards that are usually found on-site include tick bites, spiders, poisonous snakes,
vermin and hazardous plants. Depending on the season and weather the hazards at Fort Ord will
vary. For instance, during cold weather many animals and insects are not active and most plants are
dormant. The project may continue through several seasons and the risks and hazards will change
with the seasons. Employee awareness and the safe work practices outlined in the following
paragraphs should reduce the risk associated with these hazards.

6.6.2.1 Hazardous Plants

     A number of hazardous plants may be encountered during field operations. The ailments
associated with these plants range from mild hay fever to contact dermatitis. Plants that present the
greatest risk to site workers are those that produce allergic reactions and tissue injury.

6.6.2.1.1          Plants That Cause Skin and Tissue Injury
         Contact with sharp leaves and thorns are of special concern to site personnel. This concern
stems from the fact that punctures, cuts, and even minor scrapes caused by accidental contact may
result in skin lesions and the introduction of fungi or bacteria through the skin. This is especially
important in light of the fact that the warm moist environment created inside protective clothing is
ideal for the propagation of fungal and bacterial infection. Personnel receiving any of the injuries
listed above, even minor scrapes shall report immediately to the UXOSO for continued observation
and care. Keeping the skin covered as much as possible (i.e., long pants and long sleeved shirts) in
areas where these plants are known to exist will limit much of the potential exposure.

6.6.2.1.2          Plants That Cause an Allergic Reaction
         The poisonous plants of greatest concern are poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac.
Contact with the poisonous sap of these plants produces a severe rash characterized by redness,
blisters, swelling, and intense burning and itching. The victim also may develop a high fever and
may be very ill. Ordinarily, the rash begins within a few hours after exposure, but it may be
delayed for 24 to 48 hours.

      The most distinctive features of poison ivy and poison oak are their leaves, which are
composed of three leaflets each (Figure 6-1). In certain seasons, both plants also have greenish-
white flowers and berries that grow in clusters. Poison sumac is a tall shrub or small tree with 6-12
leaflets arranged in pairs with a single leaflet at the end. This plant grows in wooded, swampy
areas. The reaction associated with exposure to these plants will generally cause the following
signs and symptoms:

        •    Blistering at the site of contact, usually occurring within 12 to 48 hours after contact.

        •    Reddening, swelling, itching and burning at the site of contact.

        •    Pain, if the reaction is severe.

        •    Conjunctivitis, asthma, and other allergic reactions if the person is extremely sensitive to
             the poisonous plant toxin.



                                                      6-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                  May 2004
     If the rash is scratched, secondary infections can occur. Preventive measures that are effective
for most site personnel include:

     •    Avoid contact with any poisonous plants on site, and keep a steady watch to identify,
          report and mark poisonous plants found on site.

     •    Wash hands, face or other exposed areas at the beginning of each break period and at the
          end of each workday.

     •    Avoid contact with, and wash on a daily basis, contaminated tools, equipment and
          clothing.

     •    Barrier creams, detoxification/wash solutions and orally administered desensitization
          may prove effective and should be tried to find the best preventive solution.

    Keeping the skin covered as much as possible (i.e., long pants and long sleeved shirts) in areas
where these plants are known to exist will limit much of the potential exposure.


                        Figure 6-1: Poison Ivy/Poison Oak/Poison Sumac


           Poison Ivy                          Poison Oak                         Poison Sumac




6.6.2.2         Tick Bites

     The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has noted the increase of Lyme Disease and Rocky
Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF), which are caused by bites from infected ticks that live in and
near wooded areas, tall grass and brush. Ticks are small, ranging from the size of a comma up to
about one quarter inch and are sometimes difficult to see (Figure 6-2). The tick season extends
from spring through summer. When embedded in the skin, they may look like a freckle.



                                                 6-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     Lyme disease has been documented in 43 states with the heaviest concentrations in the
northeast (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania), the upper
Midwest (Minnesota and Wisconsin), and along the northern California coast and more
specifically, Monterey County. It is caused by deer ticks and lone star ticks that have become
infected with spirochetes. Female deer ticks are about one quarter inch in size and are black and
brick red in color. Male deer ticks are smaller and completely black. Lone star ticks are larger and
chestnut brown in color.

     Lyme disease has been documented in 43                  Figure 6-2: Photograph of Tick
states with the heaviest concentrations in the
northeast (Connecticut, Massachusetts, New
Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania), the upper
Midwest (Minnesota and Wisconsin), and along
the northern California coast and more
specifically, Monterey County. It is caused by
deer ticks and lone star ticks that have become
infected with spirochetes. Female deer ticks are
about one quarter inch in size and are black and
brick red in color. Male deer ticks are smaller
and completely black. Lone star ticks are larger
and chestnut brown in color.



    RMSF has occurred in 36 states, with the heaviest concentrations in Oklahoma, North
Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. It is caused by Rocky Mountain Wood Ticks and Dog
Ticks that have become infected with rickettsia. Both are black in color.

     The first symptoms of either disease are flu like chills, fever, headache, dizziness, fatigue, stiff
neck, and bone pain. If immediately treated by a physician, most individuals recover fully in a
short period of time. If not treated, more serious symptoms can occur.

     If you believe a tick has bitten you, or if any of the signs and symptoms noted above appear
contact the UXOSO, who will authorize you to visit a physician for an examination and possible
treatment.

     Protective Measures

     Standard field gear (work boots, socks and light-colored coveralls) provides good protection
against tick bites, particularly if the joints are taped. However, even when wearing field gear, the
following precautions shall be taken when working in areas that might be infested with ticks:

     •    When in the field, check yourself often for ticks, particularly on your lower legs and
          areas covered with hair.

     •    Spray outer clothing, particularly your pant legs and socks, BUT NOT YOUR SKIN,
          with an insect repellant that contains permethrin or permanone.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
     •      When walking in wooded areas wear a hard hat and avoid contact with bushes, tall grass
            or brush as much as possible.

     •      If you find a tick, remove it by pulling on it gently with tweezers. Do not squeeze the
            tick's body. Grasp it where the mouthparts enter the skin and tug gently, but firmly, until
            it releases its hold on the skin.

     •      If the tick resists, cover the tick with salad oil/Vaseline for about 15 minutes to
            asphyxiate it then remove it with tweezers.

     •      DO NOT use matches, a lit cigarette, nail polish or any other type of chemical to "coax"
            the tick out.

     •      Be sure to remove all parts of the tick's body and disinfect the area with alcohol or a
            similar antiseptic after removal.

     •      For several days to several weeks after removal of the tick, look for the signs of the onset
            of Lyme disease, such as a rash that looks like a bulls-eye or an expanding red circle
            surrounding a light area, frequently seen with a small welt in the center.

     •      Also look for the signs of the onset of RMSF, such as an inflammation, which is visible
            in the form of a rash comprising many red spots under the skin, which appears 3 to 10
            days after the tick bite.

6.6.2.3 Insects

      Contact with stinging insects may result in site personnel experiencing adverse health affects
that range from being mildly uncomfortable to being life threatening. Therefore, stinging insects
present a serious hazard to site personnel and extreme caution must be exercised whenever site and
weather conditions increase the risk of encountering stinging insects. A decision diagram for stings
from insects is presented in Figure 6-3. Poisonous insects and insect-like creatures that may be
encountered at Fort Ord include the following:

     •      Bees ("Killer" bees, honeybees, bumble bees, wasps, and hornets and wingless wasps)

     •      Scorpions

     •      Fire ants

     Bees

      At Fort Ord, personnel should be very cautious of "killer" bees. They have the appearance of
the typical honeybee, however they are very aggressive. These Africanized honeybees (AHB)
defend their colonies much more vigorously than typical bees. The colonies are easily disturbed
(sometimes just by being nearby). When they do sting, many more bees may participate, so there is
a danger of receiving more stings. This can make them life threatening, especially to people
allergic to stings, or with limited capacity to escape (the young, old, and handicapped).




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
     Scorpions

     The scorpions commonly found in California have the capacity to inflict a painful sting,
however, they are not considered to pose a danger to humans. Stings by these scorpions can be
managed by washing the wound with soap and water and by application of an ice pack for a few
minutes. Medical attention is usually not needed unless the victim is displaying signs of an allergic
reaction (rash, severe swelling, shortness of breath).

     Fire Ants

      Fire ants are aggressive, reddish-brown to black ants that are 1/8 inch to 1/4 inch long. They
construct nests, which are often visible as dome-shaped mounds of soil, sometimes as large as 3
feet across and 1 1/2 feet in height. In sandy soils, mounds are flatter and less visible. Fire ants
usually build mounds in sunny, open areas such as lawns, pastures, cultivated fields and meadows,
but they are not restricted to these areas. Mounds or nests may be located in rotting logs, around
trees and stumps, under pavement and buildings, and occasionally indoors.

     Fire ants use their stingers to immobilize or kill prey and to defend ant mounds from
disturbance by larger animals, such as humans. Any disturbance sends hundreds of workers out to
attack anything that moves. The ant grabs its victim with its mandibles (mouthparts) and then
inserts its stinger. The process of stinging releases a chemical, which alerts other ants, inducing
them to sting. In addition, one ant can sting several times without letting go with its mandibles.

     Once stung, humans experience a sharp pain that lasts a couple of minutes, then after a while
the sting starts itching and a welt appears. Fire ant venom contains alkaloids and a relatively small
amount of protein. The alkaloids kill skin cells; this attracts white blood cells, which form a
pustule within a few hours of being stung. The fluid in the pustule is sterile, but if the pustule is
broken, the wound may become infected. The protein in the venom can cause allergic reactions
that may require medical attention.

     Some of the factors related to stinging insects that increases the risk associated with accidental
contact are:

     •    The nests for these insects are frequently found in remote wooded or grassy areas and
          hidden in cavities.

     •    The nests can be situated in trees, rocks, bushes or in the ground, and are usually difficult
          to see.

     •    Accidental contact with these insects is highly probable, especially during warm weather
          conditions when the insects are most active.

     •    If a site worker accidentally disturbs a nest, the worker may be inflicted with multiple
          stings, causing extreme pain and swelling which can leave the worker incapacitated and
          in need of medical attention.

     •    Some people are hypersensitive to the toxins injected by a sting, and when stung,
          experience a violent and immediate allergic reaction resulting in a life-threatening
          condition known as anaphylactic shock.



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
     •    Anaphylactic shock manifests itself very rapidly and is characterized by extreme
          swelling of the body, eyes, face, mouth and respiratory passages.

     •    The hypersensitivity needed to cause anaphylactic shock, can in some people,
          accumulate over time and exposure, therefore even if someone has been stung
          previously, and not experienced an allergic reaction, there is no guarantee that they will
          not have an allergic reaction if they are stung again.

      With these things in mind, and with the high probability of contact with stinging insects, all
site personnel will comply with the following safe work practices:

     •    If a worker knows that he is hypersensitive to bee, wasp or hornet stings, he must inform
          the UXOSO of this condition prior to participation in site activities.

     •    All site personnel will be watchful for the presence of stinging insects and their nests,
          and will advise the UXOSO if a stinging insect nest is located or suspected in the area.

     •    Any nests located on site will be flagged off and site personnel will be notified of its
          presence.

     •    If stung, site personnel will immediately seek shelter and stay there even if some bees
          come in with you (there are more outside the building or car). Do not jump in water (bees
          will still be in the area when you come up). Once safe, remove stings from your skin, it
          does not matter how you do it, but do it as quickly as possible to reduce the amount of
          venom they inject. Obtain first aid treatment and contact the UXOSO who will observe
          for signs of allergic reaction.

     •    Site personnel with a known hypersensitivity to stinging insects will keep required
          emergency medication on or near their person at all times.




                                                 6-14
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
                      Figure 6-3: Decision Diagram for Stings from Insects




                                             Honey bee
                                 No                                  Yes
                                               sting?



                    Other types of
                                                                           Stinger
                     stinging insects                      No                               Yes
                                                                         embedded?




                                                                                     Scrape stinger off with
                                                                                     fingernail, credit card, or
                                                                                     knife. Do not squeeze
                                                                                     stinger.




                                             Allergic to
                               No                                  Yes
                                               stings?




  Wash site with soap and water. Apply ice pack                 Seek medical attention
  for 15-20 minutes. Relieve pain with aspirin or               immediately.
  acetaminophen.                                                Keep bite area lower than heart.
  Relieve itching and swelling with topical                     Apply constriction band.
  steroid cream.                                                Use insect bite kit.
  Keep bite area lower than heart.                              Monitor ABCs; treat accordingly.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                         May 2004
6.6.2.4 Snakes

     Snakes like to sun themselves on rocks during the day. Therefore, when site activities are
conducted, extreme caution must be exercised around areas where snakes might be found (i.e.
rocks, bushes, logs, or in holes, crevices, and abandoned pipes). The rattlesnake is the only type of
snake in California that is dangerous to humans. These snakes are normally not aggressive and will
flee when humans approach. However, if a rattlesnake is encountered, leave the area and report the
location to UXOSO. The UXOSO will issue protective clothing, such as snake leggings, to site
personnel.

     Western Rattlesnake
                                                             Figure 6-4 Photograph of Western
      This is the only rattlesnake that can be                          Rattlesnake
encountered in Northern California. Its venom,
which it uses to immobilized its prey and defend
itself, contains both neurotoxins and hemotoxins.
Neurotoxins affect the nervous system and
hemotoxins affect the bloodstream. Its size can
vary between 1.25 and 5.25 feet and can be
identified by brownish blotches down midline of
back; generally edged with dark brown or black
(Figure 6-4). The snake is most active between the
months of April and October.

     Treatment

      A snake bite is usually characterized by
extreme pain and swelling at the site of the bite; the presence of one or more puncture wounds
created by the fangs; and a general skin discoloration. The manifestations of the bite include
general weakness, rapid pulse, nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath, dimness of vision,
tingling or numbness of the tongue, mouth or scalp and shock.

     Physical reactions are aggravated by acute fear, anxiety, the amount of venom injected, the
speed of absorption of venom into the victim's circulation, the size of the victim, protection
provided by clothing (including shoes and gloves), the amount of time before anti-venom therapy
and location of the bite.

     First Aid – The rules to follow for a snake bite are:

     •    DO NOT cut "Xs" over the bite area, as this will intensify the effect of the venom.

     •    DO NOT apply suction to the wound since this has a minimal effective in removing
          venom.

     •    DO NOT apply a tourniquet since this will concentrate the venom and increase the
          amount of tissue damage in the immediate area.

     •    DO NOT use cold compresses, ice, dry ice, chemical ice packs, spray refrigerants, or
          other methods of cold therapy.



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •     If possible, try to get a good look at the snake so it can be identified for proper selection
           of anti-venom.

     •     DO NOT allow the victim to run for help since running increases the heart rate and will
           increase the spread of the venom throughout the body.

     •     Calm, reassure and keep the victim calm, quiet and immobile. Do not delay evacuation.

     •     Have the victim hold the affected extremity lower than the body while waiting for
           medical assistance.

     •     Transport the victim to medical attention immediately.

     Identification Features -- Non-poisonous snakes are often erroneously identified as poisonous.
The features identified in Table 6.2 will assist in properly identifying a snake as poisonous or non-
poisonous.

                                             Table 6-2
                                    Snake Identification Features

  Feature            Poisonous                                        Non-Poisonous

  Eye Pupils         Elliptical, or cat-like                          Round

  Sensing Pits       Pit between the eyelids and nostrils             No pit between the eyelids and nostrils

  Teeth              Two enlarged teeth (fangs) in front of the All teeth are approximately the same
                     upper jaw                                  size

  Scales             Form a single row on the underside and Arranged in a double row on the
                     below the tail                         underside of the tail

  Head               Head much wider than the neck                    Head slightly wider than the neck

  Tail               Single anal plate                                Divided anal plate




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
6.6.2.5 Spiders

     A large variety of spiders may be                  Figure 6-2: Photograph of Black Widow Spider
encountered during site activities.         Extreme
caution must be used when lifting logs and debris,
since spiders are typically found in these areas.

     While most spider bites merely cause
localized pain, swelling, reddening and in some
cases, tissue damage, there are a few spiders that,
due to the severity of the physiological affects
caused by their venom, are dangerous. The
UXOSO will brief site personnel as to the
identification and avoidance of these dangerous
spiders. These species include the black widow
and the brown or violin spiders.

      The black widow (Figure 6-5) is a coal-black
bulbous spider 3/4 to 1 1/2 inches in length, with a
bright red hourglass on the under side of the
abdomen. The black widow is usually found in
dark moist locations, especially under rocks,
rotting logs and may even be found in outdoor toilets where they inhabit the underside of the seat.
Victims of a black widow bite may exhibit the following signs or symptoms:

     •    Sensation of pinprick or minor burning at the time of the bite.

     •    Appearance of small punctures (but sometimes none are visible).

     •    After 15 to 60 minutes, intense pain is felt at the site of the bite which spreads quickly,
          and is followed by profuse sweating, rigid abdominal muscles, muscle spasms, breathing
          difficulty, slurred speech, poor coordination, dilated pupils and generalized swelling of
          face and extremities.

     The brown or violin spider (Figure 6-6) is      Figure 6-3: Photograph of Brown Recluse
brownish to tan in color, rather flat, 1/2 to 5/8                     Spider
inches long.       However unlike the typical
species, the ones encountered at Fort Ord do not
have a violin or “fiddle” shaped mark on the top of
the head. Of the brown spider, there are three
varieties found in the United States that present
a problem to site personnel. These are the brown
recluse, the desert violin and the Arizona violin.
These spiders may be found in a variety of locations
including trees, rocks or in dark locations. Victims
of a brown or violin spider bite may exhibit the
following signs or symptoms:




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •    Blistering at the site of the bite, followed by a local burning at the site 30 to 60 minutes
          after the bite.

     •    Formation of a large, red, swollen, postulating lesion with a bull's-eye appearance.

     •    Systemic affects may include a generalized rash, joint pain, chills, fever, nausea and
          vomiting.

     •    Pain may become severe after 8 hours, with the onset of tissue necrosis.

     There is no effective first aid treatment for either of these bites. Except for very young, very
old or weak victims, spider bites are not considered to be life threatening. However, medical
treatment must be sought to reduce the extent of damage caused by the injected toxins. First aid
should include:

     •    If possible, catch the spider to confirm its identity. Even if the body is crushed, save it
          for identification.

     •    Clean the bitten area with soap and water or rubbing alcohol.

     •    To relieve pain, place an ice pack over the bite.

     •    Keep the victim quiet and monitor breathing.

     •    Seek immediate medical attention.

6.6.2.6 Rats, Mice, and Bats

     Rats, mice, and bats may be found at the site. These animals may carry rabies and should be
avoided. In addition, Hanta Virus is also a concern when coming in contact with these animals.
Hanta Virus is a disease spread primarily from infected rodent droppings. Hanta Virus results from
intimate contact with rodents, such as may occur in agricultural areas with dense human and rodent
populations or during soil excavation. Hanta virus is not transferred from person to person. The
overwhelming evidence is that spread is from rodent to humans through contact with infected
rodent secretions or airborne transmission by infected dust particles.

     Preventive measures should focus on cleaning all cuts and scratches with soap and water,
followed by rinsing with hydrogen peroxide. Put liquid skin on the affected areas. The best
preventative measure is to avoid all rodent nests during geophysical surveys. If rodent nests are
discovered field team members should be apprised of their locations and avoid working adjacent to
the nests. If work must be performed at that location, a 10% bleach solution will be sprayed on the
nest and adjacent areas to kill the virus. If work must be performed at a location where rodent
infestation is evident personal protective equipment should be worn. The PPE ensemble will
include:

     •    Half face air purifying respirator with HEPA filter cartridges (N/P/R99, 100) and non-
          vented goggles or high filtration dust mask with non-vented goggles

     •    Tyvek coveralls


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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
        •    Tyvek boot covers or rubber boots

        •    PVC or latex gloves

6.6.2.7 Blood borne Pathogen

     Blood borne pathogens enter the human body and blood circulation system through punctures,
cuts or abrasions of the skin or mucous membranes. They are not transmitted through ingestion
(swallowing), through the lungs (breathing), or by contact with whole, healthy skin. Examples of
blood borne pathogens are HIV, Hepatitis B, Malaria, Syphilis and West Nile Virus. However,
under the principle of universal precautions all blood should be considered infectious, and all skin
and mucous membranes should be considered to have possible points of entry for pathogens.

        Potential blood borne pathogen exposures that employees might face include:

        •    Contact with contaminated medical equipment or medical waste or sharp instruments.

        •    Medical emergency response operations such as administering first aid or CPR.

        •    Contact with human wastes such as domestic sewage.

     Parsons field personnel that could potentially contact human blood must be familiar with the
Parsons Exposure Control Program.

6.6.3       Physical Hazards

     Physical hazards that exist at Fort Ord sites include noise, heat and cold stress, and fire
hazards. Procedures to protect workers from these hazards are presented below.

6.6.3.1 Noised Induced Hearing Loss

      Planned activities will involve the use of heavy equipment, such as backhoes and generators.
The unprotected exposure of site workers to this noise during activities can result in noise-induced
hearing loss. Personnel working at this site will be enrolled in a hearing conservation program
(Attachment B). The UXOSO will verify that each site worker has received hearing conservation
training that entails proper use of hearing protectors. Additionally, the UXOSO will ensure that
either earmuffs or disposable foam earplugs are made available to, and used by, all personnel near
operating heavy equipment, or other sources of high intensity noise. Hearing protection is required
any time the noise level reaches 85 dbA or greater. Double protection is required anytime noise
levels exceed 104 dbA.

     Noise monitoring will be accomplished by field determination - if a person speaking in a
normal voice cannot be heard at a minimum three-foot distance - hearing protection will be
required.

6.6.3.2 Heat Stress

    Heat stress is one of the most common (and potentially serious) illnesses that affect site
workers. When site personnel are engaged in operations in hot environments, a number of



                                                  6-20
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
physiological responses can occur which may seriously affect the health and safety of the workers.
These affects can be eliminated or controlled through the use of a comprehensive heat stress
prevention and monitoring program.

      Individuals vary in their susceptibility and degree of response to stress induced by increased
body heat. Heat stress can result in health effects ranging from transient heat fatigue to serious
illness or death. Heat stress is cause by a number of interacting factors including environmental
condition, clothing, workload, and the individual characteristics of the worker. Because heat stress
is probably one of the most common (and potentially serious) illnesses at MEC sites, regular
monitoring and other preventive precautions are vital. Factors that may predispose a worker to
heat stress include:

     •    Lack of physical fitness

     •    Lack of acclimatization to hot environments

     •    Degree of hydration

     •    Obesity

     •    Current health (i.e., having an infection, chronic disease, diarrhea, etc.)

     •    Alcohol or drug use

     •    The worker’s age and sex

     The amount and type of PPE worn influence the worker’s heat tolerance. PPE adds weight
and bulk, severely reduces the body’s access to normal heat exchange mechanisms (evaporation,
convection, and radiation), and increases energy expenditure. Therefore, when selecting PPE, each
item’s benefit should be carefully evaluated in relation to its potential for increasing the risk of heat
stress. Once PPE is selected, the safe duration of work/rest periods should be determined based on:

     •    Anticipated work rate

     •    Ambient temperature and other environmental factors

     •    Type of protective ensemble

     •    Individual worker characteristics and fitness

      Sweating does not cool the body unless moisture is removed from the body. The use of PPE
reduces the body's ability to eliminate large quantities of heat because the evaporation of sweat is
decreased. The body's effort to maintain an acceptable temperature may become impaired and this
may cause heat stress. Increased body temperature and physical discomfort also promote
irritability and a decreased attention to the performance of hazardous tasks. At Fort Ord sites,
Level D PPE will be utilized, thus providing minimal increase in the potential for heat stress.
Level D PEP is defined as standard work clothes with long pants, hard-hat (when overhead hazard
is present), and safety boots (when working around heavy equipment).




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
6.6.3.2.1 Early Symptoms of Heat Stress
     The early symptoms used to recognize heat related illnesses include:

     •    Decline in task performance

     •    Lack of coordination

     •    Decline in alertness

     •    Unsteady walk

     •    Excessive fatigue

     •    Muscle cramps

     •    Dizziness

6.6.3.2.2 Heat Stress Disorders
     The following paragraphs outline the major heat related illness that may result from exposure
  to high heat environments, which include heat rash, fainting, heat cramps heat exhaustion, and
  heat stroke. For the purpose of this program, reference to “liquids” will indicate the use of water
  or an electrolyte replacement solution.

    6.6.3.2.2.1 Heat Rash
     Heat rash is caused by continuous exposure to heat and humid air and is aggravated by wet
chafing clothing. This condition can decrease a worker’s ability to tolerate hot environments.
Symptoms include a mild red rash, especially in areas of the body that sweat heavily. Treatment of
heat rash entails decreasing the amount of time in protective gear and using baby powder to absorb
moisture and decrease chafing. Maintain good personal hygiene standards and change into dry
clothes as needed.

    6.6.3.2.2.2 Heat Cramps
     Heat cramps are caused by a profuse rate of perspiration that is not balanced by adequate fluid
and electrolyte intake. The occurrence of heat related cramps are often an indication that excessive
water and electrolyte loss has occurred, which can further develop into heat exhaustion or heat
stroke. Symptoms include acute, painful spasms of voluntary muscles such as the back, abdomen
and extremities. Treatment involves moving victim to a cool area and loosening restrictive
clothing. Stretch and massage affected muscles to increase blood flow to the area. Have patient
drink one to two cups of liquids immediately with fluid intake repeated every twenty minutes
thereafter. Consult with physician if condition does not improve. If available, an electrolyte
replacement solution should be consumed.

    6.6.3.2.2.3 Heat Exhaustion
     Heat exhaustion occurs due to the large fluid and salt loss from profuse sweating. It is a state
of very definite weakness or exhaustion caused by increased stress on various organs to meet


                                                 6-22
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
increased demands to cool the body from excessive loss of fluids. This condition leads to
inadequate blood supply and cardiac insufficiency. Heat exhaustion is less dangerous than heat
stroke, but nonetheless must be treated. If allowed to go untreated, heat exhaustion can quickly
develop into heat stroke. Symptoms include: pale and moist skin, profuse perspiration, and extreme
weakness. Body temperature is basically normal or slightly elevated. The worker's pulse is weak
and rapid, and breathing is often shallow. The individual may have a headache or experience
nausea. Treatment for heat exhaustion involves removing the individual to a cool, air-conditioned
place, loosen the persons clothing and elevate victim’s feet. Consult physician, especially in severe
cases. Have patient drink one to two cups of liquids immediately, and repeat every twenty minutes
thereafter. Total liquid consumption should be about one to two gallons per day. If the signs and
symptoms of heat exhaustion do not subside, or become more severe, medical attention will be
required.

    6.6.3.2.2.4 Heat Stroke
     Heat stroke is an acute and dangerous reaction to heat stress caused by failure of the heat
regulating mechanisms of the body. The failure of the individual’s temperature control system
causes the perspiration system to stop working correctly. When this occurs, the body core
temperature rises very rapidly to a point (+105°F) where brain damage and death will result if the
person is not cooled quickly. The victim’s skin is hot and often dry. Other symptoms include
confusion; extremely high body temperature; rapid respiratory and pulse rate; delirium;
convulsions; unconsciousness or coma.

     Cool the victim immediately. If the body temperature is not brought down quickly, permanent
brain damage or death may result. The victim should be moved to a shady area; he should lie down
and keep head elevated. Cool the victim by either sponging or immersing the victim in very cool
water to reduce the core temperature to a safe level (<102°F). If conscious, give the victim cool
liquids to drink. Observe the victim and obtain immediate medical help. Do not give the victim
caffeinated or alcoholic beverages. Heat stroke is considered a medical emergency. Medical help
should be summoned immediately. EARLY RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT OF HEAT
STROKE ARE THE ONLY MEANS OF PREVENTING BRAIN DAMAGE OR DEATH.

6.6.3.2.3 Preventive Measures
     Proper training and preventive measures will help avert serious illness and loss of work
productivity. Preventing heat stress is particularly important because once someone suffers from
heat exhaustion, that person may become predisposed to additional heat injuries. In order to avoid
heat related illnesses, proper preventive measures will be implemented whenever environmental
conditions dictate the need, normally whenever the temperature reaches at least 75°F. These
preventive measures represent the minimal steps to be taken and will include the following
procedures:

     •    The UXOSO will examine each site worker prior to the start of daily operations, and
          periodically throughout the day, to determine the individuals susceptible to heat induced
          stress. Evidence of extreme dehydration or may require the UXOSO to restrict the
          worker’s activities until such time as the worker is fit for duty. Personnel identified as
          being at high risk (obese, using diuretics, etc) for heat stress that are allowed to
          participate in site operations will be monitored frequently by the UXOSO.




                                                 6-23
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •    Site workers will be trained to recognize and treat heat-related illnesses. This training
          will include recognizing the signs, symptoms of heat stress disorders and knowing proper
          treatment.

     •    In order to maintain workers’ body fluids at normal levels, workers will be encouraged to
          drink, as a minimum, approximately sixteen ounces of liquids prior to start of work in the
          morning, after lunch and prior to leaving the site at the conclusion of the day’s activities.
          Disposable four (4) to twelve (12) ounce cups and liquids will be provided on site.
          Liquids to be provided will include water and an electrolyte replacement solution, with
          the intake of each being equally divided. Liquids containing caffeine are to be avoided.

     •    When ambient conditions and site workload requirements dictate, as determined by the
          UXOSO, workers will be required to drink a minimum of 16 to 32 ounces of liquids
          during each rest cycle. The normal thirst mechanism is not sensitive enough to ensure
          that enough water will be ingested to replace lost sweat. When heavy sweating occurs,
          workers shall be encouraged to drink even though they may not be thirsty.

     •    A shelter or shaded area will be provided where workers may be protected from direct
          sunlight during rest periods.

     •    Monitoring of ambient or physiological heat stress indices will be conducted to allow
          prevention and early detection of heat induced stress. Monitoring will be conducted in
          accordance with applicable paragraphs of this SSHP.

     •    Site workers will be given time to acclimatize to site work conditions, temperature,
          protective equipment, and workload. Acclimatization is the adaptive process that results
          in a decrease of the physiological response produced by the application of a constant
          environmental stress. On initial exposure to a hot environment, there is an impaired
          ability to work and evidence of physiological strain. If the exposure is repeated on
          several successive days, there is a gradual return of the ability to work and a decrease in
          physiological strain. Acclimatization usually takes two to six days of continued work in
          hot environments, and allows the worker’s body to become adjusted to this level and
          type of work. This process involves a gradual increase in the workload over the required
          period, the length of which depends upon the nature of the work performed, the ambient
          temperatures, and the individual’s susceptibility to heat stress. The results of
          acclimatization include: subjective discomfort practically disappears; body temperature
          and heart rate are lower; there is a more stable blood pressure; and the sweat is more
          profuse and dilute.

     •    Work schedules will be adjusted as follows:

          −   Modify work/rest schedules according to monitoring requirements.

          −   Mandate work slowdowns as needed.

          −   Rotate personnel: alternate job functions to minimize over-stress or overexertion at
              one task.

          −   Add additional personnel to work teams.


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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
             −    Perform work during cooler hours of the day if possible.

       •     Workers will be encouraged to achieve and maintain an optimum level of physical
             fitness. Increased physical fitness will allow workers to better tolerate and respond to
             hot environments and heavy workloads. In comparison to an unfit person, a fit person
             will have: less physiological strain, a lower heart rate and body temperature, and a more
             efficient sweating mechanism.

       •     Alcohol should not be consumed in a hot environment because the loss of body fluids
             increases the risk of heat stress.

6.6.3.2.4 Heat Stress Monitoring

     Heat stress prevention is important, because once a person suffers from heat stroke or heat
exhaustion, that person may be more likely to have additional heat-related illnesses. The signs and
symptoms of heat stress are presented in Table 6-3. Table 6-4 presents a suggested schedule for
the heat stress monitoring.
The following steps to prevent heat stress should be followed:

   •       Provide air conditioned shelter or shaded areas to protect personnel during rest periods.

   •       Urge workers to drink water to keep their body fluids at normal levels.

   •       Adjust work schedules according to monitoring requirements and performing work during
           cooler hours of the day. The normal work schedule consists of a 10-hour day, four days per
           week.

   •       Provide accurate verbal and written instructions, frequent training programs, and other
           information about heat stress and strain.

   •       Permit self-limitation of exposures and encourage co-worker observation to detect signs and
           symptoms of heat strain in others.

   •       Counsel and monitor those who take medications that may compromise normal
           cardiovascular, blood pressure, body temperature regulation, renal, or sweat gland
           functions; and those who abuse or are recovering from the abuse of alcohol or other
           intoxicants.

   •       Encourage healthy life-styles, ideal body weight and electrolyte balance.

   •       Adjust expectations of those returning to work after absence from hot exposure situations
           and encourage consumption of salty foods (with approval of physician if on a salt-restricted
           diet).

   •       Ensure workers have current medical screening to identify those susceptible to systemic
           heat injury.




                                                     6-25
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                 May 2004
                                          TABLE 6-3
                                                              a
                             SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF HEAT STRESS



HEAT RASH may result from continuous exposure to heat or humid air.

HEAT CRAMPS are caused by heavy sweating with inadequate electrolyte replacement.
Signs and symptoms include:

   •   muscle spasms

   •   pain in the hands, feet, and abdomen

HEAT EXHAUSTION occurs from increased stress on various body organs including
inadequate blood circulation due to cardiovascular insufficiency or dehydration. Signs and
symptoms include:

   •   pale, cool, moist skin

   •   heavy sweating

   •   dizziness

   •   nausea

   •   fainting

HEAT STROKE is the most serious form of heat stress. Temperature regulation fails and
the body temperature rises to critical levels. Immediate action must be taken to cool the body
before serious injury and death occur. Competent medical help must be obtained. Signs and
symptoms are:

   •   red, hot, usually dry skin
   •   lack of or reduced perspiration
   •   nausea
   •   dizziness and confusion
   •   strong, rapid pulse
   •   coma




                                              6-26
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                      May 2004
    a
          NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA, 1985.
                                          TABLE 6-4
                            SUGGESTED FREQUENCY FOR MONITORING
                                                            a
                               FIT AND ACCLIMATIZED WORKERS

         Adjusted                             Normal Work                             Impermeable
                        b                                  c
    Temperature                                 Ensemble                               Ensemble
        90ºF (32.2ºC)                          After each 45                         After each 15

          or above                            minutes of work                       minutes of work



         87.5º-90ºF                            After each 60                         After each 30

     (30.8º- 32.2ºC)                          minutes of work                       minutes of work



        82.5º-87.5ºF                           After each 90                         After each 60

     (28.1º- 30.8ºC)                          minutes of work                       minutes of work



        77.5º-82.5ºF                           After each 120                        After each 90

     (25.3º- 28.1ºC)                          minutes of work                       minutes of work



        72.5º-77.5ºF                           After each 150                        After each 120

     (22.5º- 25.3ºC)                          minutes of work                       minutes of work

    Reference NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA, 1985.
    a
       For work levels of 250 kilocalories/hour.
    b
       Calculate the adjusted air temperature (ta adj) by using the equation:
       ta adj = ta + (13 x percent sunshine)
       where: ta is the air temperature in ºF.
       Measure air temperature (ta) with a standard mercury-in-glass thermometer, with the bulb
       shielded from radiant heat.
       Estimate percent sunshine by judging what percent time the sun is not covered by clouds that
       are thick enough to produce a shadow (100 percent sunshine = no cloud cover and a sharp,
       distinct shadow; zero percent sunshine = no shadows.)
    c
       A normal work ensemble consists of cotton coveralls or other cotton clothing with long sleeves
       and pants.




                                                   6-27
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                  May 2004
    For temperatures above 70°F (21°C), heat stress monitoring will be initiated for workers
wearing semi-permeable or impermeable clothing. The monitoring will be as follows:

     Heart rate: Count the radial pulse during a 30-second period as early as possible in the rest
period.

   •   If the heart rate exceeds 110 beats per minute at the beginning of the rest period, shorten the
       next work cycle by one-third and keep the rest period the same.

   •   If the heart rate still exceeds 110 beats per minute at the next rest period, shorten the
       following work cycle by one-third.




                                                 6-28
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
6.6.3.3 Cold Related Illnesses
      If work on this project is conducted in the winter months, thermal injury due to cold exposure
can become a problem for field personnel. Work will cease under unusually hazardous conditions
(e.g., wind-chill less than 0°F, or wind-chill less than 10°F with precipitation). Systemic cold
exposure is referred to as hypothermia. Local cold exposure is generally labeled frostbite.
Recognition of the symptoms of cold related illness will be discussed during the health and safety
briefing conducted prior to the onset of site activities. Refer to the 2000 American Conference of
Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Values (TLV) for Chemical
Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices for additional information on
cold stress prevention, monitoring, and protective measures.

6.6.3.3.1 Hypothermia
     Hypothermia is a life-threatening condition in which the core body temperature falls below
95°F. Hypothermia can occur at temperatures above freezing particularly, when the skin or
clothing becomes wet. During exposure to cold, maximum shivering occurs when the core
temperature falls to 95°F. As hypothermia progresses, depression of the central nervous system
becomes increasingly more severe. This accounts for the progressive signs and symptoms ranging
from sluggishness and slurred speech to disorientation and eventually unconsciousness (see Table
6.5). The ability to sustain metabolic rate and to reduce skin blood flow is diminished by fatigue.
Thus, fatigue increases the risk of severe hypothermia by decreasing metabolic heat. Additionally,
because blood flow through the skin is reduced to conserve heat, the skin and underlying tissues
become more susceptible to frostbite.

                                             Table 6-5
                          Progressive Clinical Symptoms of Hypothermia

                              °
            Core Temperature (°F)                                   Clinical Signs
                        95°                        Maximum shivering
                      87° - 89°                    Consciousness clouded; blood pressure
                                                   becomes difficult to obtain; pupils dilated
                      84° - 86°                    Progressive loss of consciousness; muscular
                                                   rigidity; respiratory rate decreases
                        79°                        Victim rarely conscious
                      70° - 72°                    Maximum risk of ventricular fibrillation



6.6.3.3.2 Frostbite
     Frostbite is both the general and medical term given to areas of cold injury. Unlike
hypothermia, frostbite rarely occurs unless environmental temperatures are less than freezing and
usually less than 20°F. Frostbite injuries occur most commonly on the distal parts of the body
(nose, earlobes, hands, and feet) that are subject to intense vasoconstriction. The three general
categories of frostbite are:




                                                6-29
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
       •     Frostnip - A whitened area of the skin, which is slightly burning or painful.

       •     Superficial frostbite - Waxy, white skin with a firm sensation but with some resiliency.
             Symptomatically feels “warm” to the victim with a notable cessation of pain.

       •     Deep frostbite - Tissue damage deeper than the skin, at times, down to the bone. The
             skin is cold, numb and hard.

6.6.3.3.3 Preventing Cold Related Illnesses
       Educate worker to recognize the symptoms of frostbite and hypothermia.

       •     Ensure the availability of an enclosed, heated environment within the vehicles. The
             nearest heated environment will be the interior of the vehicles at the site.

       •     Ensure the availability of dry changes of clothes.

       •     Record temperature readings.

       •     Ensure the availability of warm beverages, preferably non-caffeinated.

6.6.3.3.4 Cold Weather Monitoring and Hypothermia

     Hypothermia is defined as a decrease in the body core temperature below 96°F (36°C). The
following symptoms appear (in the order listed) as the body loses heat faster than it can be
produced:

   •       Voluntary exercise to stay warm

   •       Involuntary exercise to stay warm (shivering)

   •       Loss of judgment and reasoning abilities

   •       Feelings of apathy, listlessness, and indifference

   •       Loss of control of the hands

   The following steps should be taken to prevent hypothermia:

   •       Educate workers to recognize the symptoms of frostbite and hypothermia

   •       Identify and limit known risk factors

   •       Ensure the availability of dry changes of clothes

   •       Develop a capability for temperature recording at the site

   •       Ensure the availability of warm drinks



                                                      6-30
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
   Monitoring the oral temperature on the job site can also be used to defend against hypothermia.
This should be done at the supervisor’s discretion based on changes in the worker’s performance or
mental status, or when the wind-chill is less than 20°F (-7°C), or a wind-chill is less than 30°F (-
2°C) with precipitation. Any worker developing moderate hypothermia, defined as a core
temperature of 92° (34°C), may not return to work for 48 hours.
6.6.3.4 Fire Hazards

     Although fires and explosions may arise spontaneously they are more commonly the result of
carelessness during the conduct of site activities, such as moving drums, mixing/bulking of site
chemicals and during refueling of heavy or hand held equipment. Some potential causes of
explosion and fires include:

     •    Mixing of incompatible chemicals which cause reactions that spontaneously ignite due to
          the production of both flammable vapors and heat;

     •    Ignition of explosive or flammable chemical gases or vapors by external ignition sources;

     •    Ignition of materials due to oxygen enrichment;

     •    Agitation of shock or friction-sensitive compounds; and

     •    Sudden release of materials under pressure.

6.6.3.4.1 Fire Prevention
     Explosions and fires not only pose the obvious hazards of intense heat, open flames, smoke
inhalation and flying objects, but may also cause the release of toxic chemicals into the
environment. Such releases can threaten both personnel on-site and members of the general public
living or working nearby. Site personnel involved with potentially flammable material or
operations must follow the guidelines listed below and EM 385-1-1, Section 9, to prevent fires and
explosions:

     •    Potentially explosive/flammable atmospheres involving gases or vapors will be
          monitored using a combustible gas indicator.

     •    Prior to initiation of site activities involving explosive/flammable materials all potential
          ignition sources must be removed or extinguished.

     •    Non-sparking and explosion-proof equipment must be used whenever the potential for
          ignition of flammable/explosive gases/vapors/liquids exists.

     •    Dilution or induced ventilation may be used to decrease the airborne concentration of
          explosive/flammable atmospheres.

     •    Smoking is restricted to designated areas on MEC work sites.

     •    Flammable and/or combustible liquids must be handled only in approved and properly
          labeled metal safety cans equipped with flash arresters and self-closing lids.



                                                 6-31
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
        •    Transfer of flammable liquids from one metal container to another will be done only
             when the containers are electrically interconnected (bonded).

        •    The motors of all equipment being fueled will be shut off during the fueling operations.

        •    Metal drums used for storing flammable/combustible liquids will be equipped with self-
             closing safety faucets, vent bung fittings, grounding cables and drip pans and will be
             stored outside buildings in an area approved by the UXOSO.

6.6.3.4.2 Fire Protection
        The following safe work practices are to be used to protect against fires:

        •    Vehicles and equipment shall not be fueled while running.

        •    Flammable/combustible liquid storage areas have at least one 4A:20:B:C fire
             extinguisher located within 25-75 feet and marked with the appropriate fire symbol and
             no smoking signs.

        •    All vehicles used in the transport of explosives are equipped with two fire extinguishers
             of not less than 2A:10B:C or higher, with one fire extinguisher mounted/placed inside
             the cab of the vehicle and one mounted outside, by the driver’s side door, if possible.

        •    Temporary offices will be equipped with a fire extinguisher of not less than 10:ABC.

        •    At least one portable fire extinguisher having a rating of not less than 4A:20B:C will be
             located at each work site.

6.6.3.5 Ionizing Radiation

     No radiological hazards are anticipated during operations at Fort Ord. If any radioactive
sources are encountered by Parsons’ personnel work at that location will be stopped and the PHSO
will be contacted to provide guidance on proper protective measures.

6.6.4       Chemical Hazards

     Non-CWM chemical hazards, such as lead contaminated soils or lead-based paint, may be
anticipated at former small arms ranges or during demolition of existing structures. The Lead
Management Plan, Appendix J, provides procedures for minimizing lead hazards onsite. Should
contaminated soils be encountered, the PHSO will be contacted to provide guidance on appropriate
safety precautions.

6.6.5       Chemical Warfare Munitions

     Chemical Munitions, Chemical Warfare Material or Radiological Contamination is not
anticipated to be encountered during operations on Fort Ord; however, should personnel encounter
a suspected toxic chemical munitions, Chemical Warfare Material or any situation where
radiological contamination could become a concern, all personnel will immediately withdraw
upwind to a safe location outside of the fragmentation zone of the type ordnance located and



                                                    6-32
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
contact the CESPK Safety Specialist who will notify the appropriate agencies. The site will be
secure with two UXO Technicians until the arrival of the Technical Escort Unit (TEU) or Military
Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD). Parsons will assist the TEU as directed. Decontamination
station setup and operation will be performed by fire department hazardous response personnel.

6.6.5.1 Ordnance Fillers

     In the event of locating a Livens Projector 4-inch Stokes or a 4.2-inch mortar and positive
identification of the filler remains unknown, the item will be left in place awaiting disposition by
TEU who will identify the filler prior to final disposition.

6.6.6   Task Hazard Analysis

     Parsons has analyzed the scope of work tasking to determine the work risk hazards associated
with each task. The tasks consist of direct tasks and implied tasks, or sub tasks, to accomplish the
work. Table 6.6 presents each activity, the associated hazards, and the control measures planned to
prevent accidents.

6.7     MEDICAL MONITORING

     Personnel engaged in field activities must be enrolled in a medical surveillance program as
required by 29 CFR Part 1910.120(f). Doctors on Duty, 2260 North Fremont Street, (831) 372-
6700, is used to provide the medical examinations for Parsons’ personnel. Qualisys Medical
Network Services, 4501 Circle 75 Parkway, Suite C-3250, Atlanta, Georgia, (770) 226-9944,
provides medical surveillance and records management. The content of the examination must be
designed to determine each individual's fitness for duty, including ability to work while wearing
protective equipment (e.g., respirator, impermeable clothing, etc.).

     Personnel performing on-site field activities on this project must present to the UXOSO a
physician's certification of completion of a comprehensive medical monitoring examination within
the 12 months prior to the beginning of field activities. Additionally, the UXOSO will ensure that
workers remain current in their medical monitoring throughout the duration of the project. Copies
of employees' Health Status Reports will be available to the COR upon request.




                                                6-33
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
                                              Table 6-6
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California

Activity                     Hazards                            Control Measures
Brush Clearing               •      Potential UXO/OE.           •      Be alert, Mark and report all OE
(Manual)                     •      Wildlife, insects, poison          located.
                                    oak                         •      Be alert. Watch for snakes; do
                             •      Slips, trips and falls             not handle wildlife.
                             •      Cuts and lacerations from   •      Use insect repellent and barrier
                                    using cutting tools and            cream. Change clothing daily.
                                    brush                       •      Be alert. Watch for trip hazards;
                             •      Noise hazard from gas              look where you are walking.
                                    powered equipment           •      Wear Level D PPE include; eye,
                             •      Heat/ Cold Stress                  hearing protection, and gloves
                             •      Sunburn/Windburn                   when operating powered
                             •      Thunderstorms                      equipment.
                                                                •      Use Kevlar chaps and steel-toed
                                                                       boots when using chainsaw.
                                                                •      Dress for the weather. Use
                                                                       sunscreen if necessary.
                                                                •      Buddy system monitoring.
                                                                •      Do not work during electrical
                                                                       storms.

Brush Clearing               •      Potential MEC               •      Conduct a thorough surface
(Mechanical)                 •      Noise      hazard    from          clearance and use equipment
                                    mechanized equipment.              with low ground pressure in
                             •      Thunderstorms                      areas where surface ordnance is
                             •      Dust                               not anticipated
                                                                •      Armor vehicle to protect the
                                                                       operator from an unintentional
                                                                       detonation, especially in areas of
                                                                       heavy UXO concentration.
                                                                •      Wear hearing protection as
                                                                       required.
                                                                •      Be alert, have UXO mark and
                                                                       report all OE located.
                                                                •      Have UXO escort mark all
                                                                       physical hazards with caution
                                                                       tape.
                                                                •      Buddy system monitoring.
                                                                •      Do not work during electrical
                                                                       storms.




                                                    6-34
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                                Control Measures
Chipping of resultant       •       Getting caught in feed         •   Chipper will be manned by two
brush and limbs from                mechanism.                         personnel, one on either side.
manual brush cutting
                            •       Poison oak contamination.      •   Feeders will use care not to place
                                                                       body parts onto feed table when
                            •       Scrapes, cuts, and scratches
                                                                       chipper is operating.
                                    from limbs and brush.
                                                                   •   Care will be exercised not to
                            •       Noise level.
                                                                       reach past the “SAFE” point
                                                                       established on the feed
                                                                       table/chute.
                                                                   •   A push stick of material
                                                                       consumable by the chipper will
                                                                       be available, one on each side of
                                                                       the chipper, for pushing brush
                                                                       into the chipper when necessary.
                                                                   •   No one will approach within 50
                                                                       feet of operating chipper while in
                                                                       operation without proper PPE
                                                                       and hearing protection.
                                                                   •   Level D PPE will be IAW the
                                                                       SSHP and the Chipper SOP.


Removing and replacing      •       Potential MEC                  •   Use UXO qualified escort in
barbed wire and chain                                                  uncleared areas.
                            •       Slips, trips and falls
link fence.
                                                                   •   UXO safety precautions IAW the
                            •       Scrapes, cuts and
                                                                       WP and SSHP.
                                    lacerations from fence
                                    material and cutting tools.    •   Be aware of terrain and overhead
                                                                       vegetation.
                            •       Wildlife, insects, and
                                    poison oak                     •   Watch for wildlife and stinging
                                                                       insects.
                            •       Heat/cold stress
                                                                   •   Use leather gloves and safety
                            •       Sunburn/windburn
                                                                       glasses when handling fence
                                                                       materials.
                                                                   •   Use barrier creams and decon as
                                                                       needed.
                                                                   •   Dress appropriately for weather.
                                                                   •   Use sunscreen as needed.




                                                       6-35
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                             Control Measures
Surveying, establishing     •       Potential MEC               •      UXO safety precautions follow
boundaries and grids.       •       Unplanned detonation.              the PWP and SSHP.
Installing stakes and       •       Wildlife.                   •      Watch for snakes; do not handle
monuments                   •       Slips, trips, and falls.           wildlife. Use insect repellent.
                            •       Cuts and lacerations from          Avoid toxic plants.
                                    brush and trees.            •      Wear level D PPE to include eye
                                                                       protection and gloves when
                                                                       digging. Be alert, watch for trip
                                                                       hazards.
                                                                •      Dress for weather; use sunscreen,
                                                                       insect repellent/ barrier cream as
                                                                       necessary.
                                                                •      No smoking except in designated
                                                                       areas.
                                                                •      UXO personnel will escort non-
                                                                       UXO personnel at all times.
                                                                       Mark and avoid UXO.
                                                                •      Only UXO personnel will handle
                                                                       UXO.
                                                                •      Do not subject UXO to heat,
                                                                       shock, or friction. Check location
                                                                       with magnetometer prior to
                                                                       driving stakes.
                                                                •      Wear Level D PPE, eye
                                                                       protection and gloves while
                                                                       pounding stakes.




                                                    6-36
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                             Control Measures
Transportation, storage,    •       Vehicle accident            •      Load/unload vehicle in
and handling of             •       Fire,                              designated areas.
explosives/UXO.             •       Unplanned detonation.       •      Use authorized explosive route.
Preparing and placing       •       Slips, trips, and falls.    •      Placard vehicle.
charges. Detonation in      •       Heat/ Cold Stress.          •      No personnel in cargo
place.                      •       Noise, fragmentation,              compartment.
                                    debris                      •      No explosives in passenger
                                                                       compartments.
                                                                •      Observe explosives
                                                                       transportation compatibility
                                                                       requirement.
                                                                •      Do not fuel when loaded.
                                                                •      No smoking.
                                                                •      Shut vehicle off and block wheels
                                                                       when loading.
                                                                •      Block/ brace secure
                                                                       explosives/UXO.
                                                                •      Use demolition Procedures IAW
                                                                       Work Plan, EODB/TM/TO 60a-
                                                                       1-1-31, and SOP’s.
                                                                •      Maintain Exclusion Zone,
                                                                       distance, tamping, personnel
                                                                       shelters, and control of shot size.
                                                                •      Be aware of obstacles- watch
                                                                       footing.
                                                                •      Level D PPE.




                                                     6-37
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                             Control Measures
Excavating, Grading,        •       Potential MEC unplanned     •      Only UXO Technicians will
Backfilling, Using Earth            detonation                         excavate or handle UXO.
Moving Machinery            •       Slips, trips and falls      •      Personnel in the immediate
(EMM), and Hand             •       Scrapes and cuts                   vicinity of UXO operations will
digging.                    •       Heat/ Cold Stress                  be kept to the minimum
                            •       Sunburn/ Windburn                  necessary for safe operations but
                            •       Unauthorized personnel             no less than two UXO
                                    within the exclusion zone          technicians.
                                    (EZ)                        •      Only hand excavation will be
                            •       Excavation cave-in                 permitted within 1 foot of UXO.
                                                                       Do not subject UXO to heat,
                                                                       shock, or friction. Establish
                                                                       exclusion zone (EZ), post
                                                                       warning signs, and stop all UXO
                                                                       operations when Non-UXO
                                                                       trained personnel are in EZ.
                                                                •      EMM will be operated by
                                                                       trained, experienced personnel.
                                                                       UXO Technicians will operate
                                                                       heavy equipment when
                                                                       excavating UXO items. Remain
                                                                       outside of the reach of EMM
                                                                       while in operation (an arc
                                                                       defining the reach of the backhoe
                                                                       arm will be cut with the bucket
                                                                       on soft surfaces or spray painted
                                                                       on the ground surface). Workers
                                                                       must wear level D PPE with hard
                                                                       hat, eye protection, work gloves,
                                                                       hearing protection, and steel-toed
                                                                       footwear, when around EMM.
                                                                       Slope trenches when deeper than
                                                                       5 feet (if workers are to enter
                                                                       excavation). Avoid obstacles
                                                                       when possible. Use buddy system
                                                                       monitoring.




                                                    6-38
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                             Control Measures
Excavating, Grading,        •       Potential MEC unplanned     •      When performing intrusive
Backfilling, Using Earth            detonation.                        digging of magnetic anomaly a
Moving Machinery            •       Slips, Trips, and falls.           minimum of a 200' EZ must be
(EMM), and Hand                     Scrapes and cuts.                  established.
digging (Continued)         •       Heat/ Cold Stress.          •      Look before backing; be aware of
                            •       Sunburn/ Windburn.                 personnel in the area.
                            •       Unauthorized personnel      •      Use ground guides when needed.
                                    within the EZ.              •      Be aware of terrain.
                            •       Excavation cave-in.         •      Dress appropriately for the
                                                                       weather.
                                                                •      Wear sunscreen, insect repellent,
                                                                       or poison oak barrier cream as
                                                                       necessary.
                                                                •      Wear level D PPE to include hard
                                                                       hat, hearing protection and
                                                                       safety-toed boots.




                                                   6-39
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                             Control Measures
Geophysical Survey          •       Potential MEC               •      Watch for, mark, and report all
Operations                  •       Slips, trips and falls             OE located.
                            •       Wildlife, insects, poison   •      Watch for wildlife (snakes,
                                    oak                                insects, etc.)
                            •       Heat/cold stress            •      Wear insect repellant and barrier
                            •       Sunburn/windburn                   creams.
                                                                •      Change clothing daily.
                                                                •      Dress for the weather.
                                                                •      Use buddy system monitoring.
                                                                •      Use sunscreen, insect repellant,
                                                                       and poison oak barrier cream, as
                                                                       needed.
                                                                •      Be aware of terrain, footing and
                                                                       overhead hazards.




                                                     6-40
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                             Control Measures
Lead sampling of soils         •       Potential MEC             • Use UXO escorts.
                               •       Slips trips and falls     • Observe UXO precautions in
                               •       Lead exposure                 work plan and SSHP.
                               •       Wildlife                  • Be aware of terrain and overhead
                               •       Poison oak                    vegetation.
                               •       Insects                   • Utilize proper PPE.
                               •       Heat illness              • Use proper decontamination
                                                                   procedures.
                                                                 • Lead Awareness Training.
                                                                 • Medical monitoring.
                                                                 • Avoid wildlife/
                                                                 • Use sunscreen, insect repellant, or
                                                                   poison oak barrier cream, as
                                                                   necessary.
                                                                 • Increase fluid intake.
                                                                 • Use buddy system.




                                                     6-41
 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
                                        Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                    Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                         Fort Ord, California
Activity                    Hazards                                Control Measures
Removal of Targets from      •      Potential MEC            •   Clear path of UXO and mark cleared
an OE Site                                                       area to target to be removed.
                                                             •   Perform a thorough visual inspection for
                                                                 UXO in and around target prior to
                                                                 removal activities.
                                                             •   Perform initial movement of target
                                                                 remotely when possible.
                                                             •   Inspect target after initial movement has
                                                                 been completed.
                                                             •   Inspect and certify target free of UXO
                                                                 and energetic materials prior to removal
                                                                 from the OE Site.
                                                             •   Allow only necessary personnel within
                                                                 the area for the operation.
                                                             •   Observe UXO precautions in work plan
                                                                 and SSHP.
                             •      Crush and Pinch          •   Keep clear of moving equipment.
                                    Hazards
                                                             •   Do not allow personnel under a
                                                                 suspended load unless protected from
                                                                 falling objects.
                                                             •   Keep all personnel clear of wire ropes
                                                                 or chains during pulling or lifting of
                                                                 targets.
                                                             •   Do not exceed the equipment lifting
                                                                 capacities.
                                                             •   Inspect all rigging at proper intervals.
                                                             •   Display warning signs at entry points to
                                                                 work area.
                                                             •   Use material handling equipment to
                                                                 move where possible and practical.
                                                             •   Ensure all PPE is serviceable




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 Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                 May 2004
                                           Table 6-6 (Continued)
                                       Hazard Analysis by Site Activity
                                            Fort Ord, California
Activity                       Hazards                              Control Measures
Removal of Targets from         •      Cuts, punctures and    •   Use material handling equipment to
an OE Site, continue                   scratches from             move where possible and practical.
                                       targets and debris
                                                              •   Use caution when handling range
                                                                  residue and scrap.
                                                              •   Ensure all PPE is serviceable.
                                                              •   Provide protective chaps as needed for
                                                                  leg and arm protection.
                                                              •   Provide protective chaps as needed for
                                                                  leg and arm protection.
                                                              •   Check targets and area near target for
                                •      Insect stings and          insect nests prior to any removal
                                       bites                      activities.
                                                              •   Observe heat illness precautions in work
                                                                  plan and SSHP.
                                •      Heat illness
                                                              •   Increase fluid intake.
                                                              •   Use buddy system.
                                                              •   Observe posted speeds
•     Driving patrol duties     •      Road conditions and
                                       hazards                •   Stay alert for changing road conditions
                                                              •   Avoid distractions while driving. Stay
                                                                  focused
                                                              •   Wear seatbelts when vehicle is in
                                                                  motion
                                                              •   Stay alert for walkers, bicyclists and
                                •      Road obstructions          joggers.
                                                              •   Look ahead for potential obstructions on
                                                                  the roadway.
                                                              •   Scan areas adjacent to the road for
                                                                  wildlife. Prepare to stop if wildlife is
                                                                  spotted.
                                                              •   Drive defensively.
                                •      Emergency              •   Ensure good communications.
                                       Situations
                                                              •   Report emergency situations and
                                                                  trespassers when necessary.




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    Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
6.8         TRAINING

      All personnel performing field activities at Fort Ord sites must have received 40 hours of
initial HAZWOPER health and safety training (or have equivalent training) in accordance with the
provisions of 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(3) and must be current in their refresher training. Site
supervisors responsible for personnel engaged in field activities must have attended a site
management training as required by OSHA in 29 CFR 1910.120(e)(4). All Parsons UXO
personnel and the Parsons UXOSO working at this site must have completed Naval Explosive
Ordnance Disposal (USNAVSCLEOD) training which details procedures for evaluation and
disposal of MEC. At least one member of each field team must be current in first aid and
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training. Copies of training certificates will be provided to
the UXOSO.

6.8.1       Site Specific Training

      In addition to the 40-hour initial training and 8-hour refresher training, site-specific training
will be conducted. The UXOSO is responsible for developing a site-specific occupational hazard
training that will be provided to all Parsons’ personnel and Parsons’ subcontractors prior to the start
of field operations. This training will cover the following topics:

        •    Names of personnel responsible for site safety and health;

        •    Safe work practices;

        •    Site history;

        •    Safety, health, and other hazards at site;

        •    Work zones and other locations;

        •    Emergency procedures, evacuation routes, emergency phone numbers;

        •    Personal protective equipment for anticipated task;

        •    Safe use of engineering controls and equipment on the site;

        •    Blood borne pathogen; and

        •    Ordnance recognition and reporting.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
        •    Prohibitions in areas and zones, including:

             −   Site layout; and

             −   Procedures for entry and exit of work areas and zones.

    In addition, site specific training may include Lead Awareness Training, as required by the
Lead Management Plan (Appendix J).

6.8.2       Tailgate Safety Meetings

    The UXO Supervisor will conduct tailgate safety briefings for field personnel. This training
must as a minimum cover the following topics:

        •    Tasks to be performed.

        •    Hazards that may be encountered, including their effects, how to recognize symptoms or
             monitor them, or danger signals.

        •    Emergency procedures (emergency equipment, emergency communications, and route to
             hospital).

        •    Rallying Points and safe refuge areas.

6.8.3       Supervisor Meetings

     Weekly meetings will be held for all supervisors. The agenda will include the past week's
operations, safety issues/problems, corrective actions required or taken, and the upcoming week's
activities.

6.8.4       Training Documentation

     The UXOSO will maintain copies of training certificates (HAZWOPER, Naval Ordnance
School Certificate, and CPR/first aid) for personnel participating in field operations. The UXOSO
will document site-specific initial training, lead awareness training, tailgate training/subjects, and
any other special or additional training.

6.8.5       Hazard Communication Training

     All project work will be conducted in accordance with standard policies for hazard
communication (Attachment B). Copies of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) for any
hazardous chemicals brought on site will be maintained at the field office. Employees that are
exposed to hazardous chemicals brought to the site must receive training on:

        •    The physical and health hazards of the chemicals in the work area.

        •    Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of the
             hazardous chemicals in the work area.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
        •    The measures a worker can take to protect themselves from these hazards.

6.8.6       Blood borne Pathogen Training

      Personnel working on this project will be provided bloodborne pathogen training review. This
training will be given initially at the same time as the site-specific initial training (paragraph 6.8.1).
The topics covered in the training will include the following:

        •    An overview of the Blood borne Pathogen Standard;

        •    Epidemiology and symptoms of blood borne diseases;

        •    Modes of transmission of blood borne pathogens;

        •    Discussion of Exposure Control;

        •    Tasks that may involve exposure to blood and other potentially infectious materials;

        •    Review of the methods that will prevent or reduce exposure;

        •    Selection and use of PPE; and

        •    Information on the post-exposure evaluation and follow-up program.

6.8.7       Visitor Training

     All visitors to the site will be given a health and safety briefing prior to gaining access to the
site. Following this briefing, visitors will be asked to sign SSHP - Plan Acceptance Forms
(Attachment A). The UXOSO will also ensure that visitors have applicable health and safety
equipment, medical surveillance, and training for the activities/areas they will be visiting. Should
questions arise as to whether or not specific training or equipment is needed - the PHSO will be
contacted.

6.8.8       Ergonomic Training

   An Industrial Training Program will be implemented and documented in accordance with
CALOSHA and California Code of Regulations.

6.9         PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

     Personal protective equipment required at the site will be at a level necessary to protect
personnel. No contamination is anticipated, therefore, a level D ensemble will be worn.

6.9.1       Level D Protective Ensemble

     The minimum level of protection for all personnel at this site is level D. A level D ensemble
consists of:

        •    Short or long sleeve coveralls or work clothing



                                                   6-46
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                 May 2004
        •    Kevlar chaps (when operating chainsaw)

        •    Leather work boots (steel toe if a foot hazard exists [brush clearing and excavation])

        •    Safety glasses or goggles when an eye hazard exists (brush clearing and hand or
             mechanical excavation operations]

        •    Hard hat, when a head hazard exists (brush clearing and around heavy equipment)

        •    Work gloves, leather or rubber as appropriate

        •    Hearing protection when working around heavy equipment or powered hand tools

        •    Respirator when clearing/grubbing rodent nests (APR with N-100 cartridge)

        •    Sun block and insect repellant as needed

        •    Demolition operations PPE

        •    Reflective safety vest usage


6.9.2       Upgrading PPE

      The level of protection is based on what is known about the site. Protection levels may change
as site conditions change. The UXOSO monitors site conditions and provides information to the
PHSO and PM as necessary. The UXOSO may increase the levels of protection when necessary
but cannot downgrade them without approval from PHSO. PPE requirements specific to lead
hazards are provided by the Lead Management Plan (Appendix J).

6.10        SITE CONTROL

      The UXOSO will coordinate access control and security on site. Due to the hazardous nature
of MEC only authorized personnel will be allowed in the exclusion zone (EZ). The EZ is the work
site, encompassing an area large enough to prevent personnel injuries as a result of MEC
operations. The boundary of the EZ will be appropriately identified. During intrusive operations
the boundary will be established by the UXOSO based on minimum separation distance. The MSD
is the minimum separation distance for unrelated personnel given unintentional detonation of
conventional ordnance items. The MSD for all unrelated personnel for an unintentional detonation
shall be determined by the greatest distance 200 feet, the K50 distance, or the maximum fragment
throw distance. During intrusive operations only essential trained personnel are allowed in the EZ.

     Visitors must check-in at the field office in the Support Zone (SZ) to gain access to work sites.
The UXOSO or a designee will escort visitors to and from work sites. The SZ is the administrative
area at the field office where operations and support equipment are located. During all operations
on site the field supervisors can cease operations if unescorted personnel are observed within the
operating area. During work hours Parsons’ personnel provide security at the site. Equipment is
returned to the SZ and secured at the end of the workday.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
     Representatives from regulatory agencies are permitted to enter the site at any time during
business hours or any other reasonable times with an escort. Site controls to ensure their safety are
as follows:

       •    Eating, drinking and smoking are prohibited except in designated areas in the EZ/SZ.

       •    Hazardous MEC operations in the EZ cease if non UXO trained personnel are present.

       •    UXO trained personnel must escort all authorized visitors to the site.

       •    All personnel, to include visitors, entering the site are in the proper PPE.

       •    The UXOSO maintains the site entry control log to ensure accurate accounting of
            personnel.

       •    The UXOSO provides visitor training (paragraph 6.8.7). All personnel acknowledge this
            briefing by signing the SSHP Plan Acceptance Form.

     In the case of an emergency, personnel will exit the site and move to the designated safe area.
The safe area will be located upwind of the site. The UXOSO will determine the severity of the
emergency. If the emergency warrants site evacuation the FOM will notify the Fort Ord Safety
Office.

6.11       DECONTAMINATION AND PERSONNEL HYGIENE

     In general, no hazardous, toxic, or radiological waste materials are anticipated, thus
decontamination for constituents will not be required. However, entry into sites with suspected lead
hazards will require decontamination per procedures defined in the Lead Management Plan
(Appendix J). Site sanitation will be established and maintained in compliance with 29 CFR
1926.51 and EM385-1-1, Section 2.

6.11.1 Potable Water

       An adequate supply of drinkable water will be provided on-site during work activities.

6.11.2 Toilet Facilities

      As the Fort Ord work sites are not provided with a sanitary sewer system, temporary toilet
facilities will be used. Each temporary toilet will be naturally lighted, ventilated and lockable from
the inside. Toilets will be provided for employees according to table 6.7.

6.11.3 Washing Facilities

   Washing facilities in the EZ will consist of water containers, buckets, soap and drying towels.
Workers exiting the EZ must wash hands and face prior to eating, drinking or smoking.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
                                           Table 6-7
                                   Minimum Number of Facilities

                 Number of Employees                                     Number of Facilities

20 or fewer employees                                   One toilet with seat.
                                                        One toilet with seat and one urinal per forty
More than 20, less than 200 employees
                                                        employees.
More than 200 employees                                 One toilet with seat and one urinal per fifty employees.



6.12       ENVIRONMENTAL AND PERSONAL MONITORING

     Exposure to hazardous airborne substances is anticipated only in areas where lead hazards
may exist (i.e. small arms ranges, or during structure demolition). Exposure assessment monitoring
requirements are provided by the Lead Management Plan.

6.13       EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND CONTINGENCY PROCEDURES

     The frequency and severity of emergency situations can be dramatically reduced through
proper implementation of the SSHP. However, if an emergency does occur, quick, decisive action
will be required since delays in minutes can create or escalate life-threatening situations. In an
emergency situation, site personnel involved in emergency response and rescue must be prepared
to respond immediately and all required equipment must be on hand, in proper working order and
ready to use. To ensure rapid, effective response to a site emergency, the procedures and
contingency plans outlined in this section will be implemented prior to and during the conduct of
any site activities involving exposure to safety and health hazards.

6.13.1 Identifying Potential Emergencies

     Contingency plans for responding to the potential emergency situations have been developed
and are presented below. Potential emergencies that may occur include:

       •    Injury or illness

       •    Fire/explosion

       •    Inclement weather

6.13.2 Emergency Response Responsibilities

     In the event of an emergency, the UXOSO will assume the responsibility of being the On
Scene Incident Commander (OSIC). The alternate person to assume this role, in the event that the
UXOSO is unavailable or incapacitated, will be the FOM. The OSIC will have the responsibility of
directing all on-site and off-site response personnel, and will, as soon as possible, advise the
CESPK Safety Specialist of the emergency situation. Upon arrival of First Responders, i.e. Fire




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
Department and upon determination that no ordnance or explosives hazard exists, the role of OSIC
will be turned over to the senior responding member of the fire department.

6.13.3 On-Site Emergency Response Services

     Parsons personnel will provide first aid treatment for minor injuries up to the limits of their
qualifications and training. At least two people per team will be First Aid and CPR certified. If
necessary the OSIC will contact medical personnel to determine if additional treatment is required.
If further treatment is required the Fire Department providing fire services to Fort Ord will be
notified and the injured person will be transported to the Community Hospital of the Monterey
Peninsula (CHOMP). If transport by the American Medical Response ambulance is required, an
escort will meet the ambulance at the Fort Ord gate and guide them to the accident site.

6.13.4 Off-Site Emergency Response Services

    Off-site emergency response services may include local fire and law enforcement personnel.
Emergency phone numbers for off-site response organizations are presented in table 6.8.

6.13.5 Route to Hospital

     The evacuation route map to the CHOMP from Fort Ord is presented as Figure 6-7. The map
will be kept in all vehicles. Directions for evacuation are printed with the figure.




                                                6-50
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
            Figure 6-8: Directions to: Community Hospital of Monterey Peninsula

                          23625 Holman Highway, Monterey, CA 93940
                                       (831) 372-6106

                          Access CA- 1 from Seaside or Sand City
                          CA-1 S becomes CA-1 S/CA-68 W.
                          Take the 68 West exit towards Asilomar.
                          The hospital will be on the right.




                                               6-51
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                  May 2004
                                          Table 6-9
                                      Emergency Contacts
                Emergency Contact                                    Telephone Number

 Presido of Monterey Fire Department/Paramedics                         831-242-7701
 MEDEVAC, Cal Star                                                     1-800-252-5050
 Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula                           (831) 372-6160
 Santa Clara Valley Medical Center                                      (831) 885-5000

 American Medical Response                                              (831) 655-4040
 Fort Ord Fire Department                                               (831) 242-7701
 Fort Ord Post Police                                                   (831) 242-7853
 Parsons PHSO-Tim Mustard                                               (303) 764-8810
 Parsons Program Manager-Gary W. Griffith                               (831) 884-2309
 Poison Control
                                                                        (800) 288-9999



6.13.6 Emergency Response Training

      All site personnel will receive specialized training that will be given by the UXOSO prior to
initiating site activities involving safety and health hazards. The content of this training will
include the items listed below and will be documented using the site Training Log.

     •    Emergency chain-of-command

     •    Communication methods and signals

     •    Emergency equipment and PPE

     •    Removing injured personnel from the site;

     •    Emergency contacts, phone numbers and hospital route

6.13.7 Emergency Equipment

During intrusive operations, the UXOSO will maintain emergency equipment containing the
following: an eyewash station, first-aid kit, a fire extinguisher, a portable cellular telephone and
radio. Copies of pertinent figures including emergency phone numbers and maps to emergency
facilities will be included with this equipment.




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     For non-intrusive operations, such as geophysical surveying, a first-aid kit, fire extinguisher,
and radio will be provided.

6.13.7.1 Fire Extinguishers

     Portable fire extinguishers approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory, and labeled
to identify the labeling organization and the fire test and performance standard, will be provided at
each individual job site. Extinguishers will be fully charged and in operable condition.

     A dry-chemical type 4A:20B:C extinguisher will be available at each work site. Each piece of
heavy equipment, site trailer, and each vehicle will be equipped with at least a 2A:10B:C fire
extinguisher.

6.13.7.2 First Aid Equipment

     First aid kits will be the 16 unit first aid kits and comply with ANSI Z308.1. A kit will be
located in each field team vehicle and at the field office. Kits will be inspected on a weekly basis
and missing components replaced immediately.

6.13.8 Communication Devices

Site communication devices will include portable, hand-held two-way radios for communication
between teams and the field office. Cellular telephones will be used to communicate with off-site
individuals and organizations. Radios will be distributed to the FOM, the UXOSO and to each field
team supervisor. Cellular phones and Police/Fire radios will be available to the FOM, the UXOSO,
and the SUXOS.

6.13.9 General Emergency Procedures

Emergency response procedures include all steps to be taken for notifying, evaluating, reacting to,
documenting and following-up on a given emergency situation. To ensure all necessary elements
are covered, the procedural steps outlined in this paragraph will be implemented for each
emergency, regardless of its nature.

6.13.9.1 Notification

     Once the OSIC has been informed of an emergency, the OSIC will alert site personnel to the
presence of the emergency by radio. This will be done to:

     •    Notify personnel and to get their attention;

     •    Stop all work activity as required;

     •    Lower noise levels in order to speed and simplify communication; and

     •    Initiate emergency or evacuation procedures.

     If on-site Parsons’ personnel or off-site emergency personnel are to enter the site in response
to the emergency, the OSIC will to the extent possible, notify the response personnel about the
nature of the emergency, to include:


                                                 6-53
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •    What happened and when it happened;

     •    Where on-site the emergency situation occurred;

     •    Who is involved and, if possible, the cause of the emergency

     •    The extent of damage and what hazards may be involved; and

     •    What actions should be taken.

6.13.9.2 Assessing the Emergency

     Available information related to the emergency and the on-site response capabilities should be
evaluated and the information listed below obtained to the extent possible:

     •    What happened:

          −   Type of incident

     •    Casualties involved:

          −   Victims (number, location and condition)

          −   Treatment required

          −   Missing personnel

     •    Cause of incident

     •    Extent of damage to structures, equipment and terrain

     •    What could happen from this point

          −   Potential for fire or explosion

          −   Location of all personnel in relation to hazardous areas

          −   Potential for emergency affecting the general public or the environment

     •    What can be done to remedy the situation:

          −   Equipment and personnel needed for rescue and hazard mitigation

          −   Number of uninjured personnel available for response

          −   Resources available on-site

          −   Resources available from off-site response groups and agencies



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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
          −   Time needed for off-site response resources to reach the site

          −   Hazards involved in rescue and response

6.13.9.3 Rescue and Response Actions

      Based on the information collected during the emergency assessment, the general actions
listed below will be taken, with some actions being conducted concurrently. No one will attempt
emergency response/rescue until the situation has been assessed and the appropriate response
outlined by the OSIC.

     •    Enforce the Buddy System:

          −   Allow no one to enter a hazardous area without a partner.

          −   Personnel in the EZ should be in line-of-sight or in communication with the OSIC or
              his designee.

     •    Survey Casualties:

          −   Locate all victims and assess their condition.

          −   Determine resources needed for stabilization and transport.

     •    Assess Existing and Potential Hazards and Determine:

          −   Whether and how to respond.

          −   The need for evacuation of site personnel and off-site population.

          −   The resources needed for evacuation and response.

     •    Contact the required off-site/on-site personnel or facilities, such as ambulance, fire
          department, police, etc.

     •    Allocate on-site personnel and equipment to rescue and initiate incident response
          operations.

     •    Assist in bringing the hazardous situation under complete or temporary control and use
          measures to prevent the spread of the emergency, i.e. control fire, secure site, etc.

     •    Remove or assist victims from the area.

     •    Stabilize:

          −   Administer any medical procedures that are necessary before the victims can be
              moved.

          −   Stabilize or permanently fix the hazardous condition.


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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
          −   Attend to what caused the emergency and anything damaged or endangered by the
              emergency (e.g., drums, tanks).

     •    Transport using either on-site or off-site assets.

     •    Casualty Logging-Record who, time, destination and condition upon transport.

     •    Evacuate:

          −   Move site personnel to the rally point, a safe distance upwind of the incident.

          −   Monitor the incident for significant changes; the hazards may diminish, permitting
              personnel to re-enter the site, or hazards may increase and require public evacuation.

     •    Casualty Tracking-Record disposition, condition and location.

6.13.9.4 Post Emergency Follow-up

     Before normal site activities can resume, the site and personnel must be prepared and
equipped to handle another emergency. It is also imperative that all federal, state and local
regulatory agencies be notified of the emergency. Therefore, the following activities must be
conducted prior to resumption of site activities:

     •    Notify all appropriate governmental agencies as required (i.e. OSHA must be notified if
          there have been any fatalities or three or more personnel hospitalized)

     •    Restock and clean all equipment and supplies utilized or damaged in the emergency.

     •    UXOSO should conduct an accident investigation to determine the cause of the
          emergency and what preventative measures could be taken to ensure the emergency does
          not occur again.

     •    Complete the CESPK Accident Investigation Report (Eng Form 3394) and any other
          governmental or Parsons forms (Attachment A).

     •    Review and revise, as needed the SSHP to reflect the new procedures.

6.13.10 Contingency Plans

     The following paragraphs contain emergency specific contingency plans. These plans outline
the procedures for mitigating potential emergency situations identified in paragraph 16.13.1. Any
changes to these plans must be approved by the PHSO.

6.13.10.1 Injury or Illness

     In the event of an emergency involving personal injury or illness, immediate response will be
key in preventing further harm and providing comfort to the affected party. When personnel are
injured or overcome by illness, the following procedure will be followed:




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
     •    Upon notification of the occurrence and nature of the injury/illness the OSIC will, if
          deemed necessary, summon emergency personnel.

     •    The OSIC or SUXOS will assess the severity of the injury/illness and direct personnel to
          provide CPR/First aid as needed.

     •    If immediate life support is not required, or once the victim is stabilized, and if required,
          transport victim to the appropriate medical facility for further attention.

6.13.10.2 Fire or Explosion

6.13.10.2.1     Small Fire
     A small fire is defined as a fire that can be extinguished with a 4A:20B:C type fire
extinguisher. In the event of a small fire, site personnel will take the following actions:

     •    All unnecessary personnel will be evacuated from the immediate area, to an upwind
          location.

     •    Extinguish the fire using portable fire extinguishers or by smothering from an upwind
          location.

     •    Request emergency response assistance (ambulance, fire, police) as needed.

     •    Do not attempt to extinguish a fire, even a small one, involving explosives.

     •    Notify the UXOSO, FOM and the CESPK representative.

6.13.10.2.2     Large Fires
        In the event of a large fire (or small fire which cannot be extinguished), the following
actions will be taken:

     •    All unnecessary personnel will be evacuated from the site, to an upwind location.

     •    The Fort Ord Fire Department, Fort Ord Environmental Office and/or other emergency
          response services (police, ambulance, hospital, etc.) will be notified as needed by the
          OSIC.

     •    OSIC will meet fire Department and direct them to location of fire.

     •    Notify the CESPK representative.

6.13.10.2.3     Explosion
         In the event of an explosion, all nonessential personnel will evacuate and help secure the
site, the OSIC will request the required support equipment and personnel, and the CESPK
representative will be notified. It is essential that the site be evacuated and no one is allowed to




                                                  6-57
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
re-enter, except to possibly save a life, until at least 30 minutes or longer if necessary, after the
explosion. The OSIC will determine what actions are appropriate.

6.13.11 Chemical Spills

     A spill kit will be maintained at the site in case a chemical being used at the site (such as oil or
gasoline) is spilled. The kit will include spill absorbers (spill socks, pads, and pillows), and
disposable bags. Approximately 18 gallons of spilled oil, coolants, fuels or water can be absorbed
using the contents of the kit.

     All spills will be immediately reported to on-site CESPK representatives per procedures
outlined in Section 12.9.1.1 of the Environmental Protection Plan.

6.14       LOGS, REPORTS AND RECORD KEEPING

6.14.1 Logbook

       The FOM will keep a log recording the following aspects related to safety at the site:

       •    Training (initial site specific training, tailgate meetings, etc)

       •    Site visitors

       •    Safety issues or problems encountered

       •    Accidents

       •    Emergencies

6.14.2 Safety Log

     The UXOSO will maintain a daily safety log of all safety related activities. The following
information will be maintained in the safety log:

       •    Date and recorder of log

       •    Tailgate safety briefing (time conducted, material discussed, etc.)

       •    Weather conditions

       •    Significant site events relating to safety

       •    Accidents;

       •    Stop work events related to safety

       •    Safety inspections




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Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
6.14.3 Training Log

     The UXOSO will maintain a training log documenting the following information:

     •    Date of training

     •    Type of training (initial, tailgate briefing, visitor)

     •    Workers or visitors attending training

     •    Signature of UXOSO

6.14.4 Equipment Maintenance

     The Senior UXO Specialist will document the results of daily check of heavy equipment using
the Heavy Equipment Daily Inspection List (Attachment A).

6.14.5 Record Keeping

      The UXOSO will establish and maintain a filing system on-site for health and safety records,
reports, and information concerning individual training, medical surveillance, etc. Sections in this
filing system will include:

     •    Training Records -- Certificates for training required by 29 CFR1910.120 (40-hour initial
          HAZWOPER, 8 hour refresher, and supervisory training) will be maintained at the site.
          Additionally, documentation of CPR and First Aid training will be available at the site.

     •    Medical Monitoring -- Documentation of current enrollment (within last 12 months) in a
          medical monitoring program will be available for each employee working at the site.
          Documentation will consist of the employee's Health Status Report that is written and
          signed by the examining physician.

     •    Accident Reports -- Copies of any accident/incident reports and follow-up reports.

     •    Plan Acceptance Forms -- Copies of the Plan Acceptance Forms documenting that
          employees have read and understand the SSHP will be maintained at the site.

6.14.6 Accident Reporting

     If an injury occurs on-site, the UXOSO is responsible for completing a Parsons’ accident
report form. The UXOSO must submit a copy of this form to PHSO within 24-hours of the injury.
All accidents/incidents must be investigated by the UXOSO. The purpose of the investigation is to
determine the causal factors that lead to the accident/incident and to establish corrective actions to
prevent a recurrence. A completed Parsons Accident Report Follow-UP Form (Attachment A)
must be forwarded to the PHSO within 7 days after the incident. CESPK notification and reporting
will be in accordance with AR 385-40, Accident Reporting and Records, and CESPK Supplement
1 to AR 385-40 (refer to CESPK Form 3394).




                                                    6-59
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
6.15       STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES, ENGINEERING CONTROLS, AND
           SAFE WORK PRACTICES

6.15.1 General Safety

       The following are standard practices for work on Fort Ord sites.

       •    Eating, drinking, chewing tobacco, smoking, and carrying matches or lighters are
            prohibited in a contaminated or potentially contaminated area or where the possibility of
            contamination transfer exists.

       •    Field crewmembers should be alert to all potentially dangerous situations i.e., presence
            of strong, irritating, unusual or nauseating odors.

       •    Field crewmembers shall be familiar with the physical characteristics of a site during
            intrusive investigations, including:

            Wind direction in relation to nearby buildings

            Accessibility to associates, equipment, vehicles, communication

            Hot zone (areas of known or suspected contamination)

            Site access

            Nearest water sources

            Protective equipment as specified in this SSHP will be used by workers throughout the
            Fort Ord project.

            Use of heavy equipment on-site, i.e., trucks, and bobcats, presents additional hazards for
            site workers. For example, the vision of a backhoe operator is limited, so all field
            crewmembers should stay clear when backhoe is operating.

            Wearing personal protective equipment can result in an impairment of the ability to
            operate site equipment. All field crewmembers should pay specific attention to
            decreased performance capabilities resulting from the use of personal protective
            equipment, such as poor tactile skills when wearing certain types of gloves. Prior
            knowledge of limitations imposed by the use of such equipment and clothing will allow
            the worker to assess the decrease in his or her capability to perform field operations in a
            safe manner.

            Wearing of jewelry, such as loose bracelets and necklaces is prohibited in order to avoid
            its entanglement in site machinery.

            Overhead power lines, downed electrical wires, and buried cables pose a danger of shock
            or electrocution if workers contact or sever them during site operations. The location of
            these potential hazards should be ascertained before beginning site activities.

            Buddy system procedures will be enforced during site operations.


                                                   6-60
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
          Site personnel will perform only those tasks that they are qualified to perform.

          Site visitors are to be escorted by qualified personnel at all times.

          Running and horseplay are prohibited in all areas of the site.

          The number of personnel in the exclusion zone will be the minimum number necessary
          to perform work tasks in a safe and efficient manner.




                                                  6-61
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
    PARSONS



                            PLAN ACCEPTANCE FORM
I, the undersigned, have read and have been verbally briefed on the topics noted above
and in the SSHP; I understand the SSHP and agree to comply with all the indicated safety
and health requirements:

  PRINTED NAME              ORGANIZATION                   SIGNATURE                  DATE




                    UXOSO                                    Signature                 Date



                      FOM                                    Signature                 Date
                                                                                       ACCIDENT REPORT FORM
     PARSONS
                                                                                                    Page 1 of 2


Employer

1.   Name:
2.   Mail Address:
                            (No. and Street)                      (City or Town)                       (State and Zip)

3.   Location :
                  (if different from mail address)
Injured or ill employee

4.   Name:                                                              Social Sec. No.:
                  (first)               (middle)             (last)     Employee No:
5.   Home Address:
                            (No. and Street)                      (City or Town)                       (State and Zip)

6.   Age:                                      7. Sex: male ( ) female ( )
8.   Date of injury or illness:                                           Time of accident:
9.   Occupation:
                       (specific job title, not the specific activity employee was performing at time of
     injury)

10. Department:
                   (enter name of department in which injured person is employed, even though they
     may have been temporarily working in another department at the time of injury)
The accident or occupational illness

11. Place of accident of exposure:
                                               (No. and Street)             (City or Town)             (State and Zip)

12. Project:
13. Was place of accident or exposure on employer's premises?                            Yes ( )           No ( )
14 How did the accident occur?
     (Describe fully the events that resulted in the injury or occupational illness.


     Tell what happened and how. Name objects and substances involved. Give details on all factors that
     led to accident. (Use separate sheet for additional space.)
                                                                                     ACCIDENT REPORT FORM
    PARSONS
                                                                                                  Page 2 of 2


15. What was the employee doing when injured?
                                                               (Be specific--was employee using tools or
    equipment

    or handling material?)



16 WITNESS TO
    ACCIDENT                         (Name)                               (Affiliation)                     (Phone No.)


                                     (Name)                               (Affiliation)                     (Phone No.)

17 Name the object or substance that directly injured the employee.
                                                                                          (For example, object

    that struck employee; the vapor or poison inhaled or swallowed; the chemical or radiation that


    irritated the skin; or in cases of strains, hernias, etc., the object the employee was lifting, pulling, etc.)

18. Did the accident result in employee fatality?                       Yes ( )              No ( )
19. Number of lost days ____/restricted workdays ____ resulting from injury or illness?
Other

20. Name and address of physician:
                                              (No. and Street)             (City or Town)                (State and Zip)
21. If hospitalized, name and address:
                                    (No. and Street)                       (City or Town)                (State and Zip)
22. Initial diagnosis of injury/occupational illness:
    Date of report:                                    Prepared by:
    Official position:
23. Treatment rendered:             ( ) first aid                          ( ) medical treatment
   PARSONS




ACCIDENT REPORT FOLLOW-UP

Employee:___________________________         Date of injury or illness: ____________________

ANALYSIS - What caused the accident. Why did it happen:
Primary                                                                     cause:
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
Contributing factors:
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________

PREVENTIVE/CORRECTIVE ACTION - State what will be done to prevent re-occurrence.


Immediate action:
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
Who is responsible ____________________         Completion date(s):________________________
Long-term action:
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
 _______________________________________________________________________________
Who is responsible ____________________         Completion date(s):________________________
Closed by _______________________________________________________________________
              Project Health and Safety Officer                        date
                       Safety Meeting Attendance Log
 Date:                     Time:                  Contract Number:
                                                  DACA05-00-D-0003
 Location: Fort Ord
 Weather Conditions:                      Temp:
                                          Wind:
 SAFETY MEETING TOPICS.
 (BRIEFLY DESCRIBE.)




                                     Attendees:

            Name                     Signature             Company




UXOSO Signature___________________                Date____________________
                                         Daily Safety Inspection Log
Date:                                          Time:                                          Location:               Fort Ord
Weather Conditions:
Type of Inspections:        Daily                   Weekly                     Special                       Reinspection
Location inspected: (List by team, grid
number, coordinates, or description)
Activity inspected:

II. Inspection Requirement                               Satisfactory                 Unsatisfactory                        N/A
Vegetation Removal
Geophysical Survey
Surface Sweep (OE Removal)
Subsurface Sweep (OE Removal)
Evacuation Technique
Personal Protection Equipment
Work Practices
Site Control
First Aid Equipment
Fire Fighting Equipment
Explosives Transportation
Explosives Storage
Disposal Operations




Overall Inspection Results:            Satisfactory                                         Unsatisfactory

III. Comments:



        •   Work stopped due to safety violation:        Yes                                   No

        •   Safety violations noted:
        •   Personnel involved:
        •   Corrective Measures
        •   Reinspection required                        Yes                                   No

IV. Signatures: I acknowledge that I have been briefed on the results of this inspection and will take corrective actions (if necessary).
________________________________________                            _________________________________________
UXOSO                                                                Sr. UXO Supervisor/Project Manager
                                      PARSONS
                                Contract No. DACA-05-00-D-0003

                            Weekly Vehicle/Equipment Inspection

Vehicle/Equipment Data

Date:__________________                                     Team:______________________

Mileage:                                                    Hour Meter:_____________

Type of Equipment:____________________________________________

Model:_______________________________

License No.:____________________________

                                 All vehicles must be cleaned weekly.
Note: Inspections should be performed weekly or accordingly to the recommended interval which ever is
less.

Vehicle/Equipment Areas Inspected



                                                  Remarks

Seatbelts                Pass       Fail          ________________________________________

Windshield               Pass       Fail          ________________________________________

Tire Pressure            Pass       Fail          ________________________________________

Fire Extinguisher        Pass       Fail          ________________________________________

Brakes
           Service       Pass       Fail          ________________________________________

           Parking       Pass       Fail          ________________________________________

Back-up Alarm            Pass       Fail   N/A    ________________________________________

Horn                     Pass       Fail          ________________________________________
Lights

         Driving         Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

         Hazards         Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

         Turn Signals    Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

         Back Up         Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

Fluid Level              Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

Engine

         Oil             Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

         Coolant         Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

         Hoses           Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

         Belts           Pass     Fail      ________________________________________

All Gages and Indicators operational
                          Yes      No       ________________________________________

Serviced within recommended intervals
                        Yes      No         ________________________________________

Registration
                         Yes      No        ________________________________________

Insurance Card
                         Yes      No        ________________________________________

Current Vehicle Tags
                         Yes      No        ________________________________________

Damaged Sidewalls
                         Yes      No        ________________________________________


Comments: _________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________


Operator: ______________________________________ Date: _______________________________

Date Completed by UXOSO: ______________________ CC: USACE          Maintenance    Safety
    ATTACHMENT 6-B
PROCEDURES AND PROGRAMS
HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM
                       HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM

      The purpose of this Hearing Conservation Program is to provide protection for employees
from adverse health effects associated with occupational exposure to noise. The program consists
of annual audiometric testing of workers, annual employee training, selection and use of hearing
protection, and noise monitoring. All Parsons’ employees and subcontractors must comply with
this program.

Audiometric Testing Program

      Audiometric testing shall be made available to all employees whose exposures equal or
exceed an 8-hour time- weighted average of 85 decibels. Audiometric tests shall be performed by
a licensed or certified audiologist, otolaryngologist, or physician who is certified by the Council
of Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation. Each employee assigned to noisy
operations must receive a baseline audiogram prior to assignment and yearly testing thereafter for
as long as that employee is exposed to excessive noise levels (8-hour time- weighted average of
85 decibels or greater). Each employee's annual audiogram is compared to that employee's
baseline audiogram to determine if the audiogram is valid and if a standard threshold shift has
occurred. (A standard threshold shift is a change in hearing threshold relative to the baseline
audiogram of an average of 10 dB or more at 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz in either ear.) This
comparison should be done by a physician.

      If a comparison of the annual audiogram to the baseline audiogram indicates a standard
threshold shift has occurred, the employee shall be informed of this fact in writing, within 21 days
of the determination. The following steps are taken by the UXOSO when a standard threshold
shift occurs:

    •     Employees not using hearing protectors shall be fitted with hearing protectors, trained
          in their use and care, and required to use them.
    •     Employees already using hearing protectors shall be refitted and retrained in the use of
          hearing protectors and provided with hearing protectors offering greater attenuation if
          necessary.
    •     The employee shall be referred for a clinical audiological evaluation or an otological
          examination, as appropriate, if additional testing is necessary.
    •     The employee is informed of the need for an otological examination if a medical
          pathology of the ear that is unrelated to the use of hearing protectors is suspected.


      Audiometric tests shall be pure tone, air conduction, hearing threshold examinations, with
test frequencies including as a minimum 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, and 6000 Hz. tests at each
frequency shall be taken separately for each ear. Audiometric tests shall be conducted with
audiometers (including microprocessor audiometers) that meet the specifications of, and are
maintained and used in accordance with, American National Standard Specification for
Audiometers, S3.6-1969. The functional operation of the audiometer shall be checked before each
day's use by testing a person with known, stable hearing thresholds, and by listening to the
audiometer's output to make sure that the output is free from distorted or unwanted sounds.
Audiometer calibration shall be checked acoustically at least annually in accordance with OSHA
requirement (29 CFR 1910.95 Appendix E)

Hearing Protectors

     The UXOSO shall make hearing protectors available to all Parsons and subcontract
employees exposed to an 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels or greater. Hearing
protection for this project will consist of earmuffs or foam fitting earplugs. The selection of
hearing protector will be based upon noise attenuation requirements for the task and worker
comfort.

Employee Training

     The UXOSO will develop a hearing conservation training program for all employees
assigned to noisy work. This training will be a component of the initial site safety training. As a
minimum the training shall consist of:

    •    The effects of noise on hearing.
    •    The purpose of hearing protectors, the advantages, disadvantages, and attenuation of
         various types, and instructions on selection, fitting, use, and care.
    •    The purpose of audiometric testing, and an explanation of the test procedures.


Noise Monitoring

     When operations are anticipated to exceed the 8-hour time-weighted average of 85 decibels,
the UXOSO shall implement a noise monitoring program. The sampling shall be used to:

    •    Verify that appropriate hearing protection is being used by employees
    •    Identify the boundaries of the noise hazard area in accordance with Section 05.C.07 of
         EM 385-1-1.


Instruments used to measure employee noise exposure shall be calibrated to ensure accuracy.
HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM
                           HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM

Introduction

     The OSHA Hazard Communications Standard (29 CFR 1910.1200) was promulgated to
ensure that all chemicals would be evaluated and information regarding the associated chemical
hazards would be communicated appropriately. The goal of the standard is to reduce the number of
chemically related occupational illnesses and injuries.

    In order to comply with the OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, this written program has
been established by Parsons for work at Fort Ord. All Parsons and subcontractor personnel
working at Fort Ord are included in this program.

Hazardous chemical inventory list

        Hazardous chemicals used at Fort Ord include industrial chemicals such as fuels, oils, and
greases. The UXOSO will maintain an inventory of hazardous chemicals brought onto Fort Ord.

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

     MSDSs are prepared by manufacturers or producers to provide specific information on the
safety precautions and health effects of a particular chemical or mixture. The MSDS contains at a
minimum the following information:

    •    Chemical and common names
    •    Physical and chemical characteristics
    •    Physical hazards
    •    Health hazards
    •    Primary routes of entry
    •    Exposure limits
    •    Carcinogenic potential
    •    Handling and protective precautions
    •    Control measures
    •    Emergency and first aid procedures
    •    Date of MSDS preparation
    •    Name and address of manufacturer
     When chemicals are ordered, the Site Manager or his designee will specify on the purchase
order that chemicals are not to be shipped without corresponding MSDSs. When chemicals and
MSDSs arrive, they will be reviewed for completeness by the UXOSO or his designee. Should any
MSDS be incomplete, a letter or FAX will be sent immediately to the manufacturer requesting the
additional information, Parsons or its subcontractors will not accept (at Fort Ord sites) any shipped
chemical materials without an MSDS.
      A complete file of MSDSs for all hazardous chemicals to which an employee of Parsons may
be exposed will be kept in labeled files on-site. MSDSs for chemicals anticipated to be used at the
site are provided at the end of this attachment. In the event that an MSDS is missing the employee
should immediately contact the UXOSO or PHSO.

   MSDSs at this site will be reviewed during periodic audits by the PHSO. Should there be any
MSDS that has not been updated within the past year a new MSDS will be requested.

Labels ad Other Forms of Warning

   The Hazard Communication Standard requires that hazardous chemicals be labeled by
manufacturers. The label must contain the following:

    •    Chemical identity
    •    Appropriate warnings
    • Name and address of manufacturer, importer, or other responsible party.
    If the labels are incomplete or missing, Parsons’ personnel will refuse the shipment.

     When chemicals are transferred from the manufacturer’s containers to secondary containers,
the Site Manager or UXOSO will ensure that the containers are labeled with the identity of the
chemicals and appropriate hazard warnings. Labels for secondary containers can be obtained from
the UXOSO.

    The entire labeling procedure will be reviewed at least annually and changed as necessary.

Employee Information And Training

     Prior to starting work Parsons and its subcontractors’ employees will attend a site specific
safety and health training course. This course will include Hazard Communication Training to
review the contents of this program and learn the hazards associated with each listed hazardous
chemical. The training will be performed by the UXOSO. The format will be classroom training.

Training Topics

    The site training or HAZCOM will include:

    •    An overview of the requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
    •    The labeling system and how to use it
    •    How to review MSDS and where they are kept
    •    Chemicals present in work operations
    •    Physical and health effects of hazardous chemicals
    •    Methods and observation techniques used to determine the presence or release of
         hazardous chemicals in the area
    •    PPE and work practices to reduce or prevent exposure to chemicals
    •    Steps to be taken to prevent or reduce exposure to chemicals
    •    Safety-emergency procedures to follow if exposure occurs
    •    Location and availability of written program/MSDSs
    Following the training session(s), each employee will sign and date the training record.
Additional training may be provided by the UXOSO, with the introduction of each new hazardous
chemical. Records of additional training will be maintained.

On-Site Contractors And Visitors

     Parsons understands that at times other persons may be on the work site. New contractors,
subcontractors and visitors will be required to attend site health and safety training to familiarize
them with the contents of this document and the specific hazards associated with Fort Ord. New
contractors, subcontractors and visitors will be provided with the following information:

    •    Hazardous chemicals to which the contractor’s employees or visitors may be exposed
    •    Precautions necessary to protect employees during normal operating conditions and
         foreseeable emergencies
    •    Labeling system used in the work place
     It is the responsibility of the Site Manager and/or UXOSO to ensure that all MSDSs of
chemicals to which the contractor’s employees or visitors may be exposed are made available at a
central location in the work place along with an example of the labeling system in use. Visitors
and subcontractors will be informed of the availability of this information and its location.

Program review

    This written hazard communications program for Parsons will be reviewed by the PHSO or
Corporate Health and Safety Manger at least annually and updated as necessary.

Reviewed and Approved:

                                             Project HSO:



                               Field Operations Manager:
                                         CHAPTER 7
                             LOCATION SURVEYS, MAPPING
                                              AND
                    GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM PLAN

7.1       GENERAL

      This Surveying, Mapping, and GIS Plan, outlines the tools and methodologies used for the
efficient and accurate completion of surveying, mapping, and GIS operations.

     The plan is divided into three sections that are outlined below. The first section focuses on
surveying and discusses the methodology and equipment to be used and the accuracy requirements
to be met to locate and record spatial coordinates. The second section identifies the various
hardware, software, data, personnel and methods required to implement a fully functioning
Geographical Information System (GIS). The final section discusses the necessary equipment, data
and structure for database design and information management.

      Surveying:

      •    Control Points

      •    MRS Site Boundaries

      •    MRS Grids

      •    Military Munitions (MM) Items Encountered

      •    Other Items as Required

      •    Safety

      •    Equipment

      •    Accuracy

      •    Quality Control




                                                7-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
     GIS:

     •      Hardware

     •      Software

     •      File Formats and Requirements

     •      Metadata Requirements

     •      GIS Data Directory Structure

     •      Data Distribution

     •      General Map Requirements

     •      Documentation

     •      Staffing

     •      Quality Control

     Database and Information Management:

     •      Hardware

     •      Software

     •      Structure and Design

     •      Database Backup routines

     •      Database User Administration

     •      Data Capture

     •      Data Distribution

     •      Digital image catalogue

     •      Staffing

     •      Quality Control




                                            7-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                  May 2004
7.2         LOCATION SURVEYS

7.2.1       Control Points

     All work on the site is based on established monumentation. The coordinate system to be
used for control points and other survey activities is NAD 83 California State Plane Zone IV. All
control points used for base lines meet the standards established by the Federal Geodetic Control
Committee (FGCC) for Third Order, Class 1 survey and published in the publication
"Classification, Standards of Accuracy and General Specifications of Geodetic Control Surveys"
(September 1984) and "Specifications to Support Classification, Standards of Accuracy, and
General Specifications of Geodetic Control Surveys” (1980). All control points recovered and/or
established at the site will be plotted on planimetric drawings at the appropriate coordinate location
and will be identified by name or number. The final adjusted coordinates will be shown, and a
tabulated master list of all points is provided.

     Copies of all field books, layout sheets, computation sheets, abstracts and computer printouts
will be maintained for inclusion in the Final Report.

7.2.1.1 Monument Caps

     The caps for the new monuments will be stamped in consecutive order. The name and
identification to be stamped on each cap will be provided by CESPK. The following is an example
of consecutive monument cap identification:

ORD-1-2000                         ORD-2-2000                        ORD-3-2000
CESPK                              CESPK                             CESPK

     The dies for stamping the numeric and alphabetic figures into the caps shall be 1/8-inch to
3/16-inch in size. All coordinates and elevations shall be depicted to the nearest one-thousandth of
a meter (0.001 m) and one-hundredth of a foot (0.01 ft).

7.2.1.2 Plotting

       The location, identification, coordinates and elevations of all control points recovered and/or
established at the site and the corners of all areas cleared of MEC will be plotted on site maps
drawn at a scale of 1 inch = 200 feet on reproducible materials. All drawings will show locations
in relation to the surface and planimetric features within the project area.

7.2.1.3 Description Cards

    A Description Card for each control point used will be submitted to CESPK with the tabulated
master list of all points. The Description Cards include the following:

        •    A north arrow;

        •    A sketch of each monument with its location relative to reference marks, buildings,
             roads, railroads, towers, etc.

        •    A detailed, typed description telling how to locate the monument from an easily
             identifiable point;



                                                  7-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
        •    A sketch showing how to locate the monument;

        •    The monument's name or number;

        •    The final adjusted coordinates and elevations in meters (to the closest 0.001m) and feet
             (to the closest 0.01 ft.).

    The Description Cards are 5" X 8" describing one monument per card. If any damaged
monuments are found, they will be clearly identified and reported to CESPK.

7.2.2       MRS Boundaries

     Boundaries for MRS on Fort Ord have been previously identified and placed into digital
format. Before MM clearance activities begin on an MRS, the boundary of the site will be loaded
into RTK-GPS receivers, which will then be used to survey and stake the MRS boundary. In areas
where terrain or vegetation precludes the use of RTK-GPS, standard surveying methods will be
used. This boundary will serve as the limit of MM investigation for the specific MRS.

7.2.3       Operating Grids

     A grid system, referred to as the, CESPK Former Fort Ord Master Grid System, has been
established for the Fort Ord MMRP. These grids measure 100 feet by 100 feet. An example of this
grid layout is shown in Figure 7-1. Corner points for these grids will be loaded into RTK-GPS
receivers for location of grid corners on the actual terrain. In areas where terrain or vegetation
precludes the use of RTK-GPS, standard surveying methods will be used in coordination with
CESPK.




                                                   7-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
                           Figure 7-1: Removal Action Grid Layout



7.2.4   MM Items Encountered

    Spatial location of MM items encountered will be surveyed in one of two ways. The first
method employs GPS technology to mark the location of the MM item, where deemed appropriate
based on vegetation cover, terrain, and other factors. The second method is the standard MM item




                                               7-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                        May 2004
location method-using x and y distances from the southwest corner of the search grid. Selection of
the appropriate survey method for MM items encountered will be coordinated with CESPK.

7.2.5      Other Items as Required

     Throughout the course of the project, it is anticipated that the location of other items or
features such as roads, firebreaks, fences, power lines, etc. will need to be determined. The
location of these items will be acquired with RTK-GPS technology where possible, and with
standard surveying procedures where terrain and or vegetation preclude such acquisition. Selection
of the appropriate survey method for other items will be coordinated with CESPK. In the event of
MM removal activities along firebreaks or roads, clearance grids will be designed and located
using the above mentioned survey methods.

7.2.6      Safety

     Accompany all survey or mapping crews will be UXO technicians serving as safety escorts.
The escorts will perform visual surface surveys (conducted en route), and magnetometer surveys at
the location of any new monuments or markers. No excavation of any kind will be initiated until
the area has been verified as safe by the UXO technician. All personnel entering the work site will
adhere to U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center, Huntsville’s “Safety Concepts and Basic
Considerations for Unexploded Explosive Ordnance Operations.”

7.2.7      Equipment

     Equipment used in surveying activities on the project will include, but not be limited to, RTK-
GPS base station and rover(s), mapping grade GPS rovers, and survey total station. In most cases,
the survey equipment to be used will be RTK-GPS; use of other survey equipment and methods
will be coordinated with CESPK.

7.2.8      Accuracy

     Survey accuracy will be dependant upon the equipment and methods used for a specific
survey. The RTK-GPS technology can achieve sub-centimeter accuracy. Mapping grade GPS,
with differential correction, can achieve sub-meter accuracy. Total station surveys can also achieve
sub-centimeter accuracy. Accuracy requirements, equipments and methods to be used for specific
surveying tasks will be coordinated with CESPK.

7.2.9      Quality Control

      The GIS Manager will be responsible for QC and validation of the survey data. Survey data
received from the field will be checked against existing surveys for accuracy and completeness.
The data will also be checked to ensure that labeling is correct and follows the project standard set
for the features surveyed.

7.3        GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM

7.3.1      GIS Hardware

        The GIS hardware for the project will consist of the following:




                                                    7-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
        •   Server

        •   GIS workstations

        •   Large format color inkjet plotter

     All of the GIS data, map files, metadata and user manuals will be stored on the server. The
server will have a RAID 5 storage array, tape backup system and an uninterruptible power supply
(UPS) to ensure maximum data integrity. The GIS workstations will be high-end computers with
large monitors designed for the intense computing and display requirements of GIS. The inkjet
plotter will be capable of high speed plotting of E size (34 inch x 44 inch) maps.

7.3.2       Software

        The following software will be used specifically for the Project GIS:

        •    ESRI ArcView ™ (with appropriate extensions)

        •    ESRI ArcInfo ™ (with appropriate extensions)

        •    ARCIMS ™

        •    ERDAS Imagine ™

        •    AutoCad Map ™

        •    GPS data processing software (varies depending upon vendor)

      Maps generated for the project will be created and stored in the latest version of ArcView™.
Vector GIS data will be created, modified, and analyzed using ArcView™ and its extensions and
ArcInfo™. Raster GIS data processing will be done in Imagine ™. ARCIMS™ will be used to
distribute appropriate GIS data layers and maps over the Internet. AutoCad Map™ will be used in
the process of converting historical GIS files, which are currently in AutoCad™ .dwg files. Any
GPS data processing software used will correspond to the appropriate GPS hardware provider (e.g.
Leica, Trimble, etc.).

7.3.3       File Formats and Requirements

      GIS vector data for the project will be stored in either ArcInfoTM coverages, ArcViewTM shape
files or in a personal Geodatabase. Raster files such as orthophotography and geophysical
pseudocolor maps will be stored as TIFF (.tif) files with .tfw world files defining the geospatial
location and resolution of the image.

7.3.4       Metadata Requirements

     Metadata for each coverage and shape file is generated using the metadata generator in the
ArcInfoTM ArcCatalog module. This software creates an .xml file, which will be available for
viewing in ArcCatalog or in any web browser. FGDC metadata will be maintained for all final GIS
data files and will be included with the data when it is distributed.




                                                    7-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
7.3.5     GIS Data Directory Structure

     The GIS data directory structure will follow the standards set forth by CESPK GIS. The
following directory tree depicts this structure:

        ../Fort_Ord_GIS

             GIS_Project (Location of ArcView .apr and ArcInfo .mxd map files)

             Graphics     (Location of logos, raster images and plot files)

            Master_Coverage (Location of all final vector GIS data files)

            Working_Files (Location of vector GIS data files that are not finalized)

        The directory structure under Master_Coverage has been established by CESPK GIS,
based on the Corps of Engineers Spatial Data Standards (SDS). Any modifications to the primary
GIS directory structure will be made in coordination with CESPK GIS.

7.3.6     Data Distribution

     Updates made to the primary coverages and shape files in the Master_Coverage directory will
be submitted to the CESPK GIS office on a quarterly basis, or as requested. Additionally, updates
to these files received from CESPK will be incorporated into the project GIS upon receipt. Data
transfer between Parsons and CESPK will be accomplished electronically, on DLT tape, or on CD
depending upon the size and format of the data.

7.3.7     General Map Requirements

     Maps will be created in a variety of sizes (e.g. 8 ½ x 11, 11 x 17, 22 x 34, 34 x 44, 36 x 36)
depending upon the cartographic requirements to present the chosen data. Each sheet/set will have
a size/type standard border, revision block, title block, complete index sheet layout (if set), scale
bar, legend, and north arrow, date, author, (initials) and name of map document (.apr or .mxd).
This variety of sizes and layouts will be used to best present and describe the data and/or analysis
included.

7.3.8     Documentation

      The project GIS documentation will consist of two documents. The first document is a GIS
Users Manual. This manual will be designed to provide new users with appropriate, detailed
information to enable them to quickly and easily use the project GIS. The second document is a
list containing pertinent information about map documents such as date of creation, map title,
author, etc. This will enable subsequent users to identify and print the appropriate map when a
map request is received.

7.3.8.1 GIS Users Manual

     The GIS user’s manual will include the GIS directory structure, standard operating procedures
(SOPs), programming scripts and code, and pointers to reference material. It will show examples
of how GIS tasks are completed for the project. Additionally, there will be a section addressing



                                                   7-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
solutions to common problems that have been solved by the GIS staff. The GIS user’s manual will
be updated regularly, and will be submitted to CESPK Monterey Office quarterly and/or as
requested.

7.3.8.2 GIS Project Tracking

     GIS projects (e.g. .apr and .mxd files) used for maps will be tracked in a list. The name of the
project file, requestor, creator, date of creation, most recent date of modification, and map content
will be tracked. This will facilitate the modification and update of maps at a later date, possibly by
other users. This tracking file will be submitted quarterly and as requested, to CESPK Monterey
Project Office.

7.3.9     Staffing

      The project GIS staff will consist of a GIS Manager and GIS analyst(s). The number of
analysts required by the project may vary with workload, with a minimum of one analyst on staff at
all times.

7.3.9.1 GIS Manager

     The GIS Manager is responsible for high-level management of the overall GIS and database
program. A person with a broad knowledge of GIS applications, capabilities and overall system
requirements fills this position. Specific duties include the day-to-day management responsibilities
of GIS projects, staff, and budget. The GIS Manager coordinates project GIS needs with the PM,
FOM, PG, and other project staff as necessary. The GIS Manager coordinates regularly with the
CESPK GIS Manager and other USACE personnel as required. The GIS Manager also oversees
the Database Manager and provides high-level oversight of the development of the database users,
structure and applications.

7.3.9.2 GIS Analyst

       The GIS Analyst performs the day-to-day GIS tasks for the project. The analyst position is
filled with a person having specific hands-on experience using the project GIS software. Duties
include creating and modifying GIS data layers; creating maps for field use, presentations, and
final reports; and integrating the MMRP database with the GIS.

7.3.10 Quality Control

     Procedures for quality control of GIS data will be implemented. The GIS Manager will
oversee spatial accuracy of new GIS data, which will be checked against known locations using
existing survey data and/or digital orthophotography. Additionally, a comparison of the
ArcCatalog metadata and the GIS data file will be made to ensure that the metadata is correct.

7.4       DATABASE MANAGEMENT

7.4.1     Hardware

        Database management hardware consists of the following:




                                                  7-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
        •    Server

        •    Workstations

     The database and related files are stored on the server. As discussed in the GIS section, the
server will have a RAID 5 storage array, tape backup system and an uninterruptible power supply
(UPS). The operating system of the server will be Windows 2000™, which provides a high level
of security for the database. Database management will be accomplished on workstations having
adequate RAM and processor speeds to handle the database tasks.

7.4.2       Software

        The following software will be used for database management:

        •    Microsoft™ SQL Server 2000

        •    Microsoft™ Office Professional 2002 (including Microsoft Access)

        •    Microsoft™ Visual Basic

        •    Microsoft™ InterDev

        •    Seagate™ Crystal Reports

7.4.3       Structure and Design

     The structure and design of the database will be accomplished in coordination with CESPK
personnel. There will be three main components to the database: MM, Geophysical, and Cost and
Scheduling, which are detailed below.

7.4.3.1 MMRP Database

      The MMRP database will provide a common repository for data collected from MM removal
efforts. The MMRP database will be maintained on a computer system that provides for control
over data access. This database shall be used to catalogue MM actions in an organized fashion so
that reporting and querying will be possible. The database will be submitted to CESPK Monterey
Project Office quarterly and as requested.

7.4.3.2 Geophysical Database

     The information management team will design a geophysical database for tracking of
fieldwork and reporting of data. This will be designed in cooperation with the Project Geophysicist
to meet overall program and site specific geophysical objectives such as reporting of survey team
information, anomaly picks, dig sheet production, geophysical file index, and project analysis. The
database will be designed with forms for categories such as geophysical processing data. Reports
and analysis will be created with queries that allow users to access and analyze data from multiple
tables and multiple records.




                                                 7-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
7.4.3.3 Cost and Scheduling Database

     The cost and scheduling database will be used to track the cost and time effort involved in all
aspects of MM clearance activity. The data captured in this database can be used for analyzing
costs for specific sites and activities.

7.4.4   Data Capture Methods

     Parsons will capture field data digitally with hand held computers. These units will be
capable of downloading the data to the appropriate database with minimum user assistance. This
method of data capture will greatly reduce the number of potential errors, which normally occurs
during the transcription and data entry process. This method will also reduce the time between data
capture in the field and inclusion in the database.

7.4.5   Data Distribution

     Updates made to the database will be submitted to the CESPK GIS office on a quarterly basis,
or as requested. As with the GIS updates, data transfer between Parsons and CESPK will be
accomplished electronically, on DLT tape, or on CD in coordination with CESPK.

7.4.6   Staffing

     Primary staffing of database activities will consist of two individuals, a Database Manager,
and a Data Entry Specialist. Additional data entry staff may be required depending upon project
workload. The responsibilities of these individuals are described below.

7.4.6.1 Database Manager

     The Database Manager will oversee and coordinate database activities on the project. The
Database Manager will have significant database experience and will perform routine database
functions such as user management, table creation and modification, query development, form
creation and report design. The Database Manager will also train and supervise the Data Entry
Specialist and oversee all database modification activities.

7.4.6.2 Data Entry Specialist

     While not explicitly part of the database itself, it is noted here that Parsons will maintain a
catalog of digital images (photographs) acquired during the course of the project. The catalog will
include, at a minimum, a listing of the image names, date taken, location taken, subject matter, and
photographer. This catalog will be submitted to CESPK quarterly and as requested. Photographs
from the catalog will be made available for use by CESPK.

     The Data Entry Specialist will enter data into the database. This will be accomplished by the
following methods: 1) Manual data entry from hardcopy forms; and 2) Digital import of data from
the field data loggers or other data sources. The data entry specialist will check for errors and
problems in the data during the entry and import process.




                                                 7-11
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
7.4.7   Database User Administration

     The Database Manager will be responsible for the administration of database user accounts.
Each user will be given the appropriate level of permissions within the database such that only
authorized personnel can make changes to database values. Read only permissions will be
assigned to users that need to review the data, but who are not authorized to make changes.

7.4.8   Database Backup Routines

     Database backup routines will be established. These routines will be set up for daily and
weekly backups. These backups will be used to restore data to the database in the event of
database corruption or other events requiring the restoration of the data. The Database Manager
will be responsible for these backups. A log of database backups will be generated and maintained.

7.4.9   Database Users Manual

         The database user’s manual will include database standard operating procedures,
programming scripts and code, and pointers to reference material. It will contain a diagram of the
database schema and descriptions of each of the tables and columns. Copies of standard forms,
reports, queries, and views will be included in this manual. The manual will also contain
instructions for administration, maintenance and backup of the database. Additionally, there will
be a section addressing solutions to common problems that have been solved by the database staff.
The database users manual will be updated regularly, and will be submitted to CESPK Monterey
Office quarterly and/or as requested.

7.4.10 Digital Image Catalog

     A digital image catalog will be created which will contain information about digital images
acquired by Parsons. These images include photographs taken to document fieldwork activities,
wildlife sightings, MM items, and other events or items of interest. The image catalog documents
the image name, date taken, subject matter, site or location, direction, photographer, and
miscellaneous comments. The purpose of this catalog is to easily identify digital images that could
potentially be used by CESPK or Parsons in documents or presentations. The digital image catalog
will be updated regularly, and will be submitted to CESPK Monterey Office quarterly and/or as
requested.

7.4.11 Quality Control

     QC of data will be performed in all data acquisition, data processing, data analysis, and data
reporting stages. The Database Manager will be fully responsible for performing and documenting
all database QC. The GIS Manager will supervise the Database Manager in these activities. It
should be noted that these are the fundamental QC steps for information management, and that
individual project sites and scopes may specify additional QC requirements.

    The basic database QC steps at Fort Ord along with the parties responsible for performing the
QC are presented in Table 7-1.




                                                7-12
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
                         Table 7-1: Database QC Action and Responsibilities

          QC Action                       Performed By                       Overseen By

Daily Back Up                      Database Manager                 GIS Manager

Field Data Quality Checks          Database Manager                 GIS Manager

Data Entry Checks                  Database Manager                 GIS Manager

Weekly Data Checks                 Database Manager                 GIS Manager

Data Deliverable Checks            Database Manager                 GIS Manager

      Parsons will perform QC of the data before delivery to CESPK and will include checks and
reviews of the digital data deliverables. Specific checks will include data completeness, quality,
and format checks, which will be entered in the database QC log. QC checks will be applied to
each step of data processing, from data entry on. Overall, these QC checks will help ensure that all
grid surveys and their included grids are entered properly, headers are attached to data files, and
that scanned field forms are included with their corresponding data files. If at any point during this
process the data are found to be deficient, Parsons will take corrective action regarding the data in
question. Automated checking procedures and other timesaving/quality assuring, measures may be
developed throughout the course of this program.




                                                 7-13
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                         CHAPTER 8
                     WORK, DATA, AND COST MANAGEMENT PLAN

8.1        PURPOSE AND APPROACH

     The Work, Data and Cost Management Plan (WDCMP) is prepared for the purpose of
effective management of allocated funds and resources. All work on the Fort Ord Military
Munitions Removal Program (MMRP) project will be accomplished via task orders issued by
CESPK after being planned, scheduled and estimated by Parsons.

     Parsons will aggressively act to prevent cost overruns and schedule slippage. Our Earned
Value Management System (EVMS) is at the heart of the project controls process. Management
emphasis will be combined with continuous quality surveillance to ensure the integrity of the
system. Information provided by the EVMS will be used to communicate status, forecast problems
and facilitate contingency planning and corrective actions.

     Our subcontractor control is centered on the control account managers (CAMs)/functional
managers working with the support of project planner/schedulers and cost engineers. The CAMs
will intensively manage the subcontractors and hold them fully accountable for meeting the
schedule milestones within the task order (TO) budgets and in compliance with designs and
specifications.

8.1.1      Earned Value Management System

      This MMRP requires earned value management (EVM) reporting. This section provides an
overview of the Parsons Integrated Control System (PICS), which is fully compliant with the ANSI
criteria for EVMS. The PICS is being tailored to the scope of this MMRP so as to efficiently,
economically, and effectively provide the necessary cost/schedule management control data to
Parsons and CESPK in a manner consistent with the cost, schedule, and technical skills required for
the successful execution of this project.

     Modifications to the PICS Description are the responsibility of the manager of program
controls for Parsons and are brought to the attention of the Parsons’ customer(s) where EVMS
changes are necessary. Parsons may choose to implement modifications to this PICS Description
prior to customer approval with the understanding that further modifications may be required if the
customer does not approve those implemented system modifications.

     The PICS is composed of six integrated management planning and control functions, which
are described in the following sections:

        Section 8.1.2:   Baseline Development
        Section 8.1.3:   Project Execution and Reporting
        Section 8.1.4:   Material and Subcontract Management
        Section 8.1.5:   Change Control
        Section 8.1.6:   System Surveillance
        Section 8.1.7:   Procedures




                                                8-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
     These major functions are integrated into a comprehensive system that maintains a project’s
cost, schedule and scope baselines and provides for the generation of timely performance
measurement data and reports. The performance measurement reports provide management with
the necessary information to monitor progress, identify significant problems, and implement
corrective actions, as necessary.

8.1.2     Baseline Development

     The baseline development process consists of those activities necessary to achieve integration
of the cost, schedule and scope baselines for a project. The process used to identify cost, schedule,
and scope metrics that will be used to measure project success is referred to as "baseline
development" and is one of the most important activities that the project team must complete. The
Baseline Development process consists of the following processes:

        Project Structure
        Integrated Master Schedule (IMS)
        Planning and Budgeting
        Work Authorization

8.1.2.1 Project Structure

    The PICS provides a well-structured, integrated and organized approach for the
accomplishment of all task orders. The schedule and budget for these tasks and the individuals and
departments responsible for performing the work are specifically identified. Parsons’ approach is
organized to provide the framework for internal and customer reporting in a consistent manner.
The tools employed to clearly identify the project organization are: Work Breakdown Structure
(WBS), Organizational Breakdown Structure (OBS), Responsibility Assignment Matrix (RAM),
and Control Accounts (CA).

     Parsons and CESPK have developed, through multiple iterations, the WBS as shown in Figure
8-1. This WBS forms the basis for developing a basis for work, estimating, costing, and the
measurement of work progress.




                                                 8-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
                                                                                                                      WBS STRUCTURE
                                                                                                                       Former Fort Ord
                                                                                                                  Muntions Response Program
                                                                                                                             1.0
                                                                                                                                Rev. 9 Tuesday, April 13, 2004




 TASK ORDER                                                                                                                                                                                                                     TYPICAL [For
                                              SITE CLEANUP                                                                                                         GENERAL SITE                              RI/FS
 MANAGEMENT                                                                                                                                                                                  PROGRAMMATIC                      Elements Noted]
                                                   739266                                                                                 Task Order 5            IMPROVEMENT                               739219
    739219                                                                                                                                                                                    DOCUMENTS                            SSx0z
                                                     1.3                                                                                                                                                                            1.A
      1.1                                                                                                                                   743710                   739266                     739219
                                                [see typical]                                                                                                                                     1.6        1.8
                                                                                                                                                                       1.4

                                                                                                                                          Watkins Gate
                    MRS-MoCo.2        MRS-SEA.01           MRS-SEA.02        MRS-SEA.03              MRS-SEA.04                            Burn Area                  FUEL BREAKS             WORK PLANS
     GENERAL          06x0z             07x0z                08x0z                                                                                                                                          RI/FS
                                                                               09x0z                   10x0z                                 1.3.38                     REMOVAL                and SOP'S
   MANAGEMENT         1.3.06            1.3.07               1.3.08                                                                                                                                         80yy0              TYPICAL SITE
                                                                               1.3.09                  1.3.10                                38x0z                        42x0z                  60000
      01001                                                                                                                                                                                                 1.8.yy                SSx0z
                                                                                                                                                                          1.4.02                 1.6.01
      1.1.01                                                                                                                               Impact Area                                                                            1.A.SS
                                              MRS R43-48                                                                                                               [see typical]
                                             Burn & Removal                                                                                  Security
                                                                                                                                              1.4.8                   GENERAL SITE
     GIS DATA                                     36x0z
                                                                                                                                              48507                      WORK                                           SITE TPP          INVESTIGATION
   MANAGEMENT                                     1.3.36
                                                                                                                                                                         44000                                           SS100                SS200
                                                                                                                                                                         1.4.04                                         1.A.SS.1             1.A.SS.2
       1.1.02         BURN,                      SITE PREP,                    QC, POST-
                   SUPPORT, AND                  REMOVAL,                    REMOVAL, AND
                    POST-BURN                                                                                 Site TPP
                                                  AND GEO                       SUPPORT
                    ACTIVITIES                                                                                 36103                                                                                                  WORK PLAN               GIS
          GIS                                                                  ACTIVITIES
      MANAGEMENT                                                                                                                                                                                                        SS300                SS400
         01021                                              Build               Quality Control                                                                                                                        1.A.SS.3             1.A.SS.4
                                                                                 Quality Assurance
                                                                                                                 Site
        1.1.02.1                                          Towed Array                 Support               Investigation
                    Prescribed Burn                         36503                    36505                       2003                                                                                                                   AFTER ACTION
                         2003
                                                                                                                36203                                                                                                                      REPORT
                         36703
                                                            Dust                                                                                                                                                                            SS600
       RI/FS                                              Monitoring-            Range Residue                                                                                                                                             1.A.SS.6
    INTERFACE                                              Removal                 Removal
                                                                                                             Work Plan
       01004          Site Security                         36512                    36506
                       Burn 2003                                                                              36303
       1.1.04                                                                                                                                                                                                                   SITE WORK
                          36537
                                                                                 Management                                                                                                                                        SS500
                                       Border Survey      Grid Survey
                                                                                   Support                                                                                                                                        1.A.SS.5
    ESCORTING                              36511             36521
                     Air Monitoring                                                  36538                         GIS
      01005
                        Burn 2003                                                                                 36403
      1.1.05
                         36803         Visual Surface   Special-Case Areas                                                                                                        LEGEND
                                          Removal        Surface Removal         Site Security                                                                                                                         LOCATION             SITE PREP &
                                           36514              36524                Removal                                                                                                                              SURVEY                 REST
    TRAINING              AAR                                                        36517                                                                                                                               SS501                 SS502
      01006            Burn 2003                                                                                                                                                                                       1.A.SS.5.1            1.A.SS.5.2
      1.1.06             36600                                                                                                                                             WBS TITLE
                                         Manual Veg      Mechanical Veg
                                         Clearance
                                           36522
                                                           Clearance
                                                             36532             Erosion Control                                                                        Parsons Job No(s). xxxxxx                         GEOPH
                                                                                    36552                                                                                                                                                 MEC REMOVAL
   FIELD OFFICE                                                                                                                                                        Parsons WBS No. xxxxx                            SURVEY
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              SS504
    CLOSE-OUT                                                                                                                                                                                                            SS503
                                         Analog                                                                                                                       Project WBS No. x.x.xx.x.x                                            1.A.SS.5.4
       01007                                                Removal-                                                                                                                                                   1.A.SS.5.3
       1.1.07                            Removal           Target Areas
                                                              36554                 Sifting
                                          36534
                                                                                    (TBD)
    CONTRACT                                                                                                                                                                                                           QUALITY               RESIDUE
                                                                                    36564
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       CONTROL               REMOVAL
    CLOSE-OUT
                                       Digital Survey
                                                           Anomaly                                                                                                      CODE STRUCTURE                                   SS505                 SS506
      01008                                              Reacquisition
      1.1.08                               36513
                                                            36523               AAR Muntions                                                                              A = 2, 3 or 4 (Level 1)                      1.A.SS.5.5            1.A.SS.5.6
                                                                                  Response                                                                       SS = Two Digit Site Number (Level 2)
    CLOSE-OUT                         Digital Anomaly         Demo                    36601                                                                             x = Site Activity (Level 3)                                       MANAGEMENT
                                                                                                                                                                                                                     SITE SECURITY         & SUPPORT
   OF INDIRECTS                         Excavations            Ops                                                                                                z = Site Work Sub Activity ( Level 4)                   SS507
                                           36544              36574                                                                                                                                                                           SS508
       01009                                                                                                                                                           yy=RI/FS Task No. (Level 2)                      1.A.SS.5.7          1.A.SS.5.8
       1.1.09                                                                                                                                                                                                                                (effective 4/1/02)
                                                                                                                                                                     = Ranges 43-48    = Task Order 5




                                                                                                                          8-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                                                                                                                          May 2004
Parsons internal functional organizations and major subcontractors are organized to perform the
project effort through the use of an OBS. The OBS displays organizational relationships and is
integrated with the WBS to establish a RAM, which is used to identify CA responsibility. The
RAM ensures that each CA is assigned to one organizational entity responsible for the management
of the work.

    The WBS for this MMRP project will be hierarchical, the top level being the program. This
approach allows for horizontal traceability for tracking and reporting both costs and schedule. This
approach also allows for efficient management of multiple TOs.

8.1.2.2 Integrated Master Schedule

      The PICS scheduling module utilizes the Critical Path Method (CPM) to generate an
Integrated Master Schedule (IMS). The IMS is developed by logically networking all detailed
activities for and between task orders used to accomplish the total project scope of work. This
network approach serves to accomplish horizontal traceability. Key milestones, decision points
and task deliverables at all levels of the schedule hierarchy are at the detail level. These schedules
are produced with MS Project and provide the network analysis system (NAS). Through the NAS
we ensure that work is properly planned and flows continuously from the beginning to the end of
the task order and the project with a critical path clearly identified. The NAS is resource loaded to
show manpower requirements as well as material and subcontractor costs across the timeline of the
task order and project as a whole.

     The detail schedule (Level II) summarizes upward to an intermediate schedule (Level I),
which in turn summarizes up to the master project schedule (Level 0). This upward summarization
ensures vertical traceability.

     Upon approval of the initial task order, the IMS becomes the baseline schedule for the project
and is maintained under the formal change control process.

     Weekly statusing of the schedule helps manage resources and focus attention on those areas of
the project that pose the most risk to the project's scheduled objectives.

8.1.2.3 Planning and Budgeting

     The Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB) is the time-phased budget plan against which
contract performance is measured. It is formed by the authorized work and budgets for each task
order assigned to control accounts, in accordance with higher-level schedules. Project controls, in
concert with the Control Account Manager (CAM), is responsible for ensuring the integrity of the
PMB through the use of formal change control procedures, which ensure that integrity is
maintained at the CA level.

8.1.2.4 Work Authorization

    Work authorization for this MMRP project has two components, the formal CESPK Work
Authorization System and internal work authorization.




                                                  8-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
8.1.2.5 Formal Work Authorizations System

     The CESPK will use a formal Work Breakdown Structure for issuing and controlling WBS
and TOs. Under this system, Parsons will prepare all necessary Work Orders (WO) for advance
approval of the KO, for the execution of the work included in each WBS/TO. Each WBS/TO will
include a budget cost estimate to include all costs, a detailed Network Analysis System, the WBS
element number under which the work will be accomplished. The cumulative cost of the approved
WO shall not exceed the total budget amount of the WBS under which they are issued without
prior approval of the KO.

     CESPK and Parsons Contract management will meet on a monthly basis to discuss
performance measurement and variance analysis for each WBS as part of the formal monthly status
review. Parsons will be available more frequently if required.

8.1.2.6 Internal Work Authorization

     The internal work authorization (IWA) process ensures that all project work is properly
defined and authorized prior to committing resources and performing work. The project itself
cannot be initiated without formal authorization being received from the Parsons Contract
Administration. The program manager must authorize all work prior to its performance. IWA
documents contain a statement of work, target budget, resource type and/or element of cost,
schedule constraints and other project requirements. An approved IWA document is required
before work can begin on any WBS element.

     IWA documents are used to authorize contract performance, initial planning, control account
budgets, budget baseline changes, and performance of direct contract work. IWA documents also
contain individual references for identification and collection of costs.

8.1.3       Project Execution and Reporting

     The baseline plans generated during the TO planning and budgeting phase are statused and
compared with actual costs and schedules for project reporting. Forecasts of future costs and
schedule dates are made. Corrective actions are initiated as required. The project execution and
reporting process includes:

        •    Project and Earned Value Status
        •    Accounting
        •    Performance Analysis
        •    Indirect Cost Planning and Control
        •    Reporting

8.1.3.1 Project and Earned Value Status

      Occurring weekly for scheduling and monthly for project performance assessment, the results
are incorporated into management reports for review and analysis of cost and schedule.

     Earned value is calculated monthly, both for the current period and cumulative, for each CA
and represents the value of work accomplished, expressed in budgeted dollars. The earned value,
Budgeted Cost for Work Performed (BCWP) is compared to the plan, Budgeted Cost for Work
Scheduled (BCWS), and to the actual cost incurred for that work, Actual Cost of Work Performed

                                                  8-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
(ACWP). The results of these comparisons are expressed as cost and schedule variances.
Variances are calculated at the CA level and are summarized upward through the WBS. The Cost
Schedule Status Report (C/SSR), monthly and weekly summary status reports, and other Parsons
internal performance reports are used to assess future performance and progress toward meeting
cost and schedule objectives for the Project.

8.1.3.2 Accounting

     The accounting process provides for the timely and accurate collection of all direct and
indirect costs associated with a project. Costs are accumulated using the Parsons accounting
structure, which is identified to WBS codes, subcontracts, and purchase orders for summarization
and higher level reporting purposes. Indirect costs are budgeted and collected within established
pools for allocation to a project. The methods used to collect and control these costs are governed
by Parsons Disclosure Statement and are reviewed and approved periodically by the Defense
Contract Audit Agency (DCAA).

8.1.3.3 Performance Analysis

     The early detection and correction of performance related problems is a major benefit of a
properly implemented EVMS. The performance analysis and estimate at completion process
(EAC) focuses management’s attention on critical project issues by identifying CAs that have
exceeded established variance thresholds. The CAM provides an evaluation of the impact of
identified problems and corrective actions required to mitigate the problem. In addition to
evaluating progress, a monthly assessment is made of cost and schedule resources required to
complete the project. The PICS requires the project to develop a comprehensive estimate to
complete (CETC) at least once a year. CAMs review their control account estimate at completion
monthly. The schedule and cost index report data is utilized by the CAMs to improve the accuracy
of their estimate at completion calculations and in defining project impacts and corrective actions.

8.1.3.4 Analyzing the Impact of Indirect Cost Applications to Project Costs

    Project controls will include the impact of overhead (indirect costs) on the project. Each
month they assess this impact of indirect costs on the project’s estimate at completion.

8.1.3.5 Reporting

     Data from the PICS is used to generate project reports, and to manage the project. The regular
project performance reports for the MMRP will be Cost and Schedule Status Report (C/SSR),
monthly cost and technical report, weekly summary status report, and schedule and cost
performance index reports as well as add-hoc reporting.

8.1.4   Material and Subcontract Management

8.1.4.1 Material Management

     Parsons has established material control and procurement systems and procedures. These
systems and procedures also provide a basis for integrating subcontractor performance into the
PICS and for tracking materials throughout the life of the project. Obligated costs, where
applicable, will also be provided.



                                                 8-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
8.1.4.2 Subcontractor Management

      Major subcontractors, who are considered to be extensions of the Parsons project-team,
perform work that is part of a CAM's responsibility. Although these subcontractors operate their
own management systems, these systems must support the CAM's ability to plan and control work.
Contractual provisions are included in the subcontract to formally specify requirements that
facilitate this capability. CAMs and project control representatives work with counterparts in the
subcontractors' organizations to develop processes to integrate the subcontractor cost and schedule
data into the PICS. Periodic baseline reviews and audits are conducted by Parsons to ensure
compliance with these requirements. The accounting system will hold obligated costs for major
subcontractors.

     Other (non-major) subcontractors that get progress payments based on costs incurred and
evidence of physical accomplishment must also be represented in the baseline plan. Budgets are
based on the progress payment plan with earned value and actual costs based on progress against
pay items and accrued actual costs. The accounting system will hold obligated costs for non-major
subcontractors.

8.1.5   Change Control

   Two categories of baseline changes exist, those that can be made unilaterally by Parsons
Management (internal changes) and those that require approval by the customer (external changes).

8.1.5.1 External Changes

     External changes for the MMRP will be in the form of Task Orders and their revisions. As
explained above, Parsons will conduct detailed planning for each task order prior to its issuance by
CESPK. External changes will not be incorporated into the performance measurement baseline
until the contracting officer approves them and they are issued to Parsons. No work will be
executed or costs accumulated on an issued TO until the PM authorizes the same through the
internal work authorization process.

8.1.5.2 Internal Changes

    Internal changes/re-planning is intended to achieve efficiencies in operation. Transfer of
funds between TOs and/or subtasks will be strictly controlled by CESPK.

8.1.6   System Surveillance

     Though not a specific requirement for the MMRP project, Parsons will conduct surveillance
of the management information system (EVMS modules) to ensure they are compliant with both
the company’s system and customer approved project specific changes. System Surveillance may
occur in any of four ways: internal company surveillance, independent consultant surveillance,
customer surveillance, or joint company/customer surveillance. As a matter of policy and practice,
Parsons assures maintenance of systems through implementation of internal surveillance programs.
These internal surveillance programs include surveillance of the EVMS system applications.

    Effective administration of the System Surveillance Program identifies changes that need to
be made to the PICS whether such changes result from a need to correct shortcomings or an
opportunity for improvement.

                                                 8-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
8.1.7   Procedures

     EVMS is implemented at the project level through procedures. The PICS is implemented at
the project level through company and project specific procedures.

8.2     SYSTEM CONCEPTS AND USE

8.2.1   Overview

     The PICS provides the ability to analyze cost/schedule information and determine the project's
performance against the established baseline throughout the life cycle of the MMRP. Variance
identification and analysis aids in isolating causes of deviation from the plan and allows the
mitigation process to minimize overall impact. Through timely reporting, management can take
actions necessary to bring the variances under control. The overall system concepts and use of the
PICS are shown in Figure 8-2.




                                                8-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
                           Figure 8-2: Parsons Integrated Control System (PICS) Flow Chart



                                                     PARSONS INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM (PICS)

                                                                                                     BUDGET                   INITIATE                           REQUEST         CONTRACT
                                                                                                    BASELINE                   MONTH                           CONTRACTUAL        CHANGE
                           MILESTONES     RFP        PROPOSAL                CONTRACT
                                                                                                  ESTABLISHED                  CLOSE                             CHANGE        IMPLEMENTED
                                                     SUBMITTAL                AWARD




                           CUSTOMER                               CUSTOMER


                           BUSINESS                             CONTRACT
                           DEVELOPMENT                        ADMINISTRATION


                           PROJECT
                           MANAGER/                                PROJECT
                           PROPOSAL                                 OFFICE
                           MANAGER



   INVOLVED
   MANAGEMENT              ESTIMATING


                           PROGRAM                                 PROGRAM
                           CONTROL                                 CONTROL
                           TEAM                                      TEAM



                           FUNCTIONAL                             FUNCTIONAL
                           MANAGER/                                MANAGER/
                           CONTROL ACCT                          CONTROL ACCT
                           MANAGER                                 MANAGER




                                          ESTABLISHING                                  ESTABLISHING            AUTHORIZING              ACCOMPLISHING                        REPLANNING &
                                              THE                                           THE                  WORK AND                   MONTHLY      PERFORMANCE         INCORPORATING
  TO ACCOMPLISH THE                        PROPOSAL                                      CONTRACT                RECORDING               PERFORMANCE      REPORTING             CONTRACT
   FUNCTIONS OF                             BASELINE                                      BASELINE                 COSTS                 MEASUREMENT                             CHANGE




  IN A WAY THAT PROVIDES                  A. ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRACEABILITY OF TIME PHASED COSTS -
                                                  FROM                                          TO                                                          TO               IN A
                                                PROPOSAL                                     CONTRACT                                                     STATUS         CHANGING
                                                ESTIMATE                                     BUDGETS                                                     REPORTS        ENVIRONMENT


                                          B. ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRACEABILITY OF WORK VERTICALLY FROM THE CONTRACT TO THE WORK PACKAGE
                                          C. REPORTING OF CONTRACT COST & SCHEDULE STATUS TO PARSONS MANAGEMENT AND TO THE CLIENT IN A CLEAR
                                                AND CONCISE MANNER




8.2.2         Data Update

     During each monthly reporting cycle, update and statusing of each active control account is
performed to provide the most recent data possible for analysis purposes. During this reporting
cycle, the CAMs assess the work accomplished to date and the BCWP. ACWP is provided by the
Parsons accounting system called PRISM and the CAMs assess the EAC based on current progress
and projections of future performance. This data is provided to Project Controls.

     The CAMs are responsible for the assessment of BCWP and updating the EAC. Project
Controls is responsible for compiling the updated information, checking the input and overseeing
the generation and distribution of internal system reports.

     The PICS has the capability to produce both internal and external performance measurement
reports at any selected level of the WBS and OBS. Performance measurement data (i.e. BCWS,
BCWP, ACWP, Budget at Completion (BAC), EAC and resulting variances) are available at each
level of the WBS and OBS.




                                                                                           8-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                                                                                             May 2004
     The PICS shows any associated Schedule Variance (SV), and Cost Variance (CV), plus
Budget at Complete (BAC) and Estimate at Complete (EAC) and their difference, Variance at
Completion (VAC), originating within the control accounts. Schedule Performance Indexes (SPI)
and Cost Performance Indexes (CPI) are produced at the CA level also. From this point,
performance measurement data is summed upward through the WBS and OBS to the TO, and total
contract level.

     BCWP is earned in the same manner that BCWS was established. For example, if work was
planned (BCWS) for a TO work element using the apportioned effort method, then BCWP must be
earned using the same method while taking into consideration the same control accounts and/or
work packages used to establish BCWS.

8.2.3   Monthly Reporting Cycles

      The reports generated from the cost and schedule system are updated and published monthly.
The amount of data, participants making inputs, processing time, and other considerations require
that an orderly process be used to collect, review, report, and use the data generated by the system.
The basic data in planning and accounting are financial in nature. Therefore, the monthly reporting
cycle is based on the accounting month.

     The CAM is responsible for providing schedule status to project controls to show
accomplishment for all discrete open work packages. This, plus the accumulation of actual costs,
allows reports containing BCWS, BCWP and ACWP to be generated. CAMs receive the
portion(s) of these reports that include their control account(s). This allows them to see their
performance status each month. Following the distribution of these reports, Variance Analysis
Reports are generated based on established thresholds. The following paragraphs address Variance
Analysis Reporting.

8.2.4   Variance Analysis Thresholds

     Variance analysis is performed at the control account level and reported to the CESPK at level
II of the WBS. Variance analysis thresholds are identified for each of these levels. Variance
thresholds for the CESPK reporting Level of the WBS will be negotiated with the CESPK and
implemented. If the CESPK does not establish variance analysis thresholds, Parsons will
recommend reasonable thresholds based on cumulative reporting level budget values. Variance
thresholds for CAs are established by Parsons and agreed to by the CESPK.

8.2.5   Variance Analysis

     The purpose of variance analysis is to investigate the scope and impact to the overall project.
The Program Manager monitors approved corrective actions to resolution via the corrective action
log or other specified approach.

     The responsible Control Account Manager for each CA completes the VAR for any variance
exceeding established thresholds. The CAM must analyze the reason for the variance, the impact
to the CA or the project along with any corrective action(s) that can be taken. In addition, the
CAM performs an estimate at completion analysis.




                                                8-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
8.2.6   Cost Variance

     A CV is calculated by subtracting ACWP from BCWP. The CV is an assessment of the cost
performance on work accomplished. Dividing the CV by BCWP and multiplying the resulting
quotient by 100 can calculate the cost variance percentage.

   A cost index, called Cost Performance Index (CPI), can be calculated by dividing BCWP by
ACWP. The index indicates the cost efficiency at which the work has been performed.

8.2.7   Schedule Variance

     The SV is calculated by subtracting BCWS from BCWP. While the CV provides an accurate
assessment of performance, the SV should only be used as an indicator because it does not consider
the criticality of tasks, only their associated dollar values, nor does it provide insight to relative time
variances. Dividing the SV by BCWS and multiplying the resulting quotient by 100 can calculate the
Schedule Variance percentage.

     A schedule index, called Schedule Performance Index (SPI), can be calculated by dividing
BCWP by BCWS. The index indicates the schedule efficiency at which work has been performed.
This is only an indicator and the schedule must be reviewed to determine schedule status.

8.2.8   At-Completion Variance

     An At-Completion Variance is calculated by subtracting the Estimate at Completion from the
BAC.      When the EAC exceeds the total budget, an overrun is being forecasted. The At-
Completion Variance percentage is calculated by dividing that At-Completion Variance by the total
budget (BAC) and multiplying the resulting quotient by 100. A Project Cost Index is calculated by
dividing the BAC by the EAC. This index is similar to the CPI but represents projected at
completion performance rather than experienced performance. The project cost index can be
compared to the cumulative to date CPI to determine whether the manager is projecting improved
or deteriorating performance.

8.2.9   Monitoring Corrective Action

     The Program Manager is responsible for monitoring corrective actions identified during the
variance analysis process until those actions are resolved.

     The Program Manager, functional managers and CAMs meet monthly for the purpose of
reviewing technical, cost and schedule performance data. Causes and impacts of variances are
discussed, as well as appropriate corrective actions. The results of previously implemented actions
are also a part of this discussion. Minutes and/or notes from these meetings are formally
documented.

8.2.10 Variance Reporting

     Variance Analysis Reports (VARs) are prepared by the CAMs for each control account
exceeding established cost and/or schedule thresholds for the cumulative-to-date performance data
or variance at completion thresholds. CAMs are responsible for determining the cause of the
variance and its impact on the control account and related activities and milestones, developing a




                                                   8-11
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                May 2004
corrective action plan, where possible, and including this information in the appropriate sections of
the VAR.

     Project Controls prepares the C/SSR for submission to the CESPK. The Program Manager,
project administrator and functional managers jointly prepare and approve the monthly VAR at the
C/SSR reporting level of the WBS. This preparation is based on the CESPK reporting Level
C/SSR and the associated VARs provided by the CAMs.

     CAMs develop realistic corrective action plans, where possible, and identify "get well" dates
on the VAR. The PM monitors corrective actions to ensure that they are being accomplished and
yield the desired results. This is normally accomplished via the Corrective Action Log maintained
by the PM and/or project controls.

     The PM/project controls/functional manager discuss the variance analyses with CAMs as
necessary, and determine if the explanations adequately describe the causes, impacts and corrective
action. Any changes in EAC are reviewed by the PM to determine if they are acceptable and
reasonable before the revisions are to be entered into the reporting system.

     If a VAR is not acceptable, it is returned with comments to the CAM. Any VARs that have
wide disparities between the CAM's evaluation and the Program Manager's comments are subjects
to further discussion until finally resolved.

    Project Controls uses the monthly performance measurement data and variance analysis report
to update charts, graphs and other visual aids used in the monthly reviews with Parsons’
management and CESPK.

8.2.11 Trend Analysis

     Graphic analysis often reveals trends that go unnoticed by statistical analysis. Any analysis
must take into account the contract percent complete. Although percent complete may be derived
by many methods, for EVMS performance measurement purposes it is calculated by dividing
BCWP by the total budget (BAC) and multiplying by 100. This formula yields a relatively
accurate percent complete because BCWP is a representation of the amount of work accomplished
and the total budget represents the total amount of work planned. Also used are analysis of period
and cumulative SPI & CPI, prior months’ performance vs. current month, etc.

8.2.12 Estimate at Completion

     The primary objective in preparing an estimate of completion (EAC) is to provide an accurate
projection of cost at contract completion. The EAC is derived by adding ACWP plus the estimate
to complete (ETC). The cumulative ACWP portion of the EAC is the more objective portion of the
EAC formula; nevertheless, it should be reviewed for missing or incorrect charges before it can be
considered valid. As a minimum, EACs are based on performance to date, actual costs to date,
projections of future performance, economic escalation, expected indirect burden rates, and material
commitments.

     The basis of the ETC is the estimate for the remaining authorized scope of work regardless of
whether or not it is budgeted. Using this as a starting point, the CAM must evaluate the validity as
estimated future costs. A recovery plan for any existing cost and schedule variances will have an
impact on the ETC and must be considered. The CAM must also consider other factors when



                                                8-12
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
estimating future costs, such as any past problem areas that may have an effect on future work,
technical breakthroughs, improvements in methods, and any other knowledge regarding the tasks to
be done.

     EACs are developed with varying degrees of detail and supporting documentation. A
comprehensive EAC is prepared at least annually. Priority changes, partial terminations, and
current performance indicate a need for an EAC update. These events may cause a comprehensive
EAC to be developed. The detailed ETC will include a description of the work remaining, a
forecast of the time frame it is to be performed in, and the estimated costs of resources to
accomplishment it.

     Each month the CAM evaluates the current EAC for accuracy using project knowledge, SPI
and CPI. If the CAM does not believe the existing EAC is correct, he/she prepares a new time-
phased ETC, by element of cost, for each work package and planning package and reports it at the
control account level. This EAC is less detailed than the comprehensive EAC.

8.3     PROJECT ORGANIZATION

     Parsons has evaluated the work requirements for the anticipated TOs and has developed a
comprehensive approach for meeting its objectives. Our approach provides a structure for
performance of the work, which results in maximized project performance.

     Figure 2-1 depicts the management structure that Parsons employs during this project. This
structure provides an appropriate level of management, safety and quality oversight for the project,
and ensures that work performed will be executed in an efficient, safe and appropriate manner.

8.3.1   Subcontractors

      Parsons issues detailed subcontracts that designate the services to be provided, monitors
performance to ensure that these services are provided, and reviews all billing documents to ensure
that they accurately reflect the services provided. In the event of a disagreement between Parsons
and a subcontractor concerning the services provided or the cost of these services Parsons resolves
these difference/discrepancies prior to submitting either the subcontractor’s work or billings to
CESPK.

8.3.1.1 Subcontractor Supervision

     Throughout execution of task orders Parsons maintains overall supervisory responsibility for
all operations. Subcontractors work under the direction and oversight of FOM and are monitored
by the UXOSO and the UXOQCS. All operational activities are scheduled by FOM and a strict
accounting is made of actions performed and activities completed. Throughout their operations
subcontractors coordinate their operational schedules with the FOM and strictly adhere to this
Work Plan.

8.4     WORK SCHEDULE

     Parsons has worked with the CESPK in developing various short- and long-term schedules.
Efforts to finalize a programmatic project schedule will continue. This schedule will then be
maintained on site at the field office and updated on a regular basis. The schedule will depict the
activities associated with the work in each operating area, the sequence in which the work will be



                                                8-13
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
performed and a proposed start and finish date for accomplishing the work. The schedule will be
based on Parsons’ alternate work schedule which is a forty-hour workweek consisting of four ten-
hour days. The daily work schedule for the field crews is outlined in Table 8-1.

                               Table 8-1: Daily Activity Schedule

      Time                              Activity                                   Location
      06:30      Safety Briefing and Team Leader Brief                            Field Office
      07:00      Start Operations and Tailgate Safety Meeting                     Work Area
      09:30      Morning Break (10 minutes)                                       Work Area
      11:30      Lunch
      12:00      Resume Work                                                      Work Area
      13:30      Afternoon Break (10 minutes)                                     Work Area
      15:30      Afternoon Break (10 minutes)                                     Work Area
      16:30      Stop Operations                                                  Work Area
      16:45      Clean and Store Equipment                                        Field Office
      17:00      End of Work Day


For site conditions where personnel are working in Level D PPE and the ambient temperature is
greater than 70 ºF the UXOSO will conduct monitoring to assist in controlling the potential for site
workers experiencing heat related adverse health affects. The break schedule may be altered as
needed upon instructions from the UXOSO to avoid the effects of heat stress.

8.5      MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS

      Parsons has structured its manpower requirements to meet the anticipated operational
requirements of the task orders. The structure is designed to minimize associated costs (i.e., travel
and per-diem), and maximize technical talents and skills for executing the work associated with
this TO.

8.5.1    Travel and Per Diem

    Travel and per diem costs associated with this task order are based on the Joint Travel
Regulation (JTR).

8.5.1.1 Travel

     This category includes all chargeable travel that is incurred during the execution of the task
orders. Included is travel for mobilization, operations and home leave. The cost is an estimate
based on the number of trips required and an average cost for commercial air-travel. During the
execution of this task order Parsons arranges travel through its corporate travel agent, and
whenever possible obtains reduced fares based on 21 days advance bookings.

8.5.1.2 Meals and Lodging

     Amounts are computed using the rates for meals and lodging authorized in the JTR and the
lodging rates where Parsons presently houses employees.




                                                8-14
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
8.5.2   Equipment, Materials and Supplies

     Chapter 9 identifies the procedures for rental and purchase of equipment to support the work
associated with the project. Prior to the start of operations Parsons will coordinate with CESPK’s
Property Manager to identify specific items from the list of required equipment, which the
Government will provide. A list of government furnished equipment (GFE) is included in Chapter
9.

8.5.3   Meetings

     Parsons and CESPK project management personnel meet weekly to discuss project status and
progress. A monthly C/SSR meeting is held to review the status of the project, schedule, costs and
any other issues.




                                               8-15
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                        May 2004
                                          CHAPTER 9
                            PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PLAN

9.1     POLICY

     It is Parsons’ policy to maintain government property and establish a system for acquiring,
using, caring for, controlling, managing, reporting, redistributing, and disposing of government
property project items (supplies/inventories) in full accordance with good commercial practice and
the requirements of FAR Part 45, Government Property, including applicable FAR Part 52 clauses.

9.2     SCOPE

     Parsons, during the performance of contract work, may obtain property (e.g., materials, parts,
or equipment) as provided by the Federal Government (GFP, GFM, GFE), fabricated by Parsons,
or by purchasing from outside parties for use in performing the contract requirements. The
property may be consumed in the course of the work or may remain as a tangible asset after
completion of the work. Title to property acquired by Parsons and its subcontractors often
transfers to the Government and, as such, requires special control and administration by Parsons.
This chapter is prepared in accordance with requirements contained in FAR Part 45.5,
Management of Government Property in Possession of Contractors, and provides instructions for
the control and administration of Government property.

9.3     RESPONSIBILITY

9.3.1   Corporate Manager of Procurement

     Responsibility for (1) coordinating the Company-wide implementation of procurement
policies and procedures, (2) developing government property policies and procedures, and (3)
overall management review of government property practices with the intent of assuring adequate
awareness of and compliance with company policy and procedures and of FAR Part 45
requirements, has been delegated by the President of Parsons to the Manager of Procurement.

     The Manager of Procurement will directly assist the PM in implementing these procedures,
and in providing training, advice and conducting periodic compliance reviews. In this task, the
Manager of Procurement will provide overall guidance, support and assistance to those carrying
out government property activities, keeping program management aware of compliance.

     The Manager of Procurement provides government property accounting record templates to
allow for local electronic record keeping using Parsons’ standard software. To assure an ability to
consolidate, merge, and share data in the electronic property accounting records, the templates will
not be modified by projects unless the corporate procurement organization concurs.

9.3.2   Program Manager

     The PM maintains overall responsibility for ensuring that property and equipment
requirements are anticipated in sufficient time for Parsons and/or the Government to process and



                                                 9-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
ship the required materials. The PM is also responsible for maintaining accountability of issued
equipment and ensuring that this equipment is maintained in an operationally ready state.

9.3.3       Logistician

     The Logistician will be the government property focal point and will be assigned
responsibility for supporting the project by maintaining government property records and being a
property reporting interface with the project client and corporate headquarters. In addition, he is
responsible for maintaining a running inventory of supplies/equipment, procuring additional
supplies/equipment and scheduling/performing routine maintenance.

9.3.4       Supervisors

     Personnel assigned to supervisory positions are responsible for the proper use, storage, and
accountability of property and equipment issued to and used by their teams. This responsibility
includes performing daily checks to ensure that equipment is present, clean, and serviceable, and
ensuring that equipment used during operations is returned and properly secured.

9.3.5       Individuals

     All site personnel are responsible for operating and maintaining equipment in a reasonable
and prudent manner. This includes using the appropriate tool for the job, daily cleaning of
equipment, properly storing and securing equipment at the end of the day, and promptly reporting
any equipment failure, breakage or disappearance.

9.4         PROPERTY TYPES AND CLASSIFICATION

     The Government classifies property into five main categories. The following is a list of the
five categories and the typical types of property that fall within the categories. It is important to
refer to the definitions included in this procedure, FAR Part 45 (e.g., 45.505-14), DFARS 245
(245.301), and other government publications and forms (DD Form 1662, DOD 4161.2-M) in
order to properly classify government property.

    1. Facilities – Includes ‘Contractor Acquired Property’ (FAR 45.101) and ‘Other Plant
Equipment’ (ref. DFARS 245.301 & Block #12 of DD 1662). It also includes Industrial Plant
Equipment

        •    Property used for production, maintenance, research, development, or testing

        •    Real Property (land)

        •    Other Plant Equipment (are items of a capital nature per FAR 45.101, and do not need to
             be reports)

        •    Equipment/Parts

        •    Machine Tools

        •    Test Equipment



                                                   9-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •    Furniture

     •    Vehicles

     •    Accessory and Auxiliary Items

     2. Material

     •    Incorporated into or attached to a deliverable or a consumable involving:

          -      Assemblies

          -      Components

          -      Parts

          -      Raw and Processed Materials

          -      Small Tools

          -      Supplies

     3.   Special Tooling (Government title only)

     •    Manufacturing Equipment and Aids

     •    Jigs

     •    Dies

     •    Fixtures

     •    Molds

     •    Patterns

     •    Taps

     •    Gauges

     4.   Special Test Equipment

     5.   Agency Peculiar Property (e.g., military property)

     A basic requirement of effective government property administration is determining the
correct property type and understanding what property administration and control requirements
apply to specific property.




                                                 9-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                      May 2004
9.5       EQUIPMENT RENTAL OR PURCHASE

     Parsons must document a rent/purchase analysis for all property acquisitions that will become
government property. The minimum requirements for rent/purchase analysis are listed at FAR
7.401 'Acquisition considerations'. The following considerations apply to rent/purchase analysis:

      •    Rent/purchase analysis is a case-by-case evaluation of comparative costs and other
           factors;

      •    If rental is appropriate, then the PM will be notified if the rental is over two months in
           duration and/or over $1,000 in value;

      •    Rental/purchase analysis applies even when the equipment is rented from Parsons;

      •    Purchase is generally appropriate if the equipment will be used beyond the point in time
           when cumulative renting costs exceed the purchase cost;

      •    Rental is appropriate if it is to the Government's advantage under the circumstances; and

      •    If rental is justified, rental with option to purchase may be preferable.

9.6       PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

     Parsons is responsible and liable for government property in its possession to the extent
provided for by the contract. Parsons may also be liable for loss or damage of government
property or when the use or consumption of government property exceeds reasonable levels. The
Logistician is responsible for maintaining up-to-date government property records, and taking
appropriate measures to protect and preserve government property to prevent loss, damage,
excessive use or consumption, theft, and deterioration. Furthermore, government property will be
clearly identified and should not be intermingled with Parsons’ owned or personal property or that
from other parties.

9.7       LOSS, DAMAGE AND DESTRUCTION OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY

    The Logistician will investigate and report any loss, damage to, or destruction of government
property to the PM and FOM as the loss is known. This reporting includes any variances resulting
from annual physical inventories. At a minimum, the Loss, Damage, Destruction Report, in letter
format, will contain the following:

      •    Company name and contract number;

      •    Description of item lost, damaged, destroyed, or unreasonably consumed;

      •    Condition at time of loss or damage;

      •    Date of last inventory;

      •    Projected cost of repair/replacement;




                                                   9-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
      •    Date, time (if pertinent), and cause of origin of the loss, damage, destruction, or
           consumption;

      •    When last seen, who saw it, who had access, who reported or noted the problem;

      •    Actions taken to locate;

      •    Remedial actions taken to prevent further loss, damage, destruction, or unreasonable
           consumption, and to prevent repetition of similar incidents;

      •    Other relevant information (e.g., cite pertinent contract Government property clauses);
           and

      •    Insurance, if any, covering the Government property or any part or interest in any
           commingled property.

    The Logistician shall ensure that program subcontractors possessing or controlling
government property accountable under the contract investigate and report all instances of loss,
damage, or destruction of such property.

9.8       INTERNAL AUDIT AND COMPLIANCE REVIEW

     The Parsons Corporation's Internal Audit organization will also check for auditing
compliance with this policy on a periodic basis. These internal audits will be conducted
throughout the life of the project and can involve discussions with outside subcontractors and
vendors.

    The Logistician will conduct periodic spot inspections, validation inventories, and review of
implementation of these procedures.

9.9       ACQUISITION

     Government property may be acquired directly from the Government (Government furnished
Property or "GFP") or through purchase order, subcontract, or fabrication (Contractor Acquired
Property or "CAP"). In most cases, Parsons will be administering Contractor Acquired Property.
The following requirements must be met for CAP:

      •    Item is contractually authorized;

      •    Quantity ordered is reasonably required;

      •    Purchase orders are issued in accordance with the Parsons Procurement Manual;

      •    Item description, contract number, and price are reflected in the purchase order; and

      •    Consent or approval is obtained, if required, and documented in the PO file.




                                                  9-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
9.10       RECEIVING

    Receiving is the process of initially entering Government property into Parsons’ custody.
Record must be maintained for accountability and shall include, as a minimum, the date of receipt,
name of receiver, item description, quantity received, and contract number.

    Upon receipt of the property, it will be inspected for damage, quantity, and quality by the
Logistician.

     Where quantity, condition, and description differs from that shown on the shipping document,
proper adjustment documentation is prepared by the Logistician detailing the receiving
discrepancy (SF 364, Report of Discrepancy) and forwards it to the PM for resolution. Only the
quantity of property actually received in acceptable condition will be inducted and recorded in
Parsons Government property records.

9.11       IDENTIFICATION OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY

     Upon receipt of government property by Parsons, the following will be accomplished for each
piece of property:

       •    Property will be properly classified (e.g., special test equipment, special tooling,
            material, other plant equipment, Contractor Acquired Property, etc.);

       •    Property will be identified with a Parsons Government Property Identification Number 1
            (GPIN or tag number; see footnote below). The GPINs are unique, within Parsons, to
            the particular piece of government property. Property will be marked (with a property
            tag or otherwise) to indicate the GPIN and identification that the property is government
            property. Nameplates or ID tags should specify the Parsons CAGE code; government's
            prime contract number and/or that contract no. of the higher-tier contractor; a part no.
            and serial no. (if applicable); nomenclature (description), etc.;

       •    If appropriate, high value or sensitive property (hazardous material, precious metals,
            etc.) will be tagged for better control;

       •    Returnable/reusable containers will be controlled and accounted for.

     In some cases, government agency or higher tier contractor procedures require that property
be identified with agency or higher tier contractor GPINs. In such cases, the Project Property
Manager will request that the agency or higher tier contractor provide the GPIN and tag.
Furthermore, in such cases, only the agency or higher tier contractor GPINs and tags will be used
to identify and record such Government property.




1
  GPIN numbers will be in the format of GP000000-00001 (GP for Government Property, the next six
numbers is the project Parsons Job Number, and the four digit suffix is a sequential series of numbers
indicating the sequence in which the item was tagged.




                                                  9-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
9.12      TAGGING

     All government property shall be tagged or marked and recorded promptly upon receipt or
fabrication (unless exempted per FAR 45.506 "Identification"). Tagging will be by means of a
decal, bar coding, stamping, steel die, etching, tag, or other method determined by the
program/project to be appropriate.

9.13      RECORDS

     Once the property is accepted by Parsons and tagged, it will be entered into the appropriate
property control record (Property Register – Form GP-005) (Appendix D) or immediately issued
for consumption.

     Parsons will maintain property records that identify all government property and provide a
complete, current, auditable record of all property transactions. Forms for government property
record keeping provided in this procedure provide for adequate control of government property as
required by FAR Part 45.

     FAR Part 45 requires specific data for each type of government property (FAR 45.505).
Accurate preparation and maintenance of the standard Parsons Government property forms must
be practiced to assure the required data is recorded.

    To simplify record keeping, the following codes will be used to record data in the government
property records (use as may be practical and supplement with additional codes as ma be needed):

       Property Type refers to how Parsons acquired the Government property use:

       GFP        -Government furnished property and

       CAP        -Contractor (Parsons) acquired Government property

       Property Classification refers to the following classes of Government property:

       MTL        Material

       PE -       Plant Equipment

       OPE        Other Plant Equipment

       ST-        Special Tooling

       STE        Special Test Equipment

   Condition Code refers to the condition of the government property at disposition (also see
FAR 45.606-5 for condition codes).

       Discrepancy Codes and Action Codes are shown on the SF 364 "report of discrepancy."




                                                   9-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
9.13.1 Records for Material

    All government furnished material and material for which title has passed to the Government
by reason of allocation from Parsons owned stores or by purchase for direct charge to a
Government contract, shall be recorded as government property (material). Parsons form GP-003,
(Appendix D), Stock Record Card, will be used for this purpose. Property records for material
must provide a complete record of receipt, stockage, issuance, and consumption/disposition.
Additionally, property records for material must be sufficient to allow for effective material use or
consumption analysis.

9.14    STORAGE

     Government property acquired by virtue of a cost-reimbursement type contract, or received as
GFP are to be stored separately unless prior approval is received from CESPK to commingle with
capital assets. All government property, whether commingled or not (FAR 45.507) will be
identified as set forth in this procedure. If commingling occurs, the government property must not
lose its identity as government property and there should be a method in place for equitable
apportionment of inventory loss [refer to 45.507 & DOD 4161.2-M (p. 3-10)].

      Care will be taken to provide protection of all government property so as to be protected from
pilferage, corrosion, weather, etc.

9.15    MOVEMENT

     During movement, attention will be given to proper packing, covering and proper handling
techniques. Safety precautions will be enforced. Shipment of government property whether
delivery of an end item or return of government property will be documented on the appropriate
Agency forms (e.g., for DOD programs/projects, DD Form 1149). Movement of government
property is tracked so that property records can be updated to show changes in quantities and
location.

9.16    MAINTENANCE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY

     Preventative maintenance will be conducted on a regularly scheduled basis according to
sound industrial practices. Necessary precautions will be taken to prevent deterioration caused by
contamination, corrosion, weather and other substances. Normal repair and parts replacement,
including calibration, will be performed on applicable government property per FAR 45.509.1.
Records will be maintained on all equipment on all equipment determine to require preventive or
corrective maintenance. The equipment will be scheduled for periodic maintenance according to
schedule.

9.17    CONSUMPTION

     Consumption is the process of incorporating government owned property into an end item, or
otherwise consuming it in the performance of a contract (testing, for example). Care will be taken
that all materials charged to a contract will be used only on the contract authorized. Parsons
government property control and management of government property will maximize conservation
of government property to the maximum practical extent. The following will be the practice of the
program/government property activities:



                                                 9-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
       •    Excess material will be returned to stores and recorded;

       •    Where appropriate, use is made of repaired and salvaged, rather than new items; and

       •    For dated items, a first in first out (FIFO) inventory system is utilized.

9.18       UTILIZATION & SCRAP

     Utilization is the process of using government property only for the purpose for which it was
furnished or acquired. Government property must be used only in support of the contract or task
order under which it was acquired and only for purposes authorized by the contract, unless the
cognizant Government Contracting Officers provide written approval to the contrary.

     When excess government property can be used in the performance of another contract/task
order, the transfer of accountability must be authorized by the giving and receiving contracting
officer. The PM may request, and receive Government approval for, use or transfer of government
property to another Parsons Government contract or task order.

     Residual material (extra parts, components, screws, bulk wire, etc.) on fixed –price type
contracts will usually belong to Parsons or our subcontractors at the project completion, and cost-
reimbursement residual material will usually belong to the government. However, a thorough
review of the contract terms (including FAR clauses) and possible discussion with CESPK would
be prudent in order to avoid misunderstandings.

     Parsons will follow the FAR 45.505-8 and DFARS 245.607 procedures relative to recording,
controlling, and disposing of scrap (inventory without value) and recovery of precious metals.

9.19       PHYSICAL INVENTORIES

       It is Parsons' policy to conduct physical inventories on an annual basis (more or less
frequently, depending on contractual considerations relative to type, amount, value, usage, etc. of
the project government property involved). It is suggested that the 30th of September of each year
(i.e., end of government fiscal year) will be used as a baseline date and that a physical inventory of
all government property will be performed. Inventory will also be performed upon completion, or
termination of contract. The Logistician will ensure that the physical inventories are accomplished
in a timely manner (e.g., within 30 days) so that he can provide a completed DD Form 1662 to its
cognizant DCMA (property administrator) and the project offices to their clients (property
administrator) by October 31st.

     The PM will commence inventory planning and scheduling at least 30 days prior to physical
inventory commencement date. The inventory must be conducted by a person who is not directly
responsible for control or custody of the government property being inventoried. In performing
the annual inventory, the Logistician will compare the actual inventory counts against the Parsons
Government property records and provide the PM with the results of the review. The Logistician
will take the appropriate action to resolve any inventory shortages, overages, discrepancies, or
deficiencies. Upon approval of the inventory physical findings and reconciliation by the PM, the
Project Administrator will update the Property Records with inventory results and an inventory
date. All property records must include a current inventory posting.




                                                     9-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
     Parsons and its subcontractors will perform reconciliation for items where there exists a
discrepancy between the actual physical count and the "balance on hand" last posted to the
property records.

     During the inventory process, all government property in Parsons’ possession will be
screened to determine if the property is still required for the performance of the contract. If
government property is no longer required, it will be classified as surplus and be dispositioned in
accordance with Disposition of Government Property of this procedure.

     A listing will be provided to the CESPK listing all discrepancies disclosed by the physical
inventory, with a signed statement that physical inventory of all government property was
completed on a given date and that the official property records were found to be in agreement,
except as noted.

9.20    REPORTS

     By 31 October of each year (based upon a 30 September baseline date for conducting a
physical inventory), or on contract completion or termination, or as required by the contract, the
Logistician will prepare and submit the contract government property inventory reports on form
DD Form 1662 to CESPK. Copies of submitted inventory reports will be forwarded to the
Parsons' Manager of Procurement and contract administrator. A zero balance DD Form 1662 will
be forwarded at contract completion.

9.21    SUBCONTRACTOR CONTROL

    All subcontractors are required to adequately care for, maintain and utilize all government
property associated with the subcontract, report any loss, damage or destruction, and conduct
physical inventory of government property annually and upon termination/completion of the
subcontract.

      The PM must assure that all program subcontractors maintain, control, and administer
government property in substantially the same manner as set forth in this procedure. Subcontracts
will contain appropriate FAR flow-down clauses to require compliance with the FAR Government
Property requirements of Parsons’ prime contract. A subcontractor cannot be given relief from
liability (e.g., risk-of-loss of government property) except after Parsons receives written relief from
CESPK.

     Parsons shall require subcontractors to comply with government property accountability and
control [FAR 45.502(d)] which will be accomplished by including government property flowdown
requirements (e.g., FAR clauses) in the subcontract or purchase order and periodic monitoring for
government property statusing through project completion. Subcontractor shall investigate and
report to Parsons all instances of loss, damage, shortages, discrepancies, or destruction of
government property in its possession or control [FAR 45.504(c)]; perform physical inventories on
a periodic basis (FAR 45.508); and adequately care for and maintain the property and assure that it
is used only as authorized by the contract (FAR 45.510).




                                                  9-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
9.22       DISPOSITION OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY

     Upon completion or termination of the contract, or when items are determined to be excess or
obsolete and no longer required in the performance of a contract/task order or other ongoing
contract performance requirements, action will be taken to properly account for and dispose of the
Government property. If the property is no longer required, the PM shall request disposition
instructions from CESPK.

9.22.1 Screening for Excess/Internal Transfer

     As a first step in disposition of government property, the PM will determine if excess
government property can be used on other Parsons’ contracts or task orders. If required on another
program or project, the releasing PM will request transfer of accountability from CESPK. Upon
authorization of an internal transfer of government property, the PM will ensure that:

       •    The government property is relocated to the other contract/task order;

       •    A signed property transfer record (DD 1149) for the government property is obtained
            from the receiving contract’s Property Manager; and

       •    A final entry in the Government Property Register is made.

9.22.2 Transfer to Government

     If the government property is no longer needed by Parsons, the PM will submit a written
disposition request to CESPK

       For government property to be transferred outside of Parsons, the Logistician will ensure that:

       •    The property is shipped to the designated depot or other requested location;

       •    A signed property transfer record (DD 1149) is obtained;

       •    After receiving the receipt or other evidence of safe deliver, a final entry into the
            property records is made;

       •    Parsons government property identification tags will be removed from the items prior to
            disposal when appropriate;

       •    Disposal will be in a reasonable amount of time after disposal instructions are received
            and where appropriate, proceeds credited to the Government; and

       •    Generally, the Government will usually reimburse contractor in some manner for
            handling disposition and shipping activities. However, review the contract terms to
            avoid misunderstandings.

9.23       CONTRACT PROPERTY CLOSE-OUT

       Upon contract completion or termination, the Logistician will ensure that:



                                                   9-11
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
       •    A final inventory of government property is accomplished and all inventory adjustments,
            liability determinations, and other property issues are resolved;

       •    Property is screened for possible use on other contracts;

       •    A close-out disposition request is submitted to the KO;

       •    KO’s disposition instructions are accomplished and documented using the appropriate
            forms;

       •    Entries are made to the Parsons government property records to reflect disposition and
            close-out;

       •    Documentation of the disposition and the KO’s disposition approval are filed with the
            contract property records;

       •    If applicable, submit a final DD Form 1662 reflecting zero inventory balance. An
            example of when this requirement would be applicable is when the DD Form 1662 for
            the previous reporting period reflected an inventory balance; and

       •    Property records are filed with the permanent contract file so they are available for
            possible future audit.

9.24       GOVERNMENT PROPERTY TRANSFERRED TO PARSONS

     Government property currently on site at Fort Ord has been transferred to Parsons and will be
inspected for serviceability, compatibility, and need.




                                                   9-12
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
                                      CHAPTER 10
                     ORDNANCE AND EXPLOSIVES SAMPLING
                                   AND ANALYSIS PLAN

    The Ordnance and Explosives Sampling and Analysis Plan (OESAP) was issued
January 2002




                                          10-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                      May 2001
                                          CHAPTER 11
                                   QUALITY CONTROL PLAN

11.1    INTRODUCTION

     This Quality Control Plan (QCP) establishes and describes the quality requirements for the
contractor services contract for the Fort Ord MMRP as directed by the government. The QCP
applies to all work performed by Parsons and its Subcontractors. This QCP shall adhere to the
requirements specified in CESPK, Sacramento District’s Quality Management Plan (QMP) and
Data Item Description (DID) OT-FTO-11, Quality Control Plan.

     The Senior Vice President and Manager of Parsons’ Federal Division have assigned a QCM to
the project. The QCM shall develop this QCP to provide an independent capability to ensure and
verify that the quality objectives comply with prescribed criteria through surveillance, audits, and
various document reviews. Parsons’ corporate policy on quality is as follows:

        “We are committed to providing quality services and products. We will meet the
        requirements of our clients and strive for continual improvement of our work
        processes.”

      Above all, project quality is the responsibility of the entire project team. The team’s
comprehension of this QCP is of primary significance for quality objectives to be accomplished;
thus, the training and indoctrination of the key personnel in the quality objectives will be
conducted. The authority and responsibility of the key personnel are provided in sub-section 11.3
of this QCP. All UXO QC personnel reporting directly to the QCM have the authority to identify
deficiencies and propose and approve solutions. All UXO QC personnel have stop work authority
for all QC issues.

     The organization structure ensures that quality is achieved and maintained by those personnel
responsible for performing the work and that verification of quality is performed by personnel
other than those who performed the work.

    The original issue and the subsequent revisions to the QCP require approval of the PM. The
adequacy and effective implementation of this program will be assessed semi-annually by a
management assessment team appointed by the PM.

11.2    ORGANIZATION

11.2.1 General

    Organizational responsibilities of Parsons’ project personnel are described in this sub-section.
Organization chart defining the lines of authority and responsibilities shall be per Data Item
Description (DID) OT-FTO-02 (Technical Management Plan).




                                                11-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
11.2.2 Authority and Responsibility

     The project organization is headed by the PM who is the single focal point for successful
accomplishment of all phases of the project. The PM reports directly to the Vice President and
Manager, OE Sector of Parsons Infrastructure and Technology’s Government Division and is
accountable to Parsons and the U.S. Army for successful project accomplishment. The PM is
given full authority and responsibility for project execution and is authorized to negotiate work,
sign contracts and permits, and obtain the resources necessary to assure effective project execution.
The PM is supported by direct line managers with functions and responsibilities outlined below.

     The PM approves the QCP, implements procedures and has direct responsibility for day-to-
day operations of the project. His responsibilities related to QC include, but are not limited to:

     •    Implementation of all applicable Parsons policies and procedures;

     •    Timely submission of all contract deliverables; and

     •    Analyzing QC failures with the QCM and FOM and ensuring that corrective actions have
          been appropriately implemented.

   The QCM reports to the Parsons Corporate QA Manager, and interfaces with the PM. The
QCM, as a management representative, has the following authorities and responsibilities:
     •    Ensure that the QCP has been established, maintained and implemented for the Fort Ord
          project;

     •    Establishing guidelines to assist in the development of program, project, site and task
          specific QC policies and procedures;

     •    Initiate, recommend, approve, or provide solutions to the quality problems identified in
          QCP during system audits;

     •    Conducting periodic audits/inspections of the projects and sites and submitting reports to
          the Corporate QA Manager with copies to the Program Manager; and

     •    Reporting the adequacy, status, and effectiveness of ongoing projects to the Corporate
          QA Manager.

     All UXO QC personnel report to the QCM on quality matters. On-site QC personnel have the
responsibility for overall quality of work performed on site. Responsibilities include, but are not
limited to:

     •    Develop QC procedures to implement the QC Plan;

     •    Verify implementation of corrective actions;

     •    Initiate actions to identify and prevent the occurrence of nonconformance relating to the
          services and QCP;

     •    Authority to stop nonconforming work;



                                                 11-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     •    Coordinating with District’s QA representative for daily activities;

     •    Coordinating with the QCM to ensure that QC procedures are being followed and are
          appropriate in demonstrating data validity sufficient to meet data quality objectives
          (DQOs);

     •    Recommending actions to be taken in the event of QC failures, to the QCM;

     •    Reporting non-compliance with QC criteria to the PM and QCM;

     •    Any UXO QC person has the authority to suspend project activities when a condition
          adverse to quality is identified. The PM and senior personnel responsible for clearance
          activities will be notified when such action is required;

     •    Conduct inspections of MEC portions of the GIS database;

     •    Prepare and submit a daily QC report for CESPK review and records (this report is
          submitted by COB the following day)

     •    Conducting daily QC audits/inspection; and

     The Geophysical Quality Control Specialist reports to the QCM and is responsible for the
quality of geophysical data. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

     •    Reviewing and implementing the geophysical portion of the project QCP;

     •    Performing checks and reviews of all raw and processed digital data;

     •    Performing periodic audits of geophysical survey teams;

     •    Conducting inspections of digital geophysical portions of the GIS database;

     •    Monitoring transfer of raw and processed geophysical data deliverables;

     •    Monitoring geophysical prove-out tests and results;

     •    Managing geophysical data;

     •    Recommending actions to be taken in the event of geophysical data QC

     •    Authority to initiate, recommend, and provide solutions to quality problems; and

     •    Authority to recommend suspension of project activities when a condition adverse to
          quality is identified.

     Additionally, UXO QC personnel are responsible for the following:

     •    Daily audit of GIS data and the respective databases;




                                                 11-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
       •    Review of procedures and GIS personnel qualifications; and

       •    In conjunction with the QCM, periodic review of the GIS system.

11.2.3 Personnel Selection, Indoctrination and Training

     Key personnel designated by the PM and those requiring licenses, certification, or other forms
of qualifications necessary to perform their work, shall be selected and evaluated periodically or on
each change of task assignment by program management to ensure that their credentials are current
to perform the pre-established job description, meeting the contract requirements referenced in DID
OT-FTO-25.

     Project personnel performing functions that affect quality will receive, prior to assuming duty,
indoctrination and training conducted in accordance with sub-section 11.14 of the QCP.

      The job description, indoctrination, training and certification shall be maintained in the project
files in accordance with sub-section 11.12 of the QCP.

11.2.4 Evaluation of QCP Implementation

     A Parsons corporate QA representative has the authority and responsibility to verify that the
QCP has been implemented on the Fort Ord project. The Parsons corporate QA representative
shall perform a scheduled, semi-annual audit of the program activities and periodic surveillance in
the manner described in sub-section 11.13 of the QCP. The results of these audits and
surveillances are reported to the PM and the Parsons corporate QA Manager of the Government
Division, to provide a formal assessment of the QC program implementation.

11.3       QUALITY PROGRAM

11.3.1 Preparation, Review, and Acceptance of QCP

     The QCP is prepared by the QCM and is reviewed and approved by the PM. After completion
of the management review, the QCP shall be submitted to the government for review and
acceptance prior to starting any operational activity. Revisions to the QCP shall be reviewed and
approved in the same manner as the original issue.

11.3.2 Preparation, Review and Approval of Project Procedures

      The Project Procedures shall be reviewed by the QCM, relevant individuals and departments,
and the PM, and shall be approved by the PM. Periodic changes to the procedures can be issued
Field Variance Forms (FVFs). The FVF changes shall be incorporated into the operating
procedures. Each relevant supervisor/manager receiving the FVF shall review the requirements
with his/her staff on a weekly basis. At each update of the procedure manual, the PM shall initiate
a training program to indoctrinate the Fort Ord staff to the requirements of the procedure update.
The structure of project procedures is shown in Table 11-1.




                                                  11-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
                        Table 11-1: The structure of project procedures
  Procedure Number                                     Type of Procedures
        1.X                   Scope of Work
        2.X                   Administrative Procedures, includes Document Control, Personnel
                              Proficiency, Records Control, Data Control
        3.X                   Cost Engineering, Scheduling, Estimating
        4.X                   Quality Control, Inspection and Testing, Supplier Quality,
                              Training
        5.XX                  Design Control, Configuration Control
        6.XX                  Procurement Control, Subcontractor Control
        7.XX                  Operational Procedures
        E-XX                  Environmental Compliance Procedure

11.3.3 Control of QCP and Project Procedures

     Controlled copies of the QCP and the Project Procedures shall be distributed to key project
personnel. An electronic copy of the PWP and SSWPs are available on the shared project drive.

11.3.4 Geophysical Survey QC

     QC is an appropriate evaluation performed by Parsons of contractually defined products, to
assure those products fully meet the prescribed requirements and comply with applicable laws,
regulations, and sound technical practices.

     The QC Geophysicist will be fully responsible for overseeing and documenting all QC
performed with respect to the Fort Ord digital geophysical surveys.

     The basic QC steps for all digital and analog geophysical survey work at Fort Ord, along with
the parties responsible for performing the QC, are presented in Table 11-2.




                                                11-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
                                                         Table 11-2 Geophysical QC Steps
Activity                       QC Actions                   Performed By              Overseen By

Digital Geophysical Surveys    Equipment Maintenance        Geophysical Field Team    QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC
                                                            Coordinator

                               Weekly Instrument            Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist
                               Checks (Instrument
                               Standardization)

                               Daily Instrument Checks      Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC
                               (Instrument
                               Standardization)

                               Positioning Control          Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC
                               Checks

                               Static Checks                Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC

                               Battery Strength Checks      Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC

                               Audio Response Checks        Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC

                               Field Data Quality Checks    Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist/ UXO QC

                               Cable Shake Test             Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist

                               Metal-free Operator check    Geophysical Teams         QC Geophysicist




                                                                      11-6
  Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                              May 2004
                                                         Table 11-2 Continued



Activity                     QC Actions                 Performed By               Overseen By

                             Download Checks            Digital Geophysical        QC Geophysicist
                                                        Teams/ Processing
                                                        Geophysicists

                             Field Records Check        QC Geophysicist/           QC Geophysicist/ Database
                                                        Database Manager           Manager

Digital Geophysical Data     Data Quality Checks        Processing Geophysicists   QC Geophysicist
Processing

                             Office Review of Field     Processing Geophysicists   QC Geophysicist
                             Forms

                             Instrument                 Processing Geophysicists   QC Geophysicist
                             Standardization Checks

                             Data Sample Spacing        Processing Geophysicists   QC Geophysicist
                             Checks

                             Data Line Spacing Checks   Processing Geophysicists   QC Geophysicist

                             Instrument Drift Checks    Processing Geophysicists   QC Geophysicist




                                                                  11-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                               May 2004
                                                          Table 11-2 Continued
         Activity                  QC Actions                 Performed By                   Overseen By

                             Processed Data Checks       Processing Geophysicists/   QC Geophysicist
                                                         QC Geophysicist/ Project
                                                         Geophysicist

                             Data Deliverable Checks     Processing Geophysicists/   QC Geophysicist
                                                         QC Geophysicist/ Project
                                                         Geophysicist

                             Database Checks             Database Manager/ QC        Database Manager
                                                         Geophysicist/ UXO QC
                                                         Specialist

                             Dig Sheet Checks Prior to   Processing Geophysicists/   QC Geophysicist
                             Delivery to UXO             QC Geophysicist
                             Subcontractor

UXO Intrusive Operations Field Verification of           UXO Intrusive Teams/        QC Geophysicist/ UXOQC
                         Geophysical Data vs             Processing Geophysicists/   Specialist
                         Intrusive Results               QC Geophysicist




                                                                    11-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                              May 2004
                                                         Table 11-2 Continued
         Activity                  QC Actions                Performed By                Overseen By

Digital QC Surveys           Verification of Anomaly    Geophysical Teams       QC Geophysicist
                             Removal During Intrusive
                             Actions and after
                             Completion of Initial
                             Survey

Analog QC Surveys            Field Analog QC Surveys    UXO QC                  UXO QC

Field QA Surveys             Field QA Surveys           CESPK, USACE MM
                                                        Safety Specialist
All Operations               Impromptu Field Team       QC Geophysicist         QC Geophysicist
                             Checks for Adherence to                            Project Geophysicist
                             Field/QC Procedures                                UXO QC Specialist

                             Daily Quality Control                              QCM
                             Reporting                  UXO QC

Document Preparation         Check document for                                 QCM
                             appropriate and full       UXO QC
                             description of QC
                             activities.




                                                                  11-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                                       May 2004
     QC of the field data will be performed by Parsons before it is delivered to CESPK and will
include checks and reviews of the digital data deliverable. Specific checks will include data
completeness, quality, and format checks. Parsons will sign off that the data have been QC’d by
Parsons’ personnel. Data that have not undergone quality control checks shall not be delivered to
the government unless by mutual agreement.

     If at any point during this process the data are found to be deficient, Parsons will take
corrective action regarding the data in question.

      Geophysical instrumentation utilized for QC of geophysical surveys will be similar in
detection/discrimination ability to that used for the main data acquisition. Thus, if an EM61 is used
in the main survey, an EM61 will be used for QC.

11.3.5 Geophysical Survey QA

     QA is an appropriate management review by CESPK of the overall effectiveness of the QC
program, processes, and compliance of Parsons. The QA procedures are the process by which
CESPK fulfills its responsibility to be certain that QC is functioning and that the desired specific
product (job result) is realized.

11.4    CONTRACT REVIEW

11.4.1 Contract Administration

     The PM shall assign the role of the Contracts Administrator for the project. The Parsons
Manager of Contracts ensures that contractual obligations are appropriately reviewed for legal,
business, and financial detail in accordance with the Corporate Matrix of Authority. The Contracts
Administrator shall facilitate such review, coordinate the contract review across the project
organizations (engineering, quality assurance, and the project staff), integrate the information
necessary for the PM to monitor the project status, verify availability of resources to implement the
contract requirements, and manage it accordingly. Upon completion of the review, any area
requiring clarification shall be referred back to the government. The minutes of the negotiations
and the final agreement shall be documented.

    Any contract changes shall require the same level of review by the appropriate organizations.
Changes to the contract are conducted through proposal negotiations (by work task) with the
government.

      Records of all reviews, submittals, clarifications received, and government approvals shall be
retained on file in the manner described in sub-section 11.13 of the QCP.

11.4.2 Subcontract/Supplier Administration

     The subcontract administrator/buyer shall specify the project requirements in the Request for
Proposal (RFP) or Request for Quotation (RFQ). The QC, Design, and Procurement staff shall
conduct the supplier evaluation in a manner specified in sub-section 11.7 of the QCP to ensure that
potential bidders have the capability to meet the requirements of the proposed subcontract or
purchase order. During the award of a subcontract or purchase order the project requirements are
reviewed and agreed upon with the subcontractor or the supplier.




                                                11-10
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
11.5      DESIGN CONTROL

11.5.1 General

       Design Control is not within the Parsons Scope of Work under this contract.

     This sub-section of the QCP shall be implemented in order to meet the requirements specified
in CESPK Report ER 1110-12, Engineering and Design, Quality Management. Table 11-3 lists the
Parsons engineering procedures that implement requirements for controlling, verifying and
validating design activities:

                 Table 11-3: Parsons Design Validation Engineering Procedures
           Procedure                                             Title
 PRO-XX-90                         Intra-discipline Check (XX-Discipline specific)
 PRO-GE-14                         Inter-discipline Review
 PRO-GE-30                         Verification and Validation of Software Computer programs



11.5.2 Design and/or Technical Documentation Verification

     The verification of design and/or technical documentation shall be performed by qualified
personnel other than those who prepared the design output being verified, and possessing
appropriate experience and educational credentials. The results shall be documented as intra-
discipline check and inter-discipline review. Records of design verification shall be maintained.

      Verification shall be completed prior to release of design output for procurement,
manufacture, construction, or release to another organization. Verification shall be completed prior
to relying on the item to perform its intended function.

11.5.3 Technical Baseline Control

     Technical baseline management shall be maintained in accordance with Chapter 8, the Work,
Data and Cost Management Plan, which is in compliance with DID OT-FT-08.

11.5.4 Review of Subcontractor Submittals

     The Task PM will administer and control the review of design documents submitted by the
subcontractors and suppliers. When required, these submittals shall be submitted to the
government for review and approval. The documents shall be transmitted to the project disciplines
for review and verification for compliance with the approved design criteria, design basis, and
specified requirements in a manner specified by project procedure.




                                                11-11
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
11.6    DOCUMENT CONTROL

11.6.1 General

     A Document Control Log shall be implemented for all the documents generated in accordance
with the Data Item Descriptions (DIDs) listed in Table 11-4 (see Appendix H for DIDs).

              Table 11-4: List of Document types for the Document Control Log
                           DESCRIPTION                                            DID
 Site Specific Removal Report                                          OT-FTO-30
 Report/Minutes, Record of Meeting                                     OT-FTO-40
 Telephone Conversations/Correspondence Records                        OT-FTO-55
 Conventional Explosives Safety Submission (ESS)                       OT-FTO-60
 Monthly Status Report                                                 OT-FTO-80
 Weekly Status Report                                                  OT-FTO-85


11.6.2 Document Distribution and Retrieval

     The most current revisions of documents that prescribe technical, management, and quality
requirements are internally and externally distributed to personnel identified in the procedures.
These personnel are responsible for the document's implementation and its verification for
implementation.

     The obsolete documents that prescribe obsolete technical and quality requirements are clearly
marked as obsolete and returned to the Parsons Fort Ord Document Control upon receipt of any
revised document. The recipient must also immediately conduct a page change for all affected
documents by inserting the revised document in place of the obsolete.

     Fort Ord Document Control must track all changes and ensure that all obsolete documents
have been received from the appropriate personnel. Additionally, UXOQC will conduct random
surveillance of documents in the field and for field office use to validate that the most current
documents are in place and being implemented.

11.6.3 Field Records Management

     Records (field data forms, field note copies, personal digital assistant (PDA files) will be
maintained in the on-site project office. All records will be stored such that they can be found
using the date they were created, the team who created them and a grid identification number.
Field forms prior to the implementation of the PDA system will also be scanned for digital
delivery.




                                              11-12
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
11.6.4 Field Data Storage

    All data collected in the field will be stored electronically in PDAs and synchronized daily.
Data from the surveys will be downloaded from data loggers at regular intervals to ensure that the
work performed will not be interrupted by a lack of storage capacity in the loggers.

Data deliverables will be transferred to CESPK in accordance with Chapter 5, section 11.

See Chapter 5, section 10 and Chapter 7, section 16, for more details on Data Management Quality
Control.

11.7        PROCUREMENT CONTROL

11.7.1 Preparation of a Subcontract or a Purchase Order

     Parsons will prepare a contract or a purchase order to procure the item(s) and/or service(s) in
compliance with Parsons’ Procurement Manual using the Parsons’ requisition forms as modified
for the Fort Ord project and contained at Appendix D. Details of procurement requirements are
also specified in Chapter 3 of the Work Plan for Explosives Management.                       Each
subcontract/purchase order will include applicable technical requirements describing the items to
be furnished, including:

       1.    References to applicable drawings, specifications, process requirements, and other
             relevant technical data.

       2.    Specific types of controls to be exercised, including requirements for source inspection at
             the supplier’s location during manufacturing, inspection, testing, and release for
             shipment.

     The Contract Manager shall be responsible for issuing the RFP or RFQ to the potential
bidders.

    All subcontract or purchase order amendments shall be controlled, reviewed, and issued in the
same manner as the original subcontract or purchase order.

11.7.2 Reviews

      The QCM shall review each subcontract or purchase order for compliance with the project
requirements (including the QCP requirements). Review by the PM and the Subcontracts Manager
shall depend on significance, value and complexity of the subcontract or purchase order.

11.7.3 Subcontractor/Supplier Evaluation

     The Contract Administrator shall perform potential subcontractor/supplier qualification
assessment and bidder selection.

     The evaluation and selection of the subcontractor/supplier shall be based on the ability to meet
specific requirements, including quality requirements. Evidence of the subcontractor/supplier
evaluation shall be maintained on file. The government’s representative shall have the privilege of
verifying at the subcontractor/supplier’s location that the item or process complies with the



                                                  11-13
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
specified requirements (verification by the government shall not relieve Parsons of the
responsibility to provide acceptable items or to limit subsequent rejection by the government).
Access by the government representative(s) to the subcontractor/supplier facilities shall be
specified in purchase order/subcontract.

11.7.4 Verification of Supplier Products and Services

     UXOQC shall review and approve source inspection plans as appropriate and included in
designated purchase requisitions to monitor supplier activities. The inspector performing the
inspections shall be responsible for issuing an inspection report to the project management. The
supplier’s management will be advised to provide corrective action to correct the deficiencies. The
inspector shall be responsible for reporting the status of the open noncompliance to the project
management and the QCM. Verification by Parsons shall not relieve the supplier of the
responsibility to provide an acceptable item, process, or to limit a subsequent rejection by Parsons.

11.8       GOVERNMENT/CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT

11.8.      General

   This sub-section of the QCP shall comply with the requirements specified in Chapter 9 of
Work Plan (Property Management) and also Parsons Procurement Manual, Section 7 for the GFE.

11.8.2 Government Furnished Equipment

     At the time of issuance of GFE to Parsons, the Contracting Officer shall require that Parsons
be responsible and accountable and that Parsons shall keep the government’s official records of the
GFE, as specified in the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), Part 45.5. Material, as defined by
FAR, means the property that can be incorporated into or attached to a deliverable end item or that
can be consumed or expended in performing a contract. All GFE shall be controlled in the manner
specified in procedure for GFE. Any GFE lost, damaged or rendered incapable of use shall be
reported to the government within 30 days of such determination by Parsons’ government property
administrator.

11.8.3 Contractor Furnished Equipment

     CFE shall be inspected upon receipt and also periodically to ensure adequate maintenance and
storage per manufacturer’s instructions.

11.9       INSPECTION AND TEST CONTROL

11.9.1 Engineering Review

        The engineering review requirements are established in sub-section 11.15 of this QCP.

11.9.2 Inspection and Test Plan

    The I & T plan shall be developed for each definable feature of work (e.g. mapping,
geophysical investigation, explosive siting, etc) to be performed.




                                                 11-14
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     Parsons will not release for use any item or system until all the activities specified in I & T
plan has been satisfactorily completed and the associated documentation is completed.

      The I & T Plan shall include a listing of items and the frequency and type of inspections and
tests to be performed. Where an item or activity fails to pass any inspection or test, it shall be
identified as a nonconforming item (see sub-section 11.11 of the QCP) and corrective actions shall
be taken. The I & T plan shall identify all inspections and tests necessary to assure compliance
with the design document requirements. The four phases of inspection are as follows:

     1.   Preparatory
     2.   Initial
     3.   Follow-up
     4.   Final

11.9.3 Qualification of Test Laboratory

     All tests on the project will be performed by an Independent Test Laboratory (ITL). Parsons
shall employ an independent test laboratory acceptable to the government for the performance of
QC testing at the work site. As a minimum the laboratory shall meet the requirements of ASTM
E329, "Standard Specification for Agencies Engaged in the Testing and/or Inspection of Materials
Used in Construction,” and shall be authorized to operate for onsite testing. Parsons shall, prior to
performance of QC testing, submit to the government for approval the name, address and
qualifications (QC Plans, procedures, equipment, etc.) of the proposed testing laboratory along
with evidence of authority to operate and qualifications of key laboratory personnel who will be
responsible for the testing services.

    Government approved test laboratory shall be used for analysis of Hazardous and Toxic
Waste (HTW). Chemical Waste Contamination test laboratory must be certified DOD Surety
Material lab.

11.9.4 Final Inspection and Tests

     Parsons QC shall ensure that all final inspection and tests have been conducted in accordance
with the I & T plan. Product(s) shall not be released for service prior to completion of all activities
specified in the I & T plan and the associated documentation is available and authorized. If an
unverified product must be released for immediate use prior to acceptance, the product shall be
identified in a place where it can be recalled and replaced in the event a nonconformance is
identified. If a nonconforming product is uncovered, it shall be controlled in a manner specified in
sub-section 11.11 of the QCP.

11.9.5 Records

     Parsons QC shall document results of inspections and tests to include the following
information:

     1.   The identity of the item or activity
     2.   Date of inspection
     3.   Identification of measuring and testing equipment used
     4.   Acceptance criteria
     5.   Results and indication of acceptability



                                                 11-15
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
     6.   Identity of the Quality Inspector

     The inspection and test records providing evidence that the work has been inspected and/or
tested shall be maintained as a QC record in a manner specified in sub-section 10.14 of the QCP.

11.9.6 Equipment Maintenance and Tests

     Parsons and its subcontractor perform the following activities in the order listed unless
directed otherwise or operational necessity dictates otherwise. These processes and activities are
controlled in accordance with the noted reference documents in the PWP:

     1. Preparatory Inspection of the project site to determine the presence of environmental
sensitive areas as detailed in DID OT-FTO-12, (see Appendix H), degree and type of vegetation
cover, MEC and scrap contamination, the best geophysical instrument to be used and where,
construction support and restoration.

     2. Conduct site border survey marker installation, (Chapter 7)

     3. Removing vegetation by a combination of manual and mechanical cutting or controlled
burning to gain access into the site, which may include fence removal and MEC construction
support. (Chapter 2)

     4. Survey in the 100’ X 100’ grids. (Chapter 7)

     5. Conduct MEC surface sweep, which may include demolition operations and QA/QC
seeding. (Chapter 2)

    6. Conduct a digital geophysical survey. This may also be performed as an analog survey.
(Chapter 5)

     7. Process geophysical data and create a pick and/or dig list. (Chapter 5)

     8. Geographic reacquire or GPS relocation of anomalies. (Chapter 5)

     9. Conduct MEC treatment and demolition. (Chapter 2)

     10. Analog and digital QC and. Re-excavate, if necessary.

     11. Analog and digital QA and, re-excavate, if necessary.

     12. Site Restoration, which may include fence replacement and MEC removal boundary
survey. (Chapter 2)

     13. Preparation on an After Action Report. (Chapter 2)




                                               11-16
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
11.10     MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT

11.10.1 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment

     A procedure shall be implemented to control, calibrate, and maintain measuring and test
equipment (including test software) used to indicate or record critical parameters or to demonstrate
compliance to specified permits and requirements. The procedures shall implement the following
requirements:

     1.    Measuring and test equipment (M&TE) shall be used in a manner that ensures that the
           measurement uncertainty is known and is consistent with the required measurement
           capability.

     2.    M&TE shall be selected to provide the proper range and accuracy for its intended use.
           The participant shall identify and document precision and accuracy tolerances.

     3.    Calibration checks shall be conducted and records shall be maintained to ensure that the
           M&TE remains accurate for its intended purposes.

11.10.2 Equipment Control

     The procedure will identify the following requirements to control equipment in use:

     1.    Determine the measurements to be made and the precision and accuracy required.

     2.    Identify and document all M&TE to be included in the controlled inventory.

     3.    Calibrate each item at prescribed intervals, or prior to use, using certified equipment
           having a known relationship to nationally recognized standards. Where no such standards
           exist, the basis for calibration shall be documented.

     4.    Define the process used for the calibration of M&TE, including equipment type, unique
           identification, location, frequency of checks, and the calibration method to include
           individual components and system (loop) checks, acceptance criteria, and actions to be
           taken if results are determined to be unsatisfactory.

     5.    Identify M&TE with a label or identification record to show the calibration status.

     6.    Maintain calibration records for M&TE.

     7.    Assess and document the validity of previous test results or plant operation history when
           M&TE is found to be out of calibration by a prescribed and approved percentage.

     8.    Ensure that environmental conditions are suitable for the calibrations, measurements, and
           tests being performed.

     9.    Ensure that the handling and storage of M&TE ensures that accuracy and usefulness of
           M&TE are maintained.

     10. Safeguard M&TE from adjustments that could invalidate the calibration setting.



                                                11-17
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     11. Provide for government or its representative to verify that measuring and test equipment
         is functionally adequate.

11.10.3 Instrument Calibration

     The quality of geophysical data sets is dependent on the operational capabilities of the
equipment used. By manufacturer’s design, these instruments are calibrated at the time of
manufacture and do not require field calibration. To ensure that equipment is fully capable and
will perform in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, pre-operational and post-
operational checks will be performed. Following these checks, any equipment that is found
unsuitable will be immediately removed from service. These checks will provide QC data
indicating the proper functionality of the instruments.

     Positioning equipment will be checked for proper operation by placing the system’s antenna
over a known point and recording the calculated location. For GPS units using real time
corrections from a dedicated base station, the position repeatability standard will be ± 0.5 ft for
RTK DGPS systems and ± 1.0 ft for ultrasonic positioning systems.

11.10.4 UXOQC Inspections/Surveys

     An inspection/survey is an activity that involves measuring, examining, testing or gauging one
or more characteristics of an entity and comparing the results with specified requirements in order
to establish whether conformance is achieved for each characteristic. QC inspections/surveys will
be performed with the instrument type that was used initially for the activity being
inspected/surveyed.

     SSWPs contain specific information regarding final acceptance, sampling inspection
acceptance criteria, the inspection process, and the requirements for maintenance of inspection
records. MEC removal operations that fail final acceptance will be controlled as a nonconforming
condition and documented on a Nonconformance Report (NCR) (QCF-02 form). Grids and
data/database information that fail final acceptance will be controlled by QC until verification of
corrective action, final inspection, and acceptance has been completed.

11.10.5 QC Seeded Items

     QC seeded items will be used as one of several quality control measures to ensure that
personnel operating geophysical instruments (analog or digital) in the field for the purpose of
locating buried ordnance items have performed their function in a quality manner. The method
involves planting inert ordnance items in known locations where geophysical surveys will be
performed and determining whether the items were found as a result of these surveys. The items
will be placed at depths and orientations that, when surveyed effectively, will cause instrument
responses that indicate the presence of a buried metallic item. This QC action will be performed in
accordance with the SOPs for Seeding Quality Control Items for Quality Control Monitoring of
Analog and Digital Geophysical Operations presented in Appendix G.

11.10.6 Equipment Maintenance and Tests

     Measurement equipment utilized on-site, i.e., magnetometers, monitors, geophysical mapping
equipment, etc., are checked for operational reliability.




                                               11-18
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                          May 2004
     In as much as possible equipment used at Fort Ord is dedicated solely to the project until the
project is completed. At times, it will be necessary to rent equipment to meet surges. Equipment
such as vehicles, backhoe and chipping/grubbing equipment have before, during and after
operation maintenance performed in accordance with the equipment’s operating manual. The UXO
QC staff is specifically responsible for inspecting the equipment and its maintenance records. If
equipment field checks indicate that any piece of equipment is not operating correctly, and field
repair cannot be made, the equipment is tagged and removed from service. The PM is notified and
a request for replacement equipment is placed immediately. Replacement equipment must meet
the same specifications for accuracy and precision as the equipment removed from service.

     Parsons has reviewed the equipment requirements of this delivery order and identified the
following equipment as requiring daily maintenance or tests: geophysical survey instruments (e.g.
Schonstedt magnetometers, Geonics EM61, Geometrics G-858) and Global Positioning System
(GPS) Receivers. Instrument standardization checks are described in section 5.12 of the PWP.

11.10.7 Preventive Maintenance

     Equipment, instruments, tools, gauges, and other items requiring preventive maintenance will
be serviced in accordance with the manufacturer’s specified recommendations.

      Maintenance Procedures. The manufacturer’s written maintenance schedule shall be followed
to minimize the downtime of the measurement system. It will be the operator’s responsibility to
adhere to this maintenance schedule and to arrange any necessary and prompt service as required.
At a minimum, equipment used daily will be kept in good operating condition. Qualified personnel
shall perform Service to the equipment instruments, tools, etc.

11.10.8 Equipment Spare Parts

     An extra battery pack for each type of geophysical instrument shall be on-site at all times. A
back-up geophysical instrument will be kept on site or arrangements shall be made with an
equipment vendor so replacement equipment or any spare parts needed can be delivered to the site
by overnight delivery.

11.11   NONCONFORMING ITEMS OR ACTIVITIES AND CORRECTIVE ACTIONS

11.11.1 Identification

     Circumstances that prevent a work process to control the output from conforming to the
contract requirements will be promptly identified, documented, investigated, and corrected
appropriately. All project personnel have the responsibility, as part of their normal work duties, to
promptly identify and report conditions adverse to quality.             The methodology for the
nonconformance report (NCR) process is described in Appendix G, Nonconforming Items or
Activities and Corrective action SOP. The status of NCRs will be maintained in a log and progress
of their resolutions shall be documented and reviewed monthly to ensure prompt attention to their
conclusion.

11.11.2 Resolution, Corrective Action, and Verification

     The appropriate level of management is responsible for evaluating the cause of a NCR and
will recommend solutions for correcting the deficiency identified. Actions and technical



                                                11-19
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
justifications for an action proposed to resolve the corrective action shall be reviewed and approved
by personnel responsible for the technical aspect of the work. The QC organization will be
responsible for verifying implementation of corrective action, monitoring the effectiveness of
preventive action, and report any findings to the QCM.

     UXOQC shall maintain the NCR log that identifies the nature, location, and status of all
nonconformance reports. The NCR log status will be briefed to CESPK weekly in addition to
copies of all closed-out NCRs.

11.11.3 Material and Item Nonconformance

     The QCM ensures that the following requirements are implemented:

     1.   Items that do not conform to prescribed technical and/or quality requirements are tagged
          or otherwise identified, documented, and reported as nonconforming.                  The
          documentation shall include the following information:

          a.    Identification of the nonconforming activity, material, or item.

          b.    Identification of the technical and quality requirement(s) with which the activity,
                material, or item is not in compliance.

          c.    Identification of the current status of the activity, material or item (i.e. whether the
                item is on hold or whether its use is conditional).

          d.    Names and dates of the individuals identifying the nonconformance.

          e.    Identification of the individual(s) or organization(s) responsible for resolution.

          f.    Indication of the severity of the nonconformance(s).

          g.    Indication regarding the continuance or stoppage of work associated with each
                nonconforming activity, material, or item.

     2.   Nonconforming materials and items are segregated, when possible, from conforming
          materials and/or items to the extent necessary to preclude their inadvertent use.

     3.   The status of nonconforming activities, materials, and items and the progress of their
          resolution are documented and routinely reviewed to ensure prompt attention to
          conclusion.

11.11.4 Review and Disposition of Nonconformance

     The review is conducted by the PM, QCM, and UXO QC personnel to ensure that:

     1.   The responsibility for review and disposition of nonconformance is defined.

     2.   Nonconforming materials and items are reviewed in accordance with procedures.
          Nonconformance can be evaluated according to four criteria:




                                                11-20
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
          a.    Reworked to meet the original requirements.
          b.    Accepted with or without repair by the designer.
          c.    Re-graded for alternative applications.
          d.    Rejected or scrapped.
     3.   Repaired or reworked materials items are re-inspected.

     4.   Each document used to identify and correct nonconforming conditions allows for the
          evaluation and approval of proposed actions by the appropriate authority.

11.11.5 Trend and Root Cause Analysis

    The trend analysis of QA audits, subcontractor/supplier surveillance reports and
nonconformance will include the following information:
     1.   Total number of audit findings and observations, surveillance reports, and NCRs for each
          area of the QCP.

     2.   A summary of the root causes for the nonconformance consolidated for each area of the
          QCP.

     3.   Trends that are developing or that have developed.

     The PM, as a part of the semi-annual assessment, shall perform the trend analysis once every
year. QC shall verify the implementation of any preventive actions resulting from the trend
analysis. The method for conducting root cause analysis of nonconformities identified by NCRs,
customer complaints and how to evaluate the need for action to ensure that the nonconformities do
not recur, is presented in Appendix G, Corrective and Preventive Action SOP. This procedure also
establishes the methodology to conduct trend analysis of nonconformities identified through NCRs,
corrective actions, quality surveillance reports and internal audit results.

      The QCM is responsible for evaluating on a semiannual basis all NCRs affecting quality and
will recommend solutions as well as steps for verifying their implementation.

      The management assessment shall propose and initiate measures necessary to deal with any
problems requiring preventive action. When preventive action necessitates a revision to the project
procedures, the PM shall issue an administrative FVF describing the necessary change. The QCM
shall verify implementation of the preventive action during the audit.

11.11.6 Lessons Learned

     Parsons will capture lessons learned in each individual site After Action Report, which will be
forwarded to the Parsons OE Sector. Lessons learned will be reviewed and distributed to other
applicable Parsons’ Projects locations by the OE Sector.




                                               11-21
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
11.12     HANDLING, STORAGE, AND PRESERVATION

11.12.1 General

     Requirements of this sub-section of the QCP will apply to handling, storage, and preservation
of explosives as specified in Chapter 3, Explosive Management Plan, and Chapter 4, Explosive
Siting Plan, of Work Plan.

11.12.2 Handling of Design Documents

    All design documents prepared for contractual submittal to the government shall be submitted
to Document Controls after all specified internal reviews are completed. The original design
documents shall be logged and retained on file as specified in sub-section 11.13 of the QCP.

11.12.3 Handling of Materials and Items

     The following requirements specified in sub-sections 11.12.4 through 11.12.6 for handling,
storage, and preservation materials and items will be implemented.

11.12.4 Handling

     Proper handling ensures that the following requirements are met:

     1.    The selection of equipment to be employed in handling items is reviewed to ensure
           adequacy with respect to capacity, range and method(s) of contact with the item.

     2.    Techniques to be used in handling items are documented and reviewed to ensure
           adequacy.

     3.    Equipment used in the handling of items is inspected and/or tested at routine intervals to
           ensure its fitness for service.

     4.    Operators of handling equipment are qualified and, when required by code, regulation, or
           procedure, certified to operate the equipment.

     5.    Control of lifting and moving heavy equipment in the plant.

11.12.5 Storage

     A detailed requirement for storage of materials and items ensures:

     1.    Materials and items are protected in storage to the extent necessary to preserve their
           usefulness, including the maintenance of protective environments and conditions
           established by or recommended by the manufacturer or supplier.

     2.    Identification markings, tags or labels are maintained.

     3.    Measures are established and implemented to ensure that special storage conditions are
           routinely identified and reviewed, including identification of shelf-life, temperature
           conditions and moisture levels.



                                                 11-22
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     4.    The authorities necessary for transactions to and from storage areas are defined.

     5.    Items in stock are assessed upon arrival and at defined intervals during storage in order to
           detect deterioration.

11.12.6 Preservation

     Parsons shall implement appropriate methods for preservation and segregation of items when
the items are under Parsons control to include preventive maintenance as recommended by the
manufacturer or supplier.

11.13     RECORDS AND PUBLICATIONS

11.13.1 Identification

     Records are documents or other media that prescribe technical or quality requirements or that
provide evidence of quality achievement for materials or items. These records are identified as
documents prepared, reviewed, or approved in this QCP and implementing project procedures.
Records are uniquely identified for ready access and retrieval.

     Records that are required to be retained are identified in project procedures. These records
and documents shall, at a minimum, apply to inspection, audits, and surveillances of: MEC records,
hazardous waste management, environmental restoration, and training.

11.13.2 Authentication

     The validity of documents submitted for use as a record is ensured through management
review of correspondence, a lead discipline engineer's review, and QCM review for compliance
with project procedures.

      All correspondence to the government is signed by the PM (or designee) after completion of
satisfactory management review.

     The authorizing signatures appear on the documents where provision has been made; e.g., the
signature or initials of the authenticating person will appear for correspondence, drawings, and
calculations.

11.13.3 Storage

     The records will be retained in a record facility providing protection from deterioration, theft,
and damage, including implementation of measures in consideration of wind, flood, fire,
temperature, moisture, pressure, erasure, exposure to light, or injurious insects, mold, and rodents.
Electronic storage shall be considered dual storage. Dual storage facilities shall be sufficiently
remote from each other to reduce the chance of a simultaneous hazard.

11.13.4 Logs and Records

     For all site work performed field personnel use personal digital assistants (PDAs). The PDAs
are used to record the daily activities of field teams and locations of MEC and other pertinent
items, and to note any observations that might affect the quality of data.



                                                 11-23
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
     •    Anomaly Excavation Records: The UXO Supervisors prepare individual records for
          each operating grid at Fort Ord. This record consists of fields that are used to record data
          on the excavation of anomalies and work conducted. This data is downloaded daily into
          the Project database through synchronization of the UXO Supervisor’s PDA. This data
          is reviewed by the SUXOS, FOM, UXO QC and the GIS Manager for completeness,
          accuracy and overall quality the following work day.

     •    Safety Log Book: The UXOSO maintains these logs. The logs are used to records all
          safety matters associated with the specific project such as: safety briefings/meetings
          (including items covered and attendees), safety training, safety audits, near-
          misses/accidents/incidents with cause and corrective action taken, weather conditions
          and any other matters relating to safety.

     •    Training Records: The UXOSO maintains training records for all site personnel. These
          records contain training certificates, licenses and other qualifying data for an individual’s
          duty position.

     •    Visitor’s Log Book: The UXOSO maintains this log. All personnel who are not directly
          involved in the project site activities are identified in this log by name, company, date,
          time in/out and a contact phone number. Safety briefings and training for visiting
          personnel are also recorded in this log.

     •    Photographic Log: Photographic logs are maintained by various functional departments
          and will be retained until the end of the project. These logs are used to record all video
          recording and photographs taken to document work and/or site conditions.

     •    Correspondence Log: The Office Administrator generates individual correspondence
          numbers for all outgoing correspondence and maintains a log of all outgoing and
          incoming correspondence.

     •    Phone Log: Long Distance calls are monitored by Project Controls and if there are any
          out of the ordinary, it/they are brought to the attention of the Office Administrator who
          will in turn research/determine if the calls are business related. Calls that are found to
          not be business related will be reimbursed by the person who made the call. If it/they
          cannot be determined then it/they will be charged to non-reimbursable.

     •    Site Maps: The PM and GIS Manager maintain current working maps of the operating
          areas in the field office throughout execution of this project. These maps are used to
          document MEC encountered and the locations of soil sampling, auguring, drilling and
          other soil disturbing activities.

     UXO QC inspects all grid operations records on a daily basis. These inspections focus on the
completeness, accuracy and logic of the records. The results of these inspections are entered
directly into the project database.

11.13.5 Publications

      Parsons conducted a technical review of the scope of work and all pertinent data and compiled
a list of required publications to be maintained at the site. In addition to this list Parsons will make



                                                 11-24
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
available, in a timely manner, any additional manuals the SUXOS may require. Prior to the start of
operations and periodically throughout the project UXOQC checks to ensure that site publications
are present and in good repair. Results of these inspections are recorded and reported. Currently
identified publications include:

     •    Copy of all Task Orders
     •    Parsons Safety and Health Program (SHP)
     •    OSHA, 29 CFR 1910, General Industry Standards
     •    27 CFR Part 55, Commerce in Explosives
     •    OSHA, 29 CFR 1926, Construction Standards
     •    ATFP 5400.7, Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms Explosives Laws and Regulations
     •    NIOSH/OSHA/USCG/EPA Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for
          Hazardous Waste Site Activities
     •    American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), Threshold Limit
          Values (TLVs) for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure
          Indices (BEIs)
     •    Applicable sections of EPA, 40 CFR Parts 260 to 299, Protection of Environment
     •    Applicable sections of DOT, 49 CFR Parts 100 to 199, Transportation
     •    CESPK EM 385-1-1, Safety and Health Requirements Manual
     •    CESPK ER 385-1-92, Safety and Occupational Health Document Requirements for
          Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions
     •    DOD 4145.26-M, Contractors' Safety Manual for Ammunition and Explosives
     •    DOD 6055.9-STD, DOD Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
     •    DOD 4160.21-M, Defense Reutilization and Marketing Manual
     •    DA PAM 385-64, Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards
     •    AR 385-64, Ammunition and Explosives Safety Standards;
     •    AR 200-1, Environmental Protection and Enhancement
     •    AR 385-10, The Army Safety Program
     •    AR 385-16, System Safety Engineering and Management
     •    AR 385-40 w/CESPK supplement, Accident Reporting and Records
     •    TM 9-1300-200, Ammunition General
     •    TM 9-1300-214, Military Explosives
     •    TM 60 Series Publications
     •    EM 1110-1-4009, Ordnance and Explosives Response

                                               Note
 The CESPK Safety Specialist has access to the TM 60-Series publications for this project.


                                               11-25
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                         May 2004
                                                   Note
  Documents of external origin are available electronically on the project shared drive and will be
    updated and/or replaced as new versions become available. Hard copes will be controlled.



11.14     AUDITS AND SURVEILLANCES

11.14.1 Audit Planning

     A Parsons Corporate QA representative shall perform semi-annual audits of the program
activities, and audits of subcontractors/suppliers and of the environmental compliance program, as
required in a manner specified below:

     1.    All areas of the activities being performed (where audits are not planned for certain
           areas, the audit schedule shall include an appropriate justification for the course of
           action).

     2.    The audit schedule shall identify office(s), including those in the subcontractor’s
           organization, to be audited.

     3.    The audit schedule shall identify the sequence and dates of audits for a fiscal year.

     Before each government fiscal year, the PM shall approve the audit schedule for the
government’s fiscal year. The lead auditor shall prepare the audit plans. The plan shall be
reviewed and approved by the Parsons Corporate QA Manager before execution.

     The audit plan shall include the following information:

     1.    Identification of the organization and work areas to be audited.

     2.    Identification of location, times, and dates of duration of the audit.

     3.    Identification of the documents that specify the criteria against which the work will be
           measured.

     4.    Checklists prepared as a guide during the audit.

     5.    Identification of auditing personnel.

     6.    Signatures and dates approving the audit.

    The organization to be audited will be notified of the impending audits at least 15 days in
advance.

11.14.2 Audit Personnel

     The lead auditor shall be qualified and certified. The lead auditor shall be responsible for the
organization and coordination of the planning, execution, and reporting of the audit. Auditors shall
not be responsible for the work being audited.

     The QCM shall be qualified and certified as a lead auditor, and is responsible for reviewing
the response to the audit report and for the verification phase of the audit.




                                                   11-26
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
11.14.3 Audit Execution

     A pre-audit briefing and a post-audit briefing shall be conducted, to inform the management
of the organization being audited or to confirm the results of the audit, including concerns, and
findings. Daily briefings may be conducted, as needed, to inform the audited organizations of the
progress of the audit and potential findings or concerns.

11.14.4 Audit Reporting

     The audit results approved by the lead auditor shall include the following information:

     1.   Reference to audit plan.

     2.   Identification of and justification for any differences that occurred between the audit plan
          and the actual conduct of the audit.

     3.   Synopsis of the audit results.

     4.   Description of nonconformity (identified as findings and observations).

     5.   Completed audit checklist and documentation (objective evidence) supporting the
          discovery of the nonconformity.

Note: Conditions determined to be in nonconformance with the contract, procedure, or other
specified requirements, are identified as findings. Conditions that are not in nonconformance when
first identified, but could lead to nonconformance if left uncorrected, are identified as observations.
Formal responses are required for findings only. Corrective action is required for both findings and
observations.

     The lead auditor shall issue the audit report to the QCM. The QCM shall distribute the report
to project management and the Vice President of Parsons OE Sector. The PM shall issue the audit
report to the subcontractors and suppliers audited.

11.14.5 Review and Approval of Recommended Action Response

     The recommended corrective action proposed by the management of the organization audited
in response to the nonconformity shall be reviewed and approved by the QCM. Justification for
rejection of the response shall be documented by the QCM and transmitted to the organization
providing the response.

11.14.6 Verification of Closeout Action

     The management of the organization that is being audited shall report the implementation of
corrective action to close out the audit nonconformity. The lead auditor or the QCM shall verify a
closeout action at the time of the next scheduled audit.

     Verification of closeout action shall be documented to ensure the satisfactory closure of the
audit nonconformity and shall be reported to PM and to the management of the organization
audited, when applicable.




                                                 11-27
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
11.14.7 Surveillances/QC Audits

     UXOQC personnel shall perform scheduled (daily) and unscheduled surveillances/QC audits
of the program activities to supplement the audit process so that confidence in the quality of items
is maintained without duplication of effort. These QC audits will include, but not limited to:

     •    Equipment Calibration audits

     •    Property accountability audit

     •    MEC-related task audits

     •    Search Effectiveness audits

     •    Equipment operator maintenance audit

     •    PPE audits

     The surveillance shall be conducted by personnel who do not report to management or to the
supervisors immediately responsible for the work being evaluated. The surveillance report shall
document the objectives, scope, and basis of the surveillance conducted, along with the description
of nonconformance(s). The surveillance report shall be discussed and coordinated with the
individual or group responsible for the document or activity evaluated and shall be reported to the
PM. The PM (or designee) shall provide corrective action to the surveillance within 4 weeks from
the date of issue of the surveillance report. The QCM is responsible for verifying the corrective
action as soon as practical following the implementation of the corrective action.

11.14.8 Stop Work

     When the QC audit, surveillance, or inspection nonconformance remain open past the
recommended period for corrective action, the PM will first be notified that a stop-work order will
be issued if the corrective action has not been taken. When activities stemming from such
nonconformance continue to compromise safety or produce unsatisfactory work on critical and
essential significant items, the QCM shall issue a stop-work order until the nonconformance is
corrected.

11.14.9 Records

     The surveillance and audit reports shall be maintained as records in the manner established in
sub-section 11.13 of this QCP.

11.15    TRAINING

11.15.1 General

     Qualifications and training of all project personnel shall comply with the requirements
specified in DID OT-FTO-25, Personnel/Work Standards.




                                               11-28
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
11.15.2 Qualification Requirements

     Key personnel, as defined in DID OT-FTO-25, shall be qualified in compliance with the DID.

     Personnel whose job requires the use of detector or use of innovative detection
techniques/equipment will be tested for proficiency IAW Appendix G, The UXO Technicians
Analog Locator Quality Control Qualification SOP.

11.15.3 Training for UXO Personnel

     For all UXO personnel assigned to this project, training includes the following courses:

              Training Course                                  Personnel Attending

40-Hour Hazardous Materials Workers            All personnel who have not previously received this
Training                                       training or who do not qualify for certification
                                               through documented experience or training
(HAZWOPER)                                     equivalent to that in paragraphs (e)(1) through (e)(4)
                                               of 29 CFR 1910.120. (Reference: Paragraph (e)(9)
                                               29 CFR 1910.120

8-Hour Supervisor Course                       All management and supervisory personnel. This
                                               includes the PM, FOM, UXOSO, SUXOS,
                                               UXOQCS, and all UXO Supervisors.

8-Hour Refresher Course                        All site personnel, except those that have completed
                                               their initial 40-Hour HAZWOPER training within
                                               the past year.

UXO Refresher Course                           All UXO-qualified personnel will be given refresher
                                               training on the ordnance known and suspected to be
                                               present.

Equipment Operation and certification          All UXO personnel will be trained and qualified on
                                               equipment such as magnetometers (Schonstedt GA-
                                               52Cx), navigational equipment and Husky Fex 21.

      Prior to the start of any intrusive on-site operations, Parsons will submit copies of the OSHA
Training Certificates for the above training to CESPK for review and approval. Under no
circumstances will any person be allowed to engage in intrusive activities until the requisite
training is verified by CESPK.

     •    All site-personnel will be trained to a clearly identifiable and consistent standard,
          because all personnel will receive the same training.

     •    The training provided can be tailored to not only meet the regulatory requirements, but to
          address specific safety and health issues associated with this particular site and
          operational conditions.




                                               11-29
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     •    Tracking, scheduling and performing annual refresher training will be made easier by
          establishing a standardized start time for each individual’s qualifications.

      In addition to the OSHA required training, UXO qualified personnel receive the comparable
training as provided to non-UXO personnel.

11.15.4 Training for Non-UXO Personnel

      Prior to commencing site activities of the non-UXO personnel, Parsons conducts required
training for all personnel assigned to this project. This training includes the following training
courses:
     •    MEC Recognition Training;

     •    Familiarization with the current Work Plan;

     •    Site-Specific Safety And Health Plan orientation and PPE training, hearing protection
          donning and doffing of PPE;

     •    Instruction applicable to equipment operation and maintenance with emphasis on safety
          procedures to be implemented, which will require operator qualification;

     •    A discussion of environmental considerations specific to the MMRP;

     •    Employees must meet the standards of OSHA (29 CFR 1910.120). The employee will
          complete the OSHA training as described in paragraph 6.4.2.1;

     •    Daily Safety and Tailgate Training: Briefings outlining the day’s activities, unique
          hazards and safety precautions and other operational issues related to the project.

     The UXOSO and others conduct training as applicable. Records of attendance (and student
performance when applicable) are recorded. Upon completion of Safety and Equipment Operator's
Training the employee is issued a certificate of training and a copy of this certificate is placed in
the site personnel record. Prior to assignment to a duty position or change in duty position the
UXO QC performs a check of the individual's site personnel record to ensure that the employee is
qualified to fill the position.

     Personnel involved in activities affecting the quality of operations and QC personnel assigned
the responsibility for verifying the adequacy of MEC removal activities, clearance activity,
environmental sampling, and related testing will be trained and certified as specified in DID OT-
FTO-25.

11.15.5 Training Requirements

     Personnel and subcontractors assigned on Fort Ord to perform activities affecting quality and
safety shall be trained to the project requirements and to the requirements of the QCP, as well as to
the project and safety procedures. The project procedure shall establish a formal training and
qualification program.

     The training program will ensure that project personnel:



                                                11-30
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
     •    Possess adequate knowledge of the processes and procedures needed to conduct assigned
          tasks;

     •    Has working knowledge of the tools to be used;

     •    Possess an understanding of acceptance and rejection criteria for the work process;

     •    Understand the safety conditions/requirements of the work task. Safety training for all
          onsite personnel will consist of daily tailgate safety meetings and weekly Safety Manager
          meetings;

     •    Knows the consequences of inadequate quality levels;

     •    Is provided training for continued maintenance of job proficiency;

     •    Aware of the quality improvement and empowerment responsibilities;

    Quality Control staff including subcontractors at the site shall be required to complete the
Corps of Engineers “Construction Quality Management for Contractors” training course.

    The training program shall describe the initial, refresher, and replacement training to be
conducted.

     All visitors shall be required to go through a safety training and orientation to the general and
specific hazard requirements.

     Training records including qualifications and certifications will be maintained as project
records in Document Controls files in accordance with requirements in sub-section 11.13.

11.16    STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES

11.16.1 General

    Statistical Sampling and Analysis: Characterization of sites using traditional or innovative
sampling methods as approved by the Government shall be performed.

     Sampling and Analysis: Chemical sampling and analysis (both on-site and off-site) for
explosives, CWM, and other Target Compound List chemicals (as required) shall be performed.

    This sub-section of the QCP shall comply with the requirements specified in Chapter 5
(Geophysical Investigation), and Chapter 10 (Sampling and Analysis) of Work Plan.

     Parsons will verify implementation of the statistical techniques used during the surveillance
and audit of the subcontractor/supplier.




                                                11-31
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
11.17   QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

11.17.1 General

    Measurable objectives and goals shall be implemented to solicit customer feedback in order to
improve the quality management process continually.

11.17.2 Goal and Objectives

     The PM shall establish measurable quality goals and objectives at relevant functions and
levels within the project organization. The PM shall measure these goals and objectives
periodically and shall identify any improvements needed from the measurements.

11.17.3 Customer Feedback

     Management assessments, NCRs and trend analyses, and client feedback received during the
course of the project execution shall be considered as customer feedback by project management.
All client concerns shall be addressed by the PM in correspondence to the client.

11.17.4 Improvements

     The measurements and feedback received by project management shall be analyzed to identify
improvement opportunities in the quality management system, processes, items, products, or
services. Implemented improvement should be monitored by the PM to verify their effectiveness.

11.17.5 Servicing

     Servicing is not within the Parsons Scope of Work under this contract.




                                               11-32
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                        May 2004
                                           CHAPTER 12
                         ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PLAN

12.1       INTRODUCTION

     This Environmental Protection Plan (EPP) has been developed for the management and
protection of the environment to be implemented by Parsons during the performance of MEC
characterization and clearance at MEC-impacted sites at Fort Ord. The EPP provides guidance,
methods, and procedures for the following environmental considerations.

       •    Protection and conservation of natural, cultural, and archaeological resources
       •    Pollution prevention and waste minimization
       •    Protection and restoration of work areas

12.2       GOALS

       MEC characterization and clearance at Fort Ord are being performed with the following goals:

       •    To enhance the usability of MEC-impacted sites by detecting and removing the hazards
            associated with MEC;

       •    To perform MEC-related operations in a manner that avoids or minimizes impacts to the
            natural environment, including populations and habitats of rare, threatened and
            endangered species, leaving the environment in as near natural condition as operationally
            possible; and

       •    To restore sites cleared of MEC to as close to their original condition as possible,
            including measures to facilitate reestablishment of native flora and fauna.

12.3       ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINATION

    To ensure compliance with all applicable environmental regulations and agreements,
implementation of this EPP will require close coordination with the onsite CESPK representative
and DENR. The PM will be responsible for coordinating all environmental actions with the
CESPK and DENR.

12.4       PROTECTION AND CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES

     Fort Ord supports a variety of wildlife, plant species and habitats. The conservation and
management of these natural resources are detailed in the Installation-Wide Multispecies Habitat
Management Plan for Former Fort Ord, California (HMP), the Wetland Restoration Plan for
Unexploded Ordnance Removal Activities at Former Fort Ord, and other documents provided by
DENR regarding guidelines for natural resource protection. Chapter 3 of the HMP, “Habitat
Management for Predisposal Actions – Ordnance and Explosives Removal”, is incorporated into
this EPP by reference for specific mitigation measures for avoiding impacts on plant and animal
resources, and direction for mitigation monitoring. General considerations for rare, threatened and




                                                   12-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                             May 2004
endangered species and sensitive habitats such as wetlands are provided in this EPP. Map 5
(Appendix B) provides the Habitat Management Areas designated by the HMP.

12.4.1             Threatened and Endangered Species

     Table 12-1 presents a list of rare, threatened and endangered (T&E) flora and fauna found on
Fort Ord and their corresponding Federal/State protection status.

                                       Table 12-1
     List of Rare, Threatened and Endangered Species Known or Suspected at Fort Ord

    Common Name                         Scientific Name                        Protection Status
                                                                       Federal              California
Western snowy plover       Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus        Threatened            Species of concern
Smith’s blue butterfly     Euphilotes enoptes smithi              Endangered
California red-legged      Rana aurora draytoni                   Threatened            Species of concern
frog
California tiger           Ambystoma tigrinum californiense       Candidate             Species of concern
salamander
California black legless   Anniella pulchra var.nigra                                   Species of concern
lizard
Monterey ornate shrew      Sorex ornatus salarius                 Species of concern
Salinas harvest mouse      Reithrodontomys megalotis distchlis                          Sensitive species
Sand gilia                 Gilia tenuiflora ssp. Arenaria         Endangered            Threatened
Monterey spineflower       Chorizanthe pungens var. pungens       Threatened
Coast wallflower           Erysimum ammophilum                    Species of concern
Seaside birds-beak         Cordylanthus rigidus var. littoralis   Species of concern Endangered
Monterey ceanothus         Ceanothus cuneatus var. rigidus        Species of concern
Sandmat manzanita          Arctostaphylos pumila                  Species of concern
Toro manzanita             Arctostaphylos montereyensis           Species of concern
Hooker’s manzanita         Arctostaphylos hookeri                                       CNPS 1B List
Eastwood’s ericameria      Ericameria fasciculata                 Species of concern
Contra Costa goldfields    Lasthenia conjugens                    Endangered
Yadon’s piperia            Piperia yadonii                        Proposed
                                                                  endangered




                                                    12-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
12.4.2          Protection and Conservation of Rare, T & E Species

12.4.2.1Training

      To ensure compliance with the HMP, a qualified biologist will provide training to all Parsons’
field personnel and subcontractors in the following:

     •    The Endangered Species Act and its implementing federal and state regulations;
     •    Recognition of above listed flora and fauna, including seasonal considerations;
     •    Notification procedures when rare, T & E species are encountered; and
     •    Impact avoidance and reduction measures as listed in Chapter 3 of the HMP for OE
          removal.

     Training will be provided by qualified individuals. New employees will be trained prior to
their deployment in the field and only trained personnel will be deployed. The training will be
provided semi-annually as a refresher.

12.4.2.2Impact Avoidance/Reduction

     •    Prior to any MEC-related activities on a work site, the Parsons’ field biologist will
          coordinate an environmental survey of the site to identify presence and locations of
          sensitive habitats and species prior to working on each site, in order to avoid impacts
          during MEC work. The survey will also include, but not be limited to, photographic and
          descriptive documentation of the work site and the general area, and measures to
          minimize impacts.

     •    The Parsons’ field biologist will be responsible for completing the habitat checklist
          detailing the following: (1) location of rare, T & E species (2) procedures, equipment,
          and training required to eliminate or mitigate the impact and (3) presence of wetlands
          and other sensitive habitats.

     •    Field personnel, when encountering flora and fauna listed in Table 12-1, will avoid
          impacting them as much as possible. When avoidance is not possible, site-specific
          impact reduction measures previously approved by the DENR and as detailed in the
          HMP will be implemented.

12.4.3          Protection of Rare, T&E Species

     To protect and avoid disturbance of the protected species, Parsons will:

     •    Limit off-road access to habitat of the listed species as identified in environmental
          surveys,
     •    Replace top soil as necessary to preserve existing seed banks of protected species, and
     •    Apply rice straw or other biodegradable weed-free material approved by DENR to
          restore MEC-cleared areas to prevent exotic weed infestations and erosion.




                                                 12-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004
12.5       VEGETATION CLEARANCE

     Dense vegetation composed of maritime chaparral shrubs and oak woodlands cover most of
the MRS-impacted sites at Fort Ord. Controlled burning is the preferred method to remove
vegetation from the work area and will be closely coordinated with the DENR at all times. Where
chaparral vegetation cover is thick, mechanical or manual brush cutting methods may be employed
as appropriate, leaving the roots intact as much as possible. During manual clearance, designated
rare shrubs may be limbed up as much as possible while allowing MEC removal activities to
proceed. These shrubs will be marked using flags so they can be recognized during vegetation
clearance activity. Cut vegetation will be chipped and spread in designated areas. In oak
woodland areas, oak trees will be limbed up as needed to allow access to the ground for MEC
removal activities.

12.6       SENSITIVE COMMUNITIES

Sensitive communities recognized by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the California
Department of Fish and Game on Fort Ord include the following:

       •    Central maritime chaparral
       •    Valley needlegrass grassland
       •    Coastal Freshwater Marsh
       •    Central dune scrub
     To protect or minimize damage to sensitive communities in MES work-sites, Parsons will
identify areas where these communities are present on work sites and implement the appropriate
protection measures as detailed in the HMP and other documents during MEC removal. These
areas are identified in the USA Final Work Plan, dated 27 April 2000.

12.7       WETLANDS

     Wetlands are areas known to (1) support predominantly hydrophytic plant species, at least
periodically, (2) have undrained hydric soil as the substrate, and (3) be saturated or inundated at
some time during the growing season, typically for a period greater than 2 weeks. Vernal pools,
ponds, and other wetland areas exist at Fort Ord. They serve as breeding habitat for the California
tiger salamander and many other rare, T, & E aquatic species, in addition to providing flood
control, natural water purification through sediment trapping, and maintenance and recharge of
groundwater resources. To protect or minimize impact to MEC-impacted wetlands and associated
flora and fauna, Parsons will implement the DENR-approved MEC removal protocol for wetlands,
including the Wetland Restoration Plan for Unexploded Ordnance Removal Activities at Former
Fort Ord.

     MEC removal activities in wetlands will be coordinated with the DENR for approval prior to
beginning any work activity.




                                                12-4
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
12.8     PROTECTION AND CONSERVATION OF CULTURAL AND
         ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESOURCES

      The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the disposal and reuse of Fort Ord
identified historical, cultural, and archaeological sites within Fort Ord. Although it is unlikely that
any of these sites will be impacted during MEC characterization and removal activities, any MEC
related activities that will affect these sites will be coordinated with the CESPK and the DENR.
All historical, cultural, and archaeological finds will be reported immediately by the PM to CESPK
for notification of cognizant agencies. All site work will cease and will only be resumed upon
approval of CESPK and DENR. Only a qualified archaeologist will be authorized to inventory,
move, and preserve the find.

12.9     POLLUTION PREVENTION AND WASTE MINIMIZATION

12.9.1          Hazardous Materials Management

    Parsons operations at Fort Ord during MEC characterization and clearance involve minimal
quantities of fuel, paints, and solvents. These hazardous materials are transported in Department of
Transportation (DOT)-approved containers and stored in HAZMAT lockers at the field office.
These HAZMAT lockers serve as secondary containers, which preclude off-site migration of the
materials during a spill.

12.9.1.1Spill Prevention and Control

     When a spill occurs, if necessary, the PM will notify CESPK for notification of the
appropriate agencies. Based on the types of materials and quantities stored on site (maximum of 5
gallon pails), and secondary containment provisions, notification of cognizant agencies may not be
necessary.

     All on-site Parsons’ personnel will be trained in spill prevention and control. When a spill
occurs the employee discovering the spill will notify the PM and/or the FOM who will immediately
secure the area. When the area is secure, the PM and/or the FOM will initiate and direct spill
control measures and elimination of the source of the spill. The area of the spill will be isolated
and cleaned up using absorbent material such as granular cellulose, absorbent mats, pillows, and
socks. All contaminated materials (e.g. contaminated soil) and used absorbent will be
containerized in plastic bags for off-site disposal.

12.9.2          Hazardous Waste Management

12.9.2.1        Operational Hazardous Wastes

     Hazardous waste streams generated from MEC characterization and clearance activities at
Fort Ord consist of small amounts of waste oil, solvents, paints, and spent absorbents. These
wastes will be collected in satellite accumulation points and will be transferred later to DENR for
proper manifesting and disposal.




                                                  12-5
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
12.9.2.2        Ordnance and UXO-Related Wastes

     The potential for encountering ordnance related waste exists. Ordnance scrap, which does not
contain explosive, pyrotechnic, or chemical agent, will be handled, transported and disposed by
FACT International, a commercial scrap metal dealer.

     If chemical warfare munitions (CWM) are encountered, Parsons will terminate all operations
within 500 meters of the CWM and the CWM site will be secured by at least two UXO technicians
who will remain at least 50 meters upwind of the CWM. The CESPK Safety Specialist will be
notified immediately, who will subsequently contact the local EOD for handling and disposal of the
CWM. Parsons will stand by and render assistance to the CESPK and the EOD when requested.

12.9.2.3        Hazardous and Toxic Waste (HTW)

     Under this contract, Parsons may be tasked to manage incidental HTW. Incidental HTWs are
wastes encountered by Parsons during MEC characterization and clearance and will be managed by
Parsons in accordance with applicable state and federal regulations of the Resource Conservation
and Recovery Act. They will be collected, labeled, and stored in accordance with federal, state,
and Army requirements, following standard operating procedures for manifesting and record
keeping (including laboratory analyses, exception reporting, land ban certification, accumulation,
and transportation).

12.9.2.4        Manifesting and Transporting of Wastes

     Incidental HTW will be shipped to an authorized offsite disposal facility and will be properly
manifested using the EPA Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form 8700-22). The
authorized transporter will also be responsible for confirming that the waste is manifested
correctly. Parsons will provide the California Department of Toxic Substances Control a legible
copy of the completed manifest within 30 days of a shipment.

     The incidental HTW will be transported in DOT-approved containers by an approved
transporter. Each hazardous waste container will have a hazardous waste label and the appropriate
DOT warning labels. The hazardous waste label will contain the following:

     •     DOT shipping name and identification number;

     •     The words “HAZARDOUS WASTE – State and Federal law prohibit improper disposal.
           If found, contact the nearest police or public safety authority, the US EPA or the
           California Department of Health Services”;

     •     Generator’s name and address (Parsons OE Sector, Fort Ord, California);

     •     EPA Identification Number (or generator number);

     •     Manifest Document Number;

     •     EPA/CA Waste Numbers;

     •     Accumulation start date; and




                                                12-6
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
     •     Waste content, composition, physical state, and hazardous characteristics.

12.9.2.5         Decontamination and Disposal of Equipment

     Equipment used in hazardous waste activities (operational or incidental) will be
decontaminated using a detergent wash followed by several tap water rinses and finally a distilled
water rinse. If required, the final distilled water rinse will be analyzed to confirm cleanliness of the
equipment. Methods to minimize decontamination solution waste and decontamination rinse water
generated during equipment cleaning will be implemented at all times. Decontamination rinsate
will be collected, tested, and disposed as hazardous waste if necessary. Equipment that cannot be
decontaminated will be properly packaged, labeled, manifested and transported offsite as hazardous
waste.

12.9.3           Wastewater Generation

     Parsons will generate minimal amounts of wastewater from sinks, showers, and toilet facilities
in the field office. Parsons will implement a water conservation program to reduce water
consumption and wastewater generation to a minimum at these fixed indoor facilities.

12.9.4           Air Emissions

     Emission sources from Parsons MEC operations at Fort Ord will include mobile equipment
such as project vehicles, earth moving equipment, UXO disposal by detonation, vegetation burning
or clearing, and dust from access roads and work areas.

12.9.4.1         Mobile Sources

     Parsons will maintain its vehicle fleet and earth moving equipment in good working order
(properly tuned) to reduce exhaust emissions from incomplete fuel combustion. In addition,
Parsons will coordinate and schedule activities to reduce vehicle trips to the work site and field
office.

12.9.4.2         Prescribed Burning

     Prescribed burning is the preferred method for reducing vegetation in operating areas.
Parsons will coordinate with DENR prior to conducting any vegetation burning activities. To
preclude excessive smoke from burning, only low-moisture content vegetation will be burned.
Discrimination of vegetation suitable for burning will be made by the contracted burn specialists,
with the concurrence of CESPK and USACE. In addition, burning will be conducted only during
conditions of low wind velocities to control the burn area to the prescribed size. Wind and weather
conditions will be further defined in site specific burn plans.

12.9.4.3         Sources of Airborne Dust

     Dust is generated from vehicular traffic on unpaved access roads, MEC disposal by
detonation, and site clearing for MEC characterization and clearance. Dust generation will be kept
to a minimum over unpaved access roads. To reduce personnel exposure to dust, detonation
personnel will be positioned upwind of the disposal site and personnel will wear dust masks during
high wind conditions. In addition, water application may also be employed to mitigate dust




                                                  12-7
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
generation. The UXOSO will be responsible for obtaining daily weather forecasts for
consideration in planning daily operations.

12.9.5           Solid Waste

      Municipal solid waste, such as domestic trash and general debris, will be collected and placed
in dumpsters for disposal by an authorized contractor. To reduce generation of solid waste,
Parsons will implement a recycling program to include a collection, storage, and transportation
plan for removal of recyclable materials. Aluminum, glass, paper, plastic, and cardboard products
related to day-to-day consumption will be collected in separate receptacles. Transporting the
recyclable materials to commercial recycling operators will be conducted on a regular basis
depending on the volumes generated.

12.10    PROTECTION AND RESTORATION OF UXO WORK AREAS

     MEC work areas need to be secured because of the inherent safety hazards associated with
them and to ensure that all MEC related activities proceed as planned. In addition, following MEC
clearance, site restoration will be conducted as needed.

12.10.1 Protection of Personnel and Work Areas

    Parsons will provide adequate protection of its personnel from exposure to hazardous
conditions while conducting MEC-related activities. Additionally, Parsons will also secure all
work areas to protect the public from exposure to work area hazards.

12.10.1.1        Personnel Protection

      Parsons will provide both field and field office personnel a general briefing regarding the
MEC removal project at Fort Ord, with special emphasis on the hazards associated with MEC.
Field personnel will be provided the initial 40-hour HAZWOPER training and the annual 8-hour
refresher training. Prior to deployment at a specific site, field personnel will also be provided with
site-specific orientation. Field personnel training will continue during the daily safety briefings.
Specifics related to personnel training are detailed in the Site Safety and Health Plan.

     Parsons will provide its field personnel with adequate personal protective equipment such as
field radios, dust masks, earplugs, first aid kits, and work boots specific for use in uneven and
rough terrain.

12.10.1.2        Site Security

     Parsons will limit access to the field office and the work areas. Access to the work areas will
be limited to CESPK representatives and authorized personnel of Parsons and its subcontractors.
Authorized visitors will log in at the field office, receive a safety briefing, and will be provided
with UXO Escorts at all times.

12.10.1.3        Equipment Security

    Parsons uses a variety of instruments and light and heavy-duty equipment in conducting its
MEC work. To prevent theft and/or vandalism to this equipment, Parsons will store the equipment
when not in use in locked storage facilities either at the field office or at the work sites. All heavy-



                                                  12-8
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                               May 2004
duty equipment will be parked and the operator’s cab will be locked to prevent entry and
unauthorized operation of the machinery.

12.10.2         Restoration of Work Areas

12.10.2.1       Post Activity Cleanup and Site Closure

     Parsons will prepare a Post Activity Cleanup and Site Closure Plan, which will be submitted
to the CESPK for review and approval, and will implement the plan following completion of all
MEC characterization and clearance and removal of incidental HTW. The plan will detail
activities and schedules for site closure as well as informal post-cleanup monitoring of the sites, if
required. The plan will cover the removal of all temporary construction and operations facilities
and restoration of disturbed areas from the MEC characterization and clearance activities.

12.10.2.2       Staging Facilities

     Staging areas may be required near UXO work areas. All staging areas will be coordinated
with DENR prior to use. The SSWP will define the staging areas if required.

12.10.2.3       Temporary Facilities

     To support its MEC work, Parsons will set up temporary facilities such as security fences,
power poles, storage sheds, storage yards, berms, etc. Following completion of all MEC work
contracted to Parsons, all temporary facilities including all signs of activity will be removed and
the areas cleaned up. Trash and debris will be removed and disposed off accordingly.

12.10.2.4       Areas of Disturbance

     Excavation sites, drill holes and all areas of soil disturbance will be restored to as close to
their pre-activity condition. Topsoil previously removed and stockpiled in bermed and lined
storage areas, will be returned following completion of MEC clearance at a specific work area.

12.10.2.5       Access Routes

      Parsons will use existing roads and easements to the maximum extent possible for accessing
work areas. For interior work sites that are not directly or readily accessible from existing roads
and easements, Parsons will coordinate with CESPK to define an off-road access route prior to
initiating off road travel or MEC operations. The use of off road access routes will be monitored as
necessary to ensure that ruts, which can develop from excessive use, do not channel water run-off
and sediment to wetlands and other sensitive areas within Fort Ord. Following completion of MEC
clearance, the installed off road access routes will be re-graded, covered with topsoil (like the rest
of the work area) and seeded, if required.




                                                 12-9
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
                                          CHAPTER 13
                         INVESTIGATION DERIVED WASTE PLAN

13.1       INTRODUCTION

     This Investigation Derived Waste (IDW) Plan has been developed for the management of
IDW by Parsons during MEC characterization and clearance activities at Fort Ord. The sampling,
management and disposal of IDW will follow Army guidance. IDW that could be generated can
include, but not be limited, to the following:

       •    Used personal protective equipment (PPE)
       •    Decontamination fluids
       •    Contaminated lumber
       •    Asbestos containing materials (ACM)
       •    Metal waste
       •    Hazardous materials packaging
       •    Contaminated soil

     Procedures outlined in the IDW Plan will be coordinated with the Fort Ord HazMat Team.
The HazMat Team will be the primary responsible party for manifesting, shipping, and disposing
of IDW. Operations will be conducted in accordance with this IWD Plan.

13.2       WASTE SEGREGATION AND CONTAINERIZATION

    The management of IDW will depend on whether the IDW is hazardous or non-hazardous.
To make this determination, Parsons will initially segregate the wastes according to the type of
material and according to the activity conducted to prevent cross contamination.

     Used PPE and hazardous materials packaging will be containerized in DOT-approved 55-
gallon drums. Drums containing PPE determined to have been used in hazardous waste activities
and hazardous materials packaging will be labeled as hazardous waste and managed, transported,
and disposed as hazardous waste as described in the Environmental Protection Plan.

     Decontamination fluids will be containerized in DOT-approved 55-gallon drums or in
temporary polyethylene storage tanks. The decontamination fluid containers will be labeled
“Potentially Hazardous Waste Pending Further Investigation” until laboratory analysis results
confirm hazardous or non-hazardous characteristics.

      Lumber from building debris will be inspected for lead-based paint. It is assumed that
buildings encountered at UXO sites were constructed prior to 1980, were painted with lead-based
paint (LBP), and will not need to be sampled for analysis. Building debris where the paint is in
relatively good condition (intact) will be accumulated and disposed in a permitted Class 2 or Class
3 landfill. Building debris with paint that is chipping will be packaged and disposed as hazardous
waste in a permitted treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF). It will be double wrapped
with 6 mil (minimum) polyethylene or drummed for transport to the TSDF.




                                                13-1
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                           May 2004
     Used lumber treated with pentachlorophenol or creosote such as electric poles, telephone
poles, and railroad ties will be reprocessed as much as possible through a recycling facility. If
recycling is not a viable option, it will be sent to a Class 2 or Class 3 landfill. A material safety
data sheet (MSDS) for pentachlorophenol or creosote will be provided with the treated wood being
landfilled. If a landfill cannot be located to accept the used treated lumber, it will be profiled for
creosote and pentachlorophenol and then disposed properly at a permitted TSDF.

     Non-friable asbestos-containing materials (ACM) such as roofing materials, floor tiles,
transite panels, etc., that are intact will be disposed as non-hazardous waste at a permitted Class 3
landfill. Friable ACM such as fireproofing material and piping insulation will be treated as
hazardous waste. It will be adequately wetted down and packaged in properly labeled, approved
ACM waste bags, which will be disposed at a permitted landfill that accepts friable ACM. For
suspect building materials, they will be profiled using the appropriate EPA standard method
(polarized light microscopy) prior to disposition.

    Metals waste such as barbed wire, concertina wire, and used pipes will be collected in a
dumpster and picked up by a metal recycler.

     Soils from excavations will be temporarily stockpiled in lined and bermed storage areas. The
current Parsons’ contract requires return of the soil onto the work areas. If contamination is
suspected, soil samples will be collected and analyzed to determine soil treatment or disposal
options.

13.3    SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL STRATEGY

     If required, Parsons will evaluate the IDW for recognizable impacts (visual and olfactory) and
will profile the IDW for chemical characteristics to determine disposal or reuse options. In general,
IDW sampling and analytical protocols will follow EPA/DTSC accepted standard methods.
Approved methods for specific analytes will depend on the contaminant of concern. Analysis will
be performed only by Army approved laboratories. For IDW contaminated with chemical agent,
analysis will be performed by a surety laboratory certified by the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical
and Biological Center.

13.4    STORAGE OF IDW

    Parsons will store hazardous IDW in either satellite accumulation points (SAP) or less than
90-day storage areas. These areas will be coordinated with the Fort Ord HazMat Team.

     SAPs are storage facilities where the IDW is accumulated and is located near the work site
where the IDW is generated. A SAP may collect one type of waste or various types of waste in
separate containers as long as the total quantity of waste does not exceed 55 gallons for a hazardous
waste or one quart of an acutely or extremely hazardous waste per waste or type of stream.
Incompatible waste streams are stored in separate SAPs. SAPs may collect or store hazardous
IDW for no more than one year.

    Less than 90-day storage areas are for the storage of hazardous IDW for less than 90 days
without a hazardous waste storage permit. These areas are for the temporary storage of hazardous
IDW containers received from SAPs prior to transport and disposal.




                                                 13-2
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                              May 2004
     Both SAPs and less than 90-day storage areas will be identified with signs and will be
provided with spill kits. Less than 90-day storage will be secured with gates and fences and will be
locked when unattended. In addition, less than 90-day storage areas will be equipped with
approved eyewashes and fire extinguishers (if storing flammables) and internal communication
devices or alarm systems for providing immediate emergency notification.

     Non-hazardous IDW can be stored in general storage areas. Parsons will provide security
fences and locks to discourage vandalism of non-hazardous IDW containers.

13.5    MANIFESTING AND TRANSPORTATION OF IDW

      Hazardous IDW will be manifested and transported for disposal following procedures outlined
for hazardous wastes in the EPP. Non-hazardous IDW will be shipped to the disposal facility using
bills of lading.

13.6    DISPOSAL OF IDW

      Hazardous IDW will be disposed only at approved Class 1 treatment, storage and disposal
facilities. Non-hazardous IDW will be disposed only at approved Class 2 or Class 3 facilities.




                                                13-3
Contract Number DACA05-00-D-0003                                                            May 2004

				
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