BEACON SEARCHES

Document Sample
BEACON SEARCHES Powered By Docstoc
					BEACON/TRANSCEIVER	
  SEARCHES	
  
(Courtesy	
  of	
  Verena	
  Blasy,	
  Bridget	
  Daughney,	
  Monica	
  Nissen,	
  Kirstie	
  Simpson,	
  Lori	
  
Zak)	
  
	
  
Grade	
  Appropriate:	
  K-­‐12	
  
	
  
Purpose:	
  To	
  demonstrate	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  a	
  beacon	
  (transceiver).	
  To	
  show	
  the	
  limits	
  of	
  
what	
  a	
  beacon	
  can	
  and	
  can’t	
  do.	
  For	
  instance	
  it	
  can’t	
  save	
  a	
  person’s	
  life	
  if	
  no	
  one	
  
knows	
  how	
  to	
  use	
  it!	
  
	
  
Materials:	
  In-­‐class:	
  2	
  beacons	
  
	
             	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Gymnasium:	
  multiple	
  beacons,	
  coloured	
  cards	
  
	
             	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  Outdoors:	
  multiple	
  beacons,	
  probes,	
  shovels,	
  coulored	
  cards,	
  candy	
  prize	
  
	
  
Presenting:	
  There	
  are	
  indoor	
  and	
  outdoor	
  options	
  with	
  this	
  activity.	
  
	
  
Prep:	
  There	
  is	
  no	
  prep	
  for	
  the	
  following	
  activities	
  besides	
  gathering	
  materials	
  and	
  
making	
  sure	
  the	
  space	
  is	
  adequate.	
  If	
  you	
  prefer	
  to	
  bury	
  the	
  beacons	
  outside	
  before	
  
students	
  arrive	
  you	
  may.	
  Alternately	
  you	
  can	
  set	
  up	
  a	
  “rescue	
  scenario”	
  before	
  
students	
  arrive	
  so	
  they	
  could	
  walk	
  into	
  a	
  search	
  scenario.	
  
	
  
Tip:	
  (Courtesy	
  Kirstie	
  Simpson)	
  
               With	
  the	
  little	
  guys	
  we	
  compare	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  a	
  beacon	
  with	
  the	
  use	
  of	
  a	
  seat	
  
belt.	
  It	
  can’t	
  protect	
  you	
  from	
  everything	
  and	
  you	
  still	
  have	
  to	
  make	
  good	
  decisions	
  
but	
  if	
  you	
  make	
  a	
  mistake	
  it	
  can	
  save	
  your	
  life.	
  Also,	
  I	
  tell	
  them	
  that	
  the	
  way	
  they	
  
treat	
  the	
  transceiver	
  is	
  like	
  a	
  seat	
  belt.	
  If	
  they	
  drop	
  the	
  transceiver	
  on	
  the	
  hard	
  floor	
  
or	
  let	
  it	
  rattle	
  around	
  in	
  the	
  back	
  of	
  a	
  pickup	
  box	
  its	
  like	
  taking	
  your	
  knife	
  and	
  
cutting	
  part	
  way	
  through	
  the	
  seat	
  belt.	
  
	
  
Activities:	
  
In-­Class	
  Demonstration:	
  	
  
               When	
  appropriate	
  in	
  your	
  lesson	
  plan	
  add	
  in	
  a	
  beacon	
  demonstration.	
  	
  With	
  
younger	
  grades	
  turn	
  a	
  beacon	
  on	
  to	
  transmit	
  and	
  give	
  it	
  to	
  the	
  teacher.	
  	
  (If	
  you	
  are	
  
the	
  teacher	
  maybe	
  turn	
  your	
  back	
  while	
  the	
  students	
  hide	
  the	
  beacon	
  so	
  you	
  can	
  
listen	
  for	
  mischief	
  or	
  answer	
  questions.)	
  You	
  leave	
  the	
  class	
  with	
  the	
  second	
  beacon	
  
leaving	
  the	
  class	
  and	
  teacher	
  with	
  instructions	
  to	
  hide	
  their	
  beacon	
  in	
  the	
  classroom	
  
somewhere.	
  When	
  they	
  have	
  hidden	
  it	
  they	
  are	
  to	
  yell	
  “avalanche!”	
  and	
  then	
  try	
  to	
  
hold	
  their	
  breath	
  for	
  your	
  search.	
  Upon	
  hearing	
  “avalanche!”	
  you	
  enter	
  the	
  class	
  
with	
  your	
  beacon	
  turned	
  to	
  receive	
  and	
  search	
  for	
  the	
  hidden	
  beacon.	
  You	
  should	
  
hear	
  exhales	
  of	
  air	
  as	
  students	
  release	
  their	
  breath	
  from	
  holding	
  it.	
  When	
  you	
  find	
  
the	
  beacon	
  come	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  front	
  and	
  discuss	
  whatever	
  age	
  appropriate	
  topics	
  you	
  
want	
  from	
  the	
  discussion	
  list	
  below.	
  
               With	
  older	
  grades	
  find	
  two	
  volunteer	
  students.	
  One	
  to	
  hide	
  the	
  beacon	
  with	
  
the	
  class’s	
  help,	
  the	
  other	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  “searcher”.	
  	
  While	
  the	
  beacon	
  is	
  being	
  hidden,	
  the	
  
teacher	
  can	
  supervise	
  this	
  or	
  a	
  responsible	
  student,	
  take	
  the	
  second	
  volunteer	
  
outside	
  into	
  the	
  hall.	
  	
  Put	
  the	
  transceiver	
  to	
  receive	
  and	
  show	
  the	
  student	
  some	
  brief	
  
techniques	
  for	
  searching.	
  Once	
  they	
  have	
  some	
  comprehension	
  leave	
  them	
  in	
  the	
  
hallway	
  with	
  the	
  instructions	
  to	
  enter	
  the	
  class	
  when	
  they	
  hear	
  “Avalanche!”.	
  Head	
  
back	
  into	
  the	
  classroom	
  and	
  make	
  sure	
  the	
  hiding	
  spot	
  of	
  the	
  class	
  beacon	
  is	
  
appropriate.(Not	
  way	
  up	
  high	
  or	
  down	
  someone’s	
  shirt).	
  Prep	
  the	
  class	
  to	
  hold	
  their	
  
breath	
  as	
  soon	
  as	
  the	
  volunteer	
  student	
  from	
  the	
  hallway	
  enters	
  the	
  class.	
  Get	
  the	
  
students	
  to	
  yell	
  “Avalanche!”.	
  If	
  all	
  goes	
  well	
  the	
  hallway	
  student	
  enters	
  the	
  class	
  and	
  
searches	
  while	
  the	
  rest	
  of	
  the	
  class	
  holds	
  their	
  breath.	
  Sometimes	
  the	
  searcher	
  
needs	
  some	
  more	
  tips	
  while	
  they	
  are	
  searching.	
  When	
  the	
  beacon	
  is	
  found	
  discuss	
  
whatever	
  age	
  appropriate	
  topics	
  you	
  want	
  from	
  the	
  discussion	
  list	
  below.	
  
             To	
  demonstrate	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  knowing	
  and	
  checking	
  your	
  equipment	
  
daily	
  try	
  this	
  activity	
  	
  
	
  
Induction/Flux	
  Lines	
  (Inside	
  or	
  Outside):	
  
(Courtesy	
  of	
  Lori	
  Zak)	
  
             If	
  you	
  have	
  many	
  beacons	
  and	
  a	
  large	
  space,	
  such	
  as	
  a	
  gym,	
  the	
  following	
  is	
  a	
  
fun	
  way	
  to	
  visually	
  show	
  induction	
  lines	
  and	
  open	
  a	
  discussion	
  on	
  how	
  the	
  beacons	
  
and	
  their	
  antennae	
  work.	
  	
  
             In	
  the	
  middle	
  of	
  the	
  space	
  place	
  a	
  transmitting	
  beacon	
  on	
  a	
  chair.	
  Line	
  up	
  the	
  
participants	
  (not	
  too	
  many!)	
  with	
  their	
  beacons	
  turned	
  to	
  “receive”	
  around	
  the	
  
perimeter	
  of	
  the	
  room.	
  Give	
  each	
  participant	
  a	
  stack	
  of	
  identifying	
  markers,	
  for	
  
instance	
  coloured	
  disks,	
  Make	
  sure	
  each	
  participant	
  will	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  tell	
  their	
  markers	
  
from	
  the	
  other	
  participant’s.	
  Each	
  participant	
  will	
  then	
  “search”	
  for	
  the	
  transmitting	
  
beacon.	
  Make	
  sure	
  they	
  are	
  prepped	
  to	
  follow	
  what	
  their	
  receiving	
  beacons	
  tell	
  them	
  
to	
  do	
  and	
  not	
  to	
  head	
  straight	
  for	
  the	
  chair.	
  Depending	
  on	
  the	
  space	
  used	
  get	
  the	
  
participants	
  to	
  drop	
  one	
  of	
  their	
  markers	
  every	
  1-­‐5	
  steps.	
  It	
  should	
  result	
  in	
  an	
  arc	
  
as	
  they	
  follow	
  the	
  induction	
  line	
  in.	
  
             Play	
  around	
  with	
  the	
  placement	
  of	
  the	
  transmitting	
  beacon	
  and	
  see	
  if	
  the	
  
“angle”	
  and/or	
  “depth”	
  of	
  the	
  beacon	
  changes	
  the	
  arc.	
  
	
  
Outside:	
  
	
           The	
  first	
  step	
  is	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  students	
  are	
  appropriately	
  dressed,	
  gone	
  to	
  the	
  
bathroom	
  and	
  not	
  distracted!	
  Head	
  outside	
  to	
  a	
  spot	
  that	
  is	
  flat	
  and	
  covered	
  with	
  
snow	
  where	
  you	
  will	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  hear	
  each	
  other.	
  (No	
  loud	
  traffic)	
  Depending	
  on	
  the	
  
class	
  size	
  and	
  how	
  many	
  adults/teachers	
  you	
  have	
  you	
  may	
  wish	
  to	
  split	
  into	
  three	
  
stations	
  to	
  demo	
  the	
  shovel/probe/transceiver	
  techniques.	
  (If	
  you	
  are	
  unfamiliar	
  
with	
  these	
  please	
  see	
  below.)	
  At	
  each	
  station	
  go	
  over	
  each	
  item	
  briefly	
  along	
  with	
  
techniques	
  for	
  using	
  the	
  item.	
  Give	
  students	
  time	
  to	
  “play”	
  a	
  little	
  bit	
  with	
  the	
  item	
  
before	
  moving	
  onto	
  the	
  next	
  station.	
  If	
  you	
  are	
  only	
  one	
  person	
  teaching	
  or	
  you	
  
prefer,	
  demonstrate	
  each	
  item	
  one	
  at	
  a	
  time	
  to	
  the	
  whole	
  class	
  allow	
  students	
  to	
  
“play”	
  a	
  little	
  before	
  the	
  next	
  demonstration.	
  
	
           Once	
  the	
  students	
  have	
  a	
  basic	
  idea	
  on	
  how	
  each	
  item	
  works	
  do	
  a	
  
demonstration	
  bringing	
  all	
  three	
  tools	
  into	
  play	
  and	
  talk	
  about	
  how	
  they	
  work	
  off	
  of	
  
each	
  other.	
  It	
  is	
  helpful	
  at	
  this	
  point	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  how	
  a	
  team	
  rescue	
  can	
  work.	
  
	
           Enough	
  talking!	
  Split	
  the	
  students	
  into	
  smaller	
  groups	
  and	
  let	
  them	
  do	
  some	
  
searches.	
  Make	
  sure	
  the	
  groups	
  are	
  far	
  enough	
  away	
  to	
  not	
  confuse	
  signals.	
  	
  
	
           To	
  keep	
  interest	
  I	
  usually	
  tell	
  the	
  students	
  that	
  at	
  the	
  end	
  I	
  am	
  going	
  to	
  bury	
  a	
  
bag	
  of	
  candy	
  with	
  a	
  beacon	
  and	
  it	
  is	
  going	
  to	
  be	
  a	
  race	
  to	
  see	
  which	
  group	
  can	
  find	
  it	
  
the	
  fastest.	
  When	
  working	
  with	
  no	
  snow	
  you	
  can	
  use	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  identical	
  little	
  boxes	
  
spread	
  out	
  around	
  the	
  school	
  yard	
  and	
  do	
  2	
  person	
  races	
  and	
  narrow	
  it	
  down	
  to	
  the	
  
quickest	
  person.	
  
	
           The	
  indoor	
  idea	
  of	
  using	
  coloured	
  markers	
  to	
  follow	
  the	
  induction	
  lines	
  can	
  
also	
  be	
  used	
  outside.	
  
	
  
Blind	
  Beacon	
  and	
  Visual	
  Clues	
  Searches:	
  
(Courtesy	
  of	
  Kirstie	
  Simpson)	
  


           It	
  is	
  a	
  2	
  objective	
  exercise.	
  I	
  use	
  it	
  to	
  compare	
  the	
  beacons	
  that	
  rely	
  on	
  an	
  
audible	
  signal	
  and	
  the	
  digital	
  only.	
  if	
  the	
  group	
  is	
  using	
  the	
  F1	
  focus,	
  it’s	
  a	
  way	
  of	
  
forcing	
  them	
  to	
  really	
  listen	
  and	
  get	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  how	
  flux	
  line	
  jumping	
  works.	
  For	
  the	
  
digital	
  folks	
  it’s	
  a	
  good	
  way	
  of	
  reminding	
  them	
  to	
  get	
  their	
  eyes	
  off	
  the	
  screen	
  and	
  to	
  
look	
  up	
  and	
  search	
  with	
  their	
  eyes	
  as	
  well.	
  
	
  
PART	
  #1	
  	
  
           A	
  blindfolded	
  search	
  race	
  with	
  the	
  analogue	
  transceivers.	
  
           This	
  has	
  4	
  racers	
  and	
  4	
  handlers	
  in	
  a	
  big	
  open	
  area	
  divided	
  into	
  four	
  with	
  a	
  
transceiver	
  in	
  each	
  quadrant.	
  The	
  4	
  racers	
  huddle	
  facing	
  each	
  other	
  and	
  pull	
  their	
  
hats	
  down	
  over	
  their	
  eyes.	
  Once	
  the	
  beacons	
  are	
  out	
  in	
  the	
  open	
  parking	
  lot	
  or	
  field	
  
the	
  handlers	
  turn	
  the	
  students	
  around	
  a	
  few	
  times	
  and	
  then	
  gently	
  nudge	
  them	
  off	
  in	
  
the	
  correct	
  direction	
  so	
  that	
  each	
  is	
  working	
  towards	
  their	
  own	
  search	
  quadrant.	
  
The	
  handler	
  stays	
  with	
  them	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  they	
  stick	
  to	
  their	
  own	
  quadrant	
  and	
  to	
  
keep	
  them	
  safe	
  if	
  needed.	
  Once	
  a	
  racer’s	
  hand	
  touches	
  the	
  beacon	
  the	
  clock	
  
stops….as	
  with	
  all	
  good	
  competitions	
  the	
  fastest	
  person	
  gets	
  chocolate!	
  
	
  
PART	
  #2	
  
           This	
  involves	
  as	
  many	
  people	
  as	
  you	
  have	
  gear	
  for	
  and	
  the	
  area	
  holds	
  
	
  comfortably.	
  You	
  can	
  run	
  it	
  a	
  couple	
  of	
  times.	
  If	
  there	
  is	
  no	
  snow	
  use	
  identical	
  boxes	
  
in	
  each	
  section	
  and	
  “hide”	
  a	
  beacon	
  in	
  one	
  of	
  them.	
  If	
  there	
  is	
  snow	
  feel	
  free	
  to	
  bury	
  
the	
  beacon.	
  Put	
  out	
  a	
  glove	
  in	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  sections	
  that	
  simulates	
  a	
  person’s	
  hand	
  
sticking	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  snow	
  or	
  a	
  “visual	
  clue”.	
  Perhaps	
  a	
  big	
  sign	
  saying	
  “Person	
  last	
  
seen	
  here”	
  so	
  that	
  observant	
  students	
  can	
  skip	
  through	
  half	
  the	
  area,	
  searching	
  only	
  
the	
  “down	
  slope”	
  space.	
  The	
  idea	
  is	
  to	
  get	
  students	
  to	
  not	
  just	
  look	
  at	
  their	
  beacon	
  
screen	
  but	
  at	
  the	
  scene	
  as	
  well.	
  By	
  looking	
  at	
  the	
  scene	
  they	
  can	
  narrow	
  their	
  search	
  
area	
  or	
  gain	
  some	
  speed	
  advantage.	
  
           Using	
  digital	
  beacons	
  searchers	
  try	
  to	
  find	
  the	
  buried	
  beacon	
  the	
  fastest.	
  
Making	
  the	
  search	
  a	
  race	
  introduces	
  urgency	
  and	
  speed,	
  which	
  you	
  need	
  when	
  
trying	
  to	
  rescue	
  someone.	
  
	
         	
  
Information	
  on	
  Techniques:	
  
           For	
  information	
  on	
  beacon,	
  probe,	
  shoveling	
  and	
  rescue	
  techniques	
  go	
  to	
  
http://www.avalanche.ca/cac/training/online-­‐course	
  and	
  look	
  under	
  “rescue”.	
  
                  Alternately	
  go	
  to	
  www.avalanche.ca,	
  public	
  section,	
  pull	
  down	
  the	
  training	
  
tab,	
  click	
  on	
  “on-­‐line	
  course”	
  and	
  look	
  under	
  “rescue”.	
  Here	
  you	
  will	
  find	
  different	
  
sections	
  specific	
  to	
  each	
  tool.	
  
	
  
Follow-­up:	
  
Discussion	
  Topic	
  suggestions:	
  
(We	
  highly	
  suggest	
  you	
  check	
  out	
  the	
  on-­‐line	
  course	
  for	
  more	
  information	
  on	
  rescue	
  
techniques.)	
  
1)	
  Why	
  do	
  we	
  use	
  beacons?	
  	
  
2)	
  Who	
  should	
  be	
  wearing	
  a	
  beacon?	
  
3)	
  If	
  I	
  am	
  wearing	
  a	
  beacon	
  does	
  that	
  mean	
  I	
  can	
  never	
  be	
  caught	
  in	
  an	
  avalanche?	
  
4)	
  Is	
  a	
  Recco	
  device	
  the	
  same	
  as	
  a	
  beacon?	
  
5)	
  What	
  are	
  the	
  two	
  modes	
  a	
  beacon	
  can	
  be	
  used	
  in?	
  
6)	
  What	
  is	
  an	
  induction(flux)	
  line?	
  	
  
7)	
  What	
  about	
  if	
  more	
  than	
  one	
  person	
  is	
  buried?	
  
8)	
  Does	
  it	
  make	
  a	
  difference	
  if	
  a	
  person	
  is	
  buried	
  close	
  to	
  the	
  surface	
  or	
  deeper?	
  
9)	
  Are	
  there	
  things	
  I	
  can	
  do	
  before	
  using	
  my	
  beacon	
  to	
  search?	
  
10)	
  Does	
  a	
  beacon	
  run	
  forever?	
  
11)	
  How	
  do	
  you	
  wear	
  a	
  beacon?	
  
12)	
  Do	
  electronic	
  interfere	
  with	
  beacon	
  signals?	
  
13)	
  Can	
  my	
  beacon	
  receive	
  signals	
  from	
  any	
  other	
  beacon?	
  
	
  
Brief	
  Answers:	
  
       1) We	
  use	
  beacons	
  to	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  locate	
  someone	
  who	
  is	
  buried	
  in	
  an	
  avalanche.	
  
       2) Everyone	
  in	
  the	
  backcountry	
  in	
  avalanche	
  terrain	
  in	
  the	
  winter	
  should	
  be	
  
                  wearing	
  a	
  beacon	
  at	
  all	
  times	
  that	
  is	
  turned	
  on.	
  This	
  includes	
  kindergarten	
  
                  kids	
  to	
  grandparents.	
  
       3) A	
  beacon	
  is	
  a	
  not	
  a	
  superhero	
  device.	
  Any	
  person	
  wearing	
  a	
  beacon	
  can	
  still	
  
                  be	
  caught	
  in	
  an	
  avalanche.	
  The	
  beacon,	
  if	
  turned	
  on,	
  provides	
  trained	
  
                  rescuers	
  a	
  means	
  to	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  locate	
  the	
  buried	
  individuals.	
  The	
  trick	
  is	
  to	
  
                  mitigate	
  avalanche	
  exposure	
  BEFORE	
  being	
  caught	
  in	
  an	
  avalanche.	
  
       4) A	
  Recco	
  device	
  in	
  NOT	
  a	
  substitute	
  for	
  a	
  beacon.	
  The	
  Recco	
  device	
  is	
  a	
  
                  reflector	
  that	
  will	
  reflect	
  back	
  to	
  a	
  Recco	
  search	
  tool.	
  If	
  the	
  Recco	
  device	
  is	
  
                  not	
  facing	
  the	
  search	
  tool,	
  the	
  search	
  tool	
  will	
  not	
  pick	
  up	
  its	
  signal.	
  Also	
  
                  metal,	
  such	
  as	
  snowmobiles,	
  can	
  interfere	
  with	
  its	
  ability	
  to	
  reflect.	
  Having	
  
                  Recco	
  labels	
  in	
  your	
  clothing	
  is	
  a	
  good	
  thing	
  but	
  every	
  person	
  should	
  also	
  be	
  
                  wearing	
  a	
  beacon.	
  (This	
  also	
  goes	
  for	
  a	
  SPOT.	
  It	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  substitute	
  for	
  a	
  
                  beacon.)	
  
       5) A	
  beacon	
  can	
  transmit	
  and	
  receive.	
  When	
  travelling	
  through	
  the	
  backcountry	
  
                  a	
  person	
  should	
  have	
  their	
  beacon	
  in	
  transmit	
  mode.	
  If	
  an	
  avalanche	
  occurs	
  
                  and	
  it	
  is	
  safe	
  for	
  the	
  searchers	
  then	
  they	
  should	
  switch	
  their	
  beacons	
  to	
  
                  receive	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  locate	
  the	
  buried	
  person(s).	
  
       6) For	
  further	
  information	
  on	
  Induction	
  lines	
  and	
  a	
  good	
  little	
  video	
  look	
  at	
  
                  “Coarse	
  Search”	
  under	
  “Rescue”	
  under	
  “On-­‐Line	
  course”.	
  
       7) A	
  beacon	
  can	
  pick	
  up	
  more	
  that	
  one	
  beacon	
  signal	
  at	
  a	
  time.	
  This	
  can	
  be	
  
                  confusing	
  at	
  first	
  until	
  a	
  person	
  becomes	
  familiar	
  with	
  their	
  beacon	
  and	
  how	
  
   it	
  works.	
  Multiple	
  burials	
  are	
  a	
  lot	
  more	
  complex	
  than	
  single	
  burials.	
  It	
  is	
  
   important	
  to	
  practice	
  with	
  the	
  beacon	
  you	
  will	
  be	
  using	
  in	
  the	
  backcountry	
  as	
  
   techniques	
  vary	
  between	
  beacons.	
  
8) Burial	
  Depth	
  makes	
  a	
  large	
  difference	
  in	
  rescuing	
  a	
  person.	
  Signals	
  have	
  a	
  
   longer	
  way	
  to	
  travel	
  to	
  reach	
  the	
  surface,	
  which	
  can	
  confuse	
  a	
  rescuer	
  on	
  
   where	
  they	
  think	
  a	
  buried	
  person	
  is.	
  Also	
  it	
  is	
  a	
  lot	
  farther	
  to	
  dig	
  through	
  the	
  
   concrete-­‐like	
  snow	
  to	
  reach	
  the	
  buried	
  person.	
  Please	
  check	
  out	
  “Deep	
  
   Burials”	
  on	
  the	
  on-­‐line	
  course	
  for	
  more	
  information.	
  	
  
9) Surface	
  Clues	
  can	
  lead	
  to	
  faster	
  recovery	
  of	
  a	
  buried	
  victim.	
  Start	
  from	
  the	
  
   last	
  seen	
  point	
  and	
  look	
  downwards.	
  Is	
  there	
  a	
  body	
  part	
  or	
  piece	
  of	
  
   equipment	
  sticking	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  snow?	
  Is	
  there	
  a	
  tree	
  a	
  person	
  could	
  get	
  caught	
  
   up	
  on?	
  If	
  you	
  have	
  multiple	
  searchers	
  it	
  may	
  be	
  beneficial	
  to	
  send	
  someone	
  
   down	
  right	
  away	
  to	
  check	
  out	
  these	
  surface	
  clues.	
  Keep	
  in	
  mind	
  takes	
  longer	
  
   and	
  is	
  harder	
  to	
  walk	
  back	
  up	
  a	
  slope	
  than	
  go	
  down	
  it.	
  Check	
  the	
  on-­‐line	
  
   course	
  for	
  more	
  search	
  techniques.	
  
10)	
  No.	
  You	
  must	
  check	
  batteries	
  every	
  time	
  you	
  head	
  out	
  into	
  the	
  backcountry	
  
   and	
  should	
  always	
  carry	
  a	
  spare	
  set	
  with	
  you.	
  Generally,	
  a	
  beacon	
  will	
  give	
  
   you	
  a	
  battery	
  %	
  as	
  it	
  turns	
  on.	
  In	
  the	
  instructions	
  it	
  should	
  give	
  you	
  an	
  
   acceptable	
  percentage	
  to	
  work	
  with	
  and	
  when	
  to	
  change	
  the	
  batteries.	
  Never	
  
   let	
  the	
  batteries	
  get	
  low.	
  
11)	
  Beacons	
  usually	
  come	
  with	
  straps	
  attached	
  to	
  them	
  or	
  a	
  case	
  in	
  which	
  to	
  put	
  
   the	
  beacon	
  that	
  has	
  straps.	
  You	
  want	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  that	
  the	
  beacon	
  is	
  under	
  
   layers	
  of	
  clothing.	
  Generally	
  people	
  wear	
  them	
  over	
  their	
  bottom	
  long	
  john	
  
   layer.	
  The	
  strap	
  must	
  go	
  around	
  your	
  body	
  and	
  anchor	
  back	
  in	
  to	
  the	
  beacon	
  
   or	
  its	
  case.	
  This	
  is	
  so	
  that	
  if	
  you	
  get	
  caught	
  in	
  an	
  avalanche	
  the	
  chances	
  of	
  the	
  
   beacon	
  being	
  ripped	
  off	
  of	
  your	
  body	
  are	
  low.	
  You	
  also	
  want	
  to	
  keep	
  in	
  mind	
  
   that	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  accessible	
  when	
  you	
  need	
  it	
  for	
  searching.	
  	
  Having	
  a	
  beacon	
  in	
  
   your	
  backpack	
  is	
  not	
  acceptable.	
  Nor	
  is	
  it	
  acceptable	
  to	
  have	
  it	
  in	
  your	
  pocket.	
  
12)	
  Try	
  doing	
  a	
  beacon	
  search	
  in	
  your	
  school’s	
  computer	
  lab	
  you	
  find	
  some	
  
   interesting	
  results!	
  Certain	
  electronics	
  can	
  interfere	
  with	
  beacon	
  signals.	
  The	
  
   good	
  news	
  is	
  we	
  generally	
  don’t	
  bring	
  our	
  computers	
  with	
  us	
  outside.	
  If	
  you	
  
   are	
  going	
  to	
  be	
  bringing	
  an	
  electronic	
  device	
  with	
  you	
  try	
  a	
  search	
  with	
  it	
  in	
  
   close	
  proximity	
  to	
  your	
  beacon	
  before	
  you	
  go	
  and	
  see	
  if	
  it	
  interferes.	
  It	
  is	
  best	
  
   practices	
  to	
  have	
  your	
  cell	
  phone	
  and/or	
  hand	
  radio	
  in	
  a	
  different	
  pocket	
  
   than	
  the	
  one	
  directly	
  over	
  your	
  beacon.	
  
13)Yes	
  your	
  beacon	
  can	
  receive	
  a	
  signal	
  from	
  any	
  other	
  beacon	
  except	
  these	
  
   obsolete	
  beacons:	
  
   -­‐2.257	
  kHZ:	
  This	
  old	
  frequency	
  that	
  was	
  replaced	
  by	
  457	
  kHz	
  in	
  the	
  1980s.	
  If	
  
   you	
  still	
  have	
  one	
  of	
  these	
  museum	
  pieces,	
  donate	
  it.	
  
   -­‐Dual	
  Frequency:	
  from	
  the	
  1980s	
  transition	
  era,	
  these	
  beacons	
  transmit	
  and	
  
   receive	
  on	
  both	
  457	
  and	
  2.257,	
  but	
  they	
  don’t	
  do	
  either	
  well.	
  Get	
  a	
  modern	
  
   beacon	
  
   -­‐Earphones:	
  if	
  your	
  beacon	
  requires	
  you	
  to	
  stick	
  something	
  in	
  your	
  ear,	
  get	
  
   one	
  with	
  a	
  speaker.	
  
                                   -­‐No	
  visual	
  display:	
  if	
  you	
  don’t	
  have	
  modern	
  visuals,	
  it’s	
  time	
  for	
  a	
  new	
  
                                   beacon	
  	
  
                                   For	
  more	
  Obsolete	
  Gear	
  information	
  look	
  under	
  the	
  GEAR	
  tab	
  in	
  the	
  public	
  
                                   CAC	
  site.	
  
	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  
                                   	
  
	
  

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:3
posted:10/12/2012
language:Unknown
pages:6