Alcohol and Intimate Partner Violence by carmenpdr

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									Alcohol & Intimate Partner Violence




©2012 Professional Development Resources | http://www.pdresources.org | email: ceinfo@pdresources.org
Title of Course: Alcohol & Intimate Partner Violence
CE Credit: 2 Hours
Learning Level: Intermediate
Author: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

Abstract:

This course, which was developed by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), is focused on
the definitions, profiles, detection and treatment of intimate partner violence (IPV) that is associated with alcohol
abuse. It explores the complex relationship between alcohol and intimate partner violence for both victims and
perpetrators, addressing various models that attempt to explain this relationship. The course describes the signs of
alcohol-related intimate partner violence and a number of techniques for assessing and intervening with individuals
who might be affected by or engaging in alcohol-related intimate partner violence.

Learning Objectives:

1. Describe epidemiology data concerning the associations between alcohol and intimate partner violence, for both
   victims and perpetrators
2. Identify various explanatory theories and models addressing the associations between alcohol and intimate
   partner violence
3. Name signs and symptoms of alcohol-related intimate partner violence
4. List techniques for assessing individuals who might be affected by or engaging in alcohol-related intimate partner
   violence
5. Identify resources and interventions related to alcohol and intimate partner violence




©2012 Professional Development Resources | http://www.pdresources.org | email: ceinfo@pdresources.org
                            Alcohol & Intimate Partner Violence

Introduction
                                                                    Family violence is a relatively young field of research,
                                                                    with systematic study coalescing during the 1970s
                                                                    (Finkelhor, Hotaling, & Yllö, 1988). The umbrella term
                                                                    "family violence" includes abuse and violence against
                                                                    children, adolescents, adults, and elders that occur
                                                                    within the context of family and other intimate
                                                                    relationships (Carden, 1994). Over the past three
                                                                    decades, much has been learned about the
                                                                    epidemiology of family violence, the associated risk
                                                                    factors, and the outcomes or effects on victims,
                                                                    witnesses, and family systems. Family violence
                                                                    interfaces with the understanding, study, and
                                                                    treatment of the more general class of aggression and
                                                                    interpersonal violence. This module discusses the
                                                                    very clear yet complex associations between alcohol
                                                                    and intimate partner violence.


Background
Intimate partner violence (IPV) refers to family violence (and/or the threat of violence) that occurs within the context of
a relationship between intimate partners. IPV includes physical acts of aggression, as well as sexual, psychological, and
emotional abuse. This term has begun to replace earlier terms such as domestic violence, spouse abuse, dating violence,
date rape, battering, and marital violence. IPV is more inclusive across types of intimate relationships (e.g., married,
cohabiting, dating, and ex-partners; heterosexual and same-sex partners), and includes a wide range of abusive
behaviors and patterns (Begun, 2003).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(Saltzman, et al., 1999) are promoting consistency in
IPV terminology with the goal of developing
standardized data collection procedures. They
recommend that relationship violence be categorized
as: (1) physical violence, (2) sexual violence, (3) threat
of physical and sexual violence, and (4)
psychological/emotional abuse. This last category
includes coercive tactics when there also has been
prior (actual or threats of) physical or sexual violence.
The continuum of abusive behaviors additionally
includes stalking, harassment, economic
abuse/control, and isolating a person from family and
friends.



©2012 Professional Development Resources | http://www.pdresources.org | email: ceinfo@pdresources.org
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©2012 Professional Development Resources | http://www.pdresources.org | email: ceinfo@pdresources.org

								
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