Docstoc

SMALL AND MEDIUM FIRM JOB SEARCH Berkeley Law

Document Sample
SMALL AND MEDIUM FIRM JOB SEARCH Berkeley Law Powered By Docstoc
					     SMALL AND MEDIUM FIRM JOB SEARCH  
What is a Small Firm?  What is a Medium Firm? 
 
“Small” and “Medium” are relative terms.  While firms of up to five attorneys are 
generally considered small, firms of up to 100 attorneys can be called small or 
medium, depending on the context.  This resource uses the term “smaller” to discuss 
firms which, whether considered small or medium, are not part of what is known as 
Biglaw.  (Satellite offices of big firms are not included; the offices may be small, but 
they are part of a big organization.)   These firms are not found in the NALP Directory, 
nor in the American Lawyer compilations of the major US law firms, and, for the most 
part, do not participate in on‐campus recruiting at Berkeley Law.  Despite their lower 
profile, however, these firms may be very desirable places to work.  
 
Smaller firms fall into a number of different categories, including the following: 
 
        High‐end boutiques; 
        General‐services firms;  
        Specialty practices, including: 
                 ‐ immigration; 
                 ‐ estates, trusts and probate; 
                 ‐ family law; 
                 ‐ criminal defense; 
        Plaintiffs’ firms; 
        Firms with a particular agenda (e.g., impact, civil rights). 
 
 
Some firms, primarily in smaller communities, do “whatever walks in the door,” while 
other firms do one or two things exclusively.  Most handle a range of legal matters.  
Boutiques are specialized in one or two areas, and may compete with larger firms for 
work requiring particular expertise.  Smaller firms’ clients may be medium or small 
(probably not large) businesses, or they may be individuals. Generally, the smaller the 
firm, the greater the number of individual or small business clients.  Plaintiffs’ firms 
run the gamut from solo personal injury attorneys to high‐profile securities litigators.   
Why a Smaller Firm? 
 
     • UPSIDES 
                 Quality of life; “balance” 
                 Opportunity to specialize and develop expertise 
                 Responsibility early on 
                 Collegiality, sense of belonging 
                 Less bureaucratic 
                 Greater client contact  
                 Faster partnership track 
                 More flexibility in compensation structure 
                                   
  
     • DOWNSIDES 
                 Lower starting salary 
                 Fewer perks 
                 Some types of work aren’t done at smaller firms (e.g., megadeals and  
                 bet‐the‐company litigation) 
                 Can be isolated or even claustrophobic 
                 Fewer resources, less support staff 
                 Less formal training 
                 Not necessarily less work or less pressure than larger firm 
 
 
Overall, life at a smaller firm tends to be less pressured and attorneys tend to work 
fewer hours than at big firms.  Sometimes, however, the pressure can be greater, 
because there are fewer attorneys to spread the work to when there is too much of 
it.  Smaller firms are unlikely to offer training to new attorneys in the form of mock 
trials or other formal exercises, but they are more likely to willing to let them go 
cover a deposition or make a court appearance, because their hourly rate is relatively 
low and there are fewer people working on each matter.  As with any firm, the 
stability of a smaller firm can be hard to gauge.  Smaller firms have lower overhead, 
so they may be more able to respond promptly to changes in market conditions.  
Certain common practice types (e.g., criminal defense) may be fairly immune to 
economic downturns.  Some smaller firms are benefiting from corporate clients’ 
increasing unwillingness to pay the hourly rates of major firms. However, smaller 
firms may be more vulnerable to overdependence on one or two leaders who have 
exclusive relationships with clients.  
 
 
Finding the Firms 
 
Sometimes smaller firms list job openings on b‐Line, or on general listings such as 
Craigslist.  However, many jobs with smaller firms are never listed; they are filled by 
personal referrals.  Therefore, even more than with larger firms, networking and 
developing your personal contacts will be very important to your job prospects.  The 
CDO has many resources to help you develop your personal networking skills and 
style. 
 
If you plan to reach out directly to smaller firms without current listings, you will have 
to develop a list of firms which meet your criteria (size and location of firm, and type 
of work they do).  Smaller firms, unlike larger ones, can be difficult to locate 
systematically.  Martindale Hubbell is a directory of attorneys which is searchable on‐
line (www.martindale.com), or within Lexis‐Nexis (allows more detailed, flexible 
searches than the web‐based version).   You can search both of these resources by 
the size of the firm, the type of practice, and the location.  You can also search for 
Berkeley Law alumni at firms, which can give you a very good starting place for your 
job search.  
 
The b‐Line includes the names of firms who have listed jobs previously; even if there 
is no current listing with such a firm, the fact that it sought in the past to hire Boalt 
students or alumni distinguishes it from other firms with no particular connection to 
the school.  Some types of work, such as criminal defense, lend themselves to finding 
practitioners by looking from the point of view of a prospective client; imagine you 
needed the kind of lawyer you hope to be; how would you find one?  The San 
Francisco Trial Lawyers Association (http://www.sftla.org/SF) is an organization of 
plaintiffs’ attorneys; their membership directory is searchable online. 
 
 
How to Approach a Smaller Firm  
 
As with any prospective employer, a personal touch is best. Whether you are 
responding to a listing, following up on a personal contact, or making a cold 
application, try to convey that you know something about what the firm does, and to 
show that this is what you want to do, e.g,:  “I hope to work for a small estate 
planning firm.” (Of course if you do have a personal contact at the firm, use it: “Jose 
Smith said I should contact you.”). 
 
If you are approaching a firm directly (not in response to a listing), you will need to 
follow the usual process of submitting a cover letter and resume (have a writing 
sample, list of references, and transcript ready in case you are asked, in response to 
your letter, to provide them).  The CDO has many resources, including sample 
resumes and cover letters, and suggestions about other application materials, on its 
web site. 
 
Note that small firms don’t normally have a Recruiting Department or a Hiring 
Partner; screening job applications might be done by a longtime staff person, or just 
ad hoc. A mid‐sized firm is more likely to have a firm administrator to whom you can 
submit your application.  You can also write to one of the attorneys (the name 
partner, or someone with a background similar to yours).   If there is an alumnus or 
alumna of Berkeley Law working at the smaller firm, it is often worthwhile to start by 
contacting this person directly 
 
Smaller firms also don’t have jobs for “summer associates,” because they don’t have 
structured, multi‐year recruiting programs, and their needs don’t change just because 
it is summer.  Just state in your cover letter when you are hoping to work (e.g., 
summer, or after graduation).   
 
 
Timing 
 
Whereas big firms with fall recruiting and summer associate programs are attuned to 
the school year, smaller firms usually are not, and only look for help when they need 
it, perhaps because a case is going to trial, a new client came in the door, or someone 
left the firm.  The good news is that smaller firms’ detachment from the rituals of 
large‐scale recruiting means that it is never too late to apply.  (Also, if you get an 
interview, you can be confident that it is because they are interested in hiring 
someone, and soon.)  If you are looking for a permanent post‐graduation job, you 
may find that some firms want to wait until bar exam results are available; others 
may hire recent graduates on a temporary or contingent basis.  
 
 It is particularly important to follow up on your efforts with a smaller firm, because 
their needs can change quickly, and you want to be the person they think of when 
they start looking for someone.  So if you feel you have made any kind of real 
contact, stay in touch with the people you know at smaller firms.   
 
Compensation 
 
As smaller firms are private businesses, they don’t make their compensation public, 
and it is not scrutinized the way larger firms’ pay scales are.  At some point— 
preferably after you have received an offer‐‐  you have to discuss compensation with 
the firm, and figure out whether it works for you.  The CDO has several resources to 
help you determine whether a smaller firm’s pay scale is appropriate for the market 
you are in (see the list below).  While chances are the compensation at a smaller firm 
is less than at big firms, you may have more room to negotiate from what you are 
initially offered; in fact, they may expect you to negotiate.  The firm may not hire 
often enough to offer a standard package to a student working for the summer or a 
new attorney; you may have to educate them on current compensation levels.  
Depending on the size of the firm, there may also not be a standard partnership 
track; this can be to your advantage, as you may advance more quickly based on your 
accomplishments.  Take the other parts of your compensation, like benefits and 
perks, into account in evaluating your offer.  (See the resources listed below for a 
good checklist.)  At some point before you accept a permanent offer, you should 
speak frankly with the smaller firm employer about the expectations as to hours— 
how much you work for your paycheck is a major factor in your compensation. It is 
not typical for smaller firms to pay for your bar expenses, which can affect the timing 
of your job search. 
 
Miscellaneous Matters 
       
Energy and persistence are key to all job searches, but this is especially true when you 
are looking at smaller firms.  Be able to articulate why you want to work for a smaller 
firm, and for this firm in particular.   
 
An understanding of a smaller firm’s basic business considerations will help you show 
your sophistication to an interviewer, and will also help you evaluate the desirability 
of an offer.  Some of the resources below contain information to help you 
understand how smaller firms operate. Overhead and cash flow (especially for 
plaintiffs’ firms, which are usually compensated at least in part by contingency fees) 
are very important to smaller firms. They are also less likely than major firms to pay 
interview or bar exam expenses. 
 
No one in the private sector is exempt from the responsibility of getting and keeping 
clients, but you may come up against this more quickly in a smaller firm.  How might 
you show your business‐getting ability in an interview?  Try to emphasize your 
community involvement, and keep in mind that interpersonal skills (such as eye 
contact and personal warmth) are extra important.  A smaller firm should be 
particularly interested in your good judgment, which may come into play sooner at a 
smaller firm, because of a high level of responsibility early on.  Although smaller 
firms’ requirements vary as to academic record, they will always place a heavy 
emphasis on an applicant’s competence and personal qualities. 
 
At smaller firms, it is impossible to avoid your colleagues, so you should really look for 
a fit with your prospective colleagues.  Personality conflicts are one of the key causes 
of dissatisfaction at smaller firms. 
 
 
Resources 
 
1.  Books (available for consultation at the CDO library or used online). 
 
     Choosing Small, Choosing Smart: Job Search Strategies for Lawyers in the Small 
     Firm Market, by Donna Gerson.  Information on why and how to get a job with a 
     smaller firm, and includes a chapter on where attorneys go from (after) small 
     firms.  
       
     Guerrilla Tactics for Getting the Legal Job of Your Dreams, by Kimm Alayne 
     Walton (aka the Job Goddess), 2nd ed. Chapter 18 (dedicated to small firms; look 
     especially at the checklist of negotiating terms) 
      
     Beyond the Big Firm: Profiles of Lawyers Who Want Something More, by Diane T. 
     Chin and Alan B. Morrison.  Contains many profiles of attorneys working at 
     smaller firms. 
      
     Flying Solo: A Survival Guide for the Solo and Small Firm Lawyer, 4th ed., by K. 
     William Gibson.  (Aimed at people interested in opening their own offices, but 
     flags many of the issues faced by smaller firms (e.g., client retainer agreements; 
     keeping research costs down); good resource to gain sophistication about how 
     smaller firms operate. 
      
2.  NALP resources (available for consultation at the CDO library) 

   Associate Salary Survey ‐ 2008 (NALP, 2008) 

   Starting Salaries: What New Law Graduates Earn (NALP, 2008) 

   Jobs & J.D.'s: Employment and Salaries of New Law Graduates ‐ Class of 2007 
   (NALP, July 2008) 

     
3.  Other Resources 
     
    Pslawnet.org has listings from more progressive/plaintiff‐side firms. 
     
    International Network of Boutique Law Firms (www.inblf.com)(has searchable 
    membership list) 
     
    Law.com’s “Small Firm Business” section: 
    http://www.law.com/jsp/law/sfb/index.jsp 
     
    American Bar Association’s General, Solo and Small Firm division: 
    http://www.abanet.org/genpractice/ 
     
    State Bar of California Solo and Small Firm section: 
    http://www.calbar.ca.gov/state/calbar/calbar_generic.jsp?cid=10714&id=5864 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:5
posted:10/20/2012
language:English
pages:6