Water Damage and Mold Stains on Art by umangp23

VIEWS: 23 PAGES: 3

Great info to help you save your irreplaceable family history documents and framed valuable prints and collectibles.

More Info
									Water	
  Damage	
  on	
  Art	
  –	
  Satins,	
  Mold	
  
Discover	
  5	
  Little	
  Known	
  Survival	
  Tips	
  
By	
  Chelsea	
  Padgett,	
  Guest	
  Blogger	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
We	
  all	
  have	
  valuable,	
  if	
  not	
  irreplaceable,	
  items	
  on	
  paper:	
  certificates,	
  diplomas,	
  love	
  
letters,	
  genealogy…	
  stuff	
  that	
  can’t	
  be	
  insured.	
  Collectors	
  of	
  prints	
  and	
  art	
  on	
  paper	
  
have	
  investment	
  and	
  decorating	
  money	
  wrapped	
  up	
  in	
  their	
  items.	
  Water	
  damage	
  is	
  
enemy	
  #1.	
  
	
  
Have	
  any	
  of	
  your	
  prints	
  or	
  personal	
  documents	
  been	
  exposed	
  to	
  water?	
  Little	
  brown	
  
dots	
  on	
  your	
  paper	
  items	
  could	
  tell	
  a	
  past	
  story	
  of	
  mold	
  that	
  had	
  died	
  and	
  dried.	
  
Maybe	
  there	
  is	
  a	
  leak	
  in	
  your	
  garage	
  and	
  it	
  happens	
  to	
  be	
  right	
  over	
  a	
  box	
  of	
  your	
  
family	
  history	
  papers,	
  diplomas	
  and	
  wedding	
  certificates?	
  	
  
	
  




                                                                                                                          	
  
	
  
If	
  it	
  has,	
  you	
  may	
  be	
  now	
  wondering	
  what	
  those	
  live	
  fuzzy	
  dots	
  on	
  it	
  are…	
  it	
  is	
  live	
  
mold	
  that	
  will	
  get	
  wore,	
  stain	
  worse	
  with	
  time	
  and	
  eat	
  into	
  your	
  cherished	
  family	
  
treasures,	
  memorabilia,	
  heirlooms.	
  Now	
  your	
  thinking	
  how	
  in	
  the	
  world	
  can	
  you	
  get	
  
rid	
  of	
  it???	
  
	
  
This	
  is	
  a	
  print	
  that	
  was	
  in	
  a	
  woman’s	
  house	
  that	
  caught	
  on	
  fire,	
  the	
  fireman	
  luckily	
  
saved	
  her	
  house,	
  so	
  naturally	
  all	
  of	
  her	
  house	
  contents	
  (lots	
  of	
  art,	
  paintings	
  and	
  
prints)	
  were	
  exposed	
  to	
  water,	
  staining,	
  mold,	
  etc.	
  We	
  got	
  involved	
  as	
  the	
  expert	
  
witness	
  for	
  her	
  insurance	
  company	
  to	
  help	
  them	
  figure	
  out	
  the	
  damage,	
  settle	
  and	
  to	
  
help	
  her	
  take	
  care	
  of	
  the	
  damage.	
  
	
  
This	
  print	
  from	
  the	
  1800’s	
  had	
  mold	
  growing	
  all	
  over	
  it.	
  After	
  it	
  got	
  wet,	
  it	
  was	
  
luckly	
  set	
  aside	
  somewhere	
  safe	
  where	
  it	
  wouldn’t	
  be	
  touched,	
  put	
  somewhere	
  to	
  
dry	
  and	
  now	
  it	
  is	
  covered	
  with	
  the	
  little	
  brown	
  dots	
  of	
  dead	
  mold	
  as	
  mentioned	
  
before.	
  It	
  attacked	
  the	
  mating	
  around	
  the	
  picture,	
  the	
  backing	
  board	
  behind	
  the	
  
print,	
  and	
  there’s	
  a	
  little	
  bit	
  barely	
  on	
  the	
  print	
  itself.	
  
	
  




	
  
So,	
  what	
  do	
  you	
  do	
  now?	
  I	
  have	
  good	
  news!	
  You	
  can’t	
  do	
  anything	
  about	
  the	
  dots	
  nor	
  
water	
  stains.	
  You’ll	
  need	
  professional	
  help	
  for	
  that.	
  So,	
  take	
  that	
  task	
  off	
  your	
  To-­‐Do	
  
list.	
  But	
  I	
  will	
  tell	
  you	
  how	
  you	
  can	
  stabilize	
  the	
  stains	
  so	
  they	
  don’t	
  get	
  darker	
  or	
  
spread.	
  	
  
	
  
DO	
  NOT	
  THROW	
  YOUR	
  STAINED	
  FAMILY	
  HISTORY	
  DOCUMENTS,	
  OLD	
  PHOTOS	
  OR	
  
PRINTS	
  AWAY!	
  (My	
  Mom	
  did	
  that	
  and	
  I’m	
  still	
  crying	
  over	
  the	
  important	
  stuff	
  we	
  
lost)	
  Follow	
  these	
  5	
  Little	
  Known	
  Survival	
  Tips,	
  as	
  I	
  promised:	
  
	
  
       1. Don’t	
  handle	
  any	
  paper	
  items	
  while	
  they	
  are	
  wet!	
  They	
  will	
  tear.	
  Let	
  them	
  dry	
  
             out,	
  move	
  the	
  air	
  with	
  fans,	
  don’t	
  turn	
  on	
  a	
  heater…	
  that	
  will	
  encourage	
  mold	
  
             growth!	
  
       2. Do	
  not	
  try	
  and	
  clean	
  the	
  mat	
  and	
  backing	
  board,	
  just	
  throw	
  them	
  away.	
  If	
  the	
  
             framing	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  pulled	
  apart,	
  the	
  framer	
  can	
  do	
  that	
  for	
  you.	
  You	
  will	
  
             probably	
  damage	
  the	
  matted	
  item.	
  
       3. Get	
  an	
  architect	
  cleaning	
  pad	
  to	
  get	
  fuzzy	
  mold	
  off	
  of	
  the	
  artwork.	
  This	
  will	
  
             not	
  remove	
  the	
  stain	
  (Click	
  here	
  for	
  Chapter	
  6	
  page	
  87	
  of	
  How	
  to	
  Save	
  Your	
  
             Stuff	
  from	
  a	
  Disaster).	
  Be	
  sure	
  to	
  wear	
  a	
  protective	
  dust	
  mask	
  and	
  plastic	
  
             gloves.	
  	
  
       4. Deacidify	
  the	
  print	
  from	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  the	
  artwork	
  with	
  a	
  deacidification	
  spray.	
  
             This	
  will	
  help	
  retard	
  any	
  future	
  discoloration	
  and	
  darkening	
  of	
  the	
  paper	
  or	
  
             stains.	
  Use	
  in	
  a	
  well	
  ventilated	
  area.	
  The	
  solvent	
  will	
  also	
  kill	
  the	
  mold.	
  
       5. Either	
  store	
  in	
  Mylar	
  protective	
  envelope	
  or	
  reframe/re-­‐mat	
  in	
  acid	
  free	
  
             buffer	
  boards.	
  As	
  you	
  can	
  see	
  in	
  this	
  photo,	
  the	
  mold	
  afflicted	
  the	
  print	
  mostly	
  
             around	
  the	
  border	
  and	
  not	
  in	
  the	
  central	
  image.	
  So,	
  when	
  you	
  re-­‐matt	
  the	
  
             item,	
  you	
  can	
  “matt	
  out”	
  the	
  mold	
  stains	
  around	
  the	
  edges.	
  In	
  this	
  case	
  you	
  
             wouldn’t	
  have	
  to	
  do	
  anything	
  to	
  the	
  “fix”	
  the	
  print.	
  
	
  
Those	
  of	
  you	
  that	
  enjoy	
  a	
  little	
  “light”	
  do-­‐it-­‐yourself	
  work,	
  this	
  process	
  is	
  for	
  you.	
  Get	
  
a	
  copy	
  of	
  How	
  To	
  Save	
  Your	
  Stuff	
  From	
  A	
  Disaster	
  for	
  more	
  instructions,	
  fun	
  stories	
  
and	
  invaluable	
  help.	
  For	
  supplies,	
  go	
  to	
  University	
  Products.	
  
                                                                        	
  
                    Art	
  conservation	
  questions?	
  Call	
  Scott	
  M.	
  Haskins	
  805	
  564	
  3438	
  
                                                                        	
  
                      Art	
  appraisal	
  questions?	
  Call	
  Richard	
  Holgate	
  805	
  895	
  5121	
  
                                                                        	
  
                    Follow	
  us	
  on	
  Facebook	
  at	
  Scott	
  M.	
  Haskins	
  and	
  at	
  Save	
  Your	
  Stuff	
  
                                                                        	
  
        For	
  a	
  quick	
  interesting	
  video	
  about	
  shake	
  proofing	
  your	
  home	
  (earthquakes,	
  
                                     hurricanes,	
  tornados,	
  grandchildren)	
  go	
  to	
  
                               http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxOkdN-­‐IR_o	
  
                                   Leave	
  a	
  THUMBS	
  UP	
  and	
  a	
  comment?	
  Thanks	
  
                                                                        	
  
          For	
  a	
  short	
  video	
  tour	
  of	
  Fine	
  Art	
  Conservation	
  Laboratories,	
  click	
  here.	
  
                                                                        	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  

								
To top