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					Measurement

 Rachel Christianson
    Ashley Gross
   Becky Kjellsen
  Courtney Zander
        Welcome 3rd Graders
   PLEASE WAIT TO EAT THE CANDY!
    (a.k.a Jon, Jeff, and Richard) With the
    peers at your table, estimate the length
    of the foot using one starburst as the
    standard unit.
                  Big Foot
   Now with the strip of paper and starbursts
    at your table make a starburst ruler. With
    your ruler, now measure the foot at your
    table. Raise your hand when you are
    finished.
                 Keep Measuring
                Please Just Listen!
   Please estimate with the ruler you have made
    other objects around the room such as:
       Projection screen
       Math Book
       Richard
       Brick (1)
        Table

   Now compare these measurements with the
    measurement of the foot
       Is the object bigger or smaller?
       Is the object shorter or taller?
                Ruler Time
             Please Just Listen
   Now look at the standard ruler on your desk.
   What measurement unit does this ruler have?
   Guess what the measurement of the big foot will
    be with the ruler. Also, guess the
    measurements for the other objects around the
    room.
   Now measure the big foot with the ruler.
   Measure the other objects around the room with
    the ruler too.
   How different were your measurements?
                     Quotes
   According to the Van De Walle text, studies
    indicate that students are weaker in the area of
    measurement than any other topic in the
    curriculum.

   According to Cathcart, et al, “measurement is a
    characteristic that can be quantified by
    comparing it to a unit” (Cathcart, et al, 2003).

   *Measurement is always an
    approximation*
                  Quotes 2
   "A measurable attribute of an object or
    event is a characteristic that can be
    quantified by comparing it to a unit. The
    process of measuring is the same for
    each attribute: An appropriate unit is
    chosen and the object or event being
    measured is compared to the unit."
    (Cathcart et al., 2006)
        Types of Measurement
   Length
   Area
   Volume and Capacity
   Weight and Mass
   Time
   Angles
     Three Sequential Steps In The
        Instructional Sequence:
   Perception and direct comparison
       Pre-measurement- no unit or assigning of numbers
       Use words such as bigger, smaller, longer, taller,
        more, less, etc.
   Nonstandard Units
       Measure objects with predetermined units that are
        not accepted by the general population
   Standard Units
       In the US- metric and customary systems are used
      Process and Instructional
     Sequence of Measurement:
   1. Meaning of the attribute is developed through
    activities involving perception and direct comparisons
   2. Begin to measure using arbitrary or non-standard
    units
   3. Measure and estimate using standard units
   4. Involve them in related experiences that help them
    learn to use the instruments accurately and correctly and
    to read their scales
   5. Relate the formulas and involve them in the formulas
    as a product of exploration and discovery; seek
    relationships
   6. Involve them in real-life applications and problem
    solving
Scope and Sequence for K-8 Content Standards for
  Measurement from the South Dakota Board of
                  Education
              Demonstration
   We will be dividing into 2 groups and
    going over the steps to teaching volume.
   We will be covering each of the 6
    instructional steps and using the
    sequential steps.
   Please participate and enjoy learning
    about volume.
   Remember- you are still 3rd graders!!
                               Chart
  Letter                              How many standard units?




Each group will delegate one person to come to the front to write down the
order of their objects. Then after finding the standard unit they will
estimate how many standard units for each container and report to the
front. After estimating all containers they will then measure with beans and
record their standard units.
           #1 Beans, beans, beans
Meaning of the attribute is developed through activities involving perception and direct comparisons.



   Place the containers in order of how many
    beans you think they will hold from more
    to less.
   If you need to look closer or hold the
    containers to help you determine your
    answer please do so.
   Do not fill any containers yet!!
       #2 Beans, beans, beans
           Begin to measure using arbitrary or non-standard units.



   Look at the beans on your table.
   With your group, decide on how we will
    measure the amount of beans that go into
    each container.
   HINT: Make the smallest container the
    base unit.
   Now guess based on this unit how many
    beans each of the other containers will
    hold.
        #3 Beans, beans, beans
                  Measure and estimate using standard units.


   We are going to measure our volume in cups. The
    standard measure of volume is milileters.
   Look at the measuring cup labeled one cup. Our
    smallest container is one cup. Place beans into the
    measuring device and then into the smallest container.
    If they are equal this is how we will measure the other
    containers.
   Remember you can use the other measuring cups
    labeled: ½ or ¼ of a cup.
   Measure all of the containers with the beans.
   Have one person record the findings.
   Are the containers still in the correct order?
            #4 Beans, beans, beans
    Involve them in related experiences that help them learn to use the instruments accurately and
                                   correctly and to read their scales.


   Lets brainstorm ideas…
   Have you ever measured volume?
        Baking/Cooking
        Presents
        Blowing up a balloon
        Filling a bath tub
            #5 Beans, beans, beans
Relate the formulas and involve them in the formulas as a product of exploration and discovery; seek
                                           relationships.


   The volume of an object will be the
    number in each layer times the number of
    layers or…
   Volume is measured in "cubic" units. The
    volume of a figure is the number of cubes
    required to fill it completely, like blocks in
    a box.

 Conceptual Understanding
       #6 Beans, beans, beans
           Involve them in real-life applications and problem solving.



   What else to we use measuring cups for at
    home?
   Is it important that we measure correctly?
              Accommodations
   All students with hearing or visual disabilities
    should sit up front closest to the teacher and the
    objects. The instructions will be on the screen
    for students to recall what to do. All directions
    will also be given orally to help auditory
    learners.
   Having students touch the objects as well as
    having them be able to move around will help
    kinesthetic and tactile learners.
             Resources:
Van de Walle, J.A. (2007) Elementary and
 middle school mathematics: Teaching
 developmentally. Boston, MA: Allyn &
 Bacon.

				
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posted:10/18/2012
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