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L.C. Smith College Of Engineering And Computer Science

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									L.C. Smith College Of Engineering And Computer Science
Laura J. Ste inbe rg, De an
227 Link Hall
lcs.syr.e du/

About The College
T hese are exciting times in engineering and computer science. Revolutionary changes in multiple areas continue to
transform the operations of most traditional employers of engineers and computer scientists. T he demand for
individuals with degrees in engineering and computer science is greater than ever. In addition, new nontraditional
opportunities for engineering and computer science graduates are opening in law, medicine, public policy, finance,
management, and communications. T raditional tools and technical know-how are often no longer enough. T oday’s
engineers and computer scientists must possess a broader set of perspectives, experiences, and skills to contribute
successfully in a dynamic, rapidly changing world.

Syracuse University’s L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science (LCS) offers courses and programs
that are designed to prepare leaders for a high-technology, knowledge-based global community. T hrough courses in
the college and across the University, LCS offers students a breadth of opportunities and experiences that is unmatched by programs at most other
universities.

T he college offers nine undergraduate programs: bachelor of science programs in aerospace engineering, bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil
engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, and mechanical engineering are accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of ABET , and bachelor science program in computer is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET ,
http://www.abet.org.

New engineering and computer science students enroll in ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science. ECS 101 provides a broad
introduction to each of our degree programs, allowing students an opportunity to explore each area before they choose a major. ECS 101 is also open to
students of other SU colleges who are interested in exploring the areas of engineering or computer science as a potential field of academic study.

LCS students may choose from a variety of study options, including technical and non-technical minors, combined B.S./M.S. degree programs, and a
combined undergraduate degree program between LCS and the College of Arts and Sciences. T he college also offers its students opportunities for co-op,
study abroad, and undergraduate research.

Founded in 1901, LCS enjoys a long-standing reputation for excellence and innovation. T he college community is composed of outstanding students,
faculty, and staff who are dedicated to personal excellence and success.

Educational Mission And Vision
THE CO LLEGE MISSIO N
T he mission of the college is to promote learning in engineering and computer science through integrated activities in teaching, research, scholarship,
creative accomplishments, and service.

THE CO LLEGE VISIO N
T he vision of the college is to earn recognition among universities for engineering and computer science programs that prepare leaders for a high-
technology, knowledge-based, global community. T he vision for LCS is a distinct student-centered research university model for engineering and computer
science education. Features of this model include the following:

• the commitment that all programs relate directly to students and their learning experiences;
• the commitment that research is an integral element of the learning environment;
• the flexibility for students to pursue the diversity of learning opportunities available in a broad university setting; and
• the commitment to world-class quality in courses and programs.

Accreditation
T he college offers nine undergraduate programs: bachelor of science programs in aerospace engineering, bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil
engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, and mechanical engineering are accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of ABET , and bachelor science program in computer is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET ,
http://www.abet.org.

STUDENT O UTCO MES
Student outcomes in all B.S. in engineering programs:

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political,
ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
Student outcomes in the B.S. in computer science program:
(a) An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
(b) An ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
(c) An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
(d) An ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
(e) An understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
(f) An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
(g) An ability to analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
(h) Recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in continuing professional development
(i) An ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.

Facilities And Research
Undergraduate
T he L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science has facilities in a three buuildings on the SU Main Campus: Edwin A. Link Hall, Bowne Hall
and the Center for Science and T echnology, located at the east end of the Quad. In addition, the college operates teaching and research facilities at the
Institute for Sensory Research, located on SU’s South Campus.

More than 200 computers are available around the clock for the exclusive use of students in engineering and computer science. T he majority of these
computers are housed in Windows and UNIX computer labs networked by up-to-date servers offering a range of software appropriate to the disciplines
offered by the college. In addition, there is one all-University public Windows lab located in Link Hall. Information about LCS specific IT resources can be
found at http://helpdesk.lcs.syr.edu/.

Students in the college can readily access campus-wide resources operated by the University’s central Information T echnology Services (IT S) organization.
Wireless network access is available in all LCS buildings and more than 40 campus buildings. Detailed information about campus-wide IT resources is
available at http://its.syr.edu.

RESEARCH
Encouraging undergraduate research is a hallmark of the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science. We recommend that students undertake
research projects as independent study experiences for academic credit.

Individual students may advance the state of knowledge and its application in dramatic ways. Many of our juniors and seniors attend national meetings and
present the results of their undergraduate research projects. It is not unusual for our students to win awards in national research paper competitions or to
graduate with one or more publications in the archival literature to their credit.

Graduate
FACILITIES
T he L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science (LCS) has facilities in three buildings: Edwin A. Link Hall; the Center for Science and
T echnology, located at the east end of the Quad; and the Institute for Sensory Research, located on the South Campus, approximately two miles away.

Each of the buildings has modern, fully equipped laboratories for research and special student projects, as well as ample space for graduate student offices,
classrooms, and seminar rooms.
T he college and University have invested heavily in the multidisciplinary research area termed “ environmental quality systems” that includes civil and
environmental engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, bioengineering, and electrical engineering and computer science. Research and
graduate education facilities dedicated to these activities include a $4.5 million, 22,000-square foot suite of environmental engineering laboratories that
house state-of-the art analytical laboratories, a clean room, bioenvironmental facilities, and a GIS lab; a new $1.8 million Building Energy and
Environmental Systems Laboratory that contains a unique environmental chamber-climate chamber pair for testing building materials, HVAC and filtration
technologies, and indoor air quality; a material characterization laboratory for studying hygrothermal performance of building envelopes; and a number of
additional laboratories that are dedicated to fundamental research focused on the quality of urban and built environments.

Chemical engineering has research laboratories devoted to supercritical extraction and oxidation, selective ion adsorption, polymer science and technology,
molecular biology, and biochemical engineering. Instrumentation available in these laboratories includes a combination gas chromatograph-mass
spectrometer, high-pressure equipment for studying extraction and chemical reaction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, differential scanning
calorimeter, and an instrumented bioreactor.

T he electrical engineering and computer science department provides its students with extensive computing facilities in UNIX and Windows environments
as well as with laboratories that cover a wide spectrum of areas, including communications, high performance computing, microwaves, multimedia,
networking, optical fibers, and photonics.

A wide range of laboratories exists in mechanical and aerospace engineering, with particular strength in the areas of fluid dynamics, energy systems, solid
mechanics and materials characterization, and intelligent manufacturing. Cutting-edge facilities, including a full-motion flight simulator, exist for research in
indoor environmental quality, composite materials, aerodynamics, computer-aided design, and the application of knowledge-based systems.
Bioengineering laboratories are devoted to teaching principles and applications of biomaterials, biomechanics, and bioinstrumentation. T he biomechanics
laboratory is equipped with mechanical testing devices, force and motion analysis systems, and a networked computer cluster for data acquisition and
analysis. T he bioinstrumentation laboratory contains equipment for design and fabrication of electronic devices and a networked computer cluster facilitates
circuit design, simulation, data acquisition, and analysis. A suite of biomaterials laboratories includes a scanning electron microscope, atomic force
microscope, differential scanning calorimeter, and FT IR for material characterization. T here are also facilities for static and dynamic mechanical testing,
anomechanics, polymer synthesis and characterization, and tissue engineering.

T he Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering maintains high-quality, advanced laboratory facilities for research and graduate instruction. T hese
include a geosynthetic laboratory, a structure/materials laboratory, a geofoam laboratory, a soil mechanics laboratory, and a particle analysis laboratory.

T he structure/materials laboratory includes a large reaction frame capable of testing full-scale beams and other structural elements. T he Geofoam Research
Center maintains a well-equipped laboratory for geomaterial testing and research.

T he environmental engineering laboratories occupy about 22,000 square feet and consist of more than 20 state-of-the-art labs. T he labs contain extensive
analytical equipment, microprocessors for chemical and biological analysis, and advanced computing hardware and software.
Syracuse University is one of a select group of institutions to have access to a federal laboratory for quick fabrication of student-designed integrated circuit
chips, which greatly strengthens courses in designing and testing very large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits.

T he computing facilities in LCS and the University’s computing services are outstanding. T he computers are available for student use, and students are
encouraged to use them throughout their academic careers.

T wo all-University public labs of personal computers are located in Link Hall. In addition, the college has UNIX, Windows, and Macintosh microcomputer
labs in the facilities that are dedicated and available around the clock to engineering and computer science students.

RESEARCH
Programs of fundamental and applied research conducted by the faculty of each department have led to significant contributions in many engineering and
computing fields. Graduate students, undergraduate students, research assistants, fellows, and postdoctoral fellows actively participate in this research.

T he College of Engineering and Computer Science is closely affiliated with the CASE Center. Faculty and students work through the CASE Center to solve
applied research and development problems using software engineering for small and large companies across New York State. T he New York ST AR Center
for Environmental Quality Systems, Geofoam Research Center, the Institute for Sensory Research, and the Institute for Manufacturing Enterprises provide
graduate students with a wealth of opportunities to contribute to important research problems across the full range of disciplines in the college.

Undergraduate Program Overview
T he college offers nine undergraduate programs: bachelor of science programs in aerospace engineering, bioengineering, chemical engineering, civil
engineering, computer engineering, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, and mechanical engineering are accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of ABET , and bachelor science program in computer is accredited by the Computing Accreditation Commission of ABET ,
http://www.abet.org.

Aerospace Engineering
Bioengineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Engineering
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
Environmental Engineering
Mechanical Engineering

General Regulations
For academic rules and regulations that apply to all University students, see the Academic Rules and Regulations section of this catalog, which also contains
special regulations that apply only to students matriculated in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science.

Engineering and computer science students enrolling at Syracuse University must maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average in all engineering,
mathematics, and science courses taken at SU. Furthermore, all students must satisfactorily complete at least 24 credits, including summer courses taken
here or transferred to Syracuse University from another institution, within any 12-month period to maintain satisfactory progress, with a 2.0 semester and
overall average.

For graduation, students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 and at least a 2.00 GPA in all LCS, mathematics, and science courses taken at
Syracuse University. In addition, students must meet all degree requirements specific to their chosen major.


Arts And Sciences/ Engineering & Computer Science (Combined Degrees)

Arts and Sciences contact the Advising and Academic Support Office, 329 Hall of Languages, 315-443-3150.

Engineering and Computer Science contact Maria Marceau, Director of Student Records, 130 Link Hall, 315-443-5191.
Engineering Faculty, See individual departments listed in the “ L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science.”

T he College of Arts and Sciences, in cooperation with the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science, offers a five-year combined curriculum.
Students complete the requirements for and receive two degrees–one degree in a major of their choice in engineering or computer science and one degree in
a major in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students who enter this program are urged to talk with advisors in both departments in which they plan to
major as soon as possible. It is important that they learn the curricular requirements of each department in order to understand how best to merge the two
sets of requirements.

Students register with the College of Arts and Sciences as the home college for the first three years. T hey receive a basic education in mathematics and
science along with a liberal education in the social sciences and humanities. While most of the coursework taken during that time is in the liberal arts,
approximately one quarter of the program consists of first- and second-year courses in the engineering field chosen by the students.

After completing the third year, students transfer the home college designation to the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science while
maintaining a connection with the College of Arts and Sciences. T he fourth and fifth years of the program focus on engineering subjects. T he B.A. or B.S.
degree in the Arts and Sciences major may be awarded upon completion of the fourth year, but increased scheduling options are possible by completing both
degrees at the end of the fifth year.

While some flexibility is possible in the program, it is a formalized curriculum. Students usually major in mathematics, biology, physics, or chemistry in the
College of Arts and Sciences, although other majors are allowed upon approval by both colleges. T he completion of the combined degree program requires a
minimum of 150 total credits earned.

Admission requirements are the same as those for students entering the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science. Students who are already
enrolled in the College of Engineering and Computer Science or the College of Arts and Sciences may transfer into the combined program provided
requirements can be met. Such transfers must be approved by both colleges.
Intra-University Transfer
Students who wish to transfer into any program within the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science from another school or college within
the University should have a strong record of achievement and demonstrated success in key technical courses. Specifically, it is critical for the applicant to
have proven their ability to excel in college-level calculus (by completing at least one of MAT 295, 296, or 397 with a grade of B- or better) and science
(by completing at least one set of PHY 211/221 or CHE 106/107 with a grade of B- or better). Students who wish to major in computer science must also
complete CIS 252 with a grade of at least a B.

LCS PRIDE OFFICE
T he PRIDE Office (Programs Rooted In Developing Excellence) provides programs that meet the needs of and foster excellence in the educational,
professional, and personal development of all students with particular emphasis on African American, Latino/a, Native American, and women students in
the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science.

T he PRIDE Office offers programs that focus on student development and their academic success including the SummerStart Program and the LCS
Pathfinders (peer advisors) and academic advising for newly admitted students. In addition, first-year students are invited to participate in theLC Smith
Learning Community in the ST EM Residential College located in Shaw Hall which allows for formed social connections and peer collaboration on similar
academic pursuits.

Academic Excellence Workshops (AEW), which focus on the mastery of calculus and other fundamental engineering courses; the ST AR (Students T aking
Academic Responsibility) Program, which provides support in the nonacademic skills that are necessary to ensure student success; and the PRIDE Incentive
Program, which celebrates the students’ academic achievement.

PRIDE is also committed to helping the student chapters of of more than sixteen professional organizations. Some highligts include the National Society
of Black Engineers (NSBE), the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE), and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) realize their programming
goals and objectives. T he activities, leadership opportunities, and community service projects sponsored by the organizations are important to the students,
the college, the University, and the local Syracuse community, as they prepare to be future societal leaders.

PRIDE evolved from the Minority Engineering Program (MEP) Office established in 1976.

Students interested in the PRIDE Office programs should contact the director’s office, 123 Link Hall, 315-443-2582, pride@lcs.syr.edu.

Co-Op
T he LCS Cooperative Education program (Co-op) empowers undergraduate students to take advantage of experiential learning opportunities that have
proven to aid them in successfully reaching their post-graduate goals. T he Co-op program consists of full-time professional work primarily during the
summer. T his design allows students the opportunity to gain more than six months of paid work experience in their field of study and still graduate in four
years. Working during the academic year is an option that students may choose, with the understanding that their ability to graduate on time may be
affected. T o be eligible, students must be enrolled full time in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science.

Contact Cooperative Education Program, L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science, 123 Link Hall, 315-443-2582.

Undergraduate Minors
Engine e ring Stude nts
Engineering students can pursue any minor within the University. Students are required to complete from 128 to 139 credits, depending on their program of
study. Minors can be earned by taking optional or additional coursework. Minors commonly pursued include mathematics, economics, and management.

Compute r Scie nce Stude nts
Computer science students can easily pursue any minor within the University. Of the 123 credits required for graduation, 9 credits are free electives. Minors
commonly pursued are mathematics, cognitive science, or operations management.

All O the r Stude nts
Students enrolled in colleges other than Engineering and Computer Science can earn a minor in computer science. Students with sufficient background in
math and science can pursue a minor in computer engineering or electrical engineering.

Bioe ngine e ring Stude nts
Bioengineering students can earn a mathematics minor within the prescribed curriculum. Other minors (e.g., biology) can be earned by taking additional
courses. Students enrolling with AP credit or who take summer school courses can easily select from a variety of minors.

Compute r Engine e ring Stude nts
Students can easily pursue two minors simultaneously. Without adding any courses to their programs of study, they can pursue a minor in mathematics, and
a second one in a discipline outside the College of Engineering and Computer Science.

Ele ctrical Engine e ring Stude nts
Students can easily pursue a technical minor, a non-technical minor without adding any additional course to their program of study. Additionally, a
mathematics minor can be obtained by taking only one additional math course.

MINO R IN CO MPUTER ENGINEERING
Minor Coordinator - C.Y. Roge r Che n, 4-133 Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 315-443-4179, crche n@syr.e du .
T he minor in computer engineering (18 credits) must include the following courses:
ECS 102 Introduction to Computing
CSE 261 Digital Logic Design
CSE 281 Computer Organization and Assembly Language
CSE 283 Introduction to Object-Oriented Design
CSE 381 Computer Architecture
CSE 382 Algorithms and Data Structures

MINO R IN CO MPUTER SCIENCE
Minor Coordinator - Jae O h, 4-283 Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 315-443-4740, jcoh@syr.e du.
T he minor in computer science requires the completion of 18 credits (five or six courses) in CIS courses with an overall grade point average of at least 2.5,
and with no individual course grade below C-. T hese 18 hours must include CIS 252 and CIS 351, and at least 12 credits must come from courses numbered
300 or greater. All courses must be intended for CIS majors.

MINO R IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Minor Coordinator - Prasanta Ghosh, 4-131 Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 315-443-4440, pkghosh@syr.e du.
T he minor in electrical engineering (EE) (20 credits) is available to any Syracuse University student who has the appropriate prerequisites such as calculus
and calculus-based physics. Students must complete 8 credits of required sophomore courses shown below and 12 credits of junior- or senior-level elective
courses offered by the electrical engineering program. Students may choose the elective courses to give them a breadth of coverage or complete a track* in
a specific concentration area as described in the catalog.
ELE 231 EE Fundamentals I (3)
ELE 291 EE Lab I (1)
ELE 232 EE Fundamentals II (3)
ELE 292 EE Lab II (1)
ELE EE Junior or senior courses (12)

*T racks are intended to provide a cohesive set of technical electives for EE students. A track consists of a sequence of two senior-level elective courses and
their appropriate prerequisites. T he current examples of tracks in EE are all 12 credits. More information can be found in the EE curriculum description.

MINO R IN ENERGY SYSTEMS
Minor Coordinator - Jianshun Zhang, 462 Link+, 315-443-1366, jsz hang@syr.e du.
T his minor option will provide students enrolled within the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and COmputer Science with a grouping of courses/electives
that will provide academic depth in the field of energy related systems in 4 different but related tracks.

Admission to the energy systems minor is by permission of an academic advisor and requires students to be enrolled in a B.S. program in Engineering within
L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science.

Students with sufficiaent technical background from other Syracuse University Academic Units may be considered for admission to the Minor in Energy
Systems and such decisions will be made by the L.C. Smith Energy Systems Committee.

Course Re quire me nts
T he following courses must be taken by all students within the minor regardless of the specific track:

ECN 203 Economic Ideas and Issues (3)
MAE 251 or CEN 252 T hermodynamics (3)
MAE/CIE 548 Engineering Economics and T echnology Valuation (3)
MAE/CIE 551 Energy Conversion (3)

In addition, 3 track-specific courses must be taken from a list of required and elctive courses for each of the 4 individual tracks. T hese 4 track specific lists
are available from an academic advisor.
Tracks:

1)   T hermo-Mechanical Energy Systems T rack
2)   Nuclear Energy T rack
3)   Renewable Energy T rack
4)   Electric Power T rack
For a list of courses, please contact the Minor Coordinator.

MINO R IN ENGINEERING AND CO MPUTER SCIENCE MANAGEMENT
Minor Coordinator Engineering - Fre de rick Carranti, 247 Link Hall, 315-443-4346, carranti@syr.e du.
Minor Coordinator Management - Lindsay Rapp, 215 Whitman School of Manage me nt, 315-443-2361, ldrapp@syr.e du.
T his minor is designed to provide LCS students with a relevant non-technical minor. It is open to all SU students with approval of their home college. T he
requirements are:

ECS 391 Legal aspects of LCS
ECS 392 Ethical Aspects of LCS

Two upper-level management courses selected from the following:
EEE 370 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
EEE 382 Entrepreneurial Marketing
EEE 451 Finance for Emerging Enterprises
FIN 301 Finance for Non-Business Students
LPP/SHR 450 Sustainability
SHR 355 Introduction to Human Resource Management

Two courses selected from the following:
ACC 201 Introduction to Accounting for Non-Management Students
ECN 203 Economic Ideas and Issues
MAR 301 Marketing for Non-Management Students
SHR 247 Strategy and Leadership

Study Abroad
T he L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science, in cooperation with Syracuse University Abraod, offers qualified engineering and computer
science students the ooportunity to spend a year at a British university in London or a semester in Madrid, Hong Kong, Sydney, Dublin, Istanbul, and
Satiago.
In a time of rapidly growing global complexity and opportunity, international study is an increasingly important and relevant component of undergraduate
study, especially for students preparing for careers in engineering or computer science. Of all the major professions, engineering and computer science are
the most likely to involve international activity. In addition to strong technical skills, employers are increasingly looking for international experience,
cross-cultural skills and perspectives, and an understanding of the world's diversity

For over 20 years, LCS in a partnership with SU Abroad, has been a national leader in providing distinctive international study opportunities. T hese
opportunities include :

        Year Abroad Program in London
        Spring Semester in Madrid
        Fall and Spring semester in Hong Kong, Sydney and Dublin
        Spring Semester in T urkey
        Summer Research programs in Strasbourg or Madrid

LCS international study programs give students the opportunity to gain global experience, develop new ways of viewing the world, form lasting friendships
abroad, and deepen their connection to other countries, languages and cultures. Students with these experiences gain a competitive edge in today's
multinational, multicultural environment.

T o participate, students must be in good academic standing with a cumulatively GPA of 3.0 and in one of Syracuse University's engineering or computer
science programs or in an equivalent program elsewhere. Participants must also meet any language requirements of the host country.

For further information, contact the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science Study Abroad Office in 130 Link Hall or Syracuse University
Abroad, 106 Walnut Place (suabroad.syr.edu).

Academic Offerings


Aerospace Engineering Program
Department Chair: Achille Messac, 263 Link Hall, 315-443-2341; fax: 315-443-9099

Program Director: Professor Achille Messac, 263 Link Hall, messac@syr.edu

Faculty Jeongmin Ahn, T hong Dang, John F. Dannenhoffer, Barry D. Davidson, Mark N. Glauser, Achille Messac, Vadrevu R. Murthy

T he mission of the aerospace engineering program at Syracuse University is to educate and to promote learning and discovery in aerospace engineering and
to prepare students for a career of technical excellence and professional growth and leadership in a complex and competitive technological environment.

T he educational objectives of the aerospace engineering curriculum are to enable graduates of the program to do the following:

• apply the physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences to professional practice or to advanced study in aerospace engineering or related fields;
• be cognizant of societal context and ethical responsibility in professional practice;
• function productively on teams and communicate ideas to both technical and non-technical audiences; and
• be agile, innovative, and adaptable in an increasingly diverse and global environment.
Opportunities for aerospace engineers will continue to expand within the military, civilian, and general aviation sectors spurred on by the development of
new aircraft that extends to civilian supersonic aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles. T his growth in aircraft demand (as well as the need for higher
efficiencies, longer ranges, and lower cost aircraft) is being fueled by the increasing global demand for air travel in the international marketplace. Space
exploration has also entered a period of increased activity that includes an increased exploitation of satellites to service the demand for global
communication, the need for low-cost assured access to space, the international space station, and planetary missions.

We prepare our students for this changing environment by providing an opportunity to gain marketable and relevant skills that can lead to success in a wide
range of careers. T he distinctive signature of undergraduate mechanical and aerospace engineering at Syracuse University is the ability to fit either a
technical or a non-technical minor into the curricula. Students explore the breadth of Syracuse University by complementing their mechanical or aerospace
engineering degree with a minor in business, public policy, fine arts, public communications, and many more.

T he technical focus of the B.S. program in aerospace engineering (AEE) is to develop a sound educational basis for the analysis and design of aerospace
systems, with emphasis on the structure, aerodynamics, flight/orbital mechanics, and propulsion of aircraft and spacecraft systems. Aerospace engineering is
a field constantly pushing the limits of technology. T he B.S. AEE program stresses the fundamental physical, mathematical, and engineering principles that
form the broadest base for future work in a fast-changing field.

T he B.S. AEE program is designed to prepare graduates for either immediate employment or for continuing studies at the graduate level. One distinguishing
feature of the program is the opportunity for undergraduate students to participate in current research projects, which provide first-hand exposure both to
advanced topics of current interest and to challenges typical of graduate school or industrial research. Research experiences for undergraduates are available
in many areas, including fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, solid mechanics, and applications of high-performance computers.

Requirements for the B.S. AEE program appear below. For the first five semesters the recommended sequence of courses for the B.S. AEE program is nearly
identical to the recommended program for the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering (MEE), which demonstrates the similarity and complementary nature
of the two disciplines. Courses carrying the prefix MAE indicate class material and assignments are drawn from both aerospace and mechanical engineering
applications. Beginning in the sixth semester, students in the B.S. AEE program begin taking courses addressing topics unique to aerospace engineering,
including aerodynamics, aircraft structures, propulsion systems, and the dynamics of aerospace vehicles.

Experience with open-ended design problems is obtained in a sequence of courses that span the entire curriculum. T he sequence begins with introductory
design experience in the first-year courses ECS 101 and MAE 184. Upper-division courses involving design content include classes on the mechanics of
solids and structures, aerospace structures, aerospace vehicle dynamics, aerodynamics, dynamics and controls, and propulsion. T he design sequence
culminates with the cap-stone design experience (AEE 472) that requires students to integrate knowledge from all areas in the design of a complete aircraft
or spacecraft system.
T opics relevant to the analysis and design of space vehicles are included in AEE 427, 446, 471, and 577. Elective courses that include significant material
concerning space topics include AEE 542 Hypersonic Gas Dynamics, and AEE 491, 492 Hypersonic Research Project I and II.

T he B.S. AEE curriculum allows for programs of study that can be tailored by students to take advantage of the diversity of strengths across both ECS and
all of Syracuse University. We provide engineering students with opportunities to complete minors in areas that can complement technical knowledge–such
as international affairs, business, and public policy–thus enhancing the value and attractiveness of a Syracuse engineering education. Students can also elect
to pursue a technical minor or take a distribution of electives, which will include liberal arts classes, free electives, and additional depth in aerospace
engineering.

T here are a total of 24 elective credits in the B.S. AEE program. T hese credits may be distributed in one of the following two ways:
     1. A student may complete any University minor that requires at least 12 credit hours beyond the core AEE curriculum. In addition to, or as part of,
        this minor, at least 9 credit hours must be taken from the social sciences or humanities (SS/H). Excluding those courses that count towards the
        minor, a maximum of 6 credit hours that are neither SS/H nor technical electives may be taken as part of the 24 elective credits.
     2. A student who does not complete a University minor must take at least 9 credits from the social sciences or humanities (SS/H), at least 6 credits of
        technical electives, and a maximum of 6 credit hours that are neither SS/H nor technical electives.
T echnical electives consist of all 300 level and above courses offered by any department within the college of engineering and computer science or by the
math or physics departments, except for ECS 391, ECS 392 and any course numbered 300, 400 or 500 that is offered outside of the MAE department.
However, in some instances, these courses may be approved by petition. In addition, no more than 3 credit hours of technical electives may be taken
outside of the MAE department.

Students are encouraged to develop a plan for elective selection during their first year. T he planning process should include discussions with the student’s
academic advisor, other faculty members, and peer advisors. T he MAE Department offers most undergraduate technical elective courses on a two-year
cycle. It may be necessary for a student to modify the sequence of courses to accommodate a technical elective course of personal interest.

In addition to successfully completing the requirements for the aerospace program, graduates from this program must also achieve the following student
outcomes:
• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
• an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs, including the integration of multiple aeronautical topics
• an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
• an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
• an ability to communicate effectively
• the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in global and societal contexts
• a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
• a knowledge of contemporary issues
• an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
• an ability to apply knowledge of aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, flight mechanics and orbital mechanics in the analysis of aerospace vehicles.
T his program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

Aerospace Engineering Requirements

First Year, Fall Semester
ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
CHE 106 General Chemistry Lecture I (3)
CHE 107 General Chemistry Lab I (1)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
Elective #1 (3)
T otal 17
First Year, Spring Semester
MAE 184 Engineering Graphics and Computer-Aided Design (3)
ECS 104 Engineering Computing T ools (3)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
PHY 211 General Physics I (3)
PHY 221 General Physics Lab I (1)
Elective #2 (3)
T otal 17

Second Year, Fall Semester
ECS 221 Statics (3)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
PHY 212 General Physics II (3)
PHY 222 General Physics Lab II (1)
MAT 331 Linear Algebra (3)
Elective #3 (3)
T otal 17

Second Year, Spring Semester
MAE 251 T hermodynamics (4)
ECS 222 Dynamics (3)
ECS 325 Mechanics of Solids (4)
MAT 514 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
T otal 17

T hird Year, Fall Semester
MAE 315 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Lab I (3)
MAE 341 Fluid Mechanics (4)
ECS 326 Engineering Materials, Properties, and Processing (3)
ELE 231 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I (3)
ELE 291 Electrical Engineering Laboratory I (1)
Elective #4 (3)
T otal 17

T hird Year, Spring Semester
AEE 342 Aerodynamics (4)
AEE 343 Compressible Flow (3)
MAE 321 Dynamics of Mechanical Systems (3)
ELE 312 Linear Control Systems (3)
Elective #5 (3)
T otal 16

Fourth Year, Fall Semester
AEE 427 Dynamics of Aerospace Vehicles (4)
AEE 446 Propulsion (3)
AEE 471 Design and Analysis of Aerospace Structures (4)
Elective #6 (3)
T otal 14

Fourth Year, Spring Semester
ELE 312 Linear Control Systems (3)
AEE 472 Synthesis of Aerospace Systems (4)
AEE 577 Space Flight (3)
Elective #7 (3)                                                                                        Elective #8 (3)
T otal 13
Program T otal 128

Re comme nde d Te chnical Ele ctive s
AEE 490 Independent Study
AEE 527 Helicopter Dynamics
AEE 542 Hypersonic/High T emperature Gas Dynamics
MAE 355 Fundamentals of Heat and Mass T ransfer
MAE 536 Composite Materials
MAE 571 Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics
MAE 585 Principles of T urbomachines
MAE 588 Principles of Wind T urbines



Aerospace Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.

3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 128 credits for the Aerospace Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.
Bioengineering
Department Chair: Radhakrishna Sureshkumar, 121 Link Hall, 315-443-1931; fax: 443-9175

Faculty Rebecca Bader, Jesse Q. Bond, Katie D. Cadwell, Andrew L. Darling, Jeremy L. Gilbert, Julie M. Hasenwinkel, James H. Henderson, John C.
Heydweiller, George C. Martin, Patrick T . Mather, Dacheng Ren, Ashok Sangani, Radhakrishna Sureshkumar, Lawrence L. T avlarides, Shikha Nangia

Emeritus/Adjunct Faculty: Gino Duca, Gustav Engbretson, Bart Farell, Shelley Kummer, Kent Ogden, David Quinn, Philiip Rice, Suresh Santanam, Klaus
Schroeder, Robert L. Smith, Joseph Spadaro, Alex Stern, Douglas Stone, Chi T ien, Fred Werner, Josef Zwislocki

Affiliate Faculty: Joseph Chaiken, Andria Staniec Costello, Martin Forstner, Yan-Yeung Luk, Cristina Marchetti

Undergraduate Bioengineering Program Director: Andrew Darling, 361 Link Hall, 315-443-4848; fax 443-9175, andarlin@syr.edu

T he mission of the Department of Biomedical and Chemical Engineering is to provide students with mentoring, curricular experience, and extracurricular
opportunities consistent with their individual career objectives in order to

• prepare them to apply science, mathematics, and engineering knowledge to serve the needs of society;
• instill in them a deep sense of respect for others and a strong foundation in professional and social ethics; and
• develop in them the understanding that continued education will further their professional and leadership skills.

Program Educational O bje ctive s

T he obje ctive s of the undergraduate bioengineering program are:

• graduates will master engineering and biological fundamentals enabling them to apply critical thinking to solve problems at the interface of science or
medicine and engineering;
• graduates will have a broad education that develops their ability to make informed and ethical decisions and understand the engineer’s role in society;
• graduates will be able to effectively communicate their work and ideas;
• graduates will be prepared for success in the biomedical industry and postgraduate education in engineering, science, or professional studies.

T he bioengineering program is designed for students interested in the application of physical science techniques to life-science problems, preparing them for
graduate study in bioengineering or medicine as well as for careers in biomedical instrument design, medical device design, orthopedic prosthesis design, or
engineering support for healthcare services. Introduced in the student’s first semester and culminating in the senior year with a capstone project, the
important topic of engineering design is an integral part of the curriculum. Fundamental concepts from courses across the entire curriculum are integrated
with formally delivered design concepts to produce a project. T he project is presented to the faculty in both oral and written forms.

T he bioengineering curriculum provides a solid foundation in mathematics, physics, engineering, and biology in preparation for advanced specialized studies.
A new curriculum was approved in fall 2008. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students can specialize their curriculum to emphasize preparation for
industry, research, or premedical studies. T his curriculum shares several courses with the chemical engineering program. T hese courses provide our students
with a strong background in the engineering sciences so they can explore emerging topics at the interface of the two fields. Students interested in research
with the possibility of continued study in graduate school are encouraged to elect one or more independent study projects and a graduate-level course in an
area of research interest. Appropriate use of electives in this emphasis and strong academic performance can lead to graduation with University Honors.

With the careful selection of electives, a student can meet the entrance requirements established by the Association of American Medical Colleges.
T his program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.


BIO ENGINEERING
Mathematics (15)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
MAT 485 Differential Equations and Matrix Algebra for Engineers (3)

Sciences (24)
BIO 327 Cell Biology (3)
CHE 106 General Chemistry I (3)
CHE 107 General Chemistry Lab I (1)
CHE 116 General Chemistry II (3)
CHE 117 General Chemistry Lab II (1)
CHE 275 Organic Chemistry 1 (3)
CHE 276 Organic Chemistry Lab 1(2)
PHY 211 General Physics I (3)
PHY 221 General Physics Lab I (1)
PHY 212 General Physics II (3)
PHY 222 General Physics Lab II (1)

English/Social Science/Humanities (24)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
Social Science/Humanities Electives (18)

Engineering (18)
ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
ECS 104 Engineering Computational T ools (3)
ECS 221 Statics (3)
ECS 326 Engineering Materials, Properties, and Processing (3)
ELE 231 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I (3)
ELE 232 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals II (3)

Bioengineering (40)
BEN 212 Experimental Methods in Chem Engr and Bioengr (3)
BEN 231 Mass and Energy Balances (3)
BEN 301 Biological Principles for Engineers (4)
BEN 333 Fluid T ransport (3)
BEN 341 Fundamentals of Heat and Mass T ransfer (4)
BEN 364 Quantitative Physiology (4)
BEN 465 Biomechanics (3)
BEN 468 Biomaterials (3)
BEN 481 Bioinstrumentation (3)
BEN 485 Bioengineering Laboratory (4)
BEN 487 Bioengineering Capstone Design (3)
BEN 575 Process Control (3)

T echnical Electives (9)

Total 130




Bioengineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.
3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 130 credits for the Bioengineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.



Chemical Engineering
Department Chair: Radhakrishna Sureshkumar, 121 Link Hall, 315-443-1931; fax: 443-9175

Faculty Rebecca Bader, Jesse Q. Bond, Katie D. Cadwell, Andrew L. Darling, Jeremy L. Gilbert, Julie M. Hasenwinkel, James H. Henderson, John C.
Heydweiller, George C. Martin, Patrick T . Mather, Dacheng Ren, Ashok Sangani, Radhakrishna Sureshkumar, Lawrence L. T avlarides, Shikha Nangia

Emeritus/Adjunct Faculty:Gino Duca, Gustav Engbretson, Bart Farell, Shelley Kummer, Kent Ogden, David Quinn, Philip Rice, Suresh Santanam, Klaus
Schroeder, Robert L. Smith, Joseph Spadaro, Alex Stern, Douglas Stone, Chi T ien, Fred Werner, Josef Zwislocki
Affiliate Faculty: Joseph Chaiken, Andria Costello Staniec, Martin Forstner, Yan-Yeung Luk, Cristina Marchetti

Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Program Director: Katie Cadwell, 341 Link Hall, 315-443-4756, Fax 315-443-9175, kdcadwel@syr.edu.

T he mission of the Department of BIomedical and Chemical Engineering is to provide our students with mentoring, curricular experience and
extracurricular opportunities consistent with their individual career objectives in order to:

          Prepare them to apply science, mathematics and engineering knowledge to serve the needs of society;
          Instill in them a deep sense of respect for others and a strong foundation in professional and social ethics;
          Develop in them the understanding that continued education will further their professional and leadership skills.
Graduates of the program will have mastered the chemical engineering fundamentals necessary to serve as practicing engineers and will be prepared for
further studies in engineering, science, or other professions. T hese fundamentals include an understanding of basic engineering concepts, the collection of
information from experimentation and from the scientific and technical literature, and the prediction of system behavior through the development and
application of mathematical models.

Graduates will be able to apply critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork and research skills to the design of chemical engineering processes and the
solution of scientific and technical problems.

Graduates will be able to effectively synthesize and then communicate their work and ideas through written, oral, and visual and graphical formats and they
will understand the impacts on and responsibilities to society of chemical engineering practices.

Chemical engineering has a rich past; chemical engineers have been identified with the large scale manufacture of numerous products including chemicals,
fibers, foods, fuels, pharmaceuticals, plastics, pulp and paper, and rubber. Because chemical engineering is the most versatile of the engineering disciplines,
chemical engineers in the future will contribute to diverse new and emerging technologies. T hey will seek new ways to process our energy and natural
resources; they will play key roles in the areas of environmental cleanup and protection, management of hazardous wastes, and process and product safety.
T hey will be involved in new technologies such as biotechnology and biomedicine, and in the development and production of new materials such as
polymers, ceramics, and advanced composites.

T he chemical engineering curriculum prepares students to apply the fundamentals of chemistry, physics, and engineering to problems related to the
efficient and safe production of chemical and related products. T he program focuses on developing a solid background in the principles of chemical
engineering and their applications to the challenges facing industry and society. If a student wishes to specialize in biochemical, environmental, or polymer
engineering, he or she can select appropriate science and engineering courses to supplement the general curriculum.

T his program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

T he curriculum prepares students to apply the fundamentals of chemistry, physics, mathematics, and engineering to diverse problems in the field of
chemical engineering. Engineering design concepts are integrated throughout all four years of the chemical engineering program.

Beginning with ECS 101 in the fall of the first year, students are introduced to the engineering method for problem solving, and concepts of engineering
design. In this way students see how mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science provide the necessary tools for design and how to go about the
design process.

During the sophomore, junior, and senior years, problems of increasing complexity and open-endedness are presented to students in the chemical
engineering courses, continually challenging their technical expertise, creativity, and knowledge.

Finally, in their senior year courses, students are required to complete major design projects in their courses and laboratory. T hese projects are open-ended
and designed to build upon the students’ understanding and mastery of the fundamentals of mathematics, sciences, and engineering topics. T hey also
consider broader social issues in addition to technical issues such as environmental impact and safety.

Many students take advantage of the low student/faculty ratio by participating in research or independent study projects. T here are part-time, summer, co-
op, and internship opportunities available for students seeking work experience. International study opportunities are also available.

Graduates from the program in chemical engineering must achieve the following student outcome s:

• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, and to analyze and interpret data;
• an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs;
• an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
• an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility;
• an ability to communicate effectively;
• the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context;
• a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning;
• a knowledge of contemporary issues;
• an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice;
• an appreciation of diversity issues in society.

Che mical Engine e ring Re quire me nts

First Year, Fall Semester (17)
CHE 106 General Chemistry Lecture I (3)
CHE 107 General Chemistry Lab I (1)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
Social Science/Humanities elective (3)

First Year, Spring Semester (15)
CHE 116 General Chemistry Lecture II (3)
CHE 117 General Chemistry Lab II (1)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
PHY 211 General Physics Lecture I (3)
PHY 221 General Physics Lab I (1)
ECS 104 Engr. Comp. T ools (3)

Second Year, Fall Semester (16)
CHE 275 Organic Chemistry I (3)
CHE 276 Organic Chemistry Lab (2)
CEN 231 Mass and Energy Balances (3)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
PHY 212 General Physics II (3)
PHY 222 General Physics Lab II (1)

Second Year, Spring Semester (18)
CEN 212 Experimental Methods in Chem. Engr & Bioengr (3)
CEN 252 Chemical Engineering T hermodynamics I (3)
MAT 485 Differential Equations and Matrix Algebra for Engineers (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
Social Science/Humanities elective (6)

Third Year, Fall Semester (17)
ECS 326 Engr. Materials, Properities & Processes (3)
CHE 346 Physical Chemistry Lecture I (3)
CHE 347 Physical Chemistry Lab I (2)
CEN 333 Fluid T ransport (3)
CEN 353 Chemical Engineering T hermodynamics II (3)
WRT 307 Adv. Writing Studio: Professional Writing (3)

Third Year, Spring Semester (15)
CEN 311 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I (2)
CEN 341 Fundamentals of Heat and Mass T ransfer (4)
CEN 575 Process Control (3)
CHE 356 Physical Chemistry II (3)
T echnical elective (3)
Fourth Year, Fall Semester (17)
CEN 412 Chemical Engineering Laboratory II (2)
CEN 542 Mass and Heat T ransfer Operations (3)
CEN 587 Chemical Reaction Engineering (3)
T echnical elective (3)
Social Science/Humanities electives (6)

Fourth Year, Spring Semester (13)
CEN 574 Process Design (4)
Social Science/Humanities elective (3)
T echnical electives (6)

Total 128


Chemical Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.

3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 128 credits for the Chemical Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.
Civil Engineering
Department Chair: Chris E. Johnson, 151 Link Hall, 315-443-2311.

Full-time Faculty: Riyad S. Aboutaha, Shobha K. Bhatia, Douglas Call, David G. Chandler, Samuel P. Clemence, Andria Costello Staniec, Joan V.
Dannenhoffer, Cliff I. Davidson, Charles T . Driscoll Jr., Chris E. Johnson, Eric M. Lui, Dawit Negussey, O. Sam Salem, Laura J. Steinberg

The mission of the civil and environmental engineering department is to promote learning and the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge in
civil and environmental engineering through integration of teaching, scholarship, and service.

The goal of the civil and environmental engineering department is to prepare students for engineering practice, advanced study, and lifelong learning in
civil and environmental engineering. Graduates are expected to be proficient in the fundamentals of engineering analysis and design and understand the
importance and methods of effective communication. Students are encouraged to use the extensive educational resources of Syracuse University and the
Syracuse community to broaden and enhance the quality of their university education.

The educational objectives of the civil engineering program are to produce graduates who:
• can apply technical knowledge and problem-solving skills to advance their careers and serve the community;
• are prepared for engineering practice and advanced studies in civil engineering;
• will engage in life-long learning to keep themselves abreast of new developments in their fields of practice or study; and
• are capable of effective written and oral communications

Our program outcomes are in line with those identified by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET . At the time of their graduation, our
students should acquire:

• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
• an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints
• an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
• an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
• an ability to communicate effectively
• an understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economical, environmental, and societal context
• a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
• a knowledge of contemporary issues
• an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Civil Engineering Description

Civil engineering is the broadest of the engineering disciplines, extending across many interrelated technical specialties. T hese technical specialties include
structures, hydraulics, geotechnical, environmental, transportation, construction, and water resources. Civil engineers plan, design, and supervise the
construction of facilities essential to modern life in both the private and the public sectors. T hese facilities vary widely in nature, size, and scope, and
include bridges, buildings, tunnels, highways, transit systems, dams, airports, irrigation projects, facilities for water, collection and treatment facilities for
wastewater, and many others.
T his program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

T he first-year curriculum emphasizes the physical and mathematical sciences and includes applications of the computer to civil engineering problems.
Additional courses in mathematics and the sciences, as well as introductory courses in civil engineering measurement, are taken during the second year. T he
last two years of the program focus on planning, design, analysis, and management in civil engineering. T he curriculum provides flexibility to allow students
to customize their academic programs and take advantage of the diversity of strength across both the college and all of Syracuse University. T he four-year
program includes coursework in the social sciences and humanities necessary for a well-rounded academic background.

By selecting electives carefully, students may specialize in any of the following areas: structural engineering, which deals with the analysis, design, and
rehabilitation of structures under static and dynamic loads; environmental engineering, which involves the purification and distribution of water in cities and
the proper disposal of sewage and industrial wastes; and geotechnical engineering, which analyzes the properties of soils and rocks that support and affect
the behavior of structures, pavements, and underground facilities; as well as to obtain minors in a variety of subject areas.

Adjustments in the program can be made to accommodate transfer students from accredited two- and four-year institutions so they may develop their
programs of study as soon after admission as possible.

Civil Engineering Curriculum

Mathematics (15)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
MAT 485 Differential Equations and Matrix Algebra for Engineers (3)

Sciences (16)
CHE 106 General Chemistry I (3)
CHE 107 General Chemistry Lab I (1)
PHY 211 General Physics I (3)
PHY 221 General Physics Laboratory I (1)
PHY 212 General Physics II (3)
PHY 222 General Physics Laboratory II (1)
Select one of the following two courses:
EAR 101 Dynamic Earth (4)
EAR 203 Earth System Science (4)
English/Social Science/Humanities (27)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
WRT 307 Advanced Writing Studio: Professional Writing (3)
Social Science/Humanities Electives (18)

Engineering (13/14)
ECS 101 Intro to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
ECS 221 Statics (3)
ECS 325 Mechanics of Solids (4)
ECS 326 Engineering Materials (3)
Select one of the following three courses:
ECS 222 Dynamics (3)
ELE 231 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I (3-4)
MAE 251 T hermodynamics (4)

Civil Engineering (41)
CIE 272 Civil and Environmental Engineering Analysis (3)
CIE 274 Civil and Environmental Systems (3)
CIE 327/MAE 341 Fluid Mechanics (4)
CIE 331 Analysis of Structures and Materials (3)
CIE 332 Design of Concrete Structures (3)
CIE 337 Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering (4)
CIE 338 Foundation Engineering (3)
CIE 341 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3)
CIE 352 Water Resources Engineering (3)
CIE 442 T reatment Processes in Environmental Engineering (4)
CIE 443 T ransportation Engineering (3)
CIE 475 Capstone Design (4)

T echnical Electives (6)
Professional Elective (3)
Free Elective (3)

Total 127/128


Civil Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.
3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 128 credits for the Civil Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.


Computer Engineering
Program Dire ctor C.Y. Roger Chen, 4-133 Center for Science and T echnology, 315-443- 4179, Fax 315-443-2583; crchen@syr.edu.

Faculty Ercument Arvas, Howard A. Blair, Stephen J. Chapin, Biao Chen, C.Y. Roger Chen, Shiu-Kai Chin, Wenliang (Kevin) Du, Ehat Ercanli, James W.
Fawcett, Prasanta Ghosh, Amrit L. Goel, Carlos R.P. Hartmann, Can Isik, Philipp Kornreich, Jay Kyoon Lee, Duane L. Marcy, Kishan G. Mehrotra,
Chilukuri K. Mohan, Jae C. Oh, Susan Older, Leonard J. Popyack Jr., James S. Royer, T apan K. Sarkar, Q. Wang Song, Pramod K. Varshney, Hong Wang

The Bache lor of Scie nce in Compute r Engine e ring (BSCE) program at Syracuse was originally established in 1969 through the former Department of
Electrical Engineering and was the second such program of its kind in the nation. T his program has been accredited by the Accreditation Board for
Engineering and T echnology (ABET ) since 1973. Currently the BSCE program is housed in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer
Science (EECS) which is a department in the College of Engineering and Computer Science (ECS).

Computer Engineering (CE) at Syracuse University has two primary foci: Computer Hardware Design: including an understanding of design methodologies
for electronic circuits, digital systems, computer architecture and integrated circuits, and Computer Software Design: including an understanding of design
methodologies for algorithms and data structures, operating systems, and a wide variety of software applications across various computer languages. In
addition to design methodologies, test and verification principles are studied, as well as performance estimation and the underlying computation theory.
T here is an excellent opportunity in laboratories to put the theory and design methods into practice by using digital components, design simulators, and
microcontrollers.

Part of the department's mission is to enable CE graduates to use computer engineering and other knowledge to solve relevant societal problems as described
by the BSCE Educational Objectives. T his is accomplished by a rigorous curriculum that prepares students to achieve the BSCE Educational Outcomes prior
to graduation and the BSCE Educational Objectives after graduation.

EDUCATIO NAL O BJECTIVES FO R THE BSCE PRO GRAM
T he educational objective of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering (BSCE) program in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer
Science (EECS) at Syracuse University is to prepare well-rounded graduates that are ready for work and ready for change.

        Well-rounded graduates of the BSCE program are known by their professional competence, innovative thinking, willingness to further enhance
        their education, ability to work individually and in diverse teams, leadership abilities, communication skills, and integrity.
        Graduates of the BSCE program who are ready for work are engaged in applying the knowledge acquired in Computer Engineering, combined with
        their problem solving abilities, to produce feasible solutions to problems, in a timely manner, which are deemed important in industry, government,
        or academia.
        Graduates of the BSCE program who are ready for change exhibit the intellectual flexibility necessary to solve new problems in innovative ways by
        integrating multiple viewpoints from several disciplines in search of the best possible solutions or applying their knowledge to different
        professional disciplines.

STUDENT O UTCO MES FO R THE BSCE PRO GRAM
In addition to successfully completing the requirements for the BSCE program which are described further on in this handbook, graduates from this program
must also achieve the following educational outcomes prior to graduation:

BSCE STUDENT O UTCO MES
(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social,
political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
(d) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
(g) an ability to communicate effectively
(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
(l) an ability to verify design correctness and evaluate performance of computing systems.

BSCE REQ UIREMENTS

Program Compone nts
T he BSCE program has four fundamental educational components: mathematics and sciences, engineering, social sciences and humanities, and general
education. A liberal number of courses have been set-aside as electives in order to allow students, with the guidance of their advisors, to customize their
education according to their personal and career objectives. A summary of required and elective credits within each component is as follows:
Math and Science Education : 34 required, 0 elective; for a total of 34 credits;
Engineering Education: 51 required, 15 elective; for a total of 66 credits;
General Education: 12 required, 9 elective; for a total of 21 credits;
Social Science and Humanities Education: 3 required, 6 elective; for a total of 9 credits.

Total Cre dits 130


A Typical Program of Study Pre se nte d by Se me ste r                                                                                          Cre dits
First Year, Fall Semester
ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering & Computer Science                                                                                              3
MAT 295 Calculus I                                                                                                                                  4
CHE 106 General Chemistry I                                                                                                                         3
CHE 107 General Chemistry II                                                                                                                        1
PHI 251 Logic                                                                                                                                       3
WRT 105 Writing Studio I                                                                                                                            3
                                                                                                                                                   17

First Year, Spring Semester
ECS 102 Introduction to Computing                                                                                                          3
MAT 296 Calculus II                                                                                                                        4
PHY 211 General Physics I                                                                                                                  3
PHY 221 General Physics Lab I                                                                                                              1
Social Science/Humanities elective                                                                                                         3
Non-Eng./Comp. Science elective                                                                                                            3
                                                                                                                                          17

Second Year, Fall Semester
CIS 275 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics                                                                                               3
CSE 283 Introduction to Object-Oriented Design                                                                                             3
MAT 397 Calculus III                                                                                                                       4
ELE 231 EE Fundamentals I                                                                                                                  3
ELE 291 EE Lab I                                                                                                                           1
PHY 212 General Physics II                                                                                                                 3
PHY 222 General Physics Lab II                                                                                                             1
                                                                                                                                          18

Second Year, Spring Semester
CSE 261 Digital Logic Design                                                                                                               3
CSE 281 Comp. Org. & Assembly Lang.                                                                                                        3

CSE 382 Algorithms and Data Structures                                                                                                     3
ELE 232 EE Fundamentals II                                                                                                                 3
ELE 292 EE Lab II                                                                                                                          1
WRT 205 Writing Studio II                                                                                                                  3
                                                                                                                                          16

Third Year, Fall Semester
                                                                                                                                           3
CSE 381 Computer Architecture
                                                                                                                                           3
CSE 397 Computer Lab I
                                                                                                                                           3
CSE 400 Systems Programming
                                                                                                                                           3
WRT 307 Professional Writing
                                                                                                                                           3
ECS 392 Ethical Aspects of ECS
                                                                                                                                           3
Social Science/Humanities elective
                                                                                                                                          18

Third Year, Spring Semester                                                                                                                4
CIS 321 Intro to Prob. and Stat.
CSE 398 Computer Lab II                                                                                                                    3
CSE 458 Data Networks: Basic Princ.                                                                                                        3
                                                                                                                                           3
CSE 471 Intro to Embedded System Design                                                                                                    3
CSE 486 Design of Operating Systems                                                                                                       16

                                                                                                                                           1
                                                                                                                                           2
Fourth Year, Fall Semester
CSE 491 Senior Design Project I                                                                                                            9
WRT 401 T ech Comm. Design Meth.                                                                                                           3
                                                                                                                                          15
T echnical electives
Non-Eng./Comp. Science Electives
                                                                                                                                           3
                                                                                                                                           1
Fourth Year, Spring Semester                                                                                                               6
CSE 492 Senior Design Project II                                                                                                           3
WRT 402 T ech Comm. Proto. & Constr.                                                                                                      13
T echnical electives
Non-Eng./Comp. Science elective                                                                                                           130


Total


 *CIS 321 can be waived if a students takes both MAT 521 and MAT 525.
**A petition is required to use CSE 400 to replace MAT 485.
***At least 3 of the 9 credits must be from the College of Arts & Sciences.

Ge ne ral Information
Note that you cannot take CIS 554 – O bje ct-O rie nte d Programming in C++, to fulfill any requirement in the Computer Engineering undergraduate
program. T his is because a considerable amount of material covered in this course overlaps with the material covered in the core course CSE 283 –
Introduction to Object-Oriented Design.

Note that CPS course s cannot be take n to fulfill any of the requirements for the Computer Engineering undergraduate program. T hese courses are
designed for non-majors in Computer Engineering or in Computer Science.

Ele ctive Course s
Technical Electives

Students fulfill 15 credits of technical electives. Out of the 15 credits, at least 6 of them must be selected from the Group A courses, which are yearly
determined by the Computer Engineering Program Committee. For example, for the year 2012-2013, the following courses are in Group A.

         CSE 400 – Special T opics in Web Application Design
         CSE 464 – Introduction to VLSI Design
         CSE 561 – Digital Machine Design

*Students graduating in May 2013 may use CSE400 to replace CIS454.

T he remaining technical electives can be selected from any CSE, CIS, or ELE courses, 300-level or above, including courses offered under special topics.
Some examples are listed below:

         ELE 331 - Digital Circuits And Systems
         ELE 333 - Analog Circuits
         ELE 346 - Semiconductor Devices
         ELE 351 - System and Signal Analysis
         CIS 352 - Programming Languages: T heory and Practice
         CIS 373 - Introduction to Automata T heory
         ELE 424 - Fundamentals of RF and Microwaves
         CIS 425 - Introduction to Computer Graphics
         ELE 431 - Analog Circuits and Systems
         CIS 453 - Software Specification and Design
         CIS 454 – Software Implementation
         CIS 467 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
         CIS 473 - Logic and Computability T heory
         CSE 482 - Principles of Software Engineering
         CIS 483 - Introduction to Computer and Network Security
         CIS 500 - Programming in Java 5.0
         CIS 543/ELE 516 - Control of Robots
         CIS 581 - Concurrent Programming
         CSE 581 - Introduction to Database Management Systems
         CSE 588 - T ranslator Design

Interdisciplinary (INT) Track:
Objective: T o allow students to have a more broad education by being able to take more courses outside of the Department of Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science (EECS).
Requirements to complete this track:

         Student must be awarded a minor or a second major in a discipline outside of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
         (EECS), excluding a minor in Mathematics;
         Student may substitute up to six credit hours of technical elective courses to fulfill this minor or second major, while still meeting the requirement
         that at least 6 credits are selected from the Group A courses.
T he Computer Engineering Program Committee will determine if a specific CSE 591 course can be used to fulfill one of the tracks.

Social Sciences and Humanities Electives

T his 6-credit requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of courses whose contents are in the social science and humanities area. A glossary of course
designations with such contents can be found in the Humanities Division and the Social Sciences Division of the College of Arts and Sciences with the
exception of the following Anthropology - Physical courses: ANT 131, 331, 431, 432, and 433. T hese glossaries are given in T he College of Arts and
Sciences section of the Undergraduate Catalog.

Non-Engineering/Computer Science Electives

T he purpose of this 9-credit requirement of non-engineering/computer science elective courses is to provide students with a broad educational experience in
a diversity of subjects. Out of the 9 credits, at least 3 credits have to be from the College or Arts and Sciences. Moreover, technical courses offered by (or
cross-listed with) the College of Engineering and Computer Science (ECS), courses with pass/fail grades, CPS courses, and 100-level courses in CHE, MAT ,
and PHY cannot be used to satisfy this requirement. IST courses will require permissions from academic advisors.

Minors
T he Computer Engineering curriculum is flexible enough to allow a student to complete minors without taking additional credits or by taking only a few
extra courses. T oday’s computer engineers work in an environment where they are expected to know not only computer hardware and software, but also
material from a collection of other subject areas-from device technology or computer science to management and how computers affect the world. T he
computer engineering curriculum responds to this need by providing students with a strong basis in the fundamentals of computer engineering coupled with
additional courses drawn from mathematics, electrical engineering and computer science. With the core courses in MAT and ELE, BSCE students normally
are no more than 9 credits away from completing a minor in Electrical Engineering (ELE) or Mathematics (MAT).

Graduation Re quire me nts
         students must complete their program of study satisfying all the course requirements described in Sections 4.2, 4.3, and 4.4;
         students cannot graduate with courses having missing grades or incompletes;
         students must have earned an average GPA of at least 2.0 (C) in all the engineering, mathematics and science courses. In addition, the overall GPA
         of all courses taken at Syracuse University must be at least 2.0 (C);
         Monitoring Student’s Progress

Advising: Each student is assigned an academic advisor. A list of advisors can be found at the board outside Room 130 in Link Hall.
He lpful Advice
If you designate a minor in your program of study and you decide not to pursue it any longer, you must drop it before graduation. Otherwise, you will not be
able to be certified for graduation because you have not fulfilled the requirements for this minor.



Computer Engineering Minor
Minor Coordinator - C.Y. Roge r Che n, 4-133 Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 315-443-4179, crche n@syr.e du


T he minor in computer engineering (18 credits) must include the following courses:
ECS 102 Introduction to Computing
CSE 261 Digital Logic Design
CSE 281 Computer Organization and Assembly Language
CSE 283 Introduction to Object-Oriented Design
CSE 381 Computer Architecture
CSE 382 Algorithms and Data Structures




Computer Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.
3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 129 credits for the Computer Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.
Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.


Computer Science
Program Dire ctor Jae C. Oh, 4-206I Center for Science and T echnology, 315-443- 4740, Fax 315-443-2583; jcoh@syr.edu.



T he mission of the computer and information science programs is to assist students to be ready for work and ready for change. T his means preparing
students to make professional contributions to computer and information science immediately upon graduation and throughout their professional careers,
and to adapt to technological and societal changes.

T he educational objective of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (BSCS) program in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer
Science (EECS) at Syracuse University are :

          T o prepare well-rounded graduates who are known by their professional competence, innovative thinking, ability to work individually and in
          diverse teams, leadership abilities, communication skills, and integrity.
          T o prepare well-rounded graduates who engage in applying the knowledge acquired in their major, combined with their problem solving abilities, to
          produce feasible solutions to problems, in a timely manner, which are deemed important in industry, government, or academia.
          T o prepare well-rounded graduates who exhibit the intellectual flexibility necessary to solve new problems in innovative ways by integrating
          multiple viewpoints from several disciplines in search of the best possible solutions.
T his program is accredited by theComputing Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

T he programs in computer science prepare professionals who will adapt to constant changes in technology and who will be leaders in developing the new
technologies of the Information Age. T he multidisciplinary nature of the curricula offers students a high degree of flexibility to design a program of study
tailored to their interests and professional aspirations.

Computer science focuses on programming, algorithms, large-scale software development, and the principles of computing that underlie these areas.
Syracuse’s program weaves together an emphasis on fundamental principles with new developments in computing, producing graduates prepared either to
begin careers or to pursue advanced studies in the field.

Graduates of the Syracuse University bachelor of science in computer science program achieve the following student outcomes:

        (a) Ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline. In particular, students should be able to apply this
        knowledge in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in modeling, design and development of software systems of
        various scales and complexity.

        (b) Ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define computing requirements appropriate to its solution.

        (c) Ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs.

        (d) Ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish common goals
        (e) Understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security, and social issues and responsibilities.

        (f) Ability to communicate effectively.

        (g) Ability to analyze the local and global impact to computing on individuals, organizations, and society.

        (h) Recognition of the need for lifelong learning and an ability to engage in the same.

        (i) Ability to use current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice.
        (j) Ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based
        systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices.
        (k) Ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity


Distribution and Core Re quire me nts

T he programs are divided into a general education section, a mathematics section, and a major section.

GENERAL EDUCATIO N SECTIO N
Completion of the general education section requires at least 51 credits of coursework, as follows. Each student is required to complete 6 credits of writing
(WRT 105, 205) and 3 credits in presentational skills by taking at least one course out of the following: CRS 225 Public Advocacy, CAS/CRS 325
Presentational Speaking, IST 444 Information Reporting and Presentation. T he student is further required to complete 12 credits of natural sciences and
engineering including PHY 211/221 (see exclusions in the Undergraduate Student Handbook). T hese 12 credits must include a two-semester sequence in a
laboratory science. T he student is required to complete an additional 15 credits in social science and humanities (SS/H) courses offered by the College of
Arts and Sciences or by the College of Visual and Performing Arts. In addition, the student is required to take PHI 251 and ECS 392 or equivalent. Finally,
each student has 9 credits of free electives. T his requirement can be satisfied by any courses except for CPS courses intended for non-majors. A list of such
courses can be obtained from the CIS program office.

MATHEMATICS SECTIO N
T he mathematics section requires at least 15 credits of math. T he student must take MAT 295, 296, either 397 or 331, and CIS 321.

MAJO R SECTIO N
T he major section consists of ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science, ECS 102 Introduction to Computing, the 33-credit computer
science core (listed below), and an 18-credit option in computer science.

Compute r Scie nce Core
CIS 252 Introduction to Computer Science
CIS 275 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
CIS 341 Computer Organization and Programming Systems

CIS342 Introduction to Systems Programming
CIS 351 Data Structures
CIS 352 Programming Languages: T heory and Practice
CIS 453 Software Specification and Design
CIS 454 Software Implementation
CIS 473 Computability T heory
CIS 477 Introduction to Analysis of Algorithms
CIS 486 Design of Operating Systems

Students are required to meet academic standards as follows: no grade below C- will satisfy the requirements for 6 credits of writing, for the mathematics
section, and for the major section. T he computer science core must be completed with a B- (2.8) average.

T he B.S. degree in computer science requires at least 123 credits, including satisfactory completion of the general education and mathematics sections;
computer science core requirements; and 18 credits, with grades of C- or better, in upper division technical electives chosen from the following listing. At
least 9 credits of the upper division technical electives must be in computer science.

Uppe r Division Te chnical Ele ctive s
Arts and Sciences
PHI 378 Minds and Machines
PHI 551 Symbolic Logic
PHI 552 Modal Logic
PHI 460/660 T opics in Logic and the Foundations of Mathematics (with approval of the CIS Program Committee)

Students may also choose any mathematics courses numbered above 400, unless specifically excluded (I.e., MAT 485 and MAT 521). Also any CIS courses
numbered above 300, unless specifically excluded. T he courses listed below are particularly recommended.

Computer and Information Science
CIS 390 Honors Seminar in Computer and Information Science
CIS 400 Selected T opics
CIS 425 Introduction to Computer Graphics
CIS 428 Introduction to Cryptography
CIS 467 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
CIS 471 Optimization Methods
CIS 478 Introduction to Quantum Computing
CIS 483 Introduction to Computer and Network Security
CIS 531 Compiler Construction
CIS/MAT 545 Finite Mathematics
CIS 543 Control of Robots
CIS 553 Software Systems Implementation
CIS 554 Object-Oriented Programming of Abstract Structures in C++
CIS 558 Data Networks: Basic Principles
CIS 565 Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks
CIS 567 Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CIS 581 Concurrent Programming
CIS 583 Systems Assurance Seminar

Students may also choose any computer engineering courses numbered above 300, unless specifically excluded. T he courses listed below are particularly
recommended.

Engineering
CSE 397 Computer Laboratory I
CSE 398 Computer Laboratory II
CSE 483 Windows Programming
CSE 561 Digital Machine Design
CSE 566 Information Display Devices and T echniques
CSE 572 Switching T heory and Sequential Machine Design
CSE 581 Introduction to Database Management Systems

Re pre se ntative Program of Study

First Year, Fall Semester (16)
ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
ECS 102 Introduction to Computing (3)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
A/SS/H* elective (3)

First Year, Spring Semester (15)
CIS 252 Introduction to Computer Science (4)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
PHI 251 Logic (3)
PHY 211/221 General Physics/General Physics Laboratory (4)

Second Year, Fall Semester (13-14)
CIS 275 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (3)
A/SS/H elective (3)
CIS 351 Data Structures (4)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4) or MAT 331 First Course in Linear Algebra (3)

Second Year, Spring Semester (17)
CIS 321 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4)
CIS 352 Programming Languages:T heory and Practice (3)
CIS 341 Introduction to Systems Programming (1)
WRT 205 Studio 2; Critical Research and Writing (3)
Free elective (3)
CIS 341 Computer Organization and Programming Systems (3)

T hird Year, Fall Semester (16)
CIS 453 Software Specification and Design (3)
CIS 477 Introduction to Analysis of Algorithms (3)
CIS 486 Software Implementation (3)
Presentation Skills Elective (3)
Science elective (4)

T hird Year, Spring Semester (16)
CIS 473 Computability T heory (3)
CIS 454 Software Implementation (3)
Upper-Division Elective (3)
A/SS/H Elective (3)
Science elective (4)

Fourth Year, Fall Semester (15)
Upper-division course (3)
Upper-division course (3)
Upper-division elective (3)
ECS 392 Ethical Aspects of Engineering and Computer Science (3)
SS/H elective (3)

Fourth Year, Spring Semester (15)
Upper-division course (3)
Upper-division course (3)
Free elective (3)
Free elective (3)
A/SS/H electives (3)

*Students wishing to preserve the option of transferring to an engineering major at the end of the first semester should take CHE 106/107 in place of SS/H
elective.

INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Students who wish to transfer into any program within the College of Engineering and Computer Science from another school or college within the
University should have a strong record of achievement and demonstrated success in key technical courses. Specifically, it is critical for the applicant to
have proven their ability to excel in college-level calculus (by completing at least one of MAT 295, 296, or 397 with a grade of B- or better) and science
(by completing at least one set of PHY 211/221 or CHE 106/107 with a grade of B- or better). Students who wish to major in computer science must also
complete CIS 252 with a grade of at least a B.

Combine d De gre e Program
Contact Jae C. Oh, Program Director, 4-206I Center for Science and T echnology, 315-443-4740, Fax 315-443-2583; jcoh@syr.edu.

B.S. AND M.S. IN CO MPUTER SCIENCE
T his combined degree program is offered for the student who wants to complete consecutively the bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science. T he
combined degree program is designed to be completed in five years, with the student taking two master’s degree courses in the senior year. Up to 6 credit
hours may be counted towards both the bachelor’s and the master’s degrees, so that the two degrees together require at least 147 credits. T he student is
normally certified for the bachelor’s degree at the end of the fourth year and for the master’s degree at the end of the fifth year.

Admission to the combined degree program, normally requested during the second semester of the junior year, is based on academic performance.

*Students are accepted for graduate study after completion of the third year of study but are not fully matriculated as graduate students until bachelor’s
degree requirements have been met. T he undergraduate degree is awarded before completion of the graduate degree. Graduate courses taken in the fourth
year of study count toward fulfillment of both undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. T he graduate courses are included in the undergraduate
tuition and appear only on the undergraduate record, and grades calculate only toward the undergraduate GPA. A block of transfer credits labeled as
“ transferred from SU undergraduate record” appears on the graduate record, if needed, and applies credit hours toward the graduate degree.

*See Online Course Catalog, Academic Rules, Degrees, T ABLE H Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs.


Computer Science Minor
Minor Coordinator - Jae O h, 4-206I Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 315-443-4740, jcoh@syr.e du.


T he minor in computer science requires the completion of 18 credits (five or six courses) in CIS courses with an overall grade point average of at least 2.5,
and with no individual course grade below C-. T hese 18 hours must include CIS 252 and CIS 351, and at least 12 credits must come from courses numbered
300 or greater. All courses must be intended for CIS majors.




Computer Science/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.
3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 124 credits for the Computer Science degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.



Combined B.S.And M.S. In Computer Science

Combined Degree Program
Contact Jae C. O h, Program Dire ctor, 4-206I Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 315-443- 4740, Fax 315-443-2583; jcoh@syr.e du.



B.S. AND M.S. IN CO MPUTER SCIENCE

T his combined degree program is offered for the student who wants to complete consecutively the bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science. T he
combined degree program is designed to be completed in five years, with the student taking two master’s degree courses in the senior year. Up to 6 credit
hours may be counted towards both the bachelor’s and the master’s degrees, so that the two degrees together require at least 147 credits. T he student is
normally certified for the bachelor’s degree at the end of the fourth year and for the master’s degree at the end of the fifth year.

Admission to the combined degree program, normally requested during the second semester of the junior year, is based on academic performance.

*Students are accepted for graduate study after completion of the third year of study but are not fully matriculated as graduate students until bachelor's
degree requirements have been met. T he undergraduate degree is awarded before completion of the graduate degree. Graduate courses taken in the fourth
year of study count toward fulfillment of both undergraduate and graduate degree requirement. T he graduate courses are included in the undergraduate tuition
and appear only on the undergraduate record, and grades calculate only toward the undergraduate GPA. A block of transfer credits labeled as "transferred
from SU undergraduate record" appears on the graduate record, if needed, and applies credit hours toward the graduate degree.

*See Online Course Catalog, Academic Rules, Degrees, T ABLE H Combined Undergraduate/Graduate Degree Programs.


Electrical Engineering
Program Dire ctor Prasanta K. Ghosh, 4-131 Center for Science and T echnology, 315-443-4440, Fax: 315-443-2583; pkghosh@syr.edu.

Faculty Ercument Arvas, Howard A. Blair, Stephen J. Chapin, Biao Chen, C.Y. Roger Chen, Shiu-Kai Chin, Wenliang (Kevin) Du, Ehat Ercanli, James W.
Fawcett, Prasanta Ghosh, Amrit L. Goel, Carlos R.P. Hartmann, Can Isik, Philipp Kornreich, Jay Kyoon Lee, Duane L. Marcy, Kishan G. Mehrotra,
Chilukuri K. Mohan, Ruixin Niu, Jae C. Oh, Susan Older, Lisa Osadciw, Daniel J. Pease, Leonard J. Popyack Jr., James S. Royer, T apan K. Sarkar, Q. Wang
Song, Pramod K. Varshney, Hong Wang

BACHELO R O F SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

T he mission of the electrical engineering program is to promote learning in electrical engineering through integrated activities in teaching, research,
scholarship, creative accomplishments, and service.

T he educational objective of the bachelor of science in electrical engineering (BSEE) program in the Department of EECS at Syracuse University is to
prepare well-rounded graduates that are ready for work and ready for change.

• Well-rounded graduates of the BSEE program are known by their professional competence, innovative thinking, ability to work individually and in diverse
teams, leadership abilities, communication skills, and integrity.
• Graduates of the BSEE program who are ready for work are engaged in applying the knowledge acquired in their major, combined with their problem
solving abilities, to produce feasible solutions to problems, in a timely manner, which are deemed important in industry, government, or academia.
• Graduates of the BSEE program who are ready for change exhibit the intellectual flexibility necessary to solve new problems in innovative ways by
integrating multiple viewpoints from several disciplines in search of the best possible solutions, or applying their knowledge to different professional
disciplines.

Electrical engineering is based on scientific principles governing the motion of charged particles through conductors, semiconductors, or even a vacuum.
T hese phenomena can be harnessed in a variety of applications such as in the treatment of disease, optical, satellite, and computer communications,
control of robots, radio and television broadcasting, and development of microelectronics for computers and analog circuits.
T his program is accredited by theEngineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

Engineering design is taught in each of the four years of the electrical?engineering program. Beginning with ECS 101 in the first year, students are required
to formulate solutions to a variety of open-ended laboratory projects. As the students progress through their sophomore and junior years, the projects
increase in complexity requiring additional creativity and knowledge. Finally, in the senior year the students are required to complete a major design project
that builds upon their mastery of the fundamental concepts of mathematics, basic sciences, the humanities and social sciences, engineering topics, and
communication skills.
In addition to successfully completing the requirements for the bachelor of science in electrical engineering, graduates from this program must also achieve
the following student outcomes:

• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and science.
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data.
• an ability to design systems to meet specifications.
• an ability to function independently and on teams.
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering and scientific problems.
• an understanding of professional, ethical, and safety considerations.
• an ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing.
• an understanding of the role of science and engineering in society.
• a recognition of the necessity of lifelong learning.
• an understanding of contemporary issues through a broad liberal arts education.
• an ability to use the modern tools necessary for professional practice.
• an ability to think critically as evidenced by skills in interpretation, analysis, evaluation, and inference.

Program Compone nts
T he electrical engineering program has four fundamental components: mathematics and sciences, engineering, social sciences and humanities, and general
education. Within each component, a number of courses have been set aside as electives in order to allow students, with the guidance of their advisors, to
customize their education according to personal and career objectives. A summary of required and elective credits within each component follows:


Mathematics and Science 30 required, 3 elective, 33 total credits;
Engineering 51 required, 12 elective, 63 total credits;
Social Science and Humanities 3 required, 9 elective, 12 total credits;
General Education 12 required, 6 elective, 18 total credits;
Free 6 elective, 6 total credits;
Overall 84 required, 48 elective, 132 total credits.


Tracks (Te chnical Ele ctive s)
T racks are intended to provide a cohesive set of technical electives for electrical engineering students. A track usually consists of a group of four courses
(12 credits). In the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, there are three tracks in electrical engineering.

Communications Track
ELE 351 System and Signal Analysis (3)
ELE 352 Digital Signal Processing (3)
and two of the following:
ELE 551 Communication Systems (3)
ELE 458 Data Networks: Basic Principles (3)
ELE 591 Special T opics in Electrical Engineering (3)


Ele ctromagne tics Track
ELE324 Electromagnetics I (3)
*ELE 325 Electromagnetics II (3)
and two of the following:

ELE 424 Fundamentals of Radio Frequencies and Microwaves (3)
ELE 425 Microwave Engineering (3)
ELE 524 Introduction to Applied Optics (3)
ELE 525 Electromagnetic Compatibility (3)


VLSI Track
ELE 331 Digital Circuits and Systems (3)
*ELE 346 Semiconductor Devices (3)
two technical electives:

ELE 464 Introduction to VLSI Design (3)
ELE 541 Integrated Circuits (3)


*Students who choose to complete a technical ECS minor may replace these courses (ELE 346, ELE 325) with technical electives.

Ele ctive Course s
In order to maximize the flexibility of the Electrical Engineering curriculum while maintaining its structure, electives have been divided into the following
categories:

Technical Electives
T racks of specialization (listed below) and minors are (typically) used to regulate technical electives. Students must take 36 required course credits, and 18
technical elective credits.

Among the technical electives, each student must choose at least two from ELE 312 (Control Systems, ELE 352 (Digital Signal Processing), and ELE 424
(Fund. of RF and Microwaves).

Each student must satisfy the requirements of a T rack by taking at least one of the sets of technical electives listed below:
     1. Communications T rack: ELE 352, and two from {ELE 458, 551, 591}
     2. Electromagnetics T rack: T wo from {ELE 424, 425, 524, 525}
     3. VLSI T rack: ELE 464, 541.

Mathe matics and Scie nce s Ele ctive
T he 3-credit elective may be fulfilled by any mathematics course with a calculus prerequisite, any physics course with a calculus-based physics prerequisite,
or any college-level course in other science departments. By taking an appropriate math course, EE students can use this elective to complete a minor in
mathematics.

Social Scie nce s and Humanitie s Ele ctive s
T his 9-credit requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of courses listed in the social sciences division or humanities division of the College of Arts
and Sciences. A glossary of course designations with such contents can be found in the Humanities Division and the Social Sciences Division of the College
of Arts and Sciences. Courses outside of this scope require prior approval from the academic advisors and Program Director.

Ge ne ral Education Ele ctive s
T his 6-credit requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of courses that do not have technical engineering, computer science, mathematics and
natural science content. T hese courses, either by themselves or in combination with social sciences and humanities electives and free electives, present a
very attractive opportunity to complete one of the non-technical minors offered in the University.

Fre e Ele ctive s
T his 6-credit requirement may be fulfilled by any combination of college-level courses, for example, to help fulfill the requirements of a technical or a non-
technical minor.

Program of Study

First Year, Fall Semester (17)
ECS 101 Introduction to ECS I (3)
CHE 106 Chemistry I (3)
CHE 107 Chemistry Lab I (1)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
SS/H elective (3)

First Year, Spring Semester (17)
ECS 102 Introduction to ECS II (3)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
PHY 211 Physics I (3)
PHY 221 Physics Lab I (1)
SS/H elective (3)
Non-technical elective (3)

Second Year, Fall Semester (15)
PHY 212 Physics II (3)
PHY 222 Physics II Lab (1)
ELE 231 EE Fundamentals I (3)
ELE 291 EE Lab I (1)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
SS/H elective (3)

Second Year, Spring Semester (16)
MAT 485 Differential Equations and Matrix Algebra (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
ELE 232 EE Fundamentals II (3)
ELE 292 EE Lab II (1)
*ELE 346 Semiconductor Devices (3)
CSE 261 Digital Logic Design (3)
Third Year, Fall Semester (18)
ELE 331 Digital Circuits (3)
ELE 391 Digital Circuits Lab (3)
ELE 351 System and Signal Analysis (3)
ELE 324 Electromagnetics I (3)
†MAT 521 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)
WRT 307 Advanced Writing Studio: Professional Writing (3)

Third Year, Spring Semester (18)
ELE 333 Analog Circuits (3)
*ELE 325 Electromagnetics II (3)
ELE 392 Analog Circuits Lab (3)
Free elective (3)
Select two of the following three courses:
ELE 352 Digital Signal Processing (3)
*ELE 312 Control Systems (3)
ELE 424 Fundamentals of Radio Frequencies and Microwaves (3)

Fourth Year, Fall Semester (15)
WRT 407 Advanced Workshop in Professional, T echnical, (3)
or Disciplinary Writing
ELE 491 Senior Design Project (2)
T echnical elective (6)
ECS 392 Ethical Aspects of ECS (3)
Fourth Year, Spring Semester (16)
ELE 492 Senior Design Project II (2)
T echnical elective (6)
Math/Science elective (3)
Non-technical elective (3)
Free elective (3)

Total 132

*T hese courses may be replaced with technical electives by students who choose to complete an ECS technical minor.

†CIS 321 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4 credits) can be substituted if a student does not want a mathematics minor.

MINO RS
T he electrical engineering curriculum is flexible enough to allow a student to complete up to three minors. T oday’s engineers work in an environment
where they are expected to know not only their specialty areas, but also a collection of other subject areas–from computers to finance. T he EE curriculum
responds to this need by providing students with a strong basis in the fundamentals of electrical engineering, coupled with an opportunity to broaden the
scope of their education. An electrical engineering student may complete one or all of the following types of minors within the normal limits of the
curriculum.

Engine e ring and compute r scie nce minor
A student who wishes to complete a technical minor offered by the college has up to 27 credits of electives distributed from the second year through the
fourth year. T welve of those credits are labeled as technical electives in the following curriculum. Nine of them are credits from the three courses marked by
an asterisk, ELE 346, 325, and 312, which are not required for students who choose to complete an ECS technical minor. T he remaining 6 credits are from
free electives.

Non-te chnical minor
A student who would like to complete a non-technical minor has 9 credits of social sciences and humanities electives and 6 credits of free electives in
addition to 9 credits of general education electives, which can be used toward any one of more than 70 minors offered at Syracuse University.

Minor in mathe matics
Electrical engineering curriculum requires students to take 18 credits of courses from the mathematics department. With the 3-credit mathematics and
sciences elective course also taken appropriately from that department, a minor in mathematics can be earned.


Electrical Engineering Minor
Minor Coordinator - Prasanta K. Ghosh, 4-131 Ce nte r for Scie nce and Te chnology, 351-443-4440, pkghosh@syr.e du.

Acade mic Re quire me nts
T he minor in electrical engineering (EE) (20 credits) is available to any Syracuse University student who has the appropriate prerequisites such as calculus
and calculus-based physics. Students must complete 8 credits of required sophomore courses shown below and 12 credits of junior- or senior-level elective
courses offered by the electrical engineering program. Students may choose the elective courses to give them a breadth of coverage or complete a track* in
a specific concentration area as described in the catalog.

ELE 231 EE Fundamentals I (3)
ELE 291 EE Lab I (1)
ELE 232 EE Fundamentals II (3)
ELE 292 EE Lab II (1)
ELE EE Junior or senior courses (12)
T otal 20

*T racks are intended to provide a cohesive set of technical electives for EE students. A track consists of a sequence of two senior-level elective courses and
their appropriate prerequisites. T he current examples of tracks in EE are all 12 credits. More information can be found in the EE curriculum description.



Electrical Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.
3+2 program requirements:
Students will complete 132 credits for the Electrical Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.



Energy Systems Minor
Minor Coordinator - Fre de rick Carranti, 247 Link Hall, 315-443-4346, carranti@syr.e du.

T his minor will provide students enrolled in any of the engineering programs within the LC Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science with a
grouping of courses/electives that will provide academic depth in the field of energy related systems in four different but related tracks. T hese four tracks
are: (1) T hermo-Mechanical Energy Systems T rack; (2) Nuclear Energy; (3) Renewable Energy T rack and (4) Electric Power T rack.

Admission to the energy systems minor is by permission of an academic advisor and requires students to be enrolled in a BS program in Engineering within
the LC Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science. Students with sufficient technical background from other Syracuse University Academic Units
may be considered for admission to the Minor in Energy Systems and such decisions will be made by the LC Smith Energy Systems Committee.

T he following courses must be taken by all students within the minor regardless of the specific track.

ECN 203, Economic Ideas and Issues
MAE 251 or CEN 252, T heromodynamics
MAE/CIE 548 Engineering Economics and T ech Valuation
MAE 551/CIE 551, Energy Conversion



       1. The rmo-Me chanical Ene rgy Syste ms Track
         Select any 2 of MAE 553, MAE 554, MAE 585, MAE 457, plus 1 Elective from any of the 4                      Energy Systems T racks:

          Elective MAE 553 HVAC Systems Design and Analysis
          Elective MAE 554 Principles of Refrigeration
          Elective MAE 585 Principles of T urbomachinary
          Elective MAE 457: Automotive Engineering
          Others to be announced

2.      Nucle ar Ene rgy Track

        Required NUC 201, Introduction to Nuclear Engineering and Reactor Safety

        Select either NUC 510 or NUC 520, plus 1 of the remaining NUC Electives, or 1
        Elective from any other Energy Systems T rack:

          Elective NUC 510. Nuclear Power Plant Design, Operation and Safety
          Elective NUC 520. Radiochemistry, Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing and Nonproliferation
          Elective NUC/ELE 530. Electric Power Generation and Distribution
          Elective NUC 540. Experiential Studies
          Others to be announced

 3.     Re ne wable Ene rgy Track

       Select any 2 of MAE 588, PHY 305, CEN 551, MAE 5xx (Principles of Fuel Cells), plus 1
       Elective from any of the 4 Energy Systems T racks:

          Elective MAE 588 Principles of Wind T urbines (offered Fall of 2010 as MAE 500)
          Elective PHY 305 Solar Energy and Architectures
          Elective CEN 551 Biochemical Engineering (Professor Ren will cover some biofuels)
          Elective MAE 5xx Principles of Fuel Cells
          Others to be announced (examples may include; relevant ESF courses, CIE may offer a class in Environmental Aspects of Energy Production)

4.      Ele ctric Powe r Track

       Select any 3 electives from the following list:

           Elective ELE 324 Electromagnetics I
           Elective ELE 416 Electromechanical Devices
           Elective ELE 514 Electric Power Systems
           Elective NUC/ELE 530 Electric Power Generation and Distribution
           Others to be announced


Engineering & Computer Science Management
Minor Coordinator Engineering - Fre de rick Carranti, 247 Link Hall, 315-443-4346, carranti@syr.e du.
Minor Coordinator Management - Dawn Kline , 215 Whitman School of Manage me nt, 315-443-4356, dkline @syr.e du.
T his minor is designed to provide LCS students with a relevant non-technical minor. It is open to all SU students with approval of their home college. T he
requirements are

ECS 391 Legal aspects of LCS
ECS 392 Ethical Aspects of LCS

Two upper-level management courses selected from the following:
EEE 370 Introduction to Entrepreneurship
EEE 382 Entrepreneurial Marketing
EEE 451 Finance for Emerging Enterprises
FIN 301 Finance for Non-Business Students
LPP 458 Environmental Law and Public Policy
SHR 355 Introduction to Human Resource Management

Two courses selected from the following:
ACC 201 Introduction to Accounting for Non-Management Students
ECN 203 Economic Ideas and Issues
MAR 301 Marketing for Non-Management Students
SHR 247 Strategy and Leadership



Environmental Engineering
Department Chair and Program Director: Chris E. Johnson, 151 Link Hall, 315-443-2311.

Full-time Faculty: Riyad S. Aboutaha, Shobha K. Bhatia, Douglas Call, David G. Chandler, Samuel P. Clemence, Andria Costello Staniec, Joan V.
Dannenhoffer, Cliff I. Davidson, Charles T . Driscoll Jr., Chris E. Johnson, Eric M. Lui, Dawit Negussey, O. Sam Salem, Laura J. Steinberg

The mission of the civil and environmental engineering department is to promote learning and the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge in
civil and environmental engineering through integration of teaching, scholarship, and service.

The goal of the civil and environmental engineering department is to prepare students for engineering practice, advanced study, and lifelong learning in
civil and environmental engineering. Graduates are expected to be proficient in the fundamentals of engineering analysis and design and to understand the
importance and methods of effective communication. Students are encouraged to use the extensive educational resources of Syracuse University and the
Syracuse community to broaden and enhance the quality of their university education.

The educational objectives of the environmental engineering program are to produce graduates who:
• can apply technical knowledge and problem-solving skills to advance their careers and serve the community;
• are prepared for engineering practice and advanced studies in environmental engineering;
• will engage in life-long learning to keep themselves abreast of new developments in their fields of practice or study; and
• are capable of effective written and oral communications.

Our program outcomes are in line with those identified by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET . At the time of their graduation, our
students should acquire:

• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
• an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints
• an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
• an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
• an ability to communicate effectively
• the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
• a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
• a knowledge of contemporary issues
• an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Environmental Engineering Description

T he B.S. degree program in environmental engineering emphasizes the application of engineering science to the preservation and management of the
environment. It provides a strong background in the basic and engineering sciences and a variety of courses in several environmental areas, including water
and wastewater treatment, solid and hazardous waste management, air pollution control, transport and fate of pollutants, and environmental chemistry and
microbiology. T he program allows students to pursue a series of elective courses suited to individual interests and goals, as well as to obtain minors in a
variety of subject areas.
T his program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

Adjustments in the program can be made to accommodate transfer students from accredited two- and four-year institutions so they may develop their
programs of study as soon after admission as possible.

Environmental Engineering Curriculum
Mathematics (15) Credits
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
MAT 485 Differential Equations and Matrix Algebra (3)
Sciences (20)
CHE 106 General Chemistry I (3)
CHE 107 General Chemistry Lab I (1)
CHE 116 General Chemistry II (3)
CHE 117 General Chemistry Lab II (1)
PHY 211 General Physics I (3)
PHY 221 General Physics Lab I (1)
EAR 203 Earth System Science (4)
GEO 383 Geographic Information System (4)

English/Social Science/Humanities (24)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
Social Science/Humanities Electives (18)

Engineering (16/17)
ECS101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
ECS 221 Statics (3)
ECS 325 Mechanics of Solids (4)
GNE 461 Air Pollution Engineering (3)
Select one of the following five courses:
ECS 222 Dynamics (3)
ECS 326 Engineering Materials (3)
ELE 231 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I (3-4)
MAE 251 T hermodynamics (4)
CHE 346 Physical Chemistry (3)

Environmental Engineering (41)
CIE 272 Civil and Environmental Engineering Measurements (3)
CIE 274 Civil and Environmental Engineering Systems (3)
CIE 327/MAE 341 Fluid Mechanics (4)
CIE 337 Introduction to Geotechnical Engineering (4)
CIE 341 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3)
CIE 352 Water Resources Engineering (4)
CIE 442 T reatment Processes in Environmental Engineering (4)
CIE 471 Environmental Chemistry and Analysis (3)
CIE 472 Applied Environmental Microbiology (3)
CIE 475 Capstone Design (4)

T echnical Electives (6)
Professional Electives (9)
Free electives (3)

Total 128/129




Environmental Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.

3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 129 credits for the Environmental Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.
Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.



Mechanical Engineering
Department Chair: Achille Messac, 263 Link Hall, 315-443-2341; fax: 315-443-9099

Program Director: Utpal Roy, 263 Link Hall, uroy@syr.edu

Faculty Jeongmin Ahn, Edward A. Bogucz Jr., Frederick J. Carranti, T hong Dang, John F. Dannenhoffer, Barry D. Davidson, Mark N. Glauser, H. Ezzat
Khalifa, Alan J. Levy, Jacques Lewalle, Achille Messac, Young Bai Moon, Vadrevu R. Murthy, Utpal Roy, Jianshun S. Zhang

T he mission of the mechanical engineering program at Syracuse University is to educate and promote learning and discovery in mechanical engineering and
to prepare students for careers of technical excellence, professional growth, and leadership in a complex and competitive technological environment.

T he educational objectives of the mechanical engineering curriculum are to enable graduates of the program to do the following:


        apply the physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences to professional practice or to advanced study in aerospace (mechanical) engineering or
        related fields;
        be cognizant of societal context and ethical responsibility in professional practice;
        function productively on teams and communicate ideas to both technical and non-technical audiences; and
        be agile, innovative, and adaptable in an increasingly diverse and global environment

In order to meet the demands of new and existing high-tech industries, we prepare our students by providing opportunities to gain marketable and relevant
skills that can lead to success in a wide range of careers. T he distinctive signature of undergraduate mechanical and aerospace engineering at Syracuse
University is its strong technical core coupled with the ability to fit either a technical or a non-technical minor into the curricula. Students explore the
breadth of Syracuse University by complementing their mechanical or aerospace engineering degree with a minor in business, public policy, fine arts, public
communications, and many more.

Mechanical engineering is a broad discipline concerned with the design and analysis of systems that produce or modify motion, force, and energy into forms
useful to people. Mechanical engineers are employed throughout the complete spectrum of industries, including automotive, industrial machinery, publishing
and printing, electrical and thermal power, chemical processing, textile, petroleum, computer and electronic, pharmaceutical, apparel, consumer products,
soap and cosmetics, paper and wood products, rubber, and glass.

Driven by the breadth of career paths open to mechanical engineering graduates, the B.S. program in mechanical engineering (MEE) is structured to provide
a firm educational foundation in the physical, mathematical, and engineering principles and design practices relevant to mechanical and thermal systems.
T he program is designed to prepare graduates for either immediate employment or for continuing studies at the graduate level.

Requirements for the B.S. MEE program appear below. For the first five semesters the recommended sequence of courses for the B.S. MEE program is
identical to the recommended program for the degree B.S. in aerospace engineering (AEE), which demonstrates the similarity and complementary nature of
the two disciplines. Courses carrying the prefix MAE indicate that class material and assignments are drawn from both aerospace and mechanical
engineering applications.

Beginning in the sixth semester students who follow the B.S. MEE program begin to take courses addressing engineering topics unique to mechanical
engineering, including machine design and manufacturing and heat transfer. T he last three semesters of the MEE program also include courses of more broad
applications, including dynamics of mechanical systems and linear control systems.

Experience with open-ended design problems is obtained in a sequence of courses that span the entire curriculum. T he sequence begins with introductory
design experiences in the first-year courses ECS 101 and MAE 184.

Upper-division courses involving design include courses in machine design and manufacturing, and senior capstone design. T he two-semester capstone design
experience (MEE 471,472) requires students to integrate knowledge from all areas in the design of a complete product or system.

T he B.S. MEE curriculum allows for programs of study that can be tailored by students to take advantage of the diversity of strengths across both ECS and
all of Syracuse University. We provide engineering students with opportunities to complete minors in areas that can complement technical knowledge–such
as international affairs, business, and public policy–thus enhancing the value and attractiveness of a Syracuse engineering education. Students can also elect
to pursue a technical minor or take a distribution of electives, which will include liberal arts classes, free electives, and additional depth in mechanical
engineering. T here are a total of 24 elective credits in the B.S. MEE program, at least 3 of which must be chosen from the social sciences or humanities
(SS/H). T he remaining 21 credits allow program customization for each student, and can be distributed in any of three different ways:

(1) completion of a non-technical University minor and 3 additional free credits;
(2) 18 credits toward a technical minor and 3 credits of SS/H;
(3) a distribution of electives:
    a. at least 6 credits of SS/H
    b. at least 9 credits of technical electives
    c. at least 6 credits of free electives

MEE students usually select technical electives from courses offered by the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE); a list of
recommended courses is below.

Students are strongly encouraged to develop a plan for selections of their electives during their first year. T he planning process should include discussions
with the student’s academic advisor, other faculty members, and peer advisers. T he MAE department offers most undergraduate technical elective courses
on a two-year cycle. As a result, it may be necessary for a student to modify the sequence of courses recommended below to accommodate a technical
elective course of personal interest.

In addition to successfully completing the requirements for the mechanical engineering program, graduates from this program must also achieve the
following student outcomes:
• an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
• an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
• an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs including both thermal and mechanical systems
• an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
• an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
• an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
• an ability to communicate effectively
• the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
• a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
• a knowledge of contemporary issues
• an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering practice
• a familiarity with statistics and linear algebra and the ability to apply advanced mathematics through multivariate calculus and differential equations


T his program is accredited by theEngineering Accreditation Commission of ABET , http://www.abet.org.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING REQ UIREMENTS

First Year, Fall Semester (17)
ECS 101 Introduction to Engineering and Computer Science (3)
MAT 295 Calculus I (4)
CHE 106 General Chemistry Lecture I (3)
CHE 107 General Chemistry Lab I (1)
WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing (3)
ECN 203 Economic Ideas/Issues (3)

First Year, Spring Semester (17)
MAE 184 Engineering Graphics and Computer-Aided Design (3)
ECS 104 Engineering Computing T ools (3)
MAT 296 Calculus II (4)
PHY 211 General Physics I (3)
PHY 221 General Physics Lab I (1)
Elective #1 (3)

Second Year, Fall Semester (17)
ECS 221 Statics (3)
MAT 331 Linear Algebra (3)
MAT 397 Calculus III (4)
PHY 212 General Physics II (3)
PHY 222 General Physics Lab II (1)
Elective #2 (3)

Second Year, Spring Semester (17)
MAE 251 T hermodynamics (4)
ECS 222 Dynamics (3)
ECS 325 Mechanics of Solids (4)
MAT 514 Introduction to Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
MFE 331 Manufacturing Processes (3)

T hird Year, Fall Semester (17)
MAE 315 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Lab I (3)
MAE 341 Fluid Mechanics (4)
ECS 326 Engineering Materials, Properties, and Processing (3)
ELE 231 Electrical Engineering Fundamentals I (3)
ELE 291 Electrical Engineering Laboratory I (1)
Elective #3 (3)

T hird Year, Spring Semester (17)
MEE 332 Introduction to Machine Design and Manufacturing (4)
MAE 355 Heat T ransfer (4)
MAE 321 Dynamics of Mechanical Systems (3)
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing (3)
Elective #4 (3)

Fourth Year, Fall Semester (13)
MEE 471 Synthesis of Mechanical Systems I (3)
MEE 416 Mechanical Engineering Lab (1)
MAT 521 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)
Elective #5 (3)
Elective #6 (3)

Fourth Year, Spring Semester (13)
MEE 472 Synthesis of Mechanical Systems II (4)
ELE 312 Linear Control Systems (3)
Elective #7 (3)
Elective #8 (3)

Total 128
Re comme nde d Te chnical Ele ctive s
AEE 342 Aerodynamics
AEE 427 Aircraft Performance & Dynamics
AEE 446 Propulsion
MAE 457 Automotive Engineering
MAE 536 Composite Materials
MAE 548 Engineering Economics/T ech Valuation
MAE 551 Energy Conversion
MAE 571 Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics
MEE 470 Experience Credit
MEE 475 Special Design Project
MAE 490 Independent Study
MEE 490 Independent Study
MEE 571 Computer-Aided Design
MAE 585 Principles of T urbomachines
MAE 588 Principles of Wind T urbines
ECS 526 Statistics for Engineers



Mechanical Engineering/Business Administration (3-2 Program)
Contact - Josh LaFave, Director of Recruiting and Graduate Distance Education, Whitman School of Management Suite 315, 315-443-3497,
jjlafave@syr.edu
Can Isik, Associate Dean, LC Smith College of Engineering & Computer Science, 223 E Link Hall, 315-443-3604, cisik@syr.edu

Program De scription - T he joint B.S. Engineering/MBA program is designed to provide high-caliber students at Syracuse University with the opportunity
to complete a bachelor's degree in the L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science and an MBA degree in the Whitman School of Management
in five years with minimal additional expense and time.

Accre ditation - T he Whitman School has been accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) since
1920.

Admission - Students in the Engineering school will apply for the MBA program during their sophomore year. Students are required to take the GMAT as
part of the application process. Applicants will be considered for the program based on their GMAT score, previous academic experience, work experience,
professional references, and personal statements.

De gre e Re quire me nts - Students admitted to the MBA program will be awarded their B.S. in engineering degree concurrently with their MBA degree, as
they will complete their B.S. and MBA requirements during their fifth year.
3+2 program requirements:

Students will complete 128 credits for the Mechanical Engineering degree and an additional 54 credits for the MBA degree.

Year   1 & 2: Enrollment in required undergraduate coursework
Year   3: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA coursework, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   4: Enrollment in some MBA courses and summer MBA internship, continued progress in undergraduate coursework
Year   5: Completion of BS and MBA coursework

Transfe r Cre dit - Students can transfer a maximum of 6 credits of elective coursework for the MBA degree. T he credits must be graduate level taken from
an AACSB accredited business school. A grade of “ B” or higher is needed to transfer in the credits. T he grade itself does not transfer.

Satisfactory Progre ss - Students are required to maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher to meet degree requirements for the MBA.


Systems And Information Science
Program Dire ctors
Robert J. Irwin, 4-206L-A Center for Science and T echnology, 315-443- 4400, Fax 315-443-2583, rjirwin@syr.edu

David Dischiave, 225 Hinds Hall, 315-443-4681, ddischia@syr.edu

What is Syste ms and Information Scie nce ?
In essence, students in the SIS program learn what they can do with computers and how best to do it. As the name implies, the focus is on information and
how it can be stored, manipulated and retrieved. Implementation of large-scale software systems and working with a group of people in achieving such goals
are emphasized in the SIS program.

SIS at Syracuse Unive rsity
In the SIS program, students learn information systems technology in broad application contexts, where issues at the confluence of information science,
technology, and management are the primary concerns. T he SIS major is oriented toward students interested in the design of new software systems for
business and consumer needs. Strong technical preparation in computer science fundamentals is given, but with a concentration on systems development
rather than mathematical issues of computability or computational complexity. T he program aims to develop a combination of technical and team
management skills in its students.

Program De scription
T he SIS program requires a total of 120 credits, as follows:
30 credits SIS Core
24 credits SIS Specializations
12 credits Mathematical Foundations
9 credits Communication Skills
39 credits Arts & Sciences
6 credits Free Electives

In the descriptions that follow, all courses are three credits unless otherwise indicated.

SIS Core
T he SIS Core (30 credits) consists of a Freshman Forum, the Information Management Core, and the Computing Core.

Freshman Forum: 1 credit

Information Management Core: 9 credits
IST 335 Introduction to Information-Based Organizations IST 352 Information Analysis of Organizational Systems IST 445 Managing Information
Systems Projects

Computing Core: 20 credits
ECS 102 Introduction to Computing
CIS 252 Introduction to Computer Science (4 cr) CIS 351 Data Structures (4 cr)
CIS/CSE 386 Principles of Computer System Design
CIS 453 Software Specification and Design
CIS 454 Software Implementation

SIS Spe cializ ations
All SIS students must complete both a T echnical Specialization (6 credits) and a Focus Area (18 credits).
T he T echnical Specialization requires a two-course sequence in one of several applied-technology areas: Artificial Intelligence, Database Management,
Networking, Security Management, Systems, and Web Design and Management.
T he Focus Area requires 18 credits in a specific domain, which represents a potential area for the appli- cation of a student’s informating management and
computing skills.

Students may not count the same course towards both their T echnical Specialization and their Focus Area.
For details of the T echnical Specialization and the Focus Areas, please consult the SIS Program Directors.

Mathe matical Foundations
T he Mathematical Foundations (12 credits) comprises four courses:
MAT 194 Precalculus
PHI 251 Logic
CIS 275 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
CIS 223 Statistical Reasoning and Practice

Communication Skills
T he Communication Skills (9 credits) requirement provides both writing and presentation experience:

WRT 105 Studio 1: Practices of Academic Writing
WRT 205 Studio 2: Critical Research and Writing

and one of the following:
CRS 325 Presentational Speaking
IST 444 Information Reporting and Presentation

Arts & Scie nce s
Students must take 39 credits of courses from the College of Arts & Sciences and/or the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Specifically, these credits
must be distributed as follows:

6 credits Humanities
6 credits Social Sciences
6 credits Natural Sciences & Mathematics
21 credits any courses from the above A&S divisions or VPA

Notes:
1. NYS Department of Education requires half of the credits for a B.S. degree to be in the liberal arts and sciences. T hese 39 credits—combined with the
Communication Skills and Mathematical Foundations— provide the necessary 60 credits.

2. A student’s Focus Area (e.g., a minor in history) may contain courses that satisfy the NYS requirement for liberal-arts content. In such a case, the
remaining credits become free electives.

Fre e Ele ctive s
A student has 6 credits of free electives. Any course in the University can be used to satisfy this requirement.

Sample Four-Ye ar Course Flow
T he following shows a fairly typical SIS undergraduate program for a student who arrives with no transfer credits. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise
indicated.


                                                         Fall                                        Spring
             First Ye ar                          Freshman Forum (1)                               CIS 252 (4)
                                                       ECS 102                                      PHI 251
                                                       MAT 194                                    A&S Elective
                                                       WRT 105                                    A&S Elective
                                                     A&S Elective                                 A&S elective
                                                        13 credits                                  16 credits



            Se cond Ye ar                               CIS 275                                      CIS 223
                                                      CIS 351 (4)                                   WRT 205
                                                        IST 335                                      IST 352
                                                      A&S elective                              T ech Spec course
                                                      free elective                               A&S elective
                                                       16 credits                                   15 credits



             Third Ye ar                                CIS 386                                 IST 444/CRS 325
                                                        IST 445                                 Focus Area course
                                                   T ech Spec course                            Focus Area course
                                                   Focus Area course                              A&S elective
                                                     A&S elective                                 A&S elective
                                                       15 credits                                   15 credits



            Fourth Ye ar                               CIS 453                                      CIS 454
                                                   Focus Area course                            Focus Area course
                                                   Focus Area course                              A&S elective
                                                     A&S elective                                 A&S elective
                                                     A&S elective                                 Free elective
                                                      15 credits                                   15 credits
Courses
                                                    AEE 471 De sgn/Anlys Ae rosp Strctr 4 Y
Aerospace Engineering                               Structural configuration of modern aircraft and    Bioengineering
                                                    spacecraft. Vehicle design requirements.
AEE 270 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S                  Symmetric and unsymmetric beams. Single and        BEN 205 Bioe ngine e ring Se minar 1 Y
Participation in a discipline- or subject-related   multicell thin-walled tubes. Skin-stringer         Lecture series with speakers representing wide
experience. Students must be evaluated by           construction. Shear flow. Shear lag. Ring,         range of bioengineering topics. Introduces
written or oral reports, or an examination.         frame, and fuselage analysis. Finite element       students to breadth of activity in
Limited to those in good academic standing. R       analysis. Design projects.                         bioengineering.
                                                    PREREQ: ECS 325.
AEE 290 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                                                                     BEN 212 Expe rime ntal Me thods in
In-depth exploration of a problem or                AEE 472 Synth of Ae rosp Syste ms 4 Y              Che mical Engine e ring and
problems. Individual independent study upon a       Design of a subsonic, supersonic, or VT OL         Bioe ngine e ring 3 Y
plan submitted by the student. Admission by         aircraft; a missile system; or a spacecraft to     Crosslisted with: CEN 212
consent of supervising instructor or instructors    meet specified performance and cost criteria.      Statistical analysis and presentation of
and the department. R                               Oral and written preliminary and final reports.    experimental data. Parameter estimation.
                                                    PREREQ: AEE 427, AEE 446, AEE 471.                 Design of experiments. Hardware and software
AEE 342 Ae rodynamics 4 Y                                                                              for computer interfacing. Collection, analysis,
Vorticity, circulation, potential flow and          AEE 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                 and reporting of laboratory data.
superposition of flows. Lift, drag, moments of      In-depth exploration of a problem or               PREREQ: MAT 296 AND ECS 104..
two- and three-dimensional wings. T hin airfoil     problems. Individual independent study upon a
theories. Panel methods. Lifting-line theory.       plan submitted by the student. Admission by        BEN 231 Mass and Ene rgy Balance s 3 Y
Flow separation and stall. Viscous drag             consent of supervising instructor or instructors   Crosslisted with: CEN 231
reduction.                                          and the department. R                              Material balances for single units and
PREREQ: MAE 341.                                                                                       multistage processes. Recycle and bypass
                                                    AEE 491 Hype rsonics Re sch Prjct I 1-3 S          streams. Gas laws. Energy balances including
AEE 343 Compre ssible Flow 3                        In depth exploration of a problem in the field     latent and sensible heat effects, heats of
Isentropic flow, normal and oblique shock           of hypersonics under the supervision of a          reaction. Applications to biomedical
waves, expansion fans. Compressible flow in         faculty member. Projects may be experimental       processes.
converging and diverging nozzles. Course            or computational research on hypersonic
includes lab component with written report.         phenomena, or a conceptual study of                BEN 270 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6
PREREQ: MAE 251 AND 341.                            hypersonic vehicles.                               Participation in a discipline- or subject-related
                                                                                                       experience. Students must be evaluated by
AEE 416 Ae rospace Engrng Lab 1 Y                   AEE 492 Hyprsonics Re sch Prjct II 1-3 S           written or oral reports or an examination.
Experiments in compressible aerodynamics            Advanced research on a problem in the field of     Limited to those in good academic standing. R
designed and performed in small groups.             hypersonics under the supervision of a faculty
Written and oral communication of results           member. Projects may be experimental or            BEN 280 Inte rnational Course 1-12 SI
stressed.                                           computational research on hypersonics              Offered through SUAbroad by educational
PREREQ: AEE 446.                                    phenomena, or a conceptual study of                institution outside the United States. Student
                                                    hypersonic vehicles.                               registers for the course at the foreign
AEE 427 Aircraft Pe rformance and                                                                      institution and is graded according to that
Dynamics 4 Y                                        AEE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI            institution's practice. SUAbroad works with
Wing aerodynamic, thrust and drag.                  Completion of an Honors Capstone Project           the S.U. academic department to assign the
Performance analysis of aircraft: take-off,         under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,     appropriate course level, title, and grade for
landing, climbing, gliding, turns, range and load   3 credits maximum                                  the student's transcript. R
factors. Control surfaces. Longitudinal and
lateral static stability. Dynamic stability.        AEE 527 He licopte r Dynamics 3 SI                 BEN 301 Biological Principle s for
Introduction to autopilot.                          Introduction to the helicopter; hover- and         Engine e rs 4 Y
PREREQ: MAE 341.                                    vertical-flight analysis; autorotation and         Introduction to cell types and structure,
                                                    vertical descent; blade motion and rotor           nucleic acids, proteins and enzyme kinetics.
AEE 442 High Spe e d Ae rodynamics 3 IR             control; aerodynamics of forward flight.           Gene expression including transcription,
Approximate theories of airfoils and wings,         PREREQ: AEE 342, 427.                              translation and post-translational
including linearized approximations,                                                                   modification. Introduction to genomics,
singularity distribution and vortex lattice         AEE 542 Hypsnc/Hgh Tmp Gas Dynmcs 3                proteomics and bioinformatics. Genetic
method; effect of sweep; delta wings; method        SI                                                 engineering and tissue engineering.
of characteristics, finite difference schemes,      Inviscid and viscous hypersonic fluid dynamics     Applications to biotechnology.
and time-dependent approaches.                      with and without high temperature effects.         PREREQ: CHE 275, MAT 397 AND ECS
PREREQ: MAE 342, 343.                               Approximate and exact methods for analyzing        104.
                                                    hypersonic flows. Elements of statistical
AEE 446 Propulsion 3 Y                              thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and                BEN 312 Control Syste ms 3 Y
Fluid dynamics and thermodynamics of                nonequilibrium gas dynamics. Experimental          Crosslisted with: ELE 312
airbreathing engines, including gas turbine,        methods.                                           Review of LaPlace transforms and z-
ramjet and scramjet. Engine component               PREREQ: MAE 251, AEE 343.                          transforms, system modeling, transfer
analysis, including inlets, combustors, nozzles,                                                       functions, feedback, stability. Analysis and
and turbomachines. Introduction to rocket           AEE 577 Introduction to Space Flight 3 Y           design using computer tools. Applications of
propulsion.                                         T wo-body orbital mechanics, orbits and            controls.
PREREQ: AEE 343.                                    trajectories, interplanetary transfers, vehicle    PREREQ: ELE/BEN 351.
                                                    and booster performance.
AEE 470 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S                  PREREQ: ECS 222.                                   BEN 333 Fluid Transport 3 Y
Participation in a discipline- or subject-related                                                      Crosslisted with: CEN 333
experience. Students must be evaluated by                                                              Fluid statics. Shear stress and viscosity. Energy
written or oral reports or an examination.                                                             and momentum balances for flow systems.
Limited to those in good academic standing. R                                                          Dimensional analysis. Friction and drag
                                                                                                       coefficients. T urbulent flow of compressible
                                                                                                       and incompressible fluids. Non-Newtonian
                                                                                                       fluids.
BEN 341 Fundame ntals of He at and Mass           BEN 468 Biomate rials & Me dical De vice s          BEN 500 Se le cte d Topics 1-3 IR
Transfe r 4 Y                                     3Y                                                  Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not
Crosslisted with: CEN 341, MAE 355                Double Numbered with: BEN 668                       covered by the standard curriculum but of
Principles of heat and mass transfer.             Materials science and biological issues             interest to faculty and students in a particular
Conduction, convection, and radiation.            associated with medical devices and                 semester. R
T hermal properties of materials. Solutions of    biomaterials are discussed. Bulk and surface
steady state and transient heat and mass          materials science, tissue engineering,              BEN 541 Principle s of Tissue Engine e ring
transfer problems. Diffusion with chemical        degradation and biocompatibility are addressed      3Y
reaction. Convective mass transfer. Prereq:       and related to medical device design and            Cellular and biomaterials principles relevant to
CEN 333; MAE 341 or CIE 327.                      regulatory issues.                                  tissue engineering, focusing on cellular and
                                                                                                      tissue organization; regulation of cell behavior;
BEN 351 Syste m and Signal Analysis 3 Y           BEN 470 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S                  biomaterials for tissue regenerations; tissue
Crosslisted with: ELE 351                         Participation in a discipline- or subject-related   engineering applications in cardiovascular,
Signal and system analysis in continuous-time,    experience. Students must be evaluated by           neurological, and musculoskeletal and other
discrete-time, and frequency domains. Fourier     written or oral reports or an examination.          organ systems.
series, continuous and discrete Fourier           Limited to those in good academic standing. R       PREREQ: BEN 301.
transforms, z-transform, LaPlace transform.
Engineering applications.                         BEN 481 Bioinstrume ntation 3 Y                     BEN 542 Cardiovascular Engine e ring 3 Y
PREREQ: ELE 232, MAT 296.                         Measurement and analysis of biological signals      Exploration of current engineering methods
                                                  in the time and frequency domain. Operational       and devices that contribute to the
BEN 364 Q uantitative Physiology 4 Y              amplifiers, analog, and digital signal              understanding and therapy of cardiac disease
Double Numbered with: BEN 664                     processing; sensors and sources of                  PREREQ: MAT 485 AND BEN 364.
Introduction to mammalian physiology from         biopotentials; biopotential electrodes. Matlab,
an engineering perspective. Each of the major     Labview and C programming.                          BEN 543 Mathe matical Mode ling in
systems of the body will be addressed, with an    PREREQ: ELE 231. 232.                               Physiology 3 Y
emphasis on electrical, mechanical, and                                                               Development, implementation and evaluation
thermodynamic principles Lecture and              BEN 482 Bioinstrume ntation:                        of mathematical models of physiological
laboratory. Additional work required of           Fundame ntals and Laboratory II 4 Y                 systems.
graduate students.                                Continuation of BEN 481: Level                      PREREQ: MAT 485 AND BEN 364.
PREREQ: BEN 301.                                  discrimination; digital and analog conversions;
                                                  blood pressure and sound; biosignal amplifiers      BEN 575 Proce ss Control 3 Y
BEN 458 Biome dical Imaging 3 Y                   and analyzers; safety issues; special topics in     Crosslisted with: CEN 575
Double Numbered with: BEN 658                     instrumentation and bioengineering. Lectures        Modeling and linearization of process
Basics of imaging techniques useful for           and laboratory.                                     dynamics. T ransfer functions. Performance
biological and medical applications.              PREREQ: BEN 481.                                    and stability of feedback control loops.
Microscopy, electron microscopy, acoustic                                                             Introduction to multivariable and digital
microscopy, atomic force microscopy,              BEN 485 Bioe ngine e ring Laboratory 4 Y            controls.
magnetic resonance imaging. Discussion of         Practical experience in the design, execution
images and literature. MRI laboratory             and analysis of experiments related to
exercises.                                        biomechanics and bioinstrumentation.                Chem ical Engineering
                                                  T echnical writing skills will also be
BEN 465 Biome chanics 3 Y                         emphasized. One four-hour laboratory a week.        CEN 212 Expe rime ntal Me thods in
Double Numbered with: BEN 665                     COREQ: BEN 465 AND BEN 481.                         Che mical Engine e ring and
Functions and mechanical properties of cells                                                          Bioe ngine e ring 3 Y
and tissues, how those cells and tissues          BEN 487 Bioe ngine e ring Capstone                  Crosslisted with: BEN 212
combine to form structures, the properties and    De sign 3 Y                                         Statistical analysis and presentation of
behaviors of those structures, and                Bioengineering design experience. Lecture,          experimental data. Parameter estimation.
biomechanical techniques to analyze the           discussion, active learning components. T eam       Design of experiments. Hardware and software
structures and individual components.             design of biomedical system, device, or process     for computer interfacing. Collection, analysis,
PREREQ: ECS 221, MAT 485, BEN 364.                from concept through prototype production.          and reporting of laboratory data.
                                                  Includes design strategy, reliability, FDA          PREREQ: MAT 296 AND ECS 104.
BEN 466 Advance d Biome chanics 3-4 Y             regulations, patents, oral, and written
Double Numbered with: BEN 666                     presentations.                                      CEN 231 Mass and Ene rgy Balance s 3 Y
Introduction to kinesiology and kinematics;                                                           Crosslisted with: BEN 231
finite element method; joint force analysis and   BEN 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                  Material balances for single units and
the properties of bone cartilage and tendon as    In-depth exploration of a problem or                multistage processes. Recycle and bypass
related to functional analysis of bone-joint      problems. Individual independent study based        streams. Gas laws. Energy balances including
systems.                                          on a plan submitted by the student. R               latent and sensible heat effects, heats of
PREREQ: BEN 465, COREQ: BEN 467.                                                                      reaction. Applications to biomedical
                                                  BEN 498 Se nior The sis 3 S                         processes.
BEN 467 Advance d Biome chanics Lab 3 Y           Mentored investigation of an approved topic
Double Numbered with: BEN 667                     under the supervision of a member of the            CEN 252 Che mical Engine e ring
Practical experience in the design, execution     faculty. A written report and oral presentation     The rmodynamics I 3 Y
and evaluation of experiments. T est the          are required in accordance with program             Review of first law. Second law and
properties of biomaterials, forces on bones and   guidelines. Required of all students.               thermodynamic analysis of processes. Power
joints using a variety of instruments and                                                             and refrigeration cycles. T hermodynamic
transducers.                                      BEN 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI             properties of pure substances and
PREREQ: BEN 465, COREQ: BEN 466.                  Completion of an Honors Capstone Project            homogeneous mixtures. Phase behavior of
                                                  under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,      ideal solutions.
                                                  3 credits maximum                                   PREREQ: CEN 231.
CEN 311 Che mical Engine e ring                     CEN 472 Applie d Env Microbiology 3 Y                 CEN 565 Biore me diation 3
Laboratory I 2 Y                                    Crosslisted with: CIE 472; Double Numbered            Crosslisted with: CIE 565
Introduction to report writing and laboratory       with: CEN 672                                         Uses of bioremediation in engineering
safety. Experiments on fluid mechanics, heat        General Principles and application of                 applications. Role of microorganisms in
conduction, and convective heat transfer.           environmental microbiology and microbial              degradation of pollutants and contaminants.
Analysis of experimental data. Engineering          processes. Role of microbes in water pollution        Regulatory, societal, and legal issues of
reports, summary reports, and oral                  control, environmental health, and element            bioremediation.
presentations required. One four-hour               cycling in the environment. Additional work is        PREREQ: CIE 472.
laboratory each week.                               required of graduate students.
PRE-COREQ: CEN 341.                                                                                       CEN 567 Biote chnology 3
                                                    CEN 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                    Crosslisted with: CIE 567
CEN 333 Fluid Transport 3 Y                         In-depth exploration of a problem or                  Engineering applications of biotechnology in
Crosslisted with: BEN 333                           problems. Individual independent study upon a         agriculture, industry, and the environment.
Fluid statics. Shear stress and viscosity. Energy   plan submitted by the student. Admission by           Principles of molecular genetics as applied in
and momentum balances for flow systems.             consent of supervising instructor or instructors      the biotechnology industry. Hands-on
Dimensional analysis. Friction and drag             and the department. R                                 exposure to laboratory recombinant DNA
coefficients. T urbulent flow of compressible                                                             technology.
and incompressible fluids. Non-Newtonian            CEN 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI               PREREQ: CIE 472.
fluids.                                             Completion of an Honors Capstone Project
PREREQ: MAT 397, PHY 212.                           under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,        CEN 573 Principle s and De sign in Air
                                                    3 credits maximum                                     Polution Control 3 IR
CEN 341 Fundame ntals of He at and Mass                                                                   Fundamental principles of pollution control,
Transfe r 4 Y                                       CEN 500 Se le cte d Topics 1-3                        design of control processes and equipment.
Crosslisted with: BEN 341, MAE 355                  Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not         Criteria for selection of control processes and
Principles of heat and mass transfer.               covered by the standard curriculum but of             equipment for gaseous and particulate
Conduction, convection, and radiation.              interest to faculty and students in a particular      pollutants.
T hermal properties of materials. Solutions of      semester. R
steady state and transient heat and mass                                                                  CEN 574 Proce ss De sign 4 Y
transfer problems. Diffusion with chemical          CEN 520 Radioche mistry, Nucle ar Fue l               Chemical engineering principles for plant
reaction. Convective mass transfer. Prereq:         Re proce ssing and Nonprolife ration 3 SI             design and optimal process operation. Cost
CEN 333; MAE 341 or CIE 327.                        Crosslisted with: NUC 520                             estimation and profitability analysis. Shortcut
PREREQ: CEN 333, MAE 341 OR CIE 327.                Radiochemistry for nuclear reactors and               and computer-aided process design techniques.
                                                    nuclear fuel reprocessing; nonproliferation           Environmental impact and health and safety
CEN 353 Che mical Engine e ring                     issues through detection and monitoring,              concerns.
The rmodynamics II 3 Y                              nuclear fuel reprocessing and design, waste           PREREQ: CEN 353, 587.
T hermodynamics of homogeneous mixtures             vitrification and storage facilities, safety issues
and mixing processes. Phase equilibrium for         in nuclear fuel reprocessing.                         CEN 575 Proce ss Control 3 Y
nonideal solutions. Equilibrium stage               PREREQ: NUC 201.                                      Crosslisted with: BEN 575
separations with applications including                                                                   Modeling and linearization of process
distillation and extraction. Chemical reaction      CEN 540 Expe rie ntial Studie s in Nucle ar           dynamics. T ransfer functions. Performance
equilibria.                                         Te chnology 3 SI                                      and stability of feedback control loops.
PREREQ: CEN 252.                                    Crosslisted with: NUC 540                             Introduction to multivariable and digital
                                                    Introduction to experimental methods,                 controls.
CEN 390 Re se arch In CEN 1-6 S                     procedures and research techniques through            PREREQ: MAT 485.
R                                                   projects at participating government facilities,
                                                    industrial entities or Syracuse University.           CEN 576 Gre e n Engine e ring 3 IR
CEN 412 Che mical Engine e ring                     PREREQ: NUC 201 AND NUC 510 OR NUC                    Review of environmental regulations.
Laboratory II 2 Y                                   520.                                                  Evaluating the environmental fate of
Report writing and laboratory safety.                                                                     chemicals. T echniques for improving
Statistical analysis and experimental design.       CEN 542 He at and Mass Transfe r                      environmental performance of processes.
Experiments on distillation, diffusion, and         O pe ratioins 3 Y                                     Methods for evaluating environmental
convective mass transfer. Engineering reports,      Selected topics in mass and heat and heat             performance, design of unit Operations, and
summary reports, and oral presentations             transfer. Application of principles of units          flowsheets for pollution prevention.
required. One four-hour laboratory a week.          operations.                                           Environmental cost accounting.
PREREQ: CEN 341.                                    PREREQ: CEN 341.                                      PREREQ: CEN 341 AND CEN 353.

CEN 461 Environme ntal Che mistry and               CEN 551 Bioche mical Engine e ring 3 Y                CEN 587 Che mical Re action Engine e ring
Analysis 3 Y                                        Introduction to microbiology, biochemical             3Y
Crosslisted with: CIE 471; Double Numbered          kinetics. Biochemical-reactor design, including       Conversion and reactor sizing, isothermal
with: CEN 661                                       methods for oxygen transfer and control.              reactor design for flow and batch systems, rate
An introduction to chemical principles in           Introduction to separation processes in               laws and stoichiometry, analysis of rate data,
natural and engineered environmental systems.       biochemical engineering.                              multiple reactions, introduction to
T hermodynamics and kinetics of reactions;          PREREQ: CHE 275, 346; CEN 333.                        heterogeneous reactor design.
acid-base chemistry; environmental organic                                                                PREREQ: CEN 341, CHE 356.
chemistry; treatment process design                 CEN 561 Polyme r Scie nce & Engine e ring
applications. Includes selected laboratory          3Y                                                    CEN 590 Re ce nt Advance s In Ce n 3 IR
exercises. Additional work is required of           Polymer structure, physical properties, and           Selected topics in research and new areas of
graduate students.                                  applications of polymers. Polymer synthesis,          competence in chemical engineering. R
                                                    characterization of molecular structure, and
                                                    copolymerization and blending. Unique
                                                    physical properties of polymeric materials.
                                                    Processing and applications of polymers.
                                                    CIE 341 Introduction to Environme ntal              CIE 471 Environme ntal Che mistry and
Civil Engineering                                   Engine e ring 3 Y                                   Analysis 3 Y
                                                    Fundamental principles of environmental             Crosslisted with: CEN 461; Double Numbered
CIE 272 Civil and Environme ntal                    processes, pollution, and pollution control,        with: CIE 671
Engine e ring Me asure me nts 3 Y                   including mass transfer, water chemistry and        An introduction to chemical principles in
Skills for civil and environmental engineering      microbiology, water and air pollution, and          natural and engineered environmental systems.
measurements. Map reading and theory of             solid- and hazardous-waste management.              T hermodynamics and kinetics of reactions;
measurement. Numerical analysis and                 PREREQ: CIE 274.                                    acid-base chemistry; environmental organic
methods. Problem solving using computers.                                                               chemistry; treatment process design
PREREQ: MAT 295.                                    CIE 352 Wate r Re source s Engine e ring 4 Y        applications. Includes selected laboratory
                                                    Analysis and design of hydraulic facilities         exercises. Additional work is required of
CIE 274 Sustainability in Civil and                 including pipe systems, open channels, pumps        graduate students.
Environme ntal Syste ms 3 Y                         and turbines, and ground water wells. Analysis
Introduction to systems theory and concepts         of rainfall and riverflow; surface and subsurface   CIE 472 Applie d Env Microbiology 3 Y
applied to natural and built environments.          water storage. Laboratory experiments and           Crosslisted with: CEN 472; Double Numbered
Sustainability, ecosystems, mass and energy         problem solving.                                    with: CIE 672
balances, chemical transformation and               PREREQ: CIE 327 OR MAE 341.                         General Principles and application of
reactions. Basic principles for sustainable civil                                                       environmental microbiology and microbial
and environmental engineering design and            CIE 372 Proje ct Layout and Site Planning           processes. Role of microbes in water pollution
decision making.                                    3Y                                                  control, environmental health, and element
PREREQ: CHE 106, MAT 296.                           Construction surveying; cut and fill                cycling in the environment. Additional work is
                                                    calculations; route surveying; GPS methods;         required of graduate students.
CIE 326 Engine e ring Mate rials 3 IR               site planning and layout issues. Project-
Atomic, molecular, and crystalline structures       oriented course includes CAD applications in        CIE 473 Transp Procss/Env Engrng 3 E
of solid engineering materials. Explanation         civil engineering and field work with modern        Double Numbered with: CIE 673
and interpretation of physical, mechanical,         surveying equipment and software.                   Fundamentals and applications of mass and
and electrical properties of materials based on     PREREQ: CIE 272.                                    heat transport in environmental engineering.
these structures. T wo one-hour lectures and                                                            Molecular and turbulent diffusion, advection,
one two-hour laboratory a week.                     CIE 433 Inte rme diate Structural Analysis          dispersion, settling, and surface transfer in air
                                                    3 IR                                                and water. Quantitative applications in
CIE 327 Prin of Fluid Me chanics 4 IR               Analysis of cables and arches. Classical and        treatment systems and the natural
Dimensional analysis. Hydrostatics. Equations       matrix methods of truss, beam, and frame            environment. Additional work is required of
of motion. Bernoulli's equation. Euler's            analysis. Computer and numerical methods of         graduate students.
momentum theorem. One-dimensional                   structural analysis. Relation of analysis to        PREREQ: CIE 327, 341 OR MAE 341.
analysis. Velocity potential. Stream function.      design.
Laminar viscous flow. Potential flow                PREREQ: CIE 331.                                    CIE 475 Civil and Environme ntal
applications.                                                                                           Engine e ring De sign 4 Y
PREREQ: MAT 397 AND ECS 221.                        CIE 442 Tre atme nt Proce sse s in                  Capstone design experience. Fundamental
                                                    Environme ntal Engine e ring 3-4 Y                  principles in various areas of civil and
CIE 331 Analysis of Structure s and                 Double Numbered with: CIE 642                       environmental engineering applied to open-
Mate rials 3 Y                                      Fundamental engineering concepts and                ended design projects. Economics, safety,
Analysis of statically determinate and              principles used for the design and operation of     reliability, environmental, sustainability,
indeterminate trusses, beams, and frames by         water and wastewater treatment systems.             ethical and social considerations.
traditional and computer-based methods.             Estimating water demand and wastewater flows
Physical, mechanical, and thermal properties        in the urban water use cycle. Significance of       CIE 478 Re habilitation of Civil
of conventional and environmental friendly          government regulations and standards.               Infrastructure 3 Y
construction materials.                             PREREQ: CIE 327 OR MAE 341AND CIE                   Double Numbered with: CIE 678
PREREQ: ECS 325.                                    341.                                                Deterioration of construction materials.
                                                                                                        Evaluation, non-destructive testing, and
CIE 332 De sign of Concre te Structure s 3          CIE 443 Transportation Engine e ring 3 Y            rehabilitation of existing structures. Properties
Y                                                   Double Numbered with: CIE 643                       and applications of repair materials. Seismic
Analysis and design of environmentally              T ransportation systems, modes and                  retrofit of bridges. Analysis and design of
friendly reinforced concrete structures             significance. T raffic engineering fundamental      structural members retrofitted with carbon
subjected to flexural, shear, and axial loads.      relationships and field studies. Intersection       fiber reinforced polymer composites.
Analysis of stresses and deformations and their     design and control. Geometric design of road        PREREQ: CIE 332, ECS 325.
relation to codes and specifications.               alignments. Introduction to transportation
PREREQ: CIE 331.                                    planning. Additional work required of graduate      CIE 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 Y
                                                    students. A research report is required for CIE     In-depth exploration of a problem or
CIE 337 Introduction to Ge ote chnical              643.                                                problems. Individual independent study upon a
Engine e ring 4 Y                                                                                       plan submitted by the student. Admission by
Nature and composition of soils. Formation          CIE 457 Bioge oche mistry 3 Y                       consent of supervising instructor or instructors
and classification of natural soils and man-        Double Numbered with: CIE 657                       and the department. R
made construction materials. Compaction,            Biogeochemical relationships as a unifying
permeability and seepage, consolidation and         concept for ecological systems, including           CIE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI
settlement, shear behavior and strength.            importance of biogeochemical relationships in       Completion of an Honors Capstone Project
PREREQ: ECS 325.                                    ecosystems and global cycles. T he interface        under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,
                                                    between abiotic and biotic components of            3 credits maximum
CIE 338 Foundation Engine e ring 3 Y                ecosystems is explained. Additional work
Subsurface investigation, bearing capacity,         required of graduate students.                      CIE 529 Risk Anlys in Civ Engin 3 IR
lateral earth pressures. Design of retaining        PREREQ: CHE 106, 107.                               Probability, statistics, and decision theory
structures, shallow and deep foundations. Slope                                                         applied to a variety of civil-engineering
stability, foundations on difficult soils, and                                                          disciplines, such as structural design and
soil-improvement methods.                                                                               analysis, geotechnical, water quality, water
PREREQ: CIE 337.                                                                                        resources, and transportation.
                                                                                                        PREREQ: MAT 397.
CIE 535 Strctrl Ste e l De sign 3 O                CIE 565 Biore me diation 3 IR                       CIS 341 Compute r O rganiz ation &
Design of structures using load- and resistance-   Crosslisted with: CEN 565                           Programming Syste ms 3 Y
factor design concept. Limit states design of      Uses of bioremediation in engineering               Essentials of computer organization: digital
columns, beams, beam-columns, frames,              applications. Role of microorganisms in             logic, microprogramming, processors,
connections, plate girders, and composite          degradation of pollutants and contaminants.         memories, input-output devices. Instruction
sections. Computer applications to design.         Regulatory, societal, and legal issues of           sets, assembly language, data types, relation to
PREREQ: CIE 331.                                   bioremediation.                                     high level languages. Program construction,
                                                   PREREQ: CIE 472.                                    traps and interrupts, input-output
CIE 536 Pre strssd Concre te De sign 3 O                                                               programming.
Analysis and design of prestressed concrete        CIE 567 Biote chnology 3 IR                         PREREQ: ECS 102 OR CIS 252.
members for flexure, shear, torsion, and           Crosslisted with: CEN 567
compression. Basic concept of prestressing.        Engineering applications of biotechnology in        CIS 342 Introduction to Syste ms
Stress computation and prestress loss              agriculture, industry, and the environment.         Programming 1 Y
estimation. Deflection and crack control.          Principles of molecular genetics as applied in      nput and output, including error handling, file
PREREQ: CIE 331.                                   the biotechnology industry. Hands-on                descriptors and interface to OS. Pointers and
                                                   exposure to laboratory recombinant DNA              pointer arithmetic. Structures. Memory
CIE 538 Dynamics of Structure s 3 SI               technology.                                         functions and storage allocation. Makefiles,
Response of single and multiple degree of          PREREQ: CIE 472.                                    header files, libraries, compilation, and linking.
freedom systems to dynamic loadings                                                                    PREREQ: CIS 351; COREQ: CIS 341.
(harmonic, blast, wind, earthquake); design of     CIE 570 Wate r&Waste wtr Trtmnt De s 3
buildings, bridges, and pipelines for dynamic      IR                                                  CIS 351 Data Structure s 4 Y
loading (with particular emphasis on               Design of water and wastewater treatment            Abstract data structures, algorithm analysis,
earthquakes); building and bridge codes.           plants; design capacity, process size and           array, string lists, trees, binary search trees,
                                                   configuration, and overall treatment system         priority queues, hashing, graphs, object-
CIE 545 Pave me nt De sign 3 E                     performance for specific use needs and              oriented programming. T hree hours of
Pavement types and stress analysis, traffic        regulatory requirements. Groups prepare             lectures. One hour of computer laboratory.
assessment, subgrade and pavement materials        designs and cost estimates with written and         PREREQ: CIS 252.
evaluation, design of flexible and rigid           oral reports.
pavements for highways and airports,               PREREQ: CIE 327, 342. R                             CIS 352 Programming Language : The ory
pavement distress and rehabilitation,                                                                  & Practice 3 Y
introduction to pavement management                CIE 584 De signg W/Ge osynthe tics 3 SI             Environments, stores, scoping, functional and
systems and SuperPave mix design.                  Engineering properties of geosynthetics             imperative languages, modules, classes, data
PREREQ: CIE 338; COREQ: CIE 443/643.               (geotextiles, geogrids, geonets, geomembranes,      encapsulation, types, and polymorphism.
                                                   and geocomposites). Design of filters using         Implementation of these constructs in a
CIE 549 De signing and Ge ofoam 3 SI               geotextiles, retaining structures using             definitional interpreter.
Introduction to geofoam production, physical       geosynthetics, design of liquid impoundment,        PREREQ: CIS 275, 351.
properties, evaluation of engineering              and solid waste containment facilities.
parameters, specification and quality              PREREQ: CIE 337.                                    CIS 390 Honors Se minar in Compute r &
assurance, analyses and design of selected                                                             Information Scie nce 3 IR
applications, comparison with conventional         CIE 588 Principle s of Wind Turbine s 3 SI          Specific topics in computer and information
methods, field monitoring, and case histories.     Crosslisted with: ECS 588, MAE 588                  science suitable for honors-thesis research. R
PREREQ: CIE 338.                                   Aerodynamics, performance, control, and
                                                   electrical aspects wind turbines.                   CIS 400 Se le cte d Topics 1-3
CIE 554 Prin Envrn Toxicology 3 SI                 PREREQ: MAE 341.                                    Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not
Factors that make chemicals environmental                                                              covered by the standard curriculum but of
hazards and techniques used in their                                                                   interest to faculty and students in a particular
evaluation. T opics include chemical,              Com puter And Inform ation Science
                                                                                                       semester. R
physiological, and molecular aspects of
toxicology; transport and fate of chemicals in     CIS 252 Introduction to Compute r
                                                                                                       CIS 406 Computational Me thods for
the environment; and current legislation.          Scie nce 4 Y
                                                   Programming emphasizing recursion, data             Distribute d Information Syste ms 3
PREREQ: BIO 121, 123, OR CHE 106, 107,                                                                 Double Numbered with: CIS 606
275.                                               structures, and data abstraction. Elementary
                                                   analysis of and reasoning about programs.           Computational methods and algorithms for
                                                   Public policy issues. Extensive programming.        information technologies. Includes network
CIE 555 Haz ardous Waste Mgmt 3 Y                                                                      issues, digital media, Web access to databases,
Regulations that address management of             T hree hours of lecture and one hour of
                                                   computer laboratory.                                software and hardware architectures, and
hazardous wastes. Practices and technologies                                                           virtual reality. Project or term paper required
commonly used in meeting regulations.              PREREQ: MAT 295.
                                                                                                       for CIS 606, not for CIS 406.
Investigative and diagnostic techniques.
                                                   CIS 275 Introcution to Discre te
                                                                                                       CIS 425 Introduction to Compute r
CIE 558 Solid Waste s: Colle ction and             Mathe matics 3 Y
                                                   Basic set theory and symbolic logic. Methods        Graphics 3 IR
Disposal 3 O                                                                                           Graphics programming. User interfaces.
Composition of refuse. Quantities produced by      of proof, including mathematical induction.
                                                   Relations, partitions, partial orders, functions,   Modeling and viewing transformations.
individuals and industries. Collection                                                                 Shading techniques. Representations of three-
equipment, methods, and associated costs.          and graphs. Modular arithmetic. Credit cannot
                                                   be given for both MAT 275 and CIS 275.              dimensional models. Curves and non-planar
Disposal problems and solutions, such as                                                               surfaces. Ray tracing and radiosity.
landfills, incineration, and composting.           PREREQ: PHI 251.
                                                                                                       Antialiasing.
                                                   CIS 321 Introduction to Probability and             PREREQ: CIS 351 AND MAT 331.
CIE 561 Air Re source s I 3 O
Occurrence, nature and properties, major           Statistics 4
sources and quantities of contaminants.            Binomial theorem, enumeration, elements of
Ambient air concentration levels, community        probability, distributions, moments, samples
distribution patterns, and control of air          and estimation, test of hypothesis, confidence
pollution.                                         intervals, and regression.
                                                   PREREQ: MAT 295.
CIS 428 Introduction to Cryptography 3              CIS 473 Automata and Computability 3 Y              CIS 521 Discre te Mathe matics and Data
Classical cryptosystems and their                   Countable and uncountable sets;                     Structure s 3 S
cryptanalysis, RSA and other public-key             diagonalization proofs; finite state automata;      Basic discrete mathematics: sets, relations,
cryptosystems, pseudo-random sequences,             regular, context-free, context-sensitive,           graphs, functions. Fundamental properties of
zero-knowledge protocols, related ethical and       recursive, and r. e. languages; T uring machines;   linked lists, graphs and trees, their computer
social concerns.                                    relationships between classes of languages and      representations and algorithms that
PREREQ: CIS 477OR MAT 534 OR 541.                   machines; the halting problem; proof methods        manipulate them. Hash T ables, relational
                                                    for decidability and undecidabilty.                 structures, directory structures.
CIS 430 Topics in Computational Scie nce            PREREQ: CIS/MAT 275.
3 IR                                                                                                    CIS 531 Compile r Construction 3 SI
Crosslisted with: CPS 430                           CIS 477 Introduction to Analysis of                 Programming a small compiler. Lexical
A variety of subjects surveyed or a particular      Algorithms 3 Y                                      analysis, tokens, finite automata, hashing.
subject in depth. R3, 12 credits maximum            Mathematical modeling of computational              Syntax analysis, grammars, syntax trees, error
                                                    problems; searching and sorting algorithms;         recovery. Scope and type analysis, symbol
CIS 453 Software Spe cification and                 search trees, heaps, and hash tables; divide-       tables. Run-time stack, variable addressing,
De sign 3                                           and-conquer, dynamic programming, and               expression evaluation, procedure activation,
Software requirements analysis, including           greedy choice design techniques; graph              recursion. Code generation, 0ptimization,
structured analysis methodology. Behavioral         algorithms; NP-completeness; and selected           portability.
and nonbehavioral aspects of software               topics.                                             PREREQ: CIS 351.
specification. Development of specification.        PREREQ: CIS 275 AND CIS 351.
Development of specification documents.                                                                 CIS 542 Compute r O rganiz ation and
High-level design and software architecture.        CIS 478 Introduction to Q uantum                    Archite cture 3
PREREQ: CIS 275 AND EIT HER CIS 351 OR              Computing 3                                         Instruction set design, computer arithmetic,
CSE 382.                                            Purpose of QC; simple Markov processes;             processor organization, high-level programs
                                                    quantum registers; quantum state transitions;       and machine code, memories, performance
CIS 454 Software Imple me ntation 3 Y               classical vs quantum models of computation;         measurement, pipelining, input-output
Ethics in software development. Detailed            measurement and superposition; no-cloning           organizations.
design of software, using tools such as structure   theorem; quantum teleportation; quantum             COREQ: CIS 555.
charts. Implementation and software testing.        logic.
T eam projects and presentations.                   PREREQ: CIS 275, MAT 397 OR MAT 331.                CIS 543 Control of Robots 3 Y
PREREQ: CIS 453.                                                                                        Crosslisted with: ELE 516
                                                    CIS 483 Introduction to Compute r and               Kinematics, dynamics, and control of mobile
CIS 458 Data Ne tworks: Basic Principle s 3         Ne twork Se curity 3                                and/or manipulator robots. Path planning,
Y                                                   Crosslisted with: CSE 484                           actuators, sensors, human/machine interface.
Crosslisted with: CSE 458, ELE 458                  Operating system security. Authentication.          T wo hours lecture and two hours laboratory
Data communication networks, multilayer             Access control. Program vulnerabilities.            weekly. Design project.
network architecture, data transmission             Malicious code. Secure programming
fundamentals, network protocols, local and          principles. T CP/IP protocols, vulnerabilities,     CIS 545 Introduction to Combinatorics 3 Y
wide area networks, transport and application       attacks, and countermeasures. Firewalls.            Crosslisted with: MAT 545
protocols.                                          Intrusion detection. Secret-key and Public-key      Permutations, combinations, recurrence
PREREQ: CIS 321 OR MAT 521.                         cryptography. One-way has function. Digital         relations, generating functions, inclusion-
                                                    Signature.                                          exclusion and applications, introductory graph
CIS 467 Introduction to Artificial                                                                      theory.
Inte llige nce 3 SI                                 CIS 486 De sign of O pe rating Syste ms 3 Y         PREREQ: CIS/MAT 275.
Double Numbered with: CIS 667                       Crosslisted with: CSE 486
Knowledge representation, production                Design and implementation of modern                 CIS 551 Mode rn Programming in Java 3
systems, search algorithms, game playing,           operating systems. Resource management and          Programming in Java with generic classes.
uncertainty handling, learning, automated           protection of CPU, memory, and storage. File        Defining generic classes. Specifying types and
reasoning, computer vision, and natural             systems. Input/output. Concurrent process           inheritance. Verifying correctness of Java
language processing. Programming project or         implementation. Process synchronization.            methods and classes. Managing concurrency,
term paper required for CIS 667, not for CIS        Networking.                                         remote method invocation, and performance
467.                                                PREREQ: (CIS 341 AND 351) OR (CSE 381               considerations.
                                                    AND 382).
CIS 468 Natural Language Proce ssing 3 SI                                                               CIS 553 Software Syste ms
Double Numbered with: CIS 668                       CIS 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                  Imple me ntation 3 Y
Linguistic and computational aspect of natural      In-depth exploration of a problem or                Organization, analysis, and documentation of
language processing technologies. Lectures,         problems. Individual independent study upon a       a sophisticated implementation project in a
readings, and projects in the computational         plan submitted by the student. Admission by         prominent high-level language, such as ADA,
techniques required to perform all levels of        consent of supervising instructor or instructors    C, or Modular-2. Substantial programming
linguistic processing of text. Additional work      and the department. R                               assignments and analytical documentation.
required of graduate students.                                                                          Language and project may vary from year to
                                                    CIS 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI             year.
CIS 470 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S                  Completion of an Honors Capstone Project            PREREQ: CIS 453.
Participation in a discipline- or subject-related   under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,
experience. Students must be evaluated by           3 credits maximum                                   CIS 554 O bje ct O rie nte d Programming in
written or oral reports or an examination.                                                              C++ 3 Y
Limited to those in good academic standing. R       CIS 500 Se le cte d Topics 1-3                      Survey of basic C constructs. Data abstraction,
                                                    Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not       classes, derived classes, types, structures and
CIS 471 O ptimiz ation Me thods 3 Y                 covered by the standard curriculum but of           template. Access control, information hiding,
Classical methods of minimum and maximum,           interest to faculty and students in a particular    multiple inheritance. Formatting stream I/O,
gradient methods, conjugate direction               semester. R                                         libraries, interfaces, modular system
methods, linear programming and simplex                                                                 0rganization. Substantial programming
algorithm, integer programming, non-linear                                                              assignments.
optimization, random search algorithms.                                                                 PREREQ: ECS 102.
CIS 555 Principle s of Programming I 3               CPS 196 Introduction to Compute r
Abstract data structures, linked structures,         Programming 3 S                                   Com puter Engineering
trees including AVL and B-trees, hashing,            Basic computing concepts, data
memory management, search and sort                   representation, problem definition, algorithms    CSE 261 Digital Logic De sign 3 Y
algorithms, object-oriented programming.             and flow charts, programming exercises.           Number representations, Boolean Algebra,
COREQ: CIS 521.                                      Students may not receive credit for both CPS      logic minimization, memory circuits, counters,
                                                     196 and ECS 102.                                  state diagrams, state machine design,
CIS 556 Principle s of Programming II 3                                                                arithmetic circuits, and asynchronous circuits.
Functional programming, modules, data                CPS 234 Introduction to Computational             Logic simulators will be used to demonstrate
encapsulation, types and polymorphism,               Thinking 3 Y                                      and provide students with design activities.
program correctness, lambda-calculus, beta-          Computational-thinking skills developed           PREREQ: ELE 231 AND 291.
reduction, evaluation strategies, basic              through team-based problem solving.
implementation techniques.                                                                             CSE 281 Cmptr O rg & Asse mbly Lang 3 Y
                                                     Fundamental concepts of computation,
PREREQ: CIS 555, 521.                                                                                  Processor organization, addressing,
                                                     including algorithms, data organization, and
                                                                                                       fetch/execute cycle, instruction set, stacks,
                                                     computational strategies. Application of those
CIS 565 Introduction to Artificial Ne ural                                                             traps and interrupts. Machine language.
                                                     concepts to solve problems from multiple
Ne tworks 3 Y                                                                                          Assemblers, macros, and subroutines.
                                                     settings and disciplines.
Perceptrons and the Perceptron Convergence                                                             PREREQ: ECS 101 AND 102.
T heorem; non-linear optimization, gradient          CPS 290 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6
descent methods; neural net architecture,                                                              CSE 282 Syste m Software De sign 3 SI
                                                     R
conjugate-gradient and recurrent networks;                                                             Real-time aspects of assembly-language
Hopfield networks, Kohonen's feature maps;           CPS 333 UNIX O pe rating Syste m and              programming for complex systems with shared
non-neural clustering algorithms.                                                                      data and concurrent input/output. Input/output
                                                     Inte rne t 3
                                                                                                       requirements and architecture, interrupts,
                                                     UNIX operating system: commands,
CIS 567 Knowle dge Re pre se ntation and                                                               buffering, concurrency of operations, and
                                                     hierarchical file systems, editors, windowing,
Re asoning 3                                                                                           memory management.
                                                     networking, security, administration.
Applications of mathematical methods to                                                                PREREQ: CSE 281.
                                                     Emphasis on shell programming, awk scripts,
knowledge bases. Methods include nonclassical,       sed, e-mail, newsgroups, Internet, telnet/ftp,    CSE 283 Introduction to O bje ct-O rie nte d
fuzzy logic and statistical inference.               search tools (Archie, Gopher, WAIS, Mosaic).
Application topics include planning, temporal                                                          De sign 3 Y
                                                     For nonmajors in computer science.
and physical reasoning, attitudes, the frame                                                           Present fundamental software design concepts
problem, preference, constraints, qualitative        CPS 335 JAVA programming for the                  of functional decomposition and object-
differential equations, situation theory.                                                              oriented design. Use both C++ and Java to
                                                     Inte rne t 3
                                                                                                       implement design projects which will be
                                                     Introduction to JAVA, object-oriented
CIS 581 Concurre nt Programming 3 IR                                                                   completed to demonstrate the design
                                                     programming concepts and windows
Processes, events, alphabets, and trace sets.                                                          concepts.
                                                     programming. Variables and data types,
Process equivalence. Divergence, dead-lock,                                                            PREREQ: ECS 102.
                                                     expression evaluation, control, stand-alone
fairness, and termination. Message channels,         programs, inheritance, polymorphism,
buffers, pipelines, trees, rings, grids, recursive                                                     CSE 351 Mathe matical Analysis of Digital
                                                     applets, graphics classes, arrays and strings,
nets. Mutual exclusion, semaphores,                                                                    Syste ms 3 Y
                                                     interfaces, threads, windows, widgets,
conditional critical regions, monitors, remote                                                         T echniques for the performance evaluation of
                                                     animation, sound, libraries.
procedures. Programming exercises in Joyce.                                                            computer systems. Simulation, analytical, and
                                                     CPS 430 Topics in Computational Scie nce          measurement techniques. Analytical
CIS 583 Syste ms Assurance Se minar 3 Y              3 IR                                              techniques include evaluation of algorithms,
Crosslisted with: CSE 583                            Crosslisted with: CIS 430                         scheduling algorithms, and independent and
Basic terminology of assurance and                   A variety of subjects surveyed or a particular    concurrent processes.
cryptography. Social and privacy issues of           subject in depth. R3, 12 credits maximum          PREREQ: MAT 521 AND CSE 281, 397.
assurance. Ethics in computing. Legal aspects
and implications of system assurance. Weekly         CPS 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6                  CSE 381 Compute r Archite cture 3 Y
presentations by external and internal               In-depth exploration of a problem or              Data representation, memory hierarchies,
speakers.                                            problems. Individual independent study upon a     protection, specialized processors, multiple
                                                     plan submitted by the student. Admission by       computers, performance evaluation, and
                                                     consent of supervising instructor and the         reliability.
Com putational Science                               department. R                                     PREREQ: CSE 261, 281.

CPS 100 Se le cte d Topics 1-3 SI                    CPS 504 Introduction to C++ 3                     CSE 382 Algorithms & Data Structr 3 Y
Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not        Object oriented programming in C++: classes,      Data structures and algorithms implemented in
covered by the standard curriculum but of            derived classes, data abstraction, inheritance,   high-level language. Nonnumeric processing,
interest to faculty and students in a particular     and access control. Substantial programming       including database management. T ypes,
semester. R                                          assignments. For students not majoring in         structures, pointers, linked lists, recursion,
                                                     computer science.                                 iteration, retrieval, pattern recognition, and
CPS 181 Introduction to Computing 3 IR                                                                 context processing.
                                                     PREREQ: CPS 196.
Organization of computers, elementary
programming, and problem solving.                    CPS 506 Introduction to C 3                       CSE 397 Compute r Lab I 3 Y
Applications in such areas as calculation and        Programming in C: data types, control             Experimental methods using electrical
visualization, communication, databases,             structures; the preprocessor; arrays and          equipment. Logic modules, computer
graphics, and artificial intelligence. Origins of    pointers. Substantial programming                 programming, analog and digital computer
the modern digital computer, future trends,          assignments. For students in computer science.    operation, logic-circuit design and testing. One
social impact, abuses. Includes lab.                                                                   hour of recitation and six hours of laboratory
                                                                                                       a week.
                                                                                                       PREREQ: CSE 261 AND ELE 292.

                                                                                                       CSE 398 Compute r Laboratory II 3 Y
                                                                                                       Continuation of CSE 397. One hour of
                                                                                                       recitation and six hours of laboratory a week.
                                                                                                       PREREQ: CSE 397.
CSE 458 Data Ne tworks: Basic Principle s          CSE 492 Se nior De sign Proje ct II 3 Y
3Y                                                 Prototyping, construction, and demonstration     Electrl & Com puter Engr
Crosslisted with: CIS 458, ELE 458                 skills for one extensive project created by a
Data communication networks, multilayer            team of students. Must be taken in sequence      ECE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI
network architecture, data transmission            with CSE 491.                                    Completion of an Honors Capstone Project
fundamentals, network protocols, local and         PREREQ: CSE 491.                                 under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,
wide area networks, transport and application                                                       3 credits maximum
protocols.                                         CSE 497 Se nior De sign Proje ct 1-4 S
                                                   Integrates skill in analysis, design, and        Engineering And Com puter Science
CSE 464 Introduction to VLSI De sign 3 Y           presentation through one extensive project
Crosslisted with: ELE 464                          selected from a list generated by course         ECS 100 Se le cte d Topics 1-3 Y
MOS VLSI technologies. CMOS digital circuits.      advisors. R                                      Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not
Layout design. Simulation. Realization of                                                           covered by the standard curriculum but of
digital subsystems-adders, memory, etc.            CSE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI          interest to faculty and students in a particular
Opportunities for chip fabrication and testing.    Completion of an Honors Capstone Project         semester. R11, 36 credits maximum
PREREQ: CSE 261, ELE 331, AND CSE 398              under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,
OR ELE 391.                                        3 credits maximum                                ECS 101 Introduction to Engine e ring and
                                                                                                    Compute r Scie nce 3 Y
CSE 471 Introduction to Embe dde d                 CSE 561 Digital Machine De sign 3 Y
                                                                                                    Gateway course: Discussion of disciplines
Syste m De sign 3                                  Behavioral and structural design methods and
                                                                                                    within the college, technical communication,
stem specification and architecture modeling;      examples using a hardware description
                                                                                                    presentation of technical results, professional
components of embedded systems; CPU,               language (VHDL).?Control, arithmetic, bus
                                                                                                    behavior, ethics, problem solving, modeling,
ASIC, control systems, interfacing peripherals;    systems, memory systems. Logic synthesis
                                                                                                    and data analysis. Laboratory topics:
embedded computing platforms and real-time         from hardware language descriptions.
                                                                                                    computers, computer language, and software
operating systems.                                 PREREQ: CSE 261.
                                                                                                    packages.
PREREQ: CSE 381.
                                                   CSE 565 Introduction to VLSI Te sting and
                                                                                                    ECS 102 Introduction to Computing 3 Y
CSE 482 Principle s/Software Engr 3 SI             Ve rification 3 SI                               Computing concepts. Principles of
Software life cycle; requirements and tools;       T echniques for validating the correctness of    programming. Applications of computing
informal and formal specifications; design         the logical and physical implementation of a     concepts to problem solving in engineering
methodologies; structural and functional           digital system in two independent modules: (1)   and computer science. Laboratory topics will
testing; models for reliability and cost. Course   functional verification, and (2) test and        include problem solving projects from various
project required.                                  validation.                                      disciplines within the college.
PREREQ: CSE 382, MAT 398 AND 521.                  PREREQ: CSE 464, 561.
                                                                                                    ECS 104 Engine e ring Computational
CSE 483 C# and Windows Programming 3               CSE 571 Switching The ory 3
                                                                                                    Tools 3 Y
SI                                                                                                  Elementary numerical techniques for root
Design and implementation of Windows 32-bit        CSE 581 Intro D/Base Mngmt Syst. 3 Y
                                                   DBMS building blocks; entity-relationship and    finding, sets of equations, curve fitting,
applications. Windows API techniques and                                                            differentiation, integration. Programming
Windows MFC techniques will be presented.          relational models; SQL/Oracle; integrity
                                                   constraints; database design; file structures;   concepts: conditional branching, loops, etc.
T his is a projects course.                                                                         Examples of engineering calculations. Use of
PREREQ: CSE 382 OR CIS 351.                        indexing; query processing; transactions and
                                                   recovery; overview of object relational DBMS,    Excel and Matlab.
                                                   data warehouses, data mining.                    COREQ: MAT 295.
CSE 484 Introduction to Compute r and
Ne twork Se curity 3                               PREREQ: CSE 382 OR CIS 351.
                                                                                                    ECS 105 LCS Summe rStart Supple me ntal
Crosslisted with: CIS 483                                                                           Math Workshop 1 S
Operating system security. Authentication.         CSE 583 Syste ms Assurance Se minar 3 Y
                                                   Crosslisted with: CIS 583                        Workshop designed to supplement the theory
Access control. Program vulnerabilities.                                                            taught in math courses. Design problems will
Malicious code. Secure programming                 Basic terminology of assurance and
                                                   cryptography. Social and privacy issues of       incorporate course work. Limited
principles. T CP/IP protocols, vulnerabilities,                                                     enrollment/special permission. R7, 8 credits
attacks, and countermeasures. Firewalls.           assurance. Ethics in computing. Legal aspects
                                                   and implications of system assurance. Weekly     maximum
Intrusion detection. Secret-key and Public-key
cryptography. One-way has function. Digital        presentations by external and internal
                                                   speakers.                                        ECS 109 LCS Summe rStart Se minar 1 SS
Signature.                                                                                          Designed to assist first-year students with their
                                                   CSE 588 Translator De sign 3 SI                  transition from high school to the University
CSE 486 De sign of O pe rating Syste ms 3 Y                                                         setting. Introduction of resources that will
Crosslisted with: CIS 486                          Compiling or interpreting computer languages.
                                                   Lexical analysis, grammars, parsing,             assist in the student's academic, social, cultural,
Design and implementation of modern                                                                 and personal development through
operating systems. Resource management and         intermediate code design, semantic processing,
                                                   optimizing, error processing, and diagnostic     interactions with various representatives.
protection of CPU, memory, and storage. File
systems. Input/output. Concurrent process          tools. Senior or graduate standing in computer
                                                   engineering.                                     ECS 114 Acade mic Exce lle nce Workshop
implementation. Process synchronization.                                                            for Pre -Calculus 1 Y
Networking.                                        PREREQ: CSE 382.
                                                                                                    Designed to supplement the theory taught in
PREREQ: CIS 341, 342, 351 OR CSE 281,                                                               pre-calculus. Problems will incorporate course
382.                                               CSE 591 Spe cial Proble ms in Compute r
                                                   Syste ms Engine e ring 1-4 SI                    work. T he computational component is
                                                   Students work on special projects. Instructors   designed to reinforce the understanding of
CSE 491 Se nior De sign Proje ct I 1 Y
                                                   present new or special material. R29, 30         concepts through a series of repetitive
Design methodology and presentation
                                                   credits maximum                                  exercises.
techniques for one extensive project created
                                                                                                    PREREQ: MAT 194.. R2, 3 credits maximum
by a team of students to be completed in the
follow-up course. Must be taken in sequence
with CSE 492.
ECS 115 Acade mic Exce lle nce Workshop          ECS 221 Statics 3 Y                                ECS 370 Profe ssional Practice 0 S
for Calculus I 1 S                               Fundamentals of static equilibrium. Vector         Full-time practical engineering or computer
Designed to supplement the theory taught in      algebra. Forces, moments, equivalent force         science work experience, with a participating
Calculus I. problems will incorporate course     systems. Free body diagrams and equilibrium        employer, that is directly related to the
work. T he computational component is            problems in two and three dimensions.              student's field of study and is of a semester's
designed to reinforce the understanding of       Analysis of structures and machines. Centroids     duration. Student must be in good standing in
concepts through a series of repetitive          and moments of inertia.                            the College of Engineering and Computer
exercises.                                       PREREQ: PHY 211; COREQ: MAT 296.                   Science Cooperative Education Program. R
PREREQ: MAT 295.. R2, 3 credits maximum
                                                 ECS 222 Dynamics 3 Y                               ECS 371 Inte rnational Profe ssional
ECS 116 Acade mic Exce lle nce Worksho           Dynamics of a particle. Newton's law and           Practice 0
for Calculus II 1 S                              D'Alembert's principle. Plane motion.              A supervised work experience in a laboratory
Designed to supplement the theory taught in      Cartesian, polar, and local coordinates. Energy    at one of several European universities near an
Calculus II. Problems will incorporate course    and momentum methods. Motion of a rigid            SU Abroad center. Offered only overseas
work. T he computational component is            body. Review of vector algebra and moments         through Syracuse University Abroad.
designed to reinforce the understanding of       of inertia.
concepts through a series of repetitive          PREREQ: MAT 296 AND ECS 221.                       ECS 375 Acade mic Exce lle nce Facilitator
exercises. R2, 3 credits maximum                                                                    Forum 1 S
                                                 ECS 290 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6                   Designed to give facilitators the opportunity
ECS 117 Acade mic Exce lle nce Workshop          In depth exploration of a problem or               to discuss issues and concerns within their
for Calculus III 1 S                             problems. Individual independent study upon a      weekly workshop. Facilitators will work as a
Designed to supplement the theory taught in      plan submitted by the student. Admission by        group to discuss, analyze, and problem solve
Calculus III. Problems will incorporate course   consent of supervising instructor(s) and the       participant issues. R7, 8 credits maximum
work. T he computational component is            department. R
designed to reinforce the understanding of                                                          ECS 391 Le gal Aspe cts of Engine e ring and
concepts through a series of repetitive          ECS 301 Unde rstanding Conte mporary               Compute r Scie nce 3 SI
exercises.                                       Te chnology 3 IR                                   Legal issues related to engineering and
PREREQ: MAT 397.. R2, 3 credits maximum          Survey of significant areas of technology:         computer science are investigated using case
                                                 scientific bases, operating principles, physical   studies, research projects, and term papers.
ECS 125 Surve y of Engine e ring Proble ms       capabilities and performance, economic             T opics include patents, copyright, licenses,
2-3 IR                                           limitations, social impact. Areas include: fuel,   trade secrets, technology transfer, computer
Current design and research problems in          energy, materials, pollution control,              crime, contracts, and product liability.
engineering presented by faculty members         environmental modification. May be taken in
actively working on these problems.              either order with 302.                             ECS 392 Ethical Aspe cts of Engine e ring
Opportunities for student participation and                                                         and Compute r Scie nce 3 S
individual project.                              ECS 302 Unde rstanding Conte mporary               Ethical issues related to engineering and
                                                 Te chnology 3 IR                                   computer science studied, including
ECS 200 Se le cte d Topics 1-3 Y                 Survey of significant areas of technology:         professionalism, collective and individual
Exploration of topics not covered by the         scientific bases, operating principles, physical   moral responsibility, codes of ethics, whistle
standard curriculum but of interest to faculty   capabilities and performance, economic             blowing, conflict of interest, pluralism in the
and students in a particular semester. R11, 36   limitations, social impact. Areas include: fuel,   workplace, product liability, and employer-
credits maximum                                  energy, materials, pollution control,              employee expectations.
                                                 environmental modification. Requisites:?May
ECS 201 Acade mic Exce lle nce Workshop          be taken in either order with ECS?301.             ECS 400 Se le cte d Topics 1-3
for Statics 1 Y                                                                                     Exploration of engineering and computer
Designed to supplement the theory taught in      ECS 325 Me chanics of Solids 4 S                   science topics not covered by the standard
the static (ECS 221) course. Design problems     T heory of deformation, stress, stress             curriculum but of interest to faculty and
will incorporate course work. Limited            resultants, transformation. Elastic and            students in a particular semester. R
enrollment/special permission.                   inelastic constitutive behavior. Equilibrium.
COREQ: ECS 221. R2, 3 credits maximum            T ension and torsion of bars; flexure and shear    ECS 401 Spe c. Proje cts-Soling Program 3
                                                 of beams; pressure vessels. T hermoelasticity.     Y
ECS 202 Acade mic Exce lle nce Workshop          Elastic and inelastic stability. Energy methods.   Projects sponsored by the greater University
for Dynamics 1 Y                                 PREREQ: ECS 221; COREQ: MAT 397.                   community are completed by interdisciplinary
Designed to supplement the theory taught in                                                         teams in consultation with a faculty advisor.
the dynamics course (ECS 222). Design            ECS 326 Engine e ring Mate rials,                  Open to juniors and seniors.
problems will incorporate course work.           Prope rtie s, and Proce ssing 3 S
Limited enrollment/special permission.           Introduction to the properties and                 ECS 441 Le onardo da Vinci: Artist and
COREQ: ECS 222. R2, 3 credits maximum            applications of engineering materials with         Engine e r 4 O
                                                 emphasis on structure-property-processing          Crosslisted with: HOA 425
ECS 203 Introduction to Te chnology 3 Y          relationships; fundamentals of structure,          Interdisciplinary exploration of the life and
Crosslisted with: ST S 203                       properties, and processing; materials selection    work of Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519).
Basic engineering principles behind some of      for design; case studies of specific engineering   Supplemented by required field trip to Europe.
today's rapidly changing technologies. T he      applications.                                      Special application required.
capabilities, limitations, and application of
these technologies to audio and T V systems,     ECS 353 Automotive Te chnology for Non-            ECS 470 Profe ssional Practice 0 S
CD players, communications' satellites, radar,   Engine e rs 3 IR                                   Full-time practical engineering or computer
computers, and the electric power system. For    A study of the modern automobile, using a          science work experience, with a participating
nonspecialists.                                  recent model car as a laboratory example.          employer, that is directly related to the
                                                 Description and demonstration of engines,          student's field of study and is of one semester's
                                                 transmissions, body, suspension, brakes,           duration. R
                                                 steering, safety equipment, and fuel systems.
                                                 Federal Motor Vehicle Standards. Open only
                                                 to non-engineering sophomore, junior, or
                                                 senior standing students.
ECS 480 Inte rnational Course 1-12 SI                                                                   ELE 331 Digital Circuits and Syste ms 3 Y
Offered through SUAbroad by educational            Electrical Engineering                               Basic switching circuits and systems using
institution outside the United States. Student                                                          diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors.
registers for the course at the foreign            ELE 231 Ele ctrical Engine e ring                    Integrated-circuit implementation of gates and
institution and is graded according to that        Fundame ntals I 3-4 S                                counters.
institution's practice. SUAbroad works with        Analysis of electric circuits. Resistive, reactive   PREREQ: ELE 232.
the S.U. academic department to assign the         circuits. Independent, dependent sources.
appropriate course level, title, and grade for     Network theorems, circuit reduction. Elements        ELE 333 Analog Circuits 3 Y
the student's transcript. R                        of transient and steady state circuit analysis.      DC and small signal models of BJT and FET .?
                                                   Power and energy considerations. Circuit             Biasing of discrete circuits. Single-stage BJT
ECS 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6                   simulation laboratory required for 4 credits.        and FET amplifiers. Voltage gain, current gain,
In-depth exploration of a problem or               PREREQ: MAT 295, PHY 211.                            input and output impedances. Differential
problems. Individual independent study upon a                                                           amplifiers. Frequency response
plan submitted by the student. Admission by        ELE 232 Ele ctrical Engine e ring                    PREREQ: ELE 231,232.
consent of supervising instructor or instructors   Fundame ntals II 3 S
and the department. R                              Frequency response, filters. Second order            ELE 346 Se miconductor De vice s 3 Y
                                                   circuits. Semiconductors, diodes, bipolar            Physics of semiconductor devices. Energy
ECS 498 Conce pts & Issue s of Te ch. 3 IR         junction transistors, field effect transistors,      bands. Electrons and holes. PN and metal
Role of engineering in modern society.             models, circuits. Operational amplifiers,            semiconductor diodes. Characteristics,
Selection of criteria. Methods of problem          models, circuits. T ransformers, rotating            operation, properties and limitations of
analysis and decision making. Case studies.        machines. DC generators and motors.                  bipolar transistors, JFET S and MOSFET S.
Open to University students with junior or         Alternators. AC motors.                              PNPN devices. Optoelectronic devices.
senior standing                                    PREREQ: ELE 231.                                     PREREQ: PHY 212.

ECS 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI            ELE 280 Inte rnational Course 1-12 SI                ELE 351 Syste m and Signal Analysis 3 Y
Completion of an Honors Capstone Project           Offered through SUAbroad by educational              Crosslisted with: BEN 351
under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,     institution outside the United States. Student       Signal and system analysis in continuous-time,
3 credits maximum                                  registers for the course at the foreign              discrete-time, and frequency domains. Fourier
                                                   institution and is graded according to that          series, continuous and discrete Fourier
ECS 511 Sustainable Manufacturing 3 SI             institution's practice. SUAbroad works with          transforms, z-transform, LaPlace transform.
Visions of sustainable manufacturing, systems      the S.U. academic department to assign the           Engineering applications.
approach to sustainable product development        appropriate course level, title, and grade for       PREREQ: ELE 232, MAT 296.
and design, manufacturing processes and            the student's transcript. R
systems, alternative energy systems for                                                                 ELE 352 Digital Signal Proce ssing 3 Y
manufacturing, innovation and                      ELE 291 Ele ctrical Engine e ring                    Discrete time sequences and systems.
entrepreneurship opportunities. Senior             Laboratory I 1 Y                                     Sampling. Discrete Fourier transform. z-
standing.                                          Electrical-instrumentation and measurement.          transform. Finite impulse response (FIR)
PREREQ: MFE 331.                                   Experimental methods in linear and nonlinear         filters. Infinite impulse response (IIR) filters.
                                                   devices and circuits. One hour of recitation         PREREQ: ELE 351.
ECS 525 Probability for Engine e rs 3 IR           and one three hour laboratory a week.
Sample spaces, events, and probabilities.          COREQ: ELE 231.                                      ELE 391 Digital Circuits Laboratory 3 Y
Conditional probability and independence.                                                               Digital circuit analysis and design using discrete
Random variables, random vectors. Probability      ELE 292 Ele ctrical Engine e ring                    and integrated components. Extensive half-
distributions and densities. Expectations.         Laboratory II 1 Y                                    semester design project. Circuit simulation.
Moment-generating functions. Introduction to       Continuation of ELE 291. Experimental                One hour of recitation and two three-hour
data analysis. Engineering applications.           methods and design with electrical circuits.         laboratories a week.
                                                   SPICE circuit simulation. One hour recitation        PREREQ: ELE 292 COREQ: ELE 331.
ECS 526 Statistics for Engine e rs 3 Y             and one three-hour laboratory a week.
Point estimation, confidence intervals, simple     PREREQ: ELE 291 COREQ: ELE 232.                      ELE 392 Analog Circuits Laboratory 3 Y
hypothesis testing, nonparametric tests, curve                                                          Analog circuit analysis and design using
fitting and regression, analysis of variance,      ELE 312 Control Syste ms 3 Y                         discrete and integrated components. Extensive
factorial experiments, and engineering             Crosslisted with: BEN 312                            half-semester design project. Circuit
applications.                                      Review of LaPlace transforms and z-                  simulation. One hour of recitation and two
PREREQ: ECS 525 OR MAT 521.                        transforms, system modeling, transfer                three-hour laboratories a week.
                                                   functions, feedback, stability. Analysis and         PREREQ: ELE 292, COREQ: ELE 333.
ECS 570 Profe ssional Practice 0 S                 design using computer tools. Applications of
Full-time practical engineering or computer        controls.                                            ELE 416 Ele ctrome chanical De vice s 3 Y
work experience, with a participating              PREREQ: ELE/BEN 351.                                 Principles of energy conversion that provide
employer, that is related to the student's field                                                        the basis of operation for electrical
of study, and is of a semester's duration. May     ELE 324 Ele ctromagne tics I 3 Y                     machinery, meters, and other transducers.
not be repeated. Student must be matriculated      Crosslisted with: PHY 424                            Rotating DC and AC machines.
in an ECS graduate program.                        Vector analysis, electrostatics, LaPlace's           PREREQ: ELE 232, ELE 324/PHY 543.
                                                   equation, dielectrics, magnetostatics, magnetic
ECS 588 Principle s of Wind Turbine s 3 SI         materials.                                           ELE 424 Fundame ntals of Radio
Crosslisted with: CIE 588, MAE 588                 PREREQ: MAT 397, PHY 212 OR PHY 251.                 Fre que ncie s and Microwave s 3 Y
Aerodynamics, performance, control, and                                                                 T ransmission lines at high frequencies.
electrical aspects wind turbines.                  ELE 325 Ele ctromagne tics II 3 Y                    Impedance matching. Network parameters.
PREREQ: MAE 341.                                   Crosslisted with: PHY 425                            Basics of filters, couplers, amplifiers,
                                                   Faraday's Law, displacement current,                 oscillators, mixers, and antennas used in
                                                   Maxwell's equations, plane waves, power flow         microwave communication systems. Basic
                                                   in waves, reflection and transmission of waves,      microwave experiments.
                                                   wave-guides, radiation, and antennas.                PREREQ: ELE 232, 324.
                                                   PREREQ: ELE 324 OR PHY 424.
ELE 425 Microwave Engine e ring 3 Y                 ELE 512 Line ar Control Syste ms 3 Y                ELE 591 Spe cial Proble ms in Ele ctrical
T ransient analysis of T EM lines, time domain      System representation, time and frequency           Engine e ring 1-4 SI
reflectometer. Parameters of coaxial, strip and     domain analysis of linear systems, stability.       Students work on special projects. Instructors
microstrip lines. Scattering parameters.            Effects of feedback on system Performance.          present new or special material. R
Coupled lines, waveguides, cavities.                Controller design using root locus, Nyquist,
Experimental illustration of microwave              and Bode methods.                                   ELE 599 Ele ctrical Engine e ring
engineering concepts. Use of network and            PREREQ: ELE 351.                                    Laboratory IV 3 Y
spectrum analyzers.                                                                                     Comprehensive projects selected from the
PREREQ: ELE 424.                                    ELE 514 Ele ctric Powe r Syste ms 3 SI              student's area of interest. One hour of
                                                    Equivalent circuits for the components of a         consultation and six hours of laboratory a
ELE 431 Analog Circuits and Syste ms 3 Y            power system. Analysis of balanced and              week. May be repeat for credit.
Amplifiers using bipolar and field-effect tran-     unbalanced polyphase systems. Symmetrical           PREREQ: ELE 391. R
sistors. Low- and high-frequency small-signal       components and sequence networks. Fault
models. Multistage amplifiers, stabilization and    studies, load-flow analysis, stability
noise considerations.                               considerations.                                     Engineering Physics
PREREQ: ELE 333.
                                                    ELE 516 Control of Robots 3 Y                       ENP 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI
ELE 458 Data Ne tworks: Basic Principle s           Crosslisted with: CIS 543                           Completion of an Honors Capstone Project
3Y                                                  Kinematics, dynamics, and control of mobile         under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,
Crosslisted with: CIS 458, CSE 458                  and/or manipulator robots. Path planning,           3 credits maximum
Data communication networks, multilayer             actuators, sensors, human/machine interface.
network architecture, data transmission             T wo hours lecture and two hours laboratory
                                                                                                        Mechanical And Aerospace
fundamentals, network protocols, local and          weekly. Design project.
                                                                                                        Engineering
wide area networks, transport and application
protocols.                                          ELE 524 Introduction to Applie d O ptics 3
                                                                                                        MAE 184 Engine e ring Graphics and
                                                    SI
ELE 464 Introduction to VLSI De sign 3 Y            Geometrical optics, two-dimensional Fourier         Compute r-Aide d De sign 3 Y
Crosslisted with: CSE 464                           transforms and wave propagation, optical            Fundamentals of projections and intersections
MOS VLSI technologies. CMOS digital circuits.       fibers, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction,         of surfaces. Dimensioning and tolerancing.
Layout design. Simulation. Realization of           interferometry, imaging and Fourier                 Different solid and surface modeling
digital subsystems-adders, memory, etc.             transforming properties of lenses, image            techniques. Use of a computer-aided design
Opportunities for chip fabrication and testing.     processing, complex filters and holography.         system. Design problems.
                                                    Includes laboratory: design and experiment.         PREREQ: ECS 101.
ELE 470 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S                  PREREQ: ELE 424.
Participation in a discipline- or subject-related                                                       MAE 251 The rmodynamics 4 Y
experience. Students must be evaluated by           ELE 525 Elctromge tc Compatability 3 SI             Basic concepts in engineering
written or oral reports or an examination.          Introduction to electromagnetic compatibility       thermodynamics. T hermodynamic properties
Limited to those in good academic standing. R       (EMC). EMC requirements for electron                of solids, liquids, and gases. First and second
                                                    systems. Nonideal behavior of circuit               laws of thermodynamics. Reversible and
ELE 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                  components. Signal spectra. Maxwell                 irreversible processes. Entropy equation.
In-depth exploration of a problem or                equations. Antenna theory. Control of               Energy analysis of basic cycles.
problems. Individual independent study upon a       radiated and conducted emissions.                   PREREQ: PHY 211.
plan submitted by the student. Admission by         PREREQ: ELE 324, 351.
consent of supervising instructor or instructors                                                        MAE 312 Engine e ring Analysis 3 IR
and the department. R                               ELE 530 Ele ctric Powe r Ge ne ration and           Analytical and numerical methods of
                                                                                                        engineering problem solving. Linear algebra,
                                                    Distribution 3 Y
ELE 491 Se nior De sign Proje ct I 1 Y                                                                  ordinary and partial differential equations.
                                                    Crosslisted with: NUC 530
Design methodology and presentation                                                                     Applications include vibration theory, column
                                                    Fundamental principles governing the electro-
techniques for one extensive project created                                                            buckling, steady and unsteady heat transfer,
                                                    mechanical power conversion; transformer;
by a team of students to be completed in the                                                            subsonic and supersonic potential flows, wave
                                                    generators; introduction to power distribution
follow-up course. Must be taken in sequence                                                             propagation in rods. One semester of
                                                    systems; reliability and safety issues related to
with ELE 492.                                                                                           computer programming is required.
                                                    power generation and delivery, particularly in
                                                                                                        PREREQ: MAT 514.
                                                    nuclear power plants.3
ELE 492 Se nior De sign Proje ct II 3 Y
Prototyping, construction, and demonstration                                                            MAE 315 Me chanical and Ae rospace
                                                    ELE 541 Inte grate d Circuits 3 IR
skills for one extensive project created by a       Principles of design and processing of              Engine e ring Laboratory 3 Y
team of students. Must be taken in sequence         monolithic and hybrid integrated circuits.          Laboratory experiments in engineering and
with ELE 491                                        Current technology and its scientific basis.        science topics. Introduction to statistical
PREREQ: ELE 491.                                    PREREQ: ELE 346.                                    evaluation of data. Experiments will be
                                                                                                        selected from various topics including solid
ELE 497 Se nior De sign Proje ct 1-4 Y              ELE 551 Communication Syste ms 3 Y                  mechanics, fluid mechanics, digital signal
Integrates skill in analysis, design, and           Communications systems. Amplitude                   processing and vibrations.
presentation through one extensive project          modulation techniques. Angle modulation or          PREREQ: ECS 325; COREQ: MAE 341.
selected from a list generated by course            frequency modulation. Sampling and
advisors. R                                         quantization of analog signals. Basic digital       MAE 321 Dynamics of Me chanical
                                                    modulation techniques. Introduction to noise.       Syste ms 3 Y
ELE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI             System modeling evaluating performance using        Formulation of dynamics problems using
Completion of an Honors Capstone Project            industry tools.                                     Newton's Laws with an introductory study of
under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,      PREREQ: ELE 351.                                    analytical dynamics. Vibration of linear
3 credits maximum                                                                                       systems. Computational techniques for
                                                    ELE 553 Communic Engin 3 IR                         predicting system response.
                                                    Integration of networks and electronic devices      PREREQ: ECS 325, 222.
                                                    into apparatus and systems for
                                                    communications. T ransmitters, receivers,
                                                    antennas, modulation, noise, propagation.
MAE 341 Fluid Me chanics 4 Y                        MAE 536 Composite Mate rials 3 E                   MAE 573 Application of Finite Ele me nt
Dimensional analysis. Hydrostatics. Bernoulli's     Design, analysis, and manufacturing of fiber-      Analysis 3
equation. Control volume analysis. Basic            reinforced composite materials. Emphasis is        Formulation of mechanics and heat transfer
equations in differential form. Inviscid            on polymeric composites for general                problems by finite element analysis.
incompressible flows. Viscous flows in pipes        aerospace and automotive applications, and on      Application of the finite element method
and ducts. Estimation of head losses in fluid       ceramic matrix composites for hypersonic           using commercial software in the static and
systems.                                            applications.                                      dynamic analysis of mechanical components.
PREREQ: PHY 211; MAT 397 AND ECS                    PREREQ: ECS 325.                                   PREREQ: MAE 373.
221.
                                                    MAE 545 Applications of Fluid Me chanics           MAE 585 Principle s of Turbomachine s 3
MAE 355 Fundame ntals of He at and Mass             3 SI                                               SI
Transfe r 4 Y                                       Selected topics in applied fluid mechanics, to     Crosslisted with: AEE 685, MEE 685
Crosslisted with: BEN 341, CEN 341                  be determined by the instructor. T ools            Fluid dynamics and thermodynamics of
Principles of heat and mass transfer.               employed include control volume analysis,          turbomachines. Performance characteristics
Conduction, convection, and radiation.              Bernoulli equation, exact and simplified           and analysis of axial and radial turbomachines.
T hermal properties of materials. Solutions of      solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, and      Cascade theory. Radial equilibrium equation.
steady state and transient heat and mass            test correlations.                                 Meridional flow analysis. T hree dimensional
transfer problems. Diffusion with chemical          PREREQ: MAE 341.                                   flow characteristics of turbomachines.
reaction. Convective mass transfer. Prereq:                                                            PREREQ: MAE 341 AND 251.
CEN 333; MAE 341 or CIE 327.                        MAE 548 Engine e ring Economics and
                                                    Te chnology Valuation 3 Y                          MAE 587 De sign of Solar Ene rgy Syste m
MAE 373 Analysis and De sign of                     Value-based assessment and management of           3 IR
Structure s 4 IR                                    engineering/technology projects: equivalence;      Fundamentals of solar radiation, collectors and
Elements of the plane theory of elasticity and      discounted cash flow; taxes/depreciation;          storage. Design of solar space heating, cooling;
strength of materials. Application to problems      financial statements. Risk-adjusted valuation:     water heating systems. Study of solar electric
of mechanical and aerospace structures.             risk/uncertainty in staged projects; Monte         systems. Economics of solar design;
                                                    Carlo simulations; decision trees; real options;   application to heat pumps, energy
MAE 415 Me chanical and Ae rospace                  project portfolio management.                      conservation techniques.
Engine e ring laboratory III 2 IR                   PREREQ:MAT 296.
Experiments in composite structures and                                                                MAE 588 Principle s of Wind Turbine s 3
instrumentation performed in small groups.          MAE 551 Ene rgy Conve rsion 3 SI                   SI
Written and oral reports.                           Energy demand and resources. Fundamentals          Crosslisted with: CIE 588, ECS 588
                                                    of combustion. Power plants, refrigeration         Aerodynamics, performance, control, and
MAE 457 Automotive Engine e ring for                systems. T urbines and engines. Advanced           electrical aspects wind turbines.
ECS Stude nts 3 Y                                   systems. Direct energy conversion. Alternate       PREREQ: MAE 341.
An engineering study of the modern                  energy sources. Energy storage. Costs and
automobile, using a recent model car as a           environmental impact.
                                                                                                       Mechanical Engineering
laboratory example. Analysis of engine,
transmission, body, suspension, brakes,             MAE 552 Building Environme ntal
                                                    Me asure me nts and Controls 3                     MEE 270 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S
steering safety equipment, and fuel systems.                                                           Participation in a discipline- or subject-related
FMVS Standards.                                     Fundamentals of building ventilating methods
                                                    for measuring and controlling indoor               experience. Students must be evaluated by
                                                    environmental conditioning, thermal comfort,       written or oral reports or an examination.
MAE 483 Applie d Environme ntal
                                                    and indoor air quality.                            Limited to those in good academic standing. R
Acoustics and Noise Control 3 Y
Double Numbered with: MAE 683                       PREREQ: MAE 341,355.
                                                                                                       MEE 290 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S
Introductory to environmental acoustics,                                                               In-depth exploration of a problem or
sound propagation, psychoacoustics, noise           MAE 553 HVAC Syste ms Analysis and
                                                                                                       problems. Individual independent study upon a
criteria for design, noise sources, absorption,     De sign 3
                                                                                                       plan submitted by the student. Admission by
noise isolation, design of critical spaces, sound   Fundamentals of moist air properties, basic air
                                                                                                       permission of supervising instructor or
measurement, vibration isolation, product           conditioning processes, heat transfer in
                                                                                                       instructors and the department. R
noise ratings, sound quality.                       building structures, heating and cooling load
PREREQ: PHY 101.                                    calculations, and air distribution systems.        MEE 331 Manufacturing Proce sse s 3
                                                    PREREQ: MAE 251.
MAE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3 SI                                                                MEE 332 Introduction to Machine De sign
Completion of an Honors Capstone Project            MAE 554 Principle s of Re frige ration 3
                                                                                                       and Manufacturing 4 Y
under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,      Basic thermodynamic analysis of refrigeration
                                                                                                       Introduction to the design process. Design,
3 credits maximum                                   cycles. Components selection. Environmental
                                                                                                       analysis, and application of machine
                                                    issues and recent developments in the
                                                                                                       components such as springs, gears, shafts,
MAE 510 Nucle ar Powe r Plant De sign,              refrigeration and the air conditioning industry.
                                                                                                       keys, drive chains, and belts. Manufacturing
O pe ration and Safe ty 3 SI                        PREREQ: MAE 251.
                                                                                                       processes required to produce machine
Crosslisted with: NUC 510                                                                              components. Open-ended design projects
Basics of fission reactor design and control;       MAE 571 Applications of Computational
                                                                                                       required.
nuclear power plant design criteria and energy      Fluid Dynamics 3 SI
                                                                                                       PREREQ: ECS 222.
conversion; thermo-fluid dynamics of fission        Use of commercial Computational Fluid
reactors; design, operation and safety issues;      Dynamics (CFD) softwares to solve problems         MEE 416 Me chanical Engine e ring
reactor accident case studies.                      of practical interest. Modeling of fluid/thermal
                                                                                                       Laboratory 1 Y
PREREQ: NUC 201 AND MAE 551.                        systems. Introduction to CFD algorithms.
                                                                                                       Experiments in air conditioning, refrigeration,
                                                    Simulation, evaluation, and interpretation of
                                                                                                       and turbomachines performed in small groups.
                                                    CFD results.
                                                                                                       Written and oral reports.
                                                                                                       PREREQ: MAE 251, AND MAE 315.
MEE 454 Air Conditioning 3 SI                       MEE 487 De sign of Solar-Ene rgy Syste ms          MFE 429 Syste m Mode ling and
sychro-metrics, air conditioning for human          3 IR                                               O ptimiz ation 3 SI
comfort and industrial processes, heating and       Solar radiation, collectors, and storage. Design   Introduction to system modeling and
cooling loads, air distribution, a/c systems,       of solar space heating, cooling; water-heating     optimization techniques and their
design project.                                     systems. Solar electric systems. Economics of      applications. T opics include linear
PREREQ: MAE 251.                                    solar design. Applications of heat pumps,          programming and its extensions, integer
                                                    energy conservation techniques.                    programming, dynamic programming,
MEE 456 Applications of He at Transfe r 3           PREREQ: MAE 251.                                   stochastic modeling, simulation and other
IR                                                                                                     system modeling techniques.
Applications of principles of heat transfer to      MEE 490 Inde pe nde nt Study 1-6 S                 PREREQ: MAT 397, MAT 521 OR
analysis and design of heat-exchange and            In-depth exploration of a problem or               EQUIVALENT .
dissipation devices. Boiling and condensation       problems. Individual independent study upon a
heat transfer. Aspects of environmental heat        plan submitted by the student. Admission by        MFE 436 Robotics in Manufacturing 3 SI
transfer, such as thermal pollution and its         consent of supervising instructor or instructors   T opics include requirements for robotic
control.                                            and the department. R                              application, mechanical considerations, and
PREREQ: MAE 355.                                                                                       effectors, sensors, software, applications, and
                                                    MEE 499 Honors Capstone Proje ct 1-3               optimization of robotic systems. Laboratory
MEE 470 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-6 S                  Completion of an Honors Capstone Project           experiments included.
Participation in a discipline- or subject-related   under the supervision of a faculty member. R2,
experience. Students must be evaluated by           3 credits maximum                                  MFE 453 Production Planning and
written or oral reports or an examination.                                                             Control 3 SI
Limited to those in good academic standing. R       MEE 524 Microproce ssors in Me chanical            Problems in designing and controlling
                                                    and Manufacturing Engine e ring 3 SI               manufacturing facilities. Layout design, line
MEE 471 Synthe sis of Me chanical                   Introduction to the microprocessor and its         balancing, production planning, sequencing,
Syste ms I 3 S                                      various configurations used in controlling         material-requirements planning, group
First capstone design course. Students              machine operations, data acquisition, etc.         technology, and quality control.
formulate open-ended design projects. Selected      Project-oriented work involving program            PREREQ: MFE 326, 429.
projects require assimilation of knowledge          development in machine, assembly, and basic
from several areas within mechanical                languages. Micro-computers used for off-line       MFE 470 Expe rie nce Cre dit 1-3
engineering. Oral and written reports. May not      program development. Not open to electrical        Participation in a discipline or subject-related
be taken concurrently with MEE 472. Senior          and computer engineering students.                 experience. Students will be evaluated by
standing required.                                                                                     written and/or oral report. R
PREREQ: MEE 332, MAE 184.                           MEE 571 Compute r Aide d De sign 3 SI
                                                    Use CAD software and hardware in the               MFE 472 Synthe sis of Manufacturing
MEE 472 Synthe sis of Me chanical                   solution of mechanical engineering problems.       Syste ms 4 IR
Syste ms II 4 Y                                     Computer graphics, computer aided geometry         Formulation and execution of manufacturing
Continuation of MEE 471.                            (space curves, splines, patches) design, solid     engineering design projects requiring
PREREQ: MEE 471.                                    modeling, optimization and an introduction to      information from several disciplines.
                                                    finite element method.
MEE 473 Engine e ring De sign Analysis 3            PREREQ: ECS 102; MAT 331.                          MFE 534 Statistical Q uality Control 3 IR
IR                                                                                                     Controlling product quality through the
Design problems that integrate the principles       MEE 584 Noise from Industrial Flow                 control of the manufacturing process and
of diverse engineering courses. Use of ANSYS        Syste ms 3 IR                                      acceptance sampling. Industrial project
as a modeling and analysis tool.                    Basic fluid mechanics and acoustics. Noise         required.
                                                    generation by fluid flows and their interaction    PREREQ: MFE 326.
MEE 475 Spe cial De sign Proje ct 3 SI              with solid bodies. T ypes of noise sources.
Special design project carried out by student       Analysis and control of such flow noise            MFE 535 Introduction to Manufacturing
under supervision of staff member.                  sources in manufacturing, transportation,          Syste ms 3 SI
                                                    propulsion, power generation, and industrial       Numerical control (NC), computer assisted NC
MEE 480 Inte rnational Course 1-12 IR               control systems.                                   programming, NC programming using
Offered through SUAbroad by educational             PREREQ: MAE 341.                                   CAD/CAM system, robot programming,
institution outside the United States. Student                                                         manufacturing automation protocol (MAP),
registers for the course at the foreign             MEE 585 Fue l & Ene rgy Utiliz ation 3             manufacturing cells, flexible manufacturing
institution and is graded according to that                                                            systems (FMS), and computer integrated
institution's practice. SUAbroad works with                                                            manufacturing (CIM) systems. Laboratory
the S.U. academic department to assign the          Manufacturing Engineering
                                                                                                       assignments.
appropriate course level, title, and grade for                                                         PREREQ: MAT 296.
the student's transcript. R                         MFE 326 Probability and Statistical
                                                    Me thods for Engine e rs 4 IR                      MFE 557 Manage me nt De cisions in
MEE 486 Introduction to Nucle ar Powe r 3           T heory of probability, sampling, estimation,
                                                                                                       Manufacturing 3 IR
IR                                                  hypothesis testing, quality control techniques.
                                                                                                       General management issues regarding the
Application of engineering principles to            Experimental design and analysis.
                                                                                                       primary importance of manufacturing
nuclear power reactors. Relation of nuclear                                                            technology, economic decision making,
power to present and future world energy            MFE 331 Manufacturing Proce sse s 3 Y
                                                    Fundamentals of casting, forming, machining,       organization theory, and the management of
sources. Elements of reactor theory. Power                                                             manufacturing technology.
removal, utilization, and economics. Design         joining, assembly, and other manufacturing
considerations and examinations of nuclear          processes. Measurement and gauging,
                                                                                                       MFE 595 Multidisciplinary Analysis and
power plants.                                       integration of manufacturing with other
                                                    disciplines, design for manufacture, the           De sign 3 IR
PREREQ: MAE 251.                                                                                       Interdisciplinary subjects related to
                                                    manufacturing organization, laboratory
                                                    experience.                                        engineering, information technology,
                                                    PREREQ: MAE 184.                                   networking, AI and HT T P://WWW-based
                                                                                                       tools. T he objective is to use different MAD
                                                                                                       tools in the product realization process.
                                                                                                       PREREQ: MEE 571.
                                                 NUC 520 Radioche mistry, Nucle ar Fue l
Materials Science                                Re proce ssing and Nonprolife ration 3 SI
                                                 Crosslisted with: CEN 520
MT S 421 Introduction to Ce ramics 3 SI          Radiochemistry for nuclear reactors and
Ceramics as a class of materials composed of     nuclear fuel reprocessing; nonproliferation
inorganic, nonmetallic components.               issues through detection and monitoring,
Development, utilization, and control of         nuclear fuel reprocessing and design, waste
properties of ceramic materials.                 vitrification and storage facilities, safety issues
                                                 in nuclear fuel reprocessing.
MT S 431 Physical Me tallurgy 3 SI
                                                 PREREQ: NUC 201.
Properties of metals and alloys.
T ransformations and their consequences in       NUC 530 Ele ctric Powe r Ge ne ration and
practical systems.
                                                 Distribution 3 Y
MT S 471 Mate rials for Engine e ring            Crosslisted with: ELE 530
                                                 Fundamental principles governing the electro-
Applications 3 SI
                                                 mechanical power conversion; transformer;
Deformation and fracture of metals, ceramics,
                                                 generators; introduction to power distribution
and polymers. Materials for applications at
                                                 systems; reliability and safety issues related to
high temperatures, corrosive environments,
                                                 power generation and delivery, particularly in
high strengths, and light weights. Prepares
                                                 nuclear power plants.3
students to select materials for certain
engineering functions.                           NUC 540 Expe rie ntial Studie s in Nucle ar
MT S 533 Introduction to The ory of              Te chnology 3 SI
                                                 Crosslisted with: CEN 540
Mate rials 3 IR
                                                 Introduction to experimental methods,
T heoretical concepts that describe the
                                                 procedures and research techniques through
electronic structure of crystals. Models of
                                                 projects at participating government facilities,
electron and ion interactions to correlate
                                                 industrial entities or Syracuse University.
electronic, magnetic, and thermal properties
                                                 PREREQ: NUC 201 AND NUC 510 OR NUC
of metals, alloys, and compounds.
                                                 520.
MT S 537 Introduction to Diffusion in
Solids 3 IR
Diffusion mechanisms, diffusion equations and
their methods of solution.

MT S 570 Nonde structive Te sting 3 IR
Determination of defects in structural
materials. Nondestructive inspection methods
include noise emission techniques, X-ray
radiography, leak detectors, ultrasonics,
magnetic and electrical methods. R

MT S 581 X-Ray Diffraction 3 SI
Kinematic theory of X-ray diffraction and its
applications in materials science.
Experimental methods. Integrated intensity,
line broadening, and peak shift analyses.
Crystal structure. X-ray effects of
imperfections in crystals.

Nuclear Energy Track

NUC 201 Introduction to Nucle ar
Engine e ring and Re actor Safe ty 3 Y
Importance of nuclear energy to society.
Nuclear and radiological engineering. Nuclear
energy production. Radioactive waste. Reactor
safety
PREREQ: PHY 212.

NUC 510 Nucle ar Powe r Plant De sign,
O pe ration and Safe ty 3 SI
Crosslisted with: MAE 510
Basics of fission reactor design and control;
nuclear power plant design criteria and energy
conversion; thermo-fluid dynamics of fission
reactors; design, operation and safety issues;
reactor accident case studies.
PREREQ: NUC 201 AND MAE 551.
Faculty
Riyad S. Aboutaha, Associate Professor            Douglas Call, Assistant Professor                John F. Danne nhoffe r, Associate Professor
Ph.D., University of T exas at Austin, 1994       Ph.D., Penn State University, 2011               Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of T echnology,
Structural design, evaluation, and                “ Developing a Scalable Microbial Electrolysis   1987
rehabilitation; structural concrete and           Cell and Investigations of Exoelectrogenic       Computational fluid dynamics, modeling and
composites; infrastructure renewal                Pure and Mixed Cultures”                         analysis in industry, collaborative education

Amit Agrawal, Assistant Professor                 Fre de rick J. Carranti, Instructor              Andre w L. Darling, Assistant Professor,
Ph.D. University of Utah, 2008                    M.S.M.E., Syracuse University, 1994              Undergraduate Bioengineering Program
Nanoplasmonics, Metamaterials,                    Licensed professional engineer, energy system    Director
Nanophonics, Nanofabrication, T erahertz          analysis, manufacturing processes                Ph.D.Mechanical Engineering, Drexel
Optoelectronics, Nonlinear Optics and                                                              University, 2005
Ultrafast Optics.                                 Jose ph Chaike n, Professor, Chemistry           Biomaterials/T issue engineering; Molecular
                                                  Ph.D. University of Illinois 1982                biotechnology; Nanotechnology
Je ongmin Ahn, Assistant Professor                Spectroscopy
Ph.D., University of Southern California 2006                                                      Barry D. Davidson, Laura J. and L. Douglas
Energy Conversion, Combustion, T hermal           David Chandle r, Professor of Practice           Meredith Professor; Professor, Mechanical
Management, PowerMEMS                             Ph.D., Cornell University, 1998                  and Aerospace Engineering; Program Director
                                                  Agricultural and Biological Engineering          Aerospace Engineering
Be njamin Akih-Kumge h, Assistant                 Dissertation: Anthropogenic Effects on           Ph.D., T exas A&M University, 1988
Professor                                         Hydrology and Soil Movement in T ropical         Mechanics of composite materials, fracture
PhD, McGill University, Canada, 2011              Calcareous Uplands.                              mechanics, solid mechanics
Combustion Physics & Chemistry; Fuel
T echnology.                                      Ste phe n J. Chapin, Associate Professor         Cliff I Davidson, T homas C. and Colleen L.
                                                  Ph.D., Purdue University, 1993                   Wilmot Professor of Civil and Environmental
Ercume nt Arvas, Professor                        Operating systems, distributed systems,          Engineering
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1983                  computer networking, computer security,          Ph.D. California Institute Of T echnology
RF/Microwave devices and circuits,                system assurance
electromagnetic scattering                                                                         R. Le land Davis, Research Faculty
                                                  Biao Che n, Professor                            M.S., University of Michigan
Re be cca Bade r, Assistant Professor             Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 1999           Indoor environmental quality
Ph.D.Materials Science, Oregon State              Signal processing, Communication and
University, 2006                                  Information T heory                              Kimbe rle y M. Driscoll, Research Faculty
Drug delivery; Molecular biotechnology;                                                            M.S.E.G., Syracuse University, 1991
Nanotechnology                                    C.Y. Roge r Che n, Professor; Computer           Environmental systems engineering
                                                  Engineering Programs
Karl R. Be hnke , Adjunct                         Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1987 CAD for      Charle s T. Driscoll Jr., University
M.S., University of Houston at Clear Lake,        VLSI physical synthesis and multimedia           Professor
1991                                              information technologies                         Ph.D., Cornell University, 1979
Statistics and quality control                                                                     Aquatic chemistry, biogeochemistry,
                                                  Hao Che n, Research Assistant Professor          environmental modeling
Shobha K. Bhatia, Laura J. and L. Douglas         Ph.D. Syracuse University 2007
Meredith Professor                                Signal and image processing and                  We nliang (Ke vin) Du, Professor
Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 1980       communications, including wireless sensor        Ph.D., Purdue University, 2001
Geosynthetic applications, image processing,      networks (WSN), stochastic resonance (SR),       Computer system and network security; data
soil dynamics, geo-environmental                  detection and estimation, remote sensing and     mining (security and privacy issues); security
                                                  image processing.                                in wireless ad-hoc and sensor networks;
Howard A. Blair, Associate Professor                                                               security education
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1980                  Shiu-Kai Chin, Professor
Knowledge Representation and Automated,           Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1986                 Gino Duca, Adjunct Instructor
hybrid systems, formal methods and                Formal verification, security, access control    M.S. Chemical Engineering Syracuse
verification                                                                                       University 2009
                                                  Lisa B. Cle ckne r, Research Faculty             Process Design, T hermodynamics
Miche lle Blum, Assitant Professor                Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1995
PhD, University of Notre Dame, May 2012           Environmental health sciences                    Charle s E. Ebbing, Adjunct Professor
Orthopedic implant development, polymer                                                            M.S.E.E., SUNY, University at Buffalo, 1966
characterization and simulation of tribological   Samue l P. Cle me nce , Laura J. and L.          Acoustic consulting, sound quality, community
contacts                                          Douglas Meredith Professor                       noise, noise criteria, sound measurements, test
                                                  Ph.D., Georgia Institute of T echnology, 1973    facilities, creative problem solving
Edward A. Bogucz Jr., Associate Professor         Soil mechanics, geotechnical engineering,
Ph.D., Lehigh University, 1985                    foundation engineering
Fluid mechanics, heat transfer, numerical
methods                                           Andria Coste llo Stanie c, Associate
                                                  Professor, Civil and Environmental
Je sse Q . Bond, Assistant Professor              Engineering Department
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison 2009       Ph.D., California Institute of T echnology,
                                                  1999
Tomislav Bujanovic, Research Associate            Environmental biology
Professor
                                                  Thong Dang, Professor
Katie D. Cadwe ll, Assistant Professor,           Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of T echnology,
Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Program        1985
Director                                          T heoretical/ computational fluid dynamics of
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison 2007       internal/external flows

                                                  Joan Danne nhoffe r, Associate Professor
Mahmoud EL Sabbagh, Professor of                  Eile e n D. Gilligan, Adjunct                     Can Isik, Professor, Senior Associate Dean,
Practice                                          Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1983                  College of Engineering and Computer Science
Ph.D. University of Maryland College Park         Environmental geology                             Ph.D., University of Florida, 1985
2002                                                                                                Applications of Neural Nets and Fuzzy Logic,
Modeling, optimization, and design of             Mark N. Glause r, Professor; Associate Dean       Intelligent Systems, Controls, Medical
RF/Microwave components such as: low cost         for Research and Doctoral Programs                Instrumentation, Environmental Control
miniaturized and tunable microwave filters for    Ph.D., University at Buffalo, SUNY, 1987          Systems
radar and satellite, miniaturized antennas, and   T urbulence, flow control, fluid mechanics of
antennas with pattern diversity for wireless      built environments, dynamical systems,            Chris E. Johnson, Associate Professor, Civil
devices; Development and design of                unsteady aerodynamics, heat transfer,             and Environmental Engineering; Director,
microwave sensors for material                    acoustics, applied mathematics, signal            Environmental Engineering Program
characterization; Model, design, and              processing and instrumentation                    Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1989
implement metamaterials as strong surface-                                                          Environmental geochemistry, soil chemistry,
wave suppressor used for EMI/EMC                  Amrit L. Goe l, Professor                         statistical modeling
applications or redirection of electromagnetic    Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1968
waves; Material characterization;                 Software engineering: data mining                 Kave h Jokar De ris , Assistant Professor
RF/microwave measurements and calibration;        applications, radial basis function models        Ph.D., University of Victoria, Canada, 2008
Numerical analysis and scientific computations                                                      Computer architecture and low power design;
for electromagnetic applications using MMT ,      Me lissa Gre e n, Assistant Professor             paralled computing and chip multi-core
MOM, FEM, and FDFD; Electrical                    PhD Princeton University, 2009                    processors, VLSI design: semiconductor
characterization of nanomaterials and their       Experimental Fluid Dynamics                       fabrication and ASIC design,
integration in microwave components; T hin                                                          firmware/hardware digital design: FPGA
film characterization using Scanning Electron     Mustafa Ce nk Gursoy, Associate Professor         prototyping and real-time systems
Microscopy (SEM) and T ransmission Electron       Ph.D. Princeton University, 2004
Microscopy (T EM).                                Wireless Communications, Information              Ke vah Jokar De ris , Assistant Professor
                                                  T Heory, Communication Networks, and Signal       Ph.D. University of Victoria Canada, 2008
Gustav A. Engbre tson, Professor Emeritus         Processing.                                       Computer Architecture and Low Power
Ph.D.Zoology, University of Oklahoma, 1976                                                          Design: Parallel Computing and Chip Multi-
                                                  Carlos R.P. Hartmann, Professor                   core Processors; VLSI Design: Semiconductor
Ehat Ercanli, Associate Professor                 Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1970               Fabrication and ASIC Design;
Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University,           Development of the theory of decoding and         Firmware/Hardware Digital Design: FPGA
1997                                              the design of practical decoding algorithms for   Prototyping and Real-T ime Systems
VLSI, computer-aided design, design               error-correcting codes, fault detection in
automation for digital systems, computer          digital systems                                   Swiatoslav W. Kacz mar, Adjunct
architecture                                                                                        Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1983
                                                  Julie M. Hase nwinke l, Associate Professor       T oxicology and environmental disposition of
Makan Fardad, Assistant Professor                 Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern        chemical and physical contaminants
Ph.,D,, University of California, Santa           University 1999.
Barbara, 2006                                     Biomaterials/T issue engineering; Complex         H. Ez z at Khalifa, Professor, Mechanical and
Structured control of spatially distributed and   fluids, soft condensed matter, rheology; Drug     Aerospace Engineering; Director, NY ST AR
large-scale systems, input-output analysis of     delivery; Multi phase systems;                    Center of Environmental Quality Systems
PDEs with periodic coefficients, parametric       Nanotechnology                                    Ph.D., Brown University, 1976
resonance in spatio-temporal systems                                                                T hermofluid dynamics of environmental
                                                  Jame s H. He nde rson, Assistant Professor,       control and energy systems, fluid machinery,
Bart Fare ll, Research Associate Professor        Graduate Bioengineering Program Director          valuation of technology
Ph.D., McGill University, 1977                    Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford
Affiliate Member, Institute for Sensory           University, 2004                                  Philipp Kornre ich, Professor
Research. Visual psychophysics, visual object     Biomaterials/T issue engineering; Indoor air      Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1967
recognition                                       quality/environmental engineering; Molecular      Fiber light amplifiers,lasers, optical fibers,
                                                  biotechnology                                     image propagation through fibers
Jame s W. Fawce tt, Part-time Associate
Professor                                         John C. He ydwe ille r, Associate Professor       Donald W. Lake , Adjunct
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1981                  Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, Kansas State          B.S., SUNY at Buffalo, 1970
Software, software complexity, re-use, salvage    University 1977                                   Urban stormwater and erosion control
                                                  Mathematical and numerical analysis
Julian Fe rnande z , Research Assistant                                                             Andre w Chung-Ye ung Le e , Assistant
Professor, Biomedical and Chemical                Hiroshi Higuchi, Professor; Director,             Professor
Engineering; Institute for Sensory Research       Aerospace Engineering Program                     Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park,
Ph.D., National University of LaPlata             Ph.D., California Institute of T echnology,       1998
(Argentina), 1998                                 1977                                              Artificial intelligence, data structures,
Biological evolution models                       Aerodynamics/hydrodynamics of vehicles,           operating systems, software engineering,
                                                  three-dimensional boundary layers, flow           computer theory, computer security
Prasanta Ghosh, Professor; Director of            separations and free shear flows, acoustics,
Electrical Engineering Programs                   compressible flows                                Jay Kyoon Le e , Associate Professor
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1986                                                          Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of T echnology,
Microelectronics, solidstate devices,             Robe rt Irwin, Research Assistant Professor       1985
optoelectronics, thin film processes, power       Ph.D., Syracuse University 2011                   Electromagnetic fields and waves, microwave
engineering                                       Generalized Dynamical Systems,                    remote sensing, antennas and propagation,
                                                  Computability and Complexity, Quantum             waves in complex media
Je re my L. Gilbe rt, Professor                   Computation
Ph.D. Metallurgical and Materials Science,                                                          Raymond D. Le tte rman, Professor Emeritus
Carnegie Mellon University 1987                                                                     Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1972
Biomaterials/T issue engineering; Corrosion                                                         Physical-chemical separation in water and
and electrochemistry; Multi phase systems;                                                          wastewater treatment
Nanotechnology
Alan J. Le vy, Professor                         Kishan G. Me hrotra, Professor                   Lisa O sadciw, Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1982                 Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1971             Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1998
T heoretical and applied mechanics, applied      Multisensor scene analysis, algorithms, neural   Spread spectrum signal design, wireless
mathematics                                      networks and genetic algorithms; earlier work    communications and Radar Systems, radar
                                                 in statistical inference includes reliability    signal processing, multi-sensor fusion
Jacque s Le walle , Associate Professor          theory, coding theory, time series analysis      processing, digital receivers, adaptive and
Ph.D., Cornell University, 1981                                                                   statistical signal processing, tracking
Fluid mechanics, thermodynamics                  Achille Me ssac, Distinguished Professor and
                                                 Department Chair                                 Emme t M. O we ns Jr., Adjunct Associate
Yingbin Liang, Assistant Professor               Ph.D., Massachussetts Institute of               Professor
Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-          T echnology, 1986                                M.S.C.E., Colorado State University 1977
Champaign, 2005                                                                                   Hydraulics, environmental fluid mechanics,
Wireless Communications and Networks,            Chilukuri K. Mohan, Professor, Electrical        water quality modeling
Information T heory, Probabilistic Graphical     Engineering and Computer Science; Chair
Models, Information Security, Scheduling in      Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony     Harish Palanthandalam-Madapusi,
Mobile Ad-hoc Wireless Networks, Resource        Brook, 1988                                      Assistant Professor
Allocation for Wireless Networks, Cognitive      Artificial intelligence, neural networks,        Ph.D., University of Michigan, 2007
Radio Wireless Networks                          evolutionary algorithms, optimization,           Control, system identification, Kalman
                                                 pattern recognition, uncertainty                 filtering, estimation
Eric Mun Lui, Laura J. and L. Douglas
Meredith Professor, Associate Professor,         Young Bai Moon, Associate Professor,             Danie l J. Pe ase , Associate Professor
Chair                                            Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering;            Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1981
Ph.D., Purdue University, 1985                   Director, Institute for Manufacturing            Design and development of shared and
Computer-aided analysis and design of            Enterprises                                      distributed parallel systems, software and tools;
structures, structural stability, structural     Ph.D., Purdue University, 1988                   performance optimization for multi-thread
dynamics, earthquake engineering                 Manufacturing systems, machine learning,         client/server application in C, C++, Ada, Java,
                                                 concurrent engineering                           and .NET applications on different parallel
Yan-Ye ung Luk, Assistant Professor,                                                              architectures, including mobile wireless
Chemistry                                        Be lal Mousa, Adjunct                            systems and cyber security on mobile systems
Ph.D. University of Chicago 2001                 Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1994
Bio-organic and chemical biology;                Structural analysis and design, composite        Pe te r W. Plumle y, Research Associate
Nanomaterials; Biosurfaces                       materials, computer analysis                     Professor
                                                                                                  Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz,
Jame s A. Mande l, Professor Emeritus            Vadre vu R. Murthy, Professor                    1984
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1967                 Ph.D., Georgia Institute of T echnology, 1974    Science education, K-12 outreach
Composite materials, fiber reinforced            Helicopter dynamics, aeroelasticity and
concrete, curved bridge design, finite element   structural dynamics                              Le onard J. Popyack Jr., Research Associate
analysis                                                                                          Professor
                                                 Dawit Ne gusse y, Professor                      Ph.D., Binghamton University, 1998
Duane L. Marcy, Part-time Assistant              Ph.D., University of British Columbia, 1985      Watermarking, steganography, information
Professor                                        Geotechnical engineering, experimental soil      attack detection, information security system
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1996    mechanics, stress strain behavior                architectures
Semiconductor manufacturing, processes, and
devices; molecular electronics using the         Ruixin Niu, Research Assistant Professor         Q inru Q iu, Associate Professor
protein bacteriorhodopsin with applications of   Ph.D., University of Connecticut, 2001           Ph.D. University of Southern California 2001
volumetric and holographic memories and thin     Statistical signal processing and                Dynamic power, thermal and performance
films for semiconductor-protein based devices    communications; data fusion and distributed      management of multiprocessor system-on-
                                                 detection and tracking; collaborative signal     chip Power and performance optimization of
Shalabh Maroo, Assistant Professor               processing in wireless sensor networks; video-   energy harvesting real-time embedded systems
PhD University of Florida, 2009                  based change detection and object tracking       Neuromorphic computing and high
Multi-scale transport phenomenon, T Hermal                                                        performance computing for bioinformatics
Management and Bio-mechanical Systems.           Ke nt O gde n, Part T ime Associate Professor    and cognitive applications
                                                 Ph.D., Medical College of Wisconsin, 1999
Ge orge C. Martin, Professor                                                                      Dache ng Re n, Assistant Professor, Graduate
Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, University of        Jae C. O h, Associate Professor, Electrical      Chemical Engineering Program Director
Minnesota 1976                                   Engineering and Computer Science; Director,      Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, University of
Complex fluids, soft condensed matter,           Computer Science Programs                        Connecticut, 2003
rheology                                         Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2000            Biomaterials/T issue engineering; Corrosion
                                                 Cooperation in multi-agent systems,              and electrochemistry; Indoor air
Patrick T. Mathe r, Milton and Ann               application of game theory and artificial        quality/environmental engineering; Molecular
Stevenson Professor of Biomedical &              intelligence techniques to the Internet and      biotechnology; Sustainable energy production;
Chemical Engineering & Director, Syracuse        distributed computer systems, evolutionary       Systems biology/metabolic engineering
Biomaterials Institute                           algorithms, game theory, search and
Ph.D. Materials, University of California at     optimization algorithms, machine learning        Philip A. Rice , Professor Emeritus
Santa Barbara 1994                               algorithms                                       Ph.D.Chemical Engineering, University of
Biomaterials/T issue engineering; Complex                                                         Michigan, 1963
fluids, soft condensed matter, rheology;         Susan O lde r, Associate Professor
Corrosion and electrochemistry; Drug             Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1996          Jorge Luis Rome u, Research Professor
delivery; Molecular biotechnology;               Semantics of programming languages,              Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1990
Nanotechnology                                   concurrency, fairness, logics of programs,       Statistical modeling, data analysis, simulation
                                                 formal methods                                   modeling, operations research
Utpal Roy, Professor, Program Director,            Walte r H. Short, Adjunct, Biomedical and         Pramod K. Varshne y, Distinguished
Mechanical Engineering                             Chemical Engineering Research Professor;          Professor; Research Director, NY State Center
Ph.D., Purdue University, 1989                     Department of Orthopedic Surgery, SUNY            for Advanced T echnology in Computer
Computer-integrated design and                     Upstate Medical University                        Applications and Software Engineering
manufacturing, development and application         M.D., SUNY Upstate Medical University,            (CASE)
of operations research, finite-element             1975                                              Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1976
methods, geometric modeling, computational         Orthopedic biomechanics                           Communications, signal and image processing,
geometry, artificial intelligence techniques                                                         multisensor data/information fusion, remote
                                                   Erne st Sibe rt, Professor                        sensing, wireless communications, detection
Jame s S. Roye r, Professor                        Ph.D., Rice University, 1967                      theory
Ph.D., State University of New York at             Computational logic, logic programming, and
Buffalo, 1984                                      parallel computation                              Thomas D. Ve dde r, Instructor Emeritus,
T heory of the computational complexity of                                                           Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering;
higher-type functionals, structural                Robe rt L. Smith, Emeritus Professor and          Director, Engineering Management Program
computational complexity theory,                   Director of the Institute for Sensory Research    B.S., Syracuse University, 1970
computational learning theory, biological          Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1973                  Mechanical laboratory experimentation,
computing                                                                                            microprocessor machine control design
                                                   Q . Wang Song, Professor
O . Sam Sale m, Abdallah H. Yabroudi               Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1989        Nave e n Ve lagapudi, Adjunct
Professor of Civil and Environmental               Photonic switching, fiber communications,         M.E., PSG T echnology Institute, India, 1984
Engineering                                        electro-optics, guided-wave optical devices,      Quality management, project management,
Ph.D. University of Alberta                        optical sensors                                   manufacturing automation

Ashok Sangani, Professor                           Eric F. Spina, Professor, Vice Chancellor and     Se ne m Ve lipasalar, Assistant Professor
Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Stanford              Provost                                           Ph.D. Princeton University, 2007
University, 1982                                   Ph.D., Princeton University, 1988                 Computer Vision, Video/Image Processing,
Complex fluids, soft condensed matter,             Fluid dynamics, compressible flows, turbulence    Battery-Powered Embedded Smart Camera
rheology; Molecular biotechnology; Multiple                                                          Systems, Distributed Multi-Camera Systems,
phase systems; Mathematical and numerical          Ale xande r Ste rn, Distinguished Professor       Pattern Recognition, Statistical Learning,
analysis                                           Emeritus                                          Signal Processing and Information T heory.
                                                   Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1952
Sure sh Santanam, Adjunct, Civil and               Structure/permeability relationships of           Hong Wang, Professor
Environmental Engineering, Biomedical and          'rubbery' and 'glassy' ploymers; membrane         Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1985
Chemical Engineering; Associate Director,          processes for the sparation of gases, vapors,     Signal processing, communication engineering,
Syracuse Center of Excellence in                   and liquids.                                      radar/sonar systems
Environmental and Energy Systems
Sc.D., Harvard University, 1989                    Radhakrishna Sure shkumar, Professor,             David S. Waz e nke witz , Adjunct
Air pollution, hazardous wastes management         Biomedical and Chemical Engineering; Chair        B.S., Syracuse University
                                                   Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, University of         Environmental engineering and solid waste
Tapan K. Sarkar, Professor                         Delaware 1996                                     management
Docteur Honoris Causa de l'Universite Blaise       Complex fluids, soft condensed matter,
Pascal, France; Docteur Honoris Causa,             rheology; Multiple phase systems;                 Volke r We iss, Professor Emeritus,
Politechnic University of Madrid, Spain,           Nanotechnology; Sustainable energy                Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering,
2004; Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1975             production; Systems biology/metabolic             Physics; Director, Engineering Physics
Analysis and design of electromagnetic             engineering; Mathematical and numerical           Program; Faculty, Solid-State Science and
radiation from various devices like computers,     analysis                                          T echnology
radio-television towers, and satellite and cable                                                     Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1957
broadcasting system; design of mobile adaptive     Jian Tang, Assistant Professor                    Mechanical behavior of solids, materials
communication systems including antennas;          Ph.D. Arizona State University, 2006              science and engineering; computer
analysis intelligent signal processing             Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and   applications
                                                   Computer Science; Ph.D. Arizona State
Fre d Schle re th, Research Associate              University, 2006; Wireless Networking and         Abdallah Yabroudi , Adjunct Professor Civil
Professor                                          Mobile Computing, Green Computing and             and Environmental Engineering
Ph.D. Syracuse University, 1969                    Networking, Cloud Computing, Data Centers,        B.S. Syracuse University
Past research interests include: Quadrupole        Algorithm Design and Analysis.
Mass Spectrometer, Fourier T ransform Ion                                                            He ng Yin, Assistant Professor
Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer,             Lawre nce L. Tavlaride s, Professor               Ph.D. T he College of William and Mary, 2009
Quartz Crystal Vacuum Deposition Monitor,          Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, University of        System Security, Malware Analysis and
Halogen Gas Leak Detector; Analog and              Pittsburgh, 1968                                  Detection Using Binary Analysis T echnique;
Digital Signal Processing and Circuit Design,      Indoor air quality/environmental engineering;     Network Security
VLSI Circuit Design; Architecture, Algorithms      Multiple phase systems; Sustainable energy
and Hardware for Parallel Computation; VLSI        production                                        Christian Ze mlin, Part-time Assistant
Cellular Array Computer; Distribution-free                                                           Professor
Detection T heory, Imaging in Dispersive           William C. Te tle y, Part-T ime Instructor        Ph.D., Humbolt University, Germany, 2002
Media; Neural Networks for Financial
Applications. Current research interests           Chi Tie n, Distinguished Professor Emeritus
include: design of VLSI Signal Processing          Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1958
Circuits for Software Defined Radio.

Klaus Schrode r, Professor Emeritus
Ph.D., University of Göttingen, 1954
Jianshun S. Zhang, Professor
Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-
Champaign, 1991
Building environmental and mechanical
systems, materials emissions and indoor air
quality, room air and contaminant
distributions, multizone air and air
contaminant transports in buildings, building
energy efficiency, integrated computer
simulation tools for building environmental
and mechanical system design, system analysis
and optimization

Jose f J. Zwislocki, Distinguished Professor
Emeritus
Sc.D. Federal Institute of T echnology, Zurich
1948

								
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