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					                          Masters in

                    Literacy Education




New York University
Steinhardt School of Education, Mary Brabeck, Dean
Robert Cohen, Chair, Department of Teaching and Learning
Katherine Stahl, Interim Director, Literacy Education




                                      Faculty:
                                      Patricia Cooper
                                      Cynthia McCallister
                                      Sara Michael-Luna (Visiting Faculty)
                                      Katherine Stahl

Updated Fall 2008
                   Masters Program in Literacy Education
The Department of Teaching and Learning offers Master’s degrees in Literacy Education,
Birth through Grade 6 and Grades 5 through 12. These programs provide certified
classroom teachers with the opportunity to earn the New York State Literacy Specialist
Certificate. These curricula are designed to prepare classroom teachers at the early
childhood, elementary levels, or content area teachers at middle school and high school
levels to address the needs of all of their students by integrating strategic teaching of
reading and writing throughout their specialty. The program also focuses on the role of
the literacy specialist in the whole-school context and assists each student in developing
the competence and the confidence needed to assume such a role. Full-time students can
finish in an accelerated 12-month format, including summer. Part-time students can finish
in two years, including two summers.

                                  Program Philosophy

The literacy master’s programs represent literacy as the means by which people think,
learn, and communicate through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The curricula
are designed to help teachers understand the principles of language and literacy learning
and the development of diverse learners, especially those who are experiencing difficulty
with literacy learning, across developmental levels, academic disciplines, and social and
cultural contexts. These programs support the development of teaching expertise in the
role of literacy specialist and in a particular area of specialization within the curriculum
selected by students. For example, the integration of strategic teaching of reading and
writing within different content areas (e.g., social studies, science, or math) or clinical
work in literacy could be areas of specialization. The course of study builds on the
participants’ professional experiences, involves the application of theory to practice and
vice versa, and stresses the use of data for decision making. Similarly the curriculum for
children in schools builds on the language and literacy learning which students bring to
school and ongoing observation of their learning in order to closely match instruction to
student level in order to assist them in achieving system standards. Finally, two
practicums at two different age levels within each program and a course which focuses on
the responsibilities of literacy specialists allow the candidates to experience leadership
and teaching responsibilities of role of the literacy specialist.

                                     Program Design

One master’s degree program is for candidates interested in students from birth through
grade 6 (LITB); the other, from grade 5 through grade 12 (LITC). To apply for these
programs a candidate must hold either initial or permanent certification in teaching at the
appropriate level (see section on admission requirements for details). On completion of a
program the candidate is eligible for New York State certification as a literacy specialist
for the appropriate grade levels (see above). Each program also serves to deepen
classroom teachers’ understanding of literacy processes, issues and pedagogy. Both
programs can be taken on a full- or part-time basis. Each program requires two electives,
and the Steinhardt School of Education provides a wealth of choices for this requirement


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including courses from areas such as bilingual education, special education, drama
education, educational communication and technology, media ecology, English
education, educational administration, or educational psychology.

Field Requirements
The Literacy MA program curriculum requires sustained involvement in the field. Most
of the coursework involves some level of fieldwork, and each student must have access to
a classroom. Students who are practicing teachers will in most cases be able to utilize
their own classroom for assignments. Students who are not practicing teachers and do not
have access to the classroom can make a placement request through the Field Activities
Office in the Department of Teaching and Learning.

Literacy Education, birth-grade 6 (LITB) (34 credits)
The Program is offered in two phases. Phase I includes Literacy Education I Early
Childhood/Childhood: Reading Practices E26.2012, Literacy Education II Early
Childhood/Childhood: Writing Practices E26.2013, Language and Literacy Development
E26.2010, Reading and Writing: Foundations E26.2016, and Texts, Tools, and Culture
E25.2017. Phase II includes Literacy Assessment E26.2011, Literacy of the Special
Learner E75.2055, and the Supervised Practicum in Early Childhood and Childhood
E26.2030 (two placements, at two different instructional levels for 2 credits each) and the
Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs E26.2065. The program requires two
electives that can be taken at any point in the program.

Literacy Education, grades 5-12 (LITC) (34 credits)
The courses are offered in two phases. Phase I includes Literacy Education I Middle
Childhood/Adolescence: Reading Practices E26.2014 (or E11.2509), Literacy Education
II Middle Childhood/Adolescence: Writing Practices E26.2015, Language and Literacy
Development E26.2010, Reading and Writing E26.2016, Text, Tools, and Culture
E26.2017 (or E11.2521, E11.2577). Phase II includes Literacy Assessment E26.2011,
Literacy of the Special Learner E75.2055, and a Supervised Practicum in Middle
Childhood and Adolescence E26.2031 (two placements, one at each level for 2 credits
each), and the Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs E26.2065. The
program requires two electives that can be taken at any point in the program.

               Dual Special Education/Literacy Specialist Certification

For information on dual programs that prepare students for certification as literacy
specialists in special education either at the early childhood (birth-grade 2) or childhood
(grades 1-6) levels, please see page 207 in this bulletin under Special Education.

                           Advisement and Program Planning

Once admitted you will consult with the program advisor, Amy Lui, at 212-995-4198, to
plan a program of study. At that time you will be assigned to a faculty advisor who will
be able to offer further guidance in terms of program and career-related decisions.


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                                 Financial Opportunities

Loans and scholarships may be available for qualified applicants to master’s study.

                                Admissions Requirements

Candidates must hold an appropriate teaching certificate as a prerequisite for admission
to these M.A. programs. For admission to the literacy program, birth-grade 6 (LITB),
candidates must hold at least a provisional certificate in early childhood/elementary
education or an initial certificate in either early childhood education or childhood
education. For admission to the literacy program, grades 5-12 (LITC), candidates must
hold at least a provisional certificate in middle or secondary education or an initial
certificate in either middle childhood or adolescence education. Candidates holding an
out-of-state base certificate must apply for a comparable New York State certificate with
the New York State Education Department (see www.highered.nysed.gov/tcert) prior to
program completion in order to be recommended for the literacy certification in New
York State.
        Contact the NYU School of Education Office of Graduate Admissions at 212-
998-5030 to learn more about admissions to the program.

                                  Career Opportunities

The graduates of this program will qualify for literacy specialist positions. Those
graduating from the LITB program work in early childhood, preschool, private, and
public schools through grade 6 either as teachers with special expertise teaching in
reading and writing or as literacy specialists. Those graduating from the LITC program
work at the middle school or high school levels as teachers in particular content area with
special expertise in integrating the teaching of language and literacy into their curricula
or as literacy specialists.
         Graduates will also be qualified to work in after-school programs, clinical settings
in hospitals and community centers, new educational companies that focus on literacy
learning, and in private tutoring practice. In addition, this degree provides excellent
background for positions in the educational publishing industry that concentrates on the
development of literacy materials and literacy assessment.

For more information about the Masters in Literacy Education Program, please
contact:

Professor Katherine Stahl, Interim Program Director
Suite 773, Pless Hall
82 Washington Square East
New York University
New York, NY 10003
212.998.5204
kay.stahl@nyu.edu



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                               Program Requirements

I. Content Core (15 credits)
E26.2010 (3 cr.)             Language and Literacy Development
E26.2016 (3 cr.)             Reading and Writing: Foundations
E26.2012 (3 cr.) LITB        Literacy Education I: Reading Practices in Early
                             Childhood/Childhood
E26.2014 (3 cr.) LITC        Literacy Education I: Middle Childhood/Adolescence
                             Or E11.2509, Teaching Reading in the Secondary
                             Classroom
E26.2013 (3 cr.) LITB        Literacy Education II: Writing Practices in Early
                             Childhood/Childhood
E26.2015 (3 cr.) LITC        Literacy Education II: Middle Childhood/Adolescence
E26.2017 (3 cr.)             Texts, Tools and Culture (LITC can substitute E11.2521,
                             Literature and the Adolescent Experience or E11.2577,
                             Pluralistic Approaches to Cultural Literacy)

II. Intervention Core (10 credits)
E26.2011 (3 cr.)             Literacy Assessment
E26.2030 (4. cr.) LITB       Supervised Practicum Early Childhood/Childhood
E26.2031 (4 cr.) LITC        Supervised Practicum Middle Childhood/Adolescence
E75.2055 (3 cr.)             Literacy for the Special Learner
E26.2065 (3 cr.)             Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs

III. Electives (6 cr.)

Total Credits: 34




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Full-time, sample program

Fall
E26.2010 Language Development (3 cr.)
E26.2012 or E26.2014 Literacy Education I: Reading Practices (3 cr.)
E26.2013 or E26.2015 Literacy Education II: Writing Practices (3 cr.)
E26.2016 Reading and Writing: Foundations (3 cr.)

January
E26.2011 (3 cr.) Literacy Assessment

Spring
E26.2017 Texts, Tools and Culture (3 cr.)
E75.2055 (3 cr.) Literacy for the Special Learner
E26.2065 (3 cr.) Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs
Take either of the following:
        E26.2030 (4. cr.) Supervised Practicum Early Childhood/Childhood or
        E26.2031 (4 cr.) Supervised Practicum Middle Childhood/Adolescence

Summer
Elective (6 cr.)

                               Part-time, sample program
Fall I
E26.2010 Language Development (3 cr.)
E26.2016 Reading and Writing: Foundations (3 cr.)

Spring I
E26.2017 Texts, Tools and Culture (3 cr.)
Elective (3 cr.)

Summer I
Elective (3 cr.)

Fall II
E26.2012 or E26.2014 Literacy Education I: Reading Practices (3 cr.)
E26.2013 or E26.2015 Literacy Education II: Writing Practices (3 cr.)

Spring II
E75.2055 Literacy for the Special Learner (3 cr.)
E26.2011 Literacy Assessment (3 cr.)
E26.2065 (3 cr.) Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs

Summer II
Take one of the following repeated twice for a total of 4 credits:
       E26.2030 (4. cr.) Supervised Practicum Early Childhood/Childhood or
       E26.2031 (4 cr.) Supervised Practicum Middle Childhood/Adolescence




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                           Literacy M.A. Program Worksheet

Semester                               Course
Taken
                               I.      Content Core (15 credits)

           E26.2010 (3 cr.) Language Development

           E26.2016 (3 cr.) Reading and Writing: Foundations

           E26.2012 or E26.2014 (3 cr.) Literacy Education I: Reading Practices

           E26.2013 or E26.2015 (3 cr.) Literacy Education II: Writing Practices

           E26.2017 (3 cr.) Texts, Tools and Culture


                            II.     Intervention Core (11 credits)

           E26.2011 (3 cr.) Literacy Assessment

           E75.2055 (3 cr.) Literacy for the Special Learner

Take either of the following for a total of 4 credits:

           E26.2030 (4. cr.) Supervised Practicum: Early Childhood/Childhood

           E26.2031 (4 cr.) Supervised Practicum: Middle Childhood/Adolescence


                            III.    Culminating Experience (3 cr.)

           E26.2065 (3 cr.) Administration and Supervision of Literacy Programs

                                    III. Electives (6 cr.)
_______ Course:

_______ Course:




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Course Descriptions

Language and Literacy Development
E26.2010 30 hours: 3 points.
Survey of theories of oral language acquisition and development in first and second languages
and the role of language as a foundation for literacy. Special emphasis on the role of language in
reading and writing development. Attention to the role of talk across the curriculum and a survey
of principles and practices for supporting a language-rich curriculum. Methods of assessing and
responding to individual language differences. The relationship between linguistic diversity and
academic achievement will be explored.

Literacy Assessment
E26.2011 30 hours: 3 points. Winter Intersession.
Prerequisites: E26.2013 or E26.2015, E26.2010, E26.2016, and E26.2017.
Survey of principles and practices of formal and informal literacy assessment. Critical
examination of test types, methods of test construction and interpretation, and large-scale literacy
evaluation. Review of measurement concepts and psychometric principles. Use of dynamic
assessment to inform the design, monitoring, and evaluation of literacy instruction.

Literacy Education I: Reading Practices in Early Childhood and Childhood
E26.2012 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.
Survey of reading process theory and related reading assessment and instruction practices. Study
of reading development in early childhood and childhood. Focus on teaching comprehension,
word identification, vocabulary development, phonemic awareness and phonics skills. Special
emphasis on individual differences and potential difficulties in reading development and methods
for planning reading instruction for struggling or reluctant readers.

Literacy Education II: Writing Practices in Early Childhood and Childhood
E26.2013 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.
Survey of writing process theory and related assessment and instruction practices with a focus on
standards-based curriculum planning. Students plan and take part in writing activities in order to
acquire pedagogical knowledge in writing. Special emphasis on writing development through
early childhood and childhood. Exploration of the relationship between reading, writing and
literacy development.

Literacy Education I: Reading Practices in Middle Childhood and Adolescence
E26.2014 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.
Survey of reading process theory and related reading assessment and instruction practices. Study
of reading development in middle childhood and adolescence. Focus on teaching comprehension,
study skills, word identification, vocabulary development, and, when necessary, phonemic
awareness and phonics skills. Special emphasis on individual differences and potential difficulties
in reading development and methods for planning reading instruction for struggling or reluctant
readers.

Literacy Education II: Writing Practices in Middle Childhood and Adolescence
E26.2015 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.
Survey of writing process theory and related assessment and instruction practices with a focus on
standards-based curriculum planning. Students plan and take part in writing activities in order to
acquire pedagogical knowledge in writing. Special emphasis on writing development through
middle childhood and adolescence. Exploration of the relationship between reading, writing and
literacy development.


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Reading and Writing: Foundations
E26.2016 30 hours: 3 points. Fall.
An examination of reading and writing education from historical, theoretical, critical, and
pedagogical perspectives. Course questions include the role of literacy in American history,
current views of ‘best practice’ in literacy, political and partisan influences on how literacy is
taught, and the relationship between literacy education and social justice. Research studies that
have shaped literacy instruction in the last century are considered.

Text, Tools, and Culture
E26.2017 30 hours: 3 points. Spring.
Children’s and adolescent literature as primary tools in the teaching of reading comprehension
from a critical perspective. Strategies for locating, selecting, and evaluating resources and
materials for use in classroom literacy programs, and selecting texts that appeal to reluctant
readers and students with special needs. Emphasis is placed on teaching children’s literature
multiculturally.

Organization and Supervision of Literacy Programs
E26.2065 30 hours: 3 points. Spring
Exploration of the role of the literacy specialist within the school community with special
attention to professional development, literacy program implementation and supervision, and
student assessment responsibilities. A variety of literacy programs and the range of functions of
the literacy specialist will be considered in light of how these are impacted by the changing needs
of the school, community and political exigencies. Field participation is required.
Prerequisite: E26.2011 or permission.

Supervised Practicum–Early Childhood/Childhood
E26.2030 48 hours: 2 points (repeatable for 4 points). Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: E26.2011.
Designed to refine proficiency in organizing and enhancing literacy programs. Focus on
collaboration and communication with other school or organizational personnel. Developing
literacy curricula and instruction that is informed by student assessment. Emphasis on
communicating assessment results to parents, caregivers, and other school personnel. Students
take two 2-point placements at the early childhood and childhood levels under supervision. These
placements are coordinated in partnership with local school districts and community-based
organizations.

Supervised Practicum—Middle Childhood/Adolescence
E26.2031 48 hours: 2 points (repeatable for 4 points). Spring and Summer.
Prerequisite: E26.2011.
Designed to refine proficiency in organizing and enhancing literacy programs. Focus on
collaboration and communication with other school or organizational personnel. Developing
literacy curricula and instruction that is informed by student assessment. Emphasis on
communicating assessment results to parents, caregivers, and other school personnel. Students
take two 2-point placements at the middle childhood and adolescent levels under supervision.
These field experiences are coordinated in partnership with local school districts and community-
based organizations.

Literacy for the Special Learner E75.2055 30 hours: 3 points. Spring. Perequisites: E26.2013
or E26.2015, E26.2010, E26.2016, and E26.2017 or permission of instructor.



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Exploration of diverse cognitive, neurological, and emotional characteristics and how these
manifest in learners’ literacy development. A focus on the atypical development and educational
needs of students who experience difficulties in acquiring the literacy skills of listening, speaking,
reading, and writing. Overview of the practices of individual assessment of student literacy
performance and teaching interventions for students, with a special focus on dyslexia.


Recommended Electives:

Early Childhood/Childhood Education:
Working with Parents E25.2297 (January and May Intersession)

Education Communication and Technology:
Integrating Media and Technology in K-12 Curriculum E19.2018 (summer)

Educational Theatre:
Drama with Special Education Population I/II/III E17.2960/2961/2962 (fall and spring)
Teaching Literacy through Drama E17.2971 (fall)
Understanding Diversity E17.2977 (summer)

English Education:
Literature and the Adolescent Experience E11.2521 (spring)
Pluralistic Approaches E11.2577 (fall)

Multilingual Multicultural Studies:
Bilingual Exceptional Child E29.2103 (fall and summer 2008)
Intercultural Perspectives E29.2005 (summer, fall and spring)
Methods of Teaching Language Arts & Literacy with a Bilingual Approach E29.2110
(summer)
Teaching Second Languages: Theory and Practice E29.2002 (summer, fall and spring)

Special Education:
Psychology Foundation of Learning Disabilities E75.2131 (fall)




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                        Literacy Education Program Faculty
                           Steinhardt School of Education
                        Department of Teaching and Learning


Patricia M. Cooper (Emory, 2001). Throughout her career as a teacher, school director,
and teacher educator, Dr. Cooper's work in literacy education has focused on the
intersection of narrative, culture, and schooling in learning to read and write. She is
interested in how curriculum expectations shape literacy learning across race and ethnic
lines. Cooper has written on Vivian Paley's storytelling curriculum, children's literature,
and White teachers of Black children in learning to read and write. She is currently
writing a book on Vivian Paley’s impact on early childhood education. Cooper holds a
B.A. from Purchase College (1976), an M.A. from the University of Chicago (1978) , and
M.Ed. from the Erikson Institute for Advanced Studies in Child Development (1980), and
a Ph.D. from Emory University (2001).

Cynthia McCallister (University of Maine, 1995). Dr. McCallister is a former elementary
school teacher and literacy staff developer. Her current research explores practices of
effective teaching of children who struggle as readers. She is the author of a number of
articles that explore literacy development through the framework of social construction.

Sara Michael-Luna (University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005). Dr. Michael-Luna studies
early childhood language, literacy and identity construction of bilingual children. She has
published empirical work examining how multilingual children and teachers resist racial,
cultural and linguistic assumptions in curriculum and pedagogy. She is currently
examining the role pre-K curriculum and pedagogy play in emergent bilinguals’ pre-
literacy development and how multilingual K-5 teacher candidates understand the
different ideologies present in their field placement curriculum and pedagogy. She
received the Morgridge Wisconsin Distinguished Graduate Fellowship, the AERA-IES
Dissertation Grant, and support from the Spencer Foundation Doctoral Research
Program. She is on the Editorial Board of TESOL Quarterly and is the Section Editor for
TESOL Quarterly’s Research Digest.

Katherine Stahl (University of Georgia, 2003) Dr. Stahl is committed to studying
elementary reading instruction that is effective in raising student achievement and
practical for teachers. Her research interests were born in the twenty-six years that she
spent teaching in high-poverty public elementary and middle school classrooms. She is
coauthor of the second edition of Assessment for Reading Instruction (McKenna & Stahl,
In press) and co-editor of Reading Research at Work: Foundations of Effective Practice
(Stahl & McKenna, 2006), a book that explores the classroom implications of twenty
years of reading research. Dr. Stahl’s articles have been published in Reading Research
Quarterly, The Reading Teacher, and The Journal of Literacy Research. Primarily
interested in reading acquisition and comprehension, she is currently investigating the
implementation of Response to Intervention in New York City’s schools.



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