Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping Regina Conceia State Layda by liaoqinmei

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 7

									                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       1	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
	
  

	
  



                                                                                                                           Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping



                                                                                                                                                       Regina M. Conceiçaõ



                                                                            State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

                                                                                                                                                                                       IMS II

                                                                                                                                         Professor Mary Anne Laffin

                                                                                                                                                                        July 26, 2011
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       2	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
                                                                                                                       Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping



                       The	
  practice	
  of	
  clamping	
  and	
  cutting	
  the	
  umbilical	
  cord	
  at	
  birth	
  is	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  oldest	
  and	
  

most	
  prevalent	
  interventions	
  in	
  humans.	
  In	
  the	
  United	
  States	
  cord	
  clamping	
  immediately	
  after	
  

birth	
  is	
  a	
  routine	
  obstetric	
  procedure.	
  However,	
  according	
  to	
  Moss	
  (1967),	
  Peltonen	
  (1981),	
  

Mercer	
  (2001)	
  and	
  the	
  WHO	
  (1998)	
  in	
  spite	
  of	
  this	
  practice	
  being	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  oldest	
  and	
  most	
  

prevalent	
  interventions	
  in	
  humans,	
  the	
  optimal	
  timing	
  of	
  cord	
  clamping	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  

controversial	
  issue	
  for	
  decades	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Hutton	
  and	
  Hassan,	
  2007).	
  The	
  reason	
  controversy	
  

exists	
  among	
  the	
  practice	
  is	
  because	
  there	
  are	
  benefits	
  for	
  late	
  and	
  early	
  clamping	
  of	
  the	
  

umbilical	
  cord.	
  This	
  paper	
  will	
  discuss	
  the	
  benefits	
  and	
  risks	
  of	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  

provide	
  useful	
  suggestions	
  on	
  how	
  midwives	
  can	
  address	
  this	
  topic	
  in	
  their	
  practice.	
  	
  


                       Several	
  studies	
  have	
  been	
  conducted	
  regarding	
  delayed	
  and	
  early	
  cord	
  clamping	
  on	
  its	
  

benefits.	
  Currently	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  set	
  definition	
  of	
  “delayed”	
  cord	
  clamping	
  and	
  the	
  times	
  to	
  clamp	
  

the	
  cord	
  varies	
  significantly	
  among	
  studies	
  (Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  Rabe	
  et	
  al.’s	
  

(2004)	
  Cochrane	
  metaanlysis	
  defines	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  as	
  a	
  delay	
  of	
  30	
  seconds	
  or	
  more	
  

after	
  birth	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  A	
  randomized	
  controlled	
  trial	
  (RCT)	
  

study	
  by	
  Van	
  Rheenen	
  et	
  al	
  (2006)	
  that	
  compared	
  delayed	
  versus	
  immediate	
  cord	
  clamping	
  in	
  

full	
  term	
  neonates	
  recommends	
  waiting	
  3	
  minutes	
  before	
  clamping	
  	
  and	
  60	
  seconds	
  for	
  infants	
  

needing	
  early	
  intervention	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  Van	
  Rheenen	
  and	
  

Brabin	
  (2006)	
  conducted	
  a	
  systemic	
  review	
  and	
  they	
  defined	
  cord	
  clamping	
  as	
  waiting	
  until	
  the	
  

umbilical	
  cord	
  stops	
  pulsing	
  which	
  is	
  roughly	
  at	
  about	
  5	
  minutes	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  

&,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       3	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
                       Studies	
  conducted	
  by	
  McDonald	
  &	
  Middleton	
  (2008)	
  and	
  Cernadas	
  et	
  al	
  (2006)	
  	
  have	
  

shown	
  waiting	
  1	
  to	
  3	
  minutes	
  after	
  birth	
  to	
  clamp	
  the	
  umbilical	
  cord	
  increases	
  the	
  hematocrit	
  

(HCT)	
  and	
  hemoglobin	
  (HgB)	
  levels	
  in	
  neonates,	
  which	
  according	
  to	
  Van	
  Rheenen	
  and	
  Brabin	
  

(2006)	
  and	
  Cernadas	
  et	
  al	
  (2006)	
  results	
  in	
  less	
  infants	
  with	
  anemia	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐

Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  A	
  metaanalysis	
  conducted	
  by	
  Hutton	
  &	
  Hassan	
  2007	
  revealed	
  several	
  

findings	
  1.	
  the	
  mean	
  level	
  for	
  Hgb	
  levels	
  in	
  infants	
  born	
  7	
  hours	
  after	
  being	
  born,	
  HgB	
  level	
  in	
  

capillary	
  blood	
  was	
  higher	
  in	
  newborns	
  with	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  2.	
  Hct	
  levels	
  of	
  newborns	
  

were	
  significantly	
  higher	
  at	
  24	
  to	
  48	
  hours	
  after	
  birth	
  when	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  was	
  done	
  at	
  

a	
  minimum	
  of	
  2	
  minutes	
  and	
  3.	
  ferritin	
  levels	
  at	
  2	
  to	
  3	
  months	
  were	
  higher	
  for	
  infants	
  who’s	
  

umbilical	
  cord	
  was	
  delayed	
  in	
  clamping	
  versus	
  early	
  clamping	
  (Hutton	
  &	
  Hassan	
  2007),	
  thus	
  

resulting	
  in	
  decreased	
  anemia	
  in	
  infancy	
  and	
  increase	
  iron	
  stores	
  which	
  could	
  be	
  found	
  in	
  

infants	
  from	
  2	
  to	
  6	
  months	
  of	
  age	
  (Bond,	
  2007).	
  	
  


                       Potential	
  adverse	
  effects	
  of	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  are	
  polycythemia,	
  

hyperbilirubinemia,	
  respiratory	
  distress,	
  maternal	
  hemorrhage,	
  and	
  newborn	
  position	
  

(Eichenbaum	
  &	
  Zasloff	
  2009).	
  Rosekrantz	
  (2003)	
  defines	
  polcythemia	
  as	
  a	
  Hct	
  level	
  >65%	
  that	
  

occurs	
  in	
  about	
  2%	
  to	
  5%	
  of	
  term	
  infants	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  

Findings	
  in	
  studies	
  have	
  been	
  varied	
  regarding	
  polycythemia	
  in	
  newborns.	
  Hutton	
  and	
  Hassan	
  

(2007)	
  study	
  found	
  no	
  significant	
  difference	
  in	
  mean	
  serum	
  bilirubin	
  levels	
  nor	
  an	
  increased	
  risk	
  

of	
  neonatal	
  jaundice	
  with	
  the	
  first	
  24	
  hours	
  of	
  life	
  associated	
  with	
  DCC.	
  	
  Similarly,	
  McDonald	
  

and	
  Middleton	
  (2008)	
  Cochrane	
  metaanalysis	
  found	
  there	
  was	
  no	
  statistical	
  difference	
  of	
  

jaundice	
  between	
  newborns	
  that	
  had	
  their	
  umbilical	
  cord	
  clamped	
  early	
  or	
  late.	
  

Hyperbilirubinemia	
  also	
  know	
  as	
  newborn	
  jaundice	
  is	
  a	
  condition	
  marked	
  by	
  high	
  levels	
  of	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       4	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
bilirubin	
  in	
  the	
  blood	
  (Varney’s,	
  2004	
  &	
  Fraser,	
  2009).	
  According	
  to	
  Ceradas	
  et	
  al	
  

(2006),“transient	
  tachypnea,	
  a	
  respiratory	
  condition	
  of	
  the	
  newborn	
  may	
  occur	
  as	
  a	
  result	
  of	
  

delayed	
  absorption	
  of	
  lung	
  fluid	
  caused	
  by	
  an	
  increase	
  blood	
  volume	
  related	
  to	
  DCC”	
  (as	
  cited	
  

in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  p.	
  324,	
  2009).	
  	
  Eichebaum-­‐Pikser	
  &	
  Zasloff	
  (2009)	
  state	
  

maternal	
  hemorrhage	
  may	
  occur	
  if	
  clamping	
  the	
  cord	
  is	
  delayed	
  (Armbruster, 2007).	
  Position	
  of	
  

the	
  newborn	
  in	
  regards	
  to	
  the	
  placenta	
  influences	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  blood	
  transfused.	
  To	
  allow	
  for	
  

optimal	
  transfusion	
  of	
  blood	
  within	
  3	
  minutes,	
  Van	
  Rheenen	
  et	
  al	
  (2007)	
  and	
  Van	
  Rheenen	
  and	
  

Barbin	
  (2006)	
  recommend	
  keeping	
  the	
  newborn	
  between	
  10cm	
  above	
  and	
  10	
  cm	
  below	
  the	
  

level	
  of	
  the	
  placenta.	
  Further	
  research	
  regarding	
  newborn	
  position,	
  and	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  above	
  

mentioned	
  conditions	
  must	
  be	
  done	
  in	
  order	
  for	
  clinicians	
  to	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  make	
  

recommendations	
  on	
  when	
  to	
  clamp	
  the	
  umbilical	
  cord.	
  


                       Special	
  consideration	
  of	
  DCC	
  exists.	
  One	
  example	
  of	
  a	
  special	
  consideration	
  is	
  DCC	
  is	
  

recommended	
  in	
  preterm	
  infants.	
  A	
  study	
  conducted	
  on	
  very	
  preterm	
  infants	
  by	
  Mercer	
  et	
  al	
  

(2006)	
  compared	
  the	
  effects	
  of	
  immediate	
  cord	
  clamping	
  (ICC)	
  and	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  DCC	
  

on	
  very	
  low	
  birth	
  weight	
  infants	
  (VLBW).	
  The	
  study’s	
  objectives	
  was	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  incidence	
  

of	
  bronchopulmonary	
  dysplasia	
  (BDP)	
  in	
  infants	
  less	
  than	
  32	
  weeks	
  gestation	
  and	
  to	
  evaluate	
  

the	
  effects	
  of	
  DCC	
  on	
  other	
  causes	
  of	
  neonatal	
  death,	
  including	
  late	
  onset	
  sepsis	
  (LOS),	
  

intraventricular	
  hemorrhage	
  (IVH),	
  and	
  retinopathy	
  of	
  prematurity	
  (ROP)	
  (Merecer	
  et	
  al,	
  2006).	
  

The	
  results	
  of	
  this	
  study	
  showed	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  seemed	
  to	
  protect	
  the	
  incidence	
  of	
  

intraventricular	
  hemorrhage	
  (IVH)	
  and	
  late-­‐onset	
  sepsis	
  (LOS).	
  Furthermore	
  according	
  to	
  

Eichebaum-­‐Pikser	
  &	
  Zasloff	
  (2009)	
  DCC	
  has	
  been	
  shown	
  to	
  be	
  beneficial	
  for	
  preterm	
  infants	
  in	
  

industrialized	
  countries	
  where	
  60%	
  to	
  80%	
  of	
  preterm	
  infants	
  born	
  before	
  32	
  weeks	
  of	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       5	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
gestation	
  require	
  blood	
  transfusion.	
  DCC	
  is	
  also	
  beneficial	
  to	
  newborns	
  in	
  developing	
  countries	
  

because	
  it	
  is	
  a	
  safe	
  and	
  inexpensive	
  way	
  to	
  prevent	
  infant	
  anemia	
  in	
  countries	
  with	
  limited	
  

resources	
  (Eichebaum-­‐Pikser	
  &	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  By	
  delaying	
  clamping	
  the	
  cord	
  Rabe	
  &	
  Diaz-­‐

Rosselle	
  (2004)	
  state	
  Hgb	
  levels	
  and	
  red	
  blood	
  cell	
  volume	
  is	
  increased	
  resulting	
  in	
  the	
  

reduction	
  of	
  an	
  infant	
  needing	
  a	
  blood	
  transfusion	
  (as	
  cited	
  in	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  

2009).	
  


                       Another	
  special	
  consideration	
  is	
  the	
  request	
  of	
  parents	
  to	
  have	
  Lotus	
  birth.	
  A	
  lotus	
  birth	
  

is	
  when	
  the	
  cord	
  of	
  a	
  newborn	
  is	
  left	
  untouched	
  and	
  uncut	
  until	
  it	
  separates	
  by	
  itself	
  from	
  the	
  

navel	
  3	
  to	
  10	
  days	
  postpartum	
  (Crowther,	
  2006	
  and	
  Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  

Because	
  the	
  placenta	
  remains	
  attached	
  to	
  the	
  newborn	
  it	
  makes	
  it	
  less	
  difficult	
  for	
  exposure	
  to	
  

infection.	
  Some	
  cultures	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  view	
  the	
  placenta	
  as	
  sacred,	
  with	
  high	
  spiritual	
  

regard.	
  The	
  practice	
  is	
  done	
  because	
  it	
  is	
  believed	
  to	
  be	
  nonviolent	
  and	
  allows	
  for	
  an	
  easier	
  

transition	
  of	
  the	
  newborn	
  into	
  life.	
  Although	
  the	
  practice	
  occurs	
  around	
  the	
  world	
  they	
  have	
  

not	
  been	
  any	
  scientific	
  studies	
  to	
  determine	
  its	
  benefits.	
  


                       A	
  third	
  consideration	
  is	
  Cord	
  Blood	
  Banking.	
  Cord	
  blood	
  banking	
  is	
  the	
  collection	
  of	
  

blood	
  from	
  a	
  newborn’s	
  umbilical	
  cord	
  to	
  be	
  preserved	
  for	
  stem	
  cell	
  harvesting	
  in	
  case	
  the	
  child	
  

gets	
  a	
  disease	
  that	
  can	
  only	
  be	
  treated	
  with	
  its	
  cord	
  blood.	
  In	
  a	
  situations	
  where	
  parents	
  

request	
  cord	
  blood	
  banking,	
  delayed	
  cord	
  clamping	
  may	
  lower	
  the	
  amount	
  of	
  stem	
  cells	
  

collected	
  leaving	
  it	
  unusable.	
  In	
  most	
  situations	
  banking	
  companies	
  request	
  practitioners	
  

immediately	
  clamp	
  the	
  cord	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       6	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
                       	
                             There	
  has	
  been	
  no	
  documentation	
  of	
  significant	
  risks	
  of	
  DCC.	
  In	
  fact,	
  there	
  have	
  

been	
  various	
  studies	
  that	
  have	
  shown	
  as	
  explained	
  in	
  this	
  paper	
  that	
  the	
  practice	
  of	
  DCC	
  is	
  

beneficial	
  to	
  newborns.	
  Therefore	
  it	
  is	
  incumbent	
  upon	
  midwives	
  to	
  educate	
  our	
  clients	
  about	
  

the	
  physiologic	
  impact	
  of	
  the	
  practice	
  of	
  DCC	
  and	
  to	
  involve	
  women	
  and	
  their	
  partners	
  in	
  this	
  

decision.	
  (Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  It	
  is	
  also	
  important	
  for	
  midwives	
  to	
  respect	
  a	
  

family’s	
  decision	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  lotus	
  birth	
  even	
  if	
  we	
  do	
  not	
  promote	
  it.	
  As	
  midwives	
  it	
  is	
  our	
  

responsibility	
  to	
  provide	
  evidence-­‐based	
  care	
  to	
  our	
  clients.	
  	
  Providing	
  such	
  care	
  can	
  help	
  to	
  

ensure	
  better	
  care	
  for	
  the	
  women	
  and	
  babies	
  we	
  serve,	
  and	
  emphasizes	
  a	
  culture	
  of	
  

attentiveness	
  to	
  clinical	
  evidence	
  (Eichenbaum-­‐Pikser	
  &,	
  Zasloff,	
  2009).	
  


	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
  

	
                     	
  
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       7	
  
	
     	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Running Head: Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping
	
  
                                                                                                                                                                            References



       Armbruster, D, Fullerton, Judith. Cord clamping and active management of the third stage.
       Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health 2007;52(5)

       Bond, S. Late cord clamping improves anemia and iron stores in term infants up to 6 months,
       but practice remains controversial. Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health
       2007;52(5)521-522.

       Crowteher, S. Lotus birth:leaving the cord alone. The Practice Midwife 2006;9(6)1214

       Eichenbaum-Pikser, G, Zasloff, J. Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord: A review with
       implication for practice. Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health 2009; 54(1)1-6.

       Fraser, D, Copper,M. (2009) Myles’ Textbook for Midwives Edinburgh, New York: Churchill
       Livingstone.

       Hutton, E, Hassan,E. Late vs early clamping of the umbilical cord in full-term neonates.
       JAMA 2007;297(11)1241-1252.

       Mercer, J. et al Pediatrics 2006; 117(4)1235-1242.

       Varney, H, Kriebs,J,Gregor,C. (2004) Varney’s Midwifery Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett
       Publishers.

								
To top