Application Guidance by TomDonnelly

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									       APPLICATION GUIDANCE



APPALACHIAN REGIONAL COMMISSION



AREA DEVELOPMENT GRANTS PROGRAM



                 FY 2010




    New York State Department of State
 Appalachian Regional Development Program

                 April 2009
                                                TABLE OF CONTENTS


 I.    Introduction .........................................................................................................................3

II.    Technical Assistance / Contacts .........................................................................................5

III.   Application Process / Schedule ...........................................................................................6

IV.    Application Review & Scoring ...........................................................................................7

V.     New York State Policies for FY 2010 Area Development Projects ...................................8

VI.    Eligible Project Activities ..................................................................................................12

                  ARC Goals & NY State Strategies:

                  General Goal 1 (Increase Job Opportunities and Per Capita
                  Income in Appalachia to Reach Parity with the Nation) .......................................12

                  General Goal 2 (Strengthen the Capacity of the People of
                  Appalachia to Compete in the Global Economy) ..................................................19

                  General Goal 3 (Develop and Improve Appalachia’s
                  Infrastructure to Make the Region Economically Competitive) ...........................25




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I. INTRODUCTION

This document provides guidance to Local Development Districts (LDDs) and to sponsors of
projects for which funding is requested under the Area Development Program of the
Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC). It will also assist sponsors in preparing applications
for ARC funding in federal fiscal year (FFY) 2010 and provides general information on program
priorities, technical assistance contacts, the application process and schedule, and a detailed
statement of New York State policies for ARC Area Development projects in FFY 2010.

Appalachian Regional Development Organization and Authority

ARC was established by the federal Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965 to improve
the economy and quality of life in the thirteen-state Appalachian Region. Governors of the
Appalachian States and a Federal Co-Chair appointed by the President comprise the
Commission. Governor David A. Paterson of New York State (NYS) is the primary member of
the Commission from NYS; Secretary of State Lorraine A. Cortés-Vázquez serves as his
Alternate. The Department of State (DOS) is the official agent of the State of New York for
cooperating with the Commission in administering the State’s Appalachian Regional
Development Program, as specified in Article 6-B, Section 153 of the New York State Executive
Law.

Each year New York State receives an allocation of resources from the Appalachian Regional
Commission (ARC) to fund area development programs in the following 14 counties: Allegany,
Broome, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Delaware, Otsego,
Schoharie, Schuyler, Steuben, Tioga, and Tompkins. The Southern Tier counties (“Appalachian
New York”) are each represented by one of three LDDs: Southern Tier West Regional Planning
and Development Board (STW), based in Salamanca, NY; Southern Tier Central Regional
Planning and Development Board (STC), in Corning, NY and Southern Tier East Regional
Planning Development Board (STE), in Binghamton, NY.

The investment of funds will be guided by ARC's Strategic Plan 2005-2010. ARC’s Plan details
four General Goals, with the first three covering three broad themes – economic opportunity;
workforce development; and infrastructure -- and the last (Goal 4) covering the completion of
the Appalachian Development Highway System (ADHS). Development of the ADHS in New
York is funded and administered by other Federal and State Agencies. DOS will focus this grants
round on projects that address the ARC’s first three General Goals. Therefore, all projects must
implement an identified New York State strategy for addressing one of only the first three ARC
General Goals. Please refer to Section V for specific New York State Strategies.

Role of the LDDs

The LDDs identify priority needs of local communities, work with their board members and
other local citizens to develop plans for their communities' economic development that target
and meet their most pressing needs, and build community unity and leadership for the districts’
social and economic development. In this capacity the LDDs serve as regional hubs for area-
wide development planning. Each year they are charged to solicit area development projects

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from local community groups and to provide technical assistance to project sponsors applying
for area development grants.

The LDDs of the Southern Tier are key agencies in New York State’s ARC project development
and review process. They provide technical assistance to local project sponsors and recommend
projects for consideration by the Department of State, which prepares an Annual Investment
Package for transmission to ARC. The ARC application must be completed in close consultation
with the LDD.

If the project proposal involves construction, the LDD will assist in identifying a basic federal or
State administering agency for the project. A key federal basic agency for many physical
infrastructure projects is the U.S. Department of Agriculture/Rural Development (USDA). Other
federal basic agencies include the U.S. Department of Commerce/Economic Development
Administration (EDA) and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).
State basic agencies include the Office for Community Renewal (for projects including HUD
“Small Cities” funds administered by this office). LDDs will assist in working with the identified
agency.

State Priorities for the FY 2010 ARC Cycle

During the FY 2010 program planning cycle, the State will place priority on projects and
initiatives that foster the economic development of the State’s various regions, preparation of its
workforce for employment in careers, creation of jobs, development of infrastructure, and
development of green technologies and industries. This year’s Guidance Document urges
heightened emphasis on soliciting and ranking proposals that address these priorities. In
addition, this year’s program emphasizes the theme of regional development planning and
encourages applicants and technical assistance providers to encourage projects that are
coordinated parts of a long-range regional development program.




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II. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CONTACTS

  A. Local Development Districts (LDDs) and the Counties They Serve

Allegany              Southern Tier West Regional Planning and Development Board
Cattaraugus                             4039 Route 219, Suite 200
Chautauqua                            Salamanca, New York 14779
                                   (716) 945-5301; Fax (716) 945-5550
                                        www.southerntierwest.org
                           EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - Donald R. Rychnowski
                                PROGRAM CONTACT - Ginger Malak
                                  E-mail: gmalak@southerntierwest.org


Chemung              Southern Tier Central Regional Planning and Development Board
Schuyler                            8 Denison Parkway East, Suite 310
Steuben                                 Corning, New York 14830
                                   (607) 962-5092; Fax (607) 962-3400
                                           www.stcplanning.org
                              EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR - Marcia D. Weber
                               PROGRAM CONTACT - Thomas McGarry
                                      E-mail: tmcgarry@stny.rr.com


Broome                  Southern Tier East Regional Planning Development Board
Chenango                                    375 State Street
Cortland                             Binghamton, New York 13901
Delaware                          (607) 724-1327; Fax (607) 724-1194
Otsego                                       www.steny.org
Schoharie                         DIRECTOR - Robert A. Augenstern
Tioga                            PROGRAM CONTACT - Lynn Cebula
Tompkins                               E-mail: lcebula@steny.org


  B. New York State Program Information:

                          NYS Department of State
                      Appalachian Development Program
              PROGRAM CONTACTS: George Korchowsky / Kyle Wilber
                         http://www.dos.state.ny.us/




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III. APPLICATION PROCESS/SCHEDULE

Prospective ARC Grant applicants must contact the appropriate Local Development District
(LDD) at the beginning of the project development process and work closely with that LDD
throughout the process. Applicants must obtain new application materials from the LDD.
Application materials from previous years are unacceptable.

Contact the appropriate LDD as soon as possible for a copy of their application materials and for
information on the submission process. The deadline for applying is Friday, June 12, 2009.

The appropriate LDD will review each Application in a competitive rating process and
recommend funding priorities to NYS Department of State (DOS). DOS will review the list of
recommended projects and prepare a draft Appalachian Regional Investment Package for review
in September 2009. A final Investment Package will then be submitted to ARC by NYS as soon
as possible after the start of FFY 2010. The LDDs will advise sponsors of preliminary and final
State funding priorities.

During this grants cycle, NYS has articulated priorities across a broad spectrum of programs.
Proposals that address these priorities will be encouraged, but all projects will be considered and
competitively ranked based on the quality of the proposal and the criteria related to the regional
and program strategies and objectives that the projects intend to address. This means that the
overall proposal is expected to be well-linked to the State’s overall Appalachian Regional
Development Plan and Strategy. The highest ranked projects will be recommended for ARC
funding by NYS DOS. Sponsors of these projects may be requested to revise their applications
according to comments provided by DOS and/or ARC prior to ARC’s consideration of final
project approval. If a revised application is requested, sponsors are encouraged to work closely
with the appropriate LDD and the State basic administering agency (if applicable) in developing
an approvable application.




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IV. APPLICATION REVIEW & SCORING

Because there are many worthy projects and organizations in need of funding, the prioritizing
and awarding of grant proposals is subject to a review and scoring process at the LDD level and
then at the state program manager level. As in prior ARC grant cycles, applications will be
ranked based on an impartial scoring of the following three general factors:

   1. Promotion of area development: a. documented need; b. outputs/outcomes. Weighted at
      6/15ths of total score. (30 of 75 pts. max.)
   2. Linkages to local/regional activities: a. support and track record with other participating
      agencies and organizations; b. documented community interest, support and commitment;
      c. private sector support; and, d. relationship to federal, state, regional, county, local,
      and LDD plans or policies. Weighted 4/15ths of total. (20 of 75 pts. max.)
   3. Need for ARC support / self-sufficiency / management capability / project sustainability /
      budget. Weighted at 5/15ths of total. (25 of 75 pts. max.)

However, in order to align the state’s funding requests with the state’s economic priorities in this
review cycle, the NYS DOS will give additional consideration to proposals that address well one
or more of the following state-wide priorities:
               Increasing employment or preparation of the State’s workforce for employment in
               careers
               Economic development
               Development of infrastructure
               Development of green technologies and industries
               Fostering rehabilitation of local pockets of distress *

*NOTE: Local pockets of distress: The ARC evaluates the Appalachian region against national
averages on poverty rate, per capita market income, and unemployment. Under this comparative
system only Allegany County ranks in the “At Risk” category, and all other counties are
designated as “Transitional,” ranking them substantially close to the national norms. However,
the ARC also identifies census tracts that on their own are markedly distressed in comparison to
the rest of the nation. A table of the region’s most distressed census tracts is provided below.

      County          LDD           Census Tract ID Number (s)
      Broome          STE           1, 3, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 135, 136, 139, 140
      Chenango        STE           9904
      Tompkins        STE           2, 4, 8, 10
      Chemung         STC           1, 6, 7, 8, 10
      Steuben         STC           9609
      Cattaraugus     STW           9400, 9617, 9621
      Chautauqua      STW           301, 303, 305, 306, 354, 355, 9400




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V. NYS POLICIES FOR FY 2010 AREA DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

New York State’s Plan for the Development of its Appalachian Region is based on developing
local leadership and strategically funding proposals covering the entire broad range of the ARC’s
social and economic development objectives. Given the relatively modest amount of federal
funds available to carry out the ARC’s broad objectives, however, the key emphasis of the ARC
program will be on establishing a regional approach to planning and fostering a comprehensive
strategy that will lift the economy of the Southern Tier.

The following policies have been established by the New York State Department of State to
guide the preparation of the New York State Appalachian Regional Investment Package for FY
2010. They were established in consultation with the three LDDs in Appalachian New York and
with cooperating State agencies.

ELIGIBLE PROJECT ACTIVITIES

ARC's Strategic Plan 2005-2010 details four General Goals, the last (Goal 4) being the building
of the Appalachian Development Highway System. While New York State recognizes this as a
crucial goal, projects involving actual highway construction are funded through and administered
by other Federal and State Agencies. Therefore, all projects must implement an identified New
York State strategy for addressing one of only the first three ARC General Goals: General Goal
1 (Increase Job Opportunities and Per Capita Income in Appalachia to Reach Parity with the
Nation), General Goal 2 (Strengthen the Capacity of the People of Appalachia to Compete in the
Global Economy) and General Goal 3 (Develop and Improve Appalachia’s Infrastructure to
Make the Region Economically Competitive). Please refer to Section V for specific New York
State Strategies.

INELIGIBLE PROJECT ACTIVITIES

ARC resources may not be used to provide assistance for:

1.     Relocating a business or industry;
2.     Recruitment activities that place a state in competition with one or more other states;
3.     Projects that promote unfair competition between businesses within the same immediate
       service area.

MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT

ARC funds cannot be used to carry out activities previously or currently undertaken with other
federal, state, or local funds. Fully documented expansions of previous activities can be funded
only to the extent of the expansion.




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APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY

Eligible applicants include any municipality, governmental entity or non-profit (not for profit)
entity that is public or private; projects MUST serve a portion of the Appalachian Region: in
New York State this encompasses the 14 Southern Tier Counties. Projects MUST support the
State’s Appalachian Program’s priorities in the Region. Project sponsor does not need to be
physically located in the Appalachian Region.

DOLLAR LIMITS FOR ARC FUNDING

There is a limit of $150,000 on the ARC portion of all projects in New York State.

MATCHING ARC RESOURCES

For the FY 2010 program year, thirteen of the Appalachian Counties in New York State have
been designated “transitional" by ARC, while Allegany County has been designated “at-risk.”
ARC’s county designations have important implications for legislatively mandated match
requirements. For projects in the transitional counties, ARC financial assistance may not exceed
50% of the total eligible project cost. For projects in “at risk” counties, ARC financial assistance
may not exceed 70% of the total eligible project cost.

Funds used to match the ARC grant may include both cash and documented "in-kind"
contributions. All such match must directly relate to and support specific project activities and
represent new expenditures above and beyond ongoing activities of the project sponsor. (See
"Maintenance of Effort" on previous page.)

In-kind contributions may involve equipment or other goods, paid personal services, or donated
office space. However, in-kind "rental" charges for the following types of office space are not
acceptable as match: (1) space presently rented by the project sponsor, (2) space in facilities
constructed with any federal funds, (3) space in any facility owned by the project sponsor or by
an entity closely related to the project sponsor, or (4) space in any public building. All in-kind
matching contributions must otherwise be allowable charges to the ARC grant to be accepted as
match. Further guidance can be provided by the appropriate documents of the U.S. Office of
Management and Budget (OMB), including the OMB Common Rule (Uniform Administrative
Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments) and
OMB Circular A-110 (Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals
and other Nonprofit Organizations). These documents may be found at
www.whitehouse.gov/omb.

Other federal funds may be used as matching funds for ARC grants, except as specifically
provided in federal statutes. Total federal funding from all sources for infrastructure,
construction and equipment projects is limited to 80% of total project cost. Community
Development Block Grant funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
and all federal loans are considered to be local funds for the purposes of matching ARC projects.




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There is a 20% cash match requirement relating to the equipment components of all projects
involving equipment. "Equipment" is defined by ARC as tangible non-expendable personal
property having both a useful life of more than one year and a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or
more. Any questions should be directed to the appropriate LDD.

TIME LIMITS FOR ARC FUNDING OF PROJECTS

Projects with an operations component are normally permitted funding for a reasonable start-up
period plus at least 12 months of direct operations, not to exceed 18 months. Start-up activities
may include hiring and training staff, setting up offices, developing administrative policies,
renovations for child care or vocational education facilities, etc. Sponsors are encouraged to
request realistic project periods. It is expected that most approved projects will receive one ARC
grant for one program period (“program year”). In limited cases, at the request of the appropriate
LDD, ARC grant funding for a second or third (continuation) program period may be permitted.
 In these cases a “second year” or “third year” application will be required and will compete with
all other applications submitted. Evaluation of these applications will be based on project
progress, demonstration of continued need, and sufficient resources available to New York State.

INDIRECT COSTS

Overhead and other indirect expenses of a project sponsor are generally not eligible as project
costs for operating projects, either as part of the ARC portion or the match.

OVERRUNS AND UNDERRUNS

ARC funding for project cost overruns should not be anticipated. ARC funds are considered to
be the last dollars spent on a given project. If a project is closed out having spent less than the
originally approved budget amount, ARC funds in the amount of the underrun are subject to
return to the administering agency (ARC or other basic agency) by the project sponsor.

PROJECT PERFORMANCE REPORTING

The Government Performance and Results Act mandates that ARC collect and report
information, for at least three years, to the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on
project performance to judge effectiveness in meeting ARC goals. Output measures quantify a
project's immediate products and activities, which have been identified in the project application.
Outcome measures assess longer-term results of project outputs by gauging quantitatively
project accomplishments. These measures, which are included under each eligible project
category in Section V below, are designed to meet the need of ARC for reporting performance
information to the OMB and congressional entities. There is generally a choice in the outcome
measures for each eligible project category; they should be utilized as appropriate. Since OMB
has indicated a desire for increased standardization of measures between agencies, the identified
output and outcome measures are subject to change. Project sponsors are encouraged in all cases
to consult the appropriate LDD for guidance.



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VI. ELIGIBLE PROJECT ACTIVITIES

All Area Development projects must implement one of the New York State Strategies under one
of the three ARC Strategic Goals (presented on the following pages). Under each Goal, there is
at least one Strategic Objective. One or more NYS strategies address each objective. The
strategies are the key statements of New York State policy for use of ARC resources.
Under each strategy, categories of projects eligible for ARC funding are identified. Activities
that are encouraged because they reflect particular State-local policy emphases are identified.
Output and outcome measures of performance for individual projects are also included under
each eligible project category. The LDDs will help sponsors determine under which Strategy
their project fits.

Note: The best projects are those that implement parts of a well-conceived regional
development strategy. Therefore one of the key ranking considerations will be how the
proposed project conforms to and complements a regional plan for development.



ARC GENERAL GOAL 1: Increase Job Opportunities and Per Capita Income in
Appalachia to Reach Parity with the Nation

In partnership with NYS, ARC will help local and state leaders diversify local economies,
support entrepreneurship, increase domestic and global markets, and foster new technologies.
Additionally local leaders will be encouraged to build upon opportunities presented by the
Appalachian Development Highway System and to examine existing community strategic assets
to create jobs, while preserving the character of the Region’s communities.

ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.1: FOSTER CIVIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

NYS Strategy 1.1a: Support programs that foster broad-based civic engagement and
support strategic readiness to take advantage of economic opportunities.

Technical Assistance projects promoting leadership development focusing on local development
and implementation of economic development strategies. Provision of technical assistance to
facilitate informed local decisions is expected in the implementation of these projects. These
projects may involve:
         1.     Assistance in creating economic development strategies.
         2.     Strategic planning to help direct and select appropriate development along
                completed and future segments of the Appalachian Development Highway
                System (ADHS). In New York, the ADHS includes Corridor T (I-86), Corridor U
                (NYS Route 328) and Corridor U-1 (NYS Route 15).

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS OF ASSISTANCE.
         • PRODUCT OF PROJECT ACTIVITIES, SUCH AS ECONOMIC


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               DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES OR STRATEGIC PLANS.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED.
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES STARTED.

NYS Strategy 1.1b: Support regionally based local government capacity-building programs
to foster sustainable economic development.

Training projects strengthening the skills of local government officials and/or civic leaders to
address economic development and resource utilization concerns. These projects may include
workshops, conferences and seminars that build the capacity to collaborate with all stakeholders
by increasing skills in consensus building, communication, networking, knowledge and
understanding of economic and social trends, and other elements of civic capacity.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS TRAINED.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • PARTICIPANT-INITIATED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS
         • PROGRAMS RESULTING IN DOCUMENTED NEW JOBS.

NYS Strategy 1.1c: Encourage the establishment of new partnerships and initiation of new
service delivery mechanisms on a multi-jurisdictional basis that promote economic
development.

Local government assistance demonstrations directed towards intermunicipal cooperation and
more effective delivery of programs and services on a multi-jurisdictional basis. Projects
institutionalizing a partnership by formal agreement or implementing small-scale demonstrations
are encouraged. Projects should be coordinated with the LDDs, which in some cases can serve
as initial conveners and catalysts of local action.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS INVOLVED IN NEW COOPERATIVE SERVICE
            DELIVERY MECHANISM.
           •   ESTABLISHMENT OF PARTNERSHIP.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
           •   INCREASED SERVICE DELIVERY, BY RECIPIENT AND SERVICE TYPE, AS
               A RESULT OF MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL AGREEMENT.



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.2: DIVERSIFY THE ECONOMIC BASE

NYS Strategy 1.2a: Encourage the development and implementation of new and innovative

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approaches to build diverse and sustainable local economies that provide employment and
entrepreneurial opportunities to all citizens.

Business development and assistance projects focusing on local development and
implementation of projects that assist business development and expansion of existing
businesses. These projects may involve:
       1.     Strengthening of organizations and networks supporting small business
              development and/or inter-firm sharing and cooperation;
       2.     Provision and coordination of new technical assistance services to businesses
              related to management and marketing;
       3.     Facilitation of technology transfer;
       4.     Activities supporting export-related technical assistance, sector related strategies
              and innovative entrepreneurship.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE OR BUSINESS
            SERVICES.
         • ESTABLISHMENT OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE NETWORKS.
         • SECTOR RELATED STRATEGIC PLANS.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED OR RETAINED.
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES STARTED AND/OR ENTERPRISES
            ESTABLISHED
         • INCREASE IN EXPORT DOLLARS.

NYS Strategy 1.2b: Support innovative efforts to deliver entrepreneurial and management
skills training to small- and medium-sized firms.

Entrepreneurial and managerial skills training projects designed to improve the economic
viability, productivity, and competitiveness of small- and medium-sized enterprises (less than
250 employees). Assisted enterprises should have the documented potential for substantial local
economic impact and job creation/retention. Innovative training projects involving distance
learning and/or Internet use as well as traditional classroom-based educational activities will be
considered. Training activities leading to expanded markets for goods and services through
export-related technical assistance, sector-based e-commerce, and innovative entrepreneurship
are encouraged.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS IN TRAINING PROJECT.
       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED AND/OR RETAINED.
         • INCREASED EXPORT TRADE.
         • OTHER MEASURES OF LOCAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ATTRIBUTABLE TO

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               PROJECT EDUCATION/TRAINING ACTIVITIES CAN SUPPLEMENT THE
               ABOVE MEASURES, SUCH AS PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENTS, NEW
               PRODUCTS AND SERVICES, ETC.



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.3: ENHANCE ENTREPRENEURIAL ACTIVITY

NYS Strategy 1.3a: Support the provision of entrepreneurial training and education for
youths, students and business persons.

Education and training projects developed to stimulate entrepreneurship through the
introduction of entrepreneurial content into the curriculum of primary and secondary school
courses. At the middle and high school education level, nonprofit organizations, as well as
business and trade groups, can assist in the initiation and development of alternative educational
venues, including mentoring programs. In addition, by providing hands-on activities that expose
students to entrepreneurial environments, permit them to explore the tasks and challenges of
enterprise development. Post-secondary educational institutions, as well as other agencies, also
play an important role as colleges and universities can offer more advanced educational and
training courses, technical assistance and information to established entrepreneurs and those who
wish to start businesses.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS IN TRAINING PROGRAMS.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED/RETAINED.
         • NUMBER OF NEW BUSINESS START-UPS/EXPANSIONS.
         • NUMBER OF PARTCIPANTS WITH IMPROVED SKILLS OR COMPLETED
            PROGRAM (i.e. course with certified skills)

NYS Strategy 1.3b: Develop technical assistance networks through business incubators,
business associations and private-sector resources to nurture new businesses.

Development of formal and informal networks of professional and trade service providers
linking entrepreneurs and firms to various business, technical, educational, training and
information services. Such service provider networks can realize synergies in providing a one-
stop shop for their customers, even though all the providers may not be under one roof. An
entrepreneurial business network can coordinate the provision of services to customers and
supply specific resources including legal services; protection of intellectual property services in
support of the acquisition and use of advanced technology; and consultation on strategic
planning, marketing and advertising. Moreover, collaboration among service providers often
generates unique technical assistance resources for entrepreneurs. Creation of business networks
that provide the sharing of information and knowledge between entrepreneurs that can stimulate
new types of business collaborations and new market opportunities are also eligible.

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       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES ASSISTED.
           •   ESTABLISHMENT OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE NETWORKS.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED/RETAINED.
           •   NUMBER OF BUSINESS START-UPS/EXPANSIONS.



NYS Strategy 1.3c: Improve access to debt and equity capital by such means as facilitating
the establishment of development venture capital funds.

Projects that identify initial debt and equity capital for new businesses. Often the most daunting
hurdle for an entrepreneur to clear is the identification of start up capital, particularly equity
capitalization. Other financing problems include finding seed capital for new technological
innovation, loan packaging assistance and long-term debt financing for newer companies or
businesses that are seeking to expand. A wide range of private and public institutions play a role
in servicing these financial needs, but the role of development finance institutions is particularly
important for rural regions like Appalachia, as these organizations often provide both finance
and technical assistance to new and expanding small businesses.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   ANTICIPATED NUMBER OF LOANS PROVIDED AND ENTERPRISES
               ASSISTED.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NEW BUSINESS START-UPS/EXPANSIONS
         • JOBS CREATED/RETAINED ATTRIBUTABLE TO PROJECT.

NYS Strategy 1.3d: Recapitalize existing regional revolving loan funds to aid business
development.

Business development projects providing funds to recapitalize existing regional revolving loan
funds are eligible. These funds may support facilities, construction, or equipment for private
firms satisfactorily documenting need. Only existing ARC-recognized revolving loan funds will
be eligible for funding in each LDD region. Project sponsors must demonstrate and
satisfactorily document effective past usage, immediate present need, and potential usage for the
recapitalization resources to encourage quality jobs. ARC's Revolving Loan Fund Guidelines
must be followed.


       OUTPUT MEASURES:


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           •   AMOUNT OF RECAPITALIZATION.
           •   ANTICIPATED NUMBER OF LOANS PROVIDED AND ENTERPRISES
               ASSISTED.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
           •   NEW BUSINESS START-UPS/EXPANSIONS AND/OR
           •   JOBS CREATED/RETAINED ATTRIBUTABLE TO PROJECT.



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.4:
DEVELOP AND MARKET STRATEGIC ASSETS FOR LOCAL ECONOMIES

NYS Strategy 1.4: The communities of Appalachian New York will identify and leverage
their local cultural, heritage, natural and community assets for economic development.

Asset-based projects that integrate conservation and economic development in the Region,
advancing the idea that economic development should not only be fiscally sound, but
environmentally responsible, aesthetically pleasing and should create a balanced, livable
community. Appalachian communities offer what an increasing number of Americans value: a
quality of life that offers a clean environment, safe streets and a friendly, small town atmosphere.
 Many of Appalachia's communities also have tremendous social, environmental and cultural
values that define the region and make it unique from anywhere else in America. This approach
to development recognizes and builds on indigenous resources, experience, wisdom, skills and
capacity in Appalachian communities. Creating local homegrown economic opportunity is
central to this asset-based approach.

Asset-based development projects will identify local and regional assets for development,
support public involvement and participation in strategic planning; provide access to information
necessary to make sound decisions; provide access to capital to promote sustainable business or
to finance the infrastructure necessary to stimulate public and private investment; and, support
collaborations of the necessary partners to make a balanced, livable community, help existing
and new local businesses capitalize on indigenous assets, and support efforts to maximize the
economic benefits of the Appalachian heritage tourism and crafts industries through awareness
and marketing opportunities.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE.
         • PRODUCT OF ACTIVITIES, SUCH AS ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
            STRATEGIES OR STRATEGIC PLANS.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED.
           •   NUMBER OF BUSINESS START-UPS.


                                                                                                 16
           •   LEVERAGED PRIVATE INVESTMENT



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.5: INCREASE THE DOMESTIC AND GLOBAL
COMPETITIVENESS OF THE EXISTING ECONOMIC BASE

NYS Strategy 1.5: Assist communities in job creation by helping local firms find and take
advantage of new markets at home and abroad.

Projects will embrace both new domestic and global opportunities to promote increased
international business activity. Taking advantage of new markets and promoting foreign direct
investment are effective approaches that can generate job opportunities and help communities
enhance their competitive advantage. Projects should support research opportunities in global
and domestic development, and provide technical assistance and ongoing business consultation
to help medium and small businesses connect to national and international markets.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES ASSISTED.
         • PRODUCT OF PROJECT ACTIVITIES, SUCH AS BUSINESS
            DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED.
         • NUMBER OF NEW MARKETS DEVELOPED.
         • AMOUNT OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.6:
FOSTER THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES.

NYS Strategy 1.6: Support and promote opportunities to close the job gap in Appalachia
New York through high value-added industries such as telecommunications and computing
services.

Information technology projects will build partnerships with federal and private-sector research
labs, research universities and other technology organizations to help create and retain
technology-related jobs. Efforts will focus on assisting in the creation of telecommunications
and computing enterprises; providing assistance for expanding existing high-technology
operations in the Region; promoting partnerships with and leveraging research opportunities
generated by government-sponsored and private-sector research labs; expanding and creating
technology research initiatives in the Region’s colleges and universities; and increasing support
for public-sector science and technology programs.
       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS IN PARTNERSHIPS.

                                                                                                17
           •   NUMBER OF BUSINESSES ASSISTED.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED.
           •   NUMBER OF NEW BUSINESS START-UPS/EXPANSIONS.




ARC GENERAL GOAL 2: Strengthen the Capacity of the People of Appalachia
to Compete in the Global Economy

To compete in the twenty-first century economy, the people of Appalachia must have the skills
and knowledge required to develop and work in globally competitive businesses. Appalachian
residents must also have adequate health care to promote socially and economically competitive
communities, and opportunities to make all Appalachian citizens productive participants in the
global economy.


ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.1: FOSTER CIVIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

NYS Strategy 2.1: Appalachian New York will develop strong leaders, organizations and
communities to promote the Region’s competitiveness.

Projects promoting leadership development, civic involvement and community improvement.
Capacity-building activities that strengthen collaborative relationships among all community
stakeholders that encourage innovative and achievable first steps and that provide an increase in
awareness of, and dialogue on, strategic opportunities contributing to improved community
responsibility and use of resources. Projects implementing specific small-scale community
development activities or a community visioning process are encouraged. Where feasible, such
projects should utilize self-help approaches. Youth initiatives improving local civic education
and training opportunities supporting greater involvement of young people in community
activities are also eligible. Appropriate projects should be coordinated with the LDDs.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS.
         • NUMBER OF NEW PROGRAMS
           •   PRODUCT OF CAPACITY-BUILDING OR VISIONING PROCESS
               (DEVELOPMENT PLAN, ETC.), PARTICULARLY IF INSTITUTIONALIZED
               OR PARTICIPANT-INITIATED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS COMPLETING TRAINING AND ACTIVELY
               INVOLVED IN LEADERSHIP POSITIONS


                                                                                               18
           •   NUMBER OF COMMUNITIES IMPLEMENTING PLANS
           •   INCREASE IN ORGANIZATION’S EFFICINEY, EFFECTIVENESS,
               DIVERSITY



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.2:
ENHANCE WORKFORCE SKILLS THROUGH TRAINING

NYS Strategy 2.2: Residents of Appalachian New York will have access to a range of basic
and advanced skills development and vocational educational programs to enhance
employment prospects.

Workforce training projects to improve the job prospects of people in Appalachian New York,
including vocational education projects, customized training and skills upgrading projects, and
innovative skills training partnerships and consortia. The intent of these projects is to build a
competitive and productive workforce through development of skills and proficiency relevant to
the existing and anticipated regional job market, increase worker productivity and build the
capacity of workforce training institutions and regional skills partnerships.

Generic training projects under the umbrella of public or not-for-profit training institutions, such
as community colleges, Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), and other
eligible providers of training services are encouraged because of their capacity-building
potential. Eligible project activities include vocational education operations/ equipment projects
and customized employer-specific training/ skills upgrading projects, as supported by the
appropriate Local Workforce Investment Board. Employer-specific training must be
administered by these or similar training institutions.

Projects sponsored by the above-cited organizations and other innovative skills training
partnerships and consortia that encourage collaboration among businesses, educational
institutions, labor, and State and local governments are also eligible for ARC funding. These
may include training/skills needs assessments, training program development, and
apprenticeship programs.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF TRAINEES ENROLLED OR OTHERWISE PARTICIPATING IN
               TRAINING PROGRAMS AND RELATED ACTIVITIES.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         o NUMBER OF TRAINEES SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETING TRAINING
            PROGRAM;
         o NUMBER OF TRAINEES OBTAINING OR ENHANCING EMPLOYMENT.




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ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.3: INCREASE ACCESS TO QUALITY CHILD CARE
AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

NYS Strategy 2.3: Support the development of comprehensive, community-based quality
child care and early education programs for children and families.

Child care programs, with early education components addressing defined community needs.
All projects should meet New York State requirements and standards for licensing, include well-
thought-out educational elements, address the need for qualified staff, and demonstrate strong
community support. Projects established or adapted to meet the needs of specific industries and
their employees are encouraged. These types of projects can stimulate employment and job
retention for working families and eliminate dependent care requirements as an obstacle to
economic growth.

Educational components of child care projects should be focused on ensuring that children arrive
at school ready to learn. School-age child care projects that have strong educational components
and facilitate the success of welfare-to-work initiatives will be considered. Eligible activities
may include surveys/ evaluations of child care and early childhood education needs, start-up
costs, operations, and incidental/ancillary renovation, such as painting and carpets.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS SERVED BY DAY CARE PROJECT.
           •   NUMBER OF CHILDREN RECEIVING EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONAL
               SERVICES DURING PROGRAM YEAR.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF CHILDREN ENTERING GRADE SCHOOL "READY TO
            LEARN."
           •   NUMBER OF JOBS FOR WORKING FAMILIES CREATED AND/OR
               RETAINED BECAUSE OF ARC-SUPPORTED AVAILABILITY OF CHILD
               CARE.



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.4:
INCREASE EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND ACHIEVEMENT

NYS Strategy 2.4a: Support local and regional efforts to better prepare students, out-of-
school youths and adults for post-secondary level training.

Basic skills projects for adults to improve reading, writing, arithmetical, or basic computer
literacy skills in direct preparation for training or employment. Individual projects should
enhance the capacity of the sponsoring institution to continue basic skills training programs
following completion of the ARC grant. The skills developed should be relevant to the current
and anticipated regional job market. The new curricular standards of the New York State
Education Department (SED) should be followed where applicable.



                                                                                              20
       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN PROGRAM.
           •   NUMBER OF COURSES AND INSTRUCTORS MADE AVAILABLE.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF STUDENTS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETING PROGRAM WHO
               SUBSEQUENTLY GAINED OR ENHANCED EMPLOYMENT OR ENGAGED
               IN ADVANCED EDUCATION/TRAINING.



NYS Strategy 2.4b: Maintain support for and seek expansion of the Appalachian Higher
Education Network and other programs that increase college-going rates.

College preparation projects should support efforts to promote the benefits of a college
education and prepare students for college entrance, with a focus on those students who would
not otherwise go onto college.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS.

       OUTCOME MEASURES:
           •   INCREASE IN NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENTERING COLLEGE AS A
               DIRECT RESULT OF PROJECT.

NYS Strategy 2.4c: Build the capacity of local school districts, BOCES, community colleges
and other institutions to provide basic workforce readiness skills to help all students find
and hold jobs.

Educational excellence projects such as dropout prevention efforts, school-business partnerships,
and math-science-technology programs with business and government to prepare secondary-
level (middle and high school) students for the 21st century. These projects should be part of a
broader strategy to address well-defined educational needs. Cooperative (preferably multi-
jurisdictional and agency collaborations) efforts maximizing use of public and private resources
to address the defined problem are encouraged. The applicable curricular standards of the New
York State Education Department (NYSED) should be followed.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS ENROLLED IN PROGRAM.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETING PROGRAM
            WHO GRADUATED FROM HIGH SCHOOL, OBTAINED A GENERAL
            EDUCATION DIPLOMA, OR PROGRESSED TO EMPLOYMENT OR POST-
            SECONDARY EDUCATION ONE YEAR AFTER PROGRAM COMPLETION.
           •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS ACHIEVING TARGET LEVELS OF
               PROFICIENCY.

                                                                                                21
ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.5:
PROVIDE ACCESS TO HEALTH-CARE PROFESSIONALS

NYS Strategy 2.5: Work to eliminate gaps in the delivery of primary health care and
mental health services by developing or expanding health/mental health care programs in
Appalachian New York, particularly those areas with a shortage of health professionals,
and promoting health professional recruitment, training, and retention, and facilitating
emergency medical services training in rural areas.

Health (including mental health) projects developing or expanding licensed primary health care
(including dental) and mental health programs in areas with a shortage of health professionals.
These programs must address well-defined service delivery needs, include detailed self-sufficiency
plans, and demonstrate support by the New York State Health Department if appropriate.

Rural health projects promoting rural health professional** recruitment and retention. These
projects may involve technical assistance to rural communities in areas with a shortage of health
professionals to design appropriate practice opportunities, improving in-state medical training
curricula to support practice in rural areas in Appalachian New York, and/or expanding appropriate
rotations and residencies in Appalachian New York. This includes emergency medical services
training. In all cases there must be close coordination with and support from the New York State
Department of Health, which cooperates with the New York State Department of State in making
recommendations for ARC's J-1 Visa Waiver Program for foreign physicians providing primary care
and certain other services in Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs) in Appalachian New
York.
 
       **       IMPORTANT NOTE: Health care professionals may include, but
                are not limited to, physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists,
                dental hygienists, paramedics, emergency medical technicians, etc.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF RECIPIENTS OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN
            SUPPORTED CLINICS DURING OPERATIONAL PHASE OF PROJECT.
         • NUMBER OF PHYSICIANS/HEALTH PROFESSIONALS PLACED IN
            SHORTAGE AREAS THROUGH PROJECT ACTIVITIES.

       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • INCREASED ACCESS TO PRIMARY HEALTH CARE IN RURAL AREAS,
            DOCUMENTED BY NUMBER OF PATIENT VISITS IN ARC-SUPPORTED
            PRIMARY HEALTH CARE CLINICS.
         • REDUCTION IN NUMBER OF AREAS WITH A SHORTAGE OF HEALTH
            PROFESSIONALS.
            •   NUMBER OF PHYSICIANS AND OTHER HEALTH PROFESSIONALS
                RECRUITED TO PROJECT AREA AND CONTINUING TO SERVE AFTER 4
                YEARS.


                                                                                               22
ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.6:
PROMOTE HEALTH THROUGH WELLNESS AND PREVENTION

NYS Strategy 2.6: Residents of Appalachian New York will lead healthy lives.

Health and Wellness projects will educate Appalachians on positive health behaviors, key to
developing a stronger workforce and ensuring the long-term viability of the Region. Appalachia
suffers from disproportionately high rates of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease,
cancer, and diabetes that have a significant adverse effect on workforce participation and
productivity, and impedes opportunity for economic growth. Projects will promote nutrition
education, physical activity and early screening as a means of eliminating or reducing the
incidence of obesity, diabetes, cancer and heart disease; and/or encourage the development of
initiatives and investments that promote healthy lifestyles.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS IN PROGRAM.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • IMPROVEMENT IN THE HEALTH OF PARTICIPANTS.




ARC GENERAL GOAL 3: Develop and Improve Appalachia’s Infrastructure to
Make the Region Economically Competitive

Appalachian Communities will have the physical infrastructure necessary for self-sustaining
economic development and improved quality of life. This includes water and sewer systems,
telecommunications systems, inter-modal transportation systems and the region’s environmental
infrastructure.


ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.1: FOSTER CIVIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

NYS Strategy 3.1: Produce visionary leaders and effective organizations that are able to
strategically mobilize communities toward their goals in developing the regional
infrastructure necessary to make Appalachian New York competitive.

Infrastructure related strategic development and technical assistance projects should build the
organizational capacity required to meet increasing demands related to technology,
environmental standards and changing revenue sources. Projects should provide training,
consultation and financial support for local leaders and organizations to build their capacity to
address infrastructure challenges and opportunities; and support partnerships and regional efforts
among local and state governments, nonprofit agencies, and citizens engaged in infrastructure


                                                                                               23
development. Eligible projects will also include the creation of strategic planning initiatives to
prioritize infrastructure development.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS.
         • PRODUCT OF STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS (INFRASTRUCTURE
            STRATEGY).


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED/RETAINED.
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES ASSISTED.



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.2:
BUILD AND ENHANCE BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE

NYS Strategy 3.2a: Provide basic and/or supplemental funding assistance for the basic
physical infrastructure necessary for creation or retention of jobs.

The development and improvement of water and wastewater systems supporting job creation or
retention. The goal of these projects should be the creation and retention of jobs in Appalachian
New York. Local infrastructure projects should implement LDD strategic plans. Projects linked
with Appalachian Development Highway Corridors and all existing and proposed Interstate
Highways in Appalachian New York are encouraged.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   PHYSICAL RESULT OF PROJECT, SUCH AS WATER TREATMENT
               FACILITY, PUMPING/TREATMENT FACILITY, INCREASE IN CAPACITY
               OR STORAGE (MEASURED BY MGD) OR LINEAR FEET OF PIPE
               INSTALLED.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED OR RETAINED.
         • NUMBER OF ADDITIONAL OR CURRENT BUSINESSES AND ANCILLARY
            HOUSEHOLDS SERVED BY INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT.
         • LEVERAGED PRIVATE INVESTMENT



NYS Strategy 3.2b: Help rural communities in distressed areas/“pockets of poverty” (as
defined by ARC) to work with public and private agencies to address documented critical
health issues.

The development and improvement of water and wastewater systems addressing fully
documented critical health needs in distressed areas/“pockets of poverty” (as defined by ARC).




                                                                                                 24
** Projects under this Strategy, which also have anticipated positive economic impacts or
involve multi-jurisdictional approaches and/or partnerships with the private sector, are more
likely to receive funding consideration and are strongly encouraged.

** IMPORTANT NOTE: “Policy for Residential Infrastructure Projects” - The ARC
Program is primarily an economic development program. ARC will provide grants for basic
residential infrastructure projects only for communities in ARC designated distressed counties
except that such assistance may be provided in a transitional county upon a special showing of
compelling need, such as the location of the project in a distressed area of the county or as
disaster relief or to address a mandate of the Federal EPA or a New York State health or
environmental agency (i.e. Order of Consent), or other confirmed imminent public health threat
justified by these agencies. Self-help projects for basic residential infrastructure may also be
funded in transitional counties.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
           •   PHYSICAL RESULT OF PROJECT, SUCH AS WATER TREATMENT
               FACILITY, PUMPING/TREATMENT FACILITY, INCREASE IN CAPACITY
               OR STORAGE (MEASURED BY MGD) OR LINEAR FEET OF PIPE
               INSTALLED.
           •   MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL AGREEMENTS REACHED.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • DOCUMENTED REMEDIATION OF CRITICAL HEALTH ISSUE.
         • NUMBER OF ADDITIONAL OR CURRENT RESIDENTIAL UNITS (AND
            BUSINESSES IF ANY) SERVED BY PROJECT.
           •   NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED OR RETAINED (IF ANY).
           •   LEVERAGED PRIVATE INVESTMENT (IF ANY).



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.3: INCREASE THE ACCESSIBILITY AND
USE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY

NYS Strategy 3.3a: Support telecommunications network development, technical
assistance, and training for educational, business, governmental, and other users.

Telecommunications projects consistent with New York State and Local Development District
(LDD) priorities and plans, including the ARC-supported Strategic Telecommunications
Initiative in the Southern Tier. These projects might involve (1) telecommunications equipment
and network development activities creating, expanding, or enhancing telecommunications
networks in Appalachian New York and facilitating access to and utilization of new technologies
and applications or (2) technical assistance and training for the education, business, government,
and health sectors. Where possible, projects should be coordinated with the telecommunications
activities of the LDDs, and serve multiple categories of beneficiaries in the above-cited sectors.

Equipment and network development projects funded under this strategy should be developed in
accordance with principles of open network architecture to foster interconnectivity and

                                                                                                25
interoperability with other telecommunications networks. Projects utilized by consortia
involving multiple sectors are encouraged. Projects should also promote telecommunications
development that coincides with other public infrastructure development.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
          •   NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS IN TELECOMMUNICATIONS-FACILITATED
              ACTIVITIES, OR RECIPIENTS OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND
              TRAINING BY CATEGORY OF BENEFICIARY.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF NEW TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACCESS SITES SERVING 50
            OR MORE STUDENTS, BUSINESSPEOPLE, WORKERS, OR GOVERNMENT
            OFFICIALS PER WEEK.
         • NUMBER OF INSTITUTIONS, BY CATEGORY OF BENEFICIARY,
            UTILIZING TELECOMMUNICATIONS OVER PERIOD OF TIME AS RESULT
            OF PROJECT.
          •   COST SAVINGS THROUGH USE OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS.

NYS Strategy 3.3b: Support telemedicine as a means of universal access to comprehensive
health care and as a tool for health education and training.

Telecommunications projects focusing on telemedicine and telehealth consistent with New York
State and Local Development District (LDD) priorities and plans, including the ARC-supported
Strategic Telecommunications Initiative in the Southern Tier. Projects involving telemedicine
equipment, the creation, expansion, and enhancement of telemedicine networks in Appalachian
New York, and associated telehealth education and training activities are eligible. Projects
supported under this strategy should, to the maximum extent possible, be developed in
accordance with principles of open network architecture to foster interconnectivity and
interoperability with other telecommunications networks. Sponsors of all projects under this
strategy are encouraged to include educational or training components.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS, STUDENTS, AND OTHERS
            PARTICIPATING IN TELEMEDICINE AND/OR TELEHEALTH ACTIVITIES.

       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF TELEMEDICINE SITES SERVING “CLIENTS” REGULARLY.
         • INCREASED ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE THROUGH USE OF
            TELEMEDICINE EQUIPMENT AS INDICATED BY NUMBER OF
            CONSULTATIONS OR PROCEDURES FACILITATED.
          •   NUMBER OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS AND OTHERS TRAINED DURING
              TELEHEALTH PROJECT.




                                                                                             26
ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.4:
BUILD AND ENHANCE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS

NYS Strategy 3.4a: Develop and support regional planning and economic development
policies that promote good stewardship of the Region’s natural resources and encourage
eco-industrial development.

Infrastructure projects promoting the responsible stewardship and use of Appalachian New
York’s natural assets and the development of environmentally sensitive industries. Typically,
the term infrastructure is thought of as the roads, sewers and utility lines. However, the region as
a whole has not planned for and managed our environmental infrastructure to the economic
benefit of the region. This includes our interconnected network of waterways, woodlands,
wildlife habitats, parks and conservation lands, working farms and ranches that sustain air and
water resources and contribute to the health and quality of life for America's communities and
people. These resources can all play a vital part in putting the Region on an equal economic
footing with the rest of the nation.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES ASSISTED.

       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED.
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES STARTED.

NYS Strategy 3.4b: Provide basic/and or supplemental funding assistance for the physical
infrastructure necessary for creation or retention of jobs, including support for re-use of
former industrial sites

Infrastructure projects assisting in development and rehabilitation of industrial/business sites
and business incubators encouraging the creation of new enterprises and the expansion of
existing businesses. This includes reclamation and reuse of brownfields properties in industrial
areas. Projects may have more speculative job commitments, but a formally organized and
experienced economic development organization must be involved in project administration and
oversight.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF SITES RE-USED.
         • NUMBER OF BUSINESSES LOCATED TO SITE OR FACILITY.
           •   NUMBER OF SQUARE FEET OR ACRES AVAILABLE FOR
               BUSINESS/INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT MEETING REGIONALLY
               DEFINED QUALITY CRITERIA.


       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED OR RETAINED.

                                                                                                 27
           •   NUMBER OF BUSINESSES CREATED OR GRADUATED FROM BUSINESS
               INCUBATOR.
           •   LEVERAGED PRIVATE INVESTMENT



ARC STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.5: PROMOTE THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN
INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION NETWORK

NYS Strategy 3.5: Support the development of intermodal transportation systems with
fast, efficient and dependable access to worldwide suppliers and markets.

Projects strengthening support for intermodal transportation strategies designed to improve
access to the Region’s transportation network (including aviation, local transit systems, railway
systems and inland waterways) as well as to increase the responsiveness of that network to the
needs of businesses, communities and residents. Projects may also support strategic planning
initiatives for local organizations and agencies to capitalize on economic development
opportunities created by the Appalachian Development Highway Systems (ADHS). Activities
may include: studies on enhancing economic development opportunities presented by
intermodalism; analysis of strategic locations for inland ports; regional forums to discuss the
potential for intermodal development; and construction of local access roads in support of the
creation of jobs that link economic development opportunities to the ADHS and other major
highways.

       OUTPUT MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF PARTICIPANTS.
         • PRODUCT OF STRATEGIC PLANNING INITIATIVES (STUDY, STRATEGIC
            PLAN).
         • ACCESS ROADS.

       OUTCOME MEASURES:
         • NUMBER OF JOBS CREATED.
         • NUMBER OF NEW BUSINESSES STARTED.




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