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Delaware Valley Science Fair

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					                       Table of Contents

Welcome                                           1

Mission Statement                                 2

CCSRC Staff/Roles                                 3

Research Fair Flow Charts
    Grades 4 & 5                                  4
    Grades 6-12                                   5

Website Instructions                              6

Getting Started                                   7-8

Changes for 2012                                  9

CCSRC Definitions                                 10-14

Role of the School Coordinator                    15

Projects the Require Special Approval
     Approval Process                             16
     Guidelines for Human Subject Projects        17
     Vertebrate Animals (Non-human)               18-19
     Potentially Hazardous Biological Agents      20
     All Projects Involving Pathogenic Agents     20-21
     Human and Vertebrate Animal Tissue           21
     Hazardous Chemicals, Activities or Devices   22

Institutional Review Board                        23-24
     Checklist for the IRB committee              25

Project Categories                                26-27

Entering students
    School Registration Form                      28
    Guidelines for completing paperwork           29-31
    Guidelines for submitting paperwork           32-33

                                                        0
    CCSRC Signature Form                                        34

Fair Day Responsibilities                                       35-37

Judging
    Rules and Criteria                                          38
    Sample CCSRC Judging Form                                   39

Awards                                                          40

Important Dates
    Dates to Remember                                           41
    Dates & Times for the CCSRC Competition Day                 42
    Delaware Valley Science Fairs and International Science &
    Engineering Fair Dates                                      43

Inclement Weather                                               44

Directions
    Center for Arts & Technology – Pickering Campus             45
    Downingtown West High School                                46
    Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks                    47

Science Fair Website Resources                                  48
    Navigating Society For Science Website                      49




                                                                     1
                           Welcome

The staff of the Chester County Science Research Competition

(CCSRC) would like to extend their sincere “thank you” to the

school coordinators and teachers who participate in the CCSRC.

Without your hard work, selfless commitment and dedication to

the children of Chester County, this endeavor could not be

successful. We are deeply appreciative of your efforts to

improve the scientific skills and knowledge of your students. In

our rapidly developing scientific and technological society, the

dedication and hard work that you exhibit today will have a

positive impact for decades to come.



With gratitude,



Jennifer Shealy       Kathy Pettiss       Dave Jarvie




                                                                   2
                            Mission Statement

The Chester County Science Research Competition (CCSRC) is dedicated to
encouraging, supporting and developing scientific inquiry and discovery through
individual and team science projects conducted by elementary, middle and high
school students. We believe that students are the foundation of our nation’s
future. Their understanding and accomplishments in science and technology will
prepare them to become the leaders of tomorrow and successful citizens in our
technologically advancing society.

We believe:

• The Chester County Science Research Competition sponsored by the Chester
County Intermediate Unit provides an opportunity for students to pursue inquiry-
based science through problem solving, planning and conducting research
investigations, and using appropriate tools to gather and analyze data.

• Inquiry based science is an integral part of science education. Students doing
experimental research exemplify the true nature of science. It is our belief that
participation in the CCSRC both compliments and better prepares students to take
the high-stakes Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) in science
education.

• Through the utilization of the rules established by the Society for Science and
the Public (SSP) for the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, we
provide a safe and flexible learning environment that promotes creativity,
investigation and critical thinking.

• The Chester County Science Research Competition also provides an opportunity
for students to present their projects to professional adults and scientists as they
communicate the results of their investigations at the local, regional, national and
international levels.

• Specifically, the CCSRC recognizes and honors participating students from all
Chester County schools at an annual regional science fair. We also provide an
opportunity for finalists from the Chester County Science Research Competition to
compete at the Delaware Valley Science Fairs (DVSF). For those students who are
successful at the DVSF, a trip awaits to Intel International Science and
Engineering Fair (ISEF).

• It is our belief that the Chester County Science Research Competition and its
affiliated fairs encourages students to pursue careers in science, technology,
mathematics, and/or engineering by providing a forum for developing academic
skills, conducting independent scientific investigation, writing research papers,
speaking, preparing an organized display, and utilizing the scientific method.

                                                                                    3
              Fair Committee and Responsibilities


Jennifer Shealy
Special Events Coordinator
Chester County Intermediate Unit
484-237-5053
484-237-5164 FAX
jenniferf@cciu.org

David D. Jarvie
CCSRC Director
610-933-7699
djarvie@verizon.net

Kathy Pettiss
CCSRC Science Advisor
610-695-9572
kapettiss@gmail.com

Responsibilities

Please contact Jennifer Shealy for questions regarding the logistics of the
fair’s organization, locations, dates, times, registration of schools and
students and other non-science or student project-based questions.

Please contact Kathy Pettiss or Dave Jarvie for questions regarding student
projects, categories, approval processes, rules interpretations and other
science and project-related questions.




                                                                              4
              Chester County Science Research Competition
                            Grades 4 and 5


      Local                                     Regional




 School Fair or
                                       Chester County Science
School Approved
                                       Research Competition
Selection Process




                                                                5
              Chester County Science Research Competition
                             Grades 6 to 12

   Local           Regional          Affiliated             Intel




 
School Fair        Chester         Delaware      International
     or             County            Valley             Science
  School            Science          Science               and
 Approved          Research           Fairs            Engineering
 Selection        Competition                             Fair
  Process




                                                                     6
                           Website Instructions

To access the Science Fair Coordinator’s website

      1.   Visit www.cciu.org/
      2.   Select User Options from the top right corner of the screen
      3.   Select Sign-In
      4.   Enter your sign-in name and password
                  Username: First initial followed by last name
                  Password: changeme
      5.   Once you have signed in, in your web address box, type
      www.cciu.org/sciencefair



To change your password:

      1.    Sign in to www.cciu.org/ following instructions above
      2.    Select User Options from the top right corner of the screen
      3.    Select Access Info
      4.    Here you may change your information and password

              DO NOT SHARE YOU PASSWORD WITH ANYONE




                                                                          7
                            Getting Started
Projects

       Student projects may be entered only from participating schools.
        Individuals may not enter their own project.

       All Chester County Public and Parochial school students are eligible to
        participate in the CCSRC.
            o Home-school students must attend the regional fair in their county
               of residence.
            o Private school students attend the regional fair in the county or
               state where their school is located.
            o Cyber school students must be residents of Chester County to
               participate in the CCSRC.

       Students may not enter multiple fairs in the counties and states served
        by the Delaware Valley Science Fairs.

       Each school may enter a maximum of five (5) individual or team projects
        per grade.

       Each student or team may enter only one project.

       There may be a maximum of three students working on a team project.

       All participating schools must establish protocols for their students’
        advancement to the CCSRC. Schools may choose to have a competition or
        establish another process for advancement that is approved by the
        school district’s officials.

Rules

       Rules established for the CCSRC are valid for the period from January 1,
        2011 to May 31, 2012.

       In the absence of a Chester County Science Research Competition
        rule, please refer to the rules established by the International
        Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) rules committee. Contact Dave
        Jarvie or Kathy Pettiss for all rules clarifications.
                                                                                  8
Participation Requirements

     Each participating school is required to appoint a School Coordinator who
      will be the school’s contact person for the CCSRC. The School
      Coordinator is required to attend one of the three offered training
      meetings at the CCIU in October. Teachers with questions will be
      referred to the School Coordinator.

Timeline

     Refer to the calendar section to develop an appropriate plan and
      timeline for your school.




                                                                              9
                        Changes for 2012

There are two major change for 2012. The first one involves the submission of
the student’s abstract. For 2012, an abstract of the student’s work must be
included in the student’s paperwork. It is to be placed immediately after the
Checklist for the Adult Sponsor 1 in the student’s paperwork packet. Guidelines
for preparing the abstract can be found in the Definitions section of this
handbook.

The second major and helpful change involves paperwork completion. The forms
required by ISEF can now be typed on and printed out. If you go to the Society
and Science website and open the Documents Library, you can open the
Complete Intel ISEF 2012 Rules and Guidelines booklet. The pages that display
the necessary forms can be typed on and printed out. While this may not work
for everyone, it is an option that a number of our School Coordinators had
expressed interest in. Forms that do not include the typing option can also be
found in the Documents Library as well.

Jennifer Fraim is now Jennifer Shealy.

Human subjects projects in which people under the age of 18 are used as
subjects now require Informed Consent. There will be no exceptions to this
rule.




                                                                             10
                                Definitions

Abstract

      One of the main requirements for students who are entering our
      competition is to write an abstract about their research. The abstract
      must follow these guidelines:
         After finishing research and experimentation, students are
         required to write a (maximum) 250 word, one-page abstract. The
         abstract should include the following:
              a) purpose of the experiment
              b) procedure
              c) data
              d) conclusions

           It may also include any possible research applications. Only
           minimal reference to previous work may be included.

           An abstract must not include the following:
               a) acknowledgments (including naming the research
                  institution and/ or mentor with which you were
                  working), or self-promotions and external endorsements
               b) work or procedures done by the mentor

Adult Sponsor
      An Adult Sponsor may be a teacher, parent, university professor,
      or scientist in whose lab the student is working. This individual
      must have a solid background in science and should have close
      contact with the student during the course of the project.
      The Adult Sponsor is responsible for working with the student to
      evaluate any possible risks involved in order to ensure the health
      and safety of the student conducting the research and the
      humans or animals involved in the study. The Adult Sponsor
      must review the student’s Student Checklist (1A) and Research
      Plan to make sure that: a) experimentation is done within local,
      state, and federal laws and these International Rules; b) that

                                                                           11
      forms are completed by other adults involved in approving or
      supervising any part of the experiment; and c) that criteria for the
      Qualified Scientist adhere to those set forth below. The Adult Sponsor
      must be familiar with the regulations that govern potentially dangerous
      research as they apply to a specific student project. These may include
      chemical and equipment usage, experimental techniques, research involving
      human or vertebrate animals, and cell cultures, microorganisms, or animal
      tissues. The issues must be discussed with the student when completing
      the Research Plan. Some experiments involve procedures or materials
      that are regulated by state and federal laws. If not thoroughly familiar
      with the regulations, the Adult Sponsor should help the student enlist the
      aid of a Qualified Scientist. The Adult Sponsor is responsible for
      ensuring the student’s research is eligible for entry in the Intel ISEF.

Chester County Science Research Competition (CCSRC)
      The Delaware Valley Science Fairs’ regional fair serving the students of
      Chester County.

Data Collection
     The act of gathering data as a result of performing an experimental
     procedure or conducting research.

Delaware Valley Science Fair (DVSF)
     The affiliated fair for the International Science and Engineering Fair
     serving the students of Chester, Bucks, Lehigh, Montgomery, Delaware,
     and Philadelphia counties as well as South Jersey and Delaware.

Designated Supervisor
      The Designated Supervisor may be a teacher, adult sponsor, parent,
      university professor or scientist who will be directly responsible for
      overseeing the experiment. The Designated Supervisor need not have an
      advanced degree, but should be thoroughly familiar with the student's
      project and must be trained in the student's area of research. The Adult
      Sponsor may act as the Designated Supervisor. If a student is
      experimenting with live vertebrates and the animals are in a situation
      where their behavior or habitat is influenced by humans, the Designated
      Supervisor must be knowledgeable about the humane care and handling of
      the animals.

Experimentation
      Deriving information from direct student experimentation.
                                                                              12
Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF)
      The final destination for students in grades 9 -12 participating in the
      science fair process. The Intel International Science and Engineering
      Fair (Intel ISEF) is the world's largest pre-college celebration of
      science. Held annually in May, the Intel ISEF brings together nearly
      1,500 students from more than 40 nations to compete for scholarships,
      tuition grants, internships, scientific field trips and the grand prize: a
      $50,000 college scholarship. Science Service founded the ISEF in 1950
      and is very proud to have Intel as the title sponsor of this prestigious,
      international competition.

Institutional Review Board (IRB)
      The IRB is formed in each school that participates in the Chester County
      Science Research Competition were human subject projects are
      permitted. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) is a committee that,
      according to federal regulations (45-CFR-46), must evaluate the
      potential physical and/or psychological risk of research involving human
      subjects. All proposed human research must be reviewed and approved by
      an IRB before experimentation begins. This includes any surveys or
      questionnaires to be used in a project. Federal regulations require local
      community involvement; therefore an IRB should be established at the
      school level to evaluate human research projects. An IRB at the school or
      ISEF Affiliated Fair level must consist of a minimum of three members.
      In order to eliminate conflict of interest, the Adult Sponsor,
      parents, the Qualified Scientist, and the Designated Supervisor who
      oversee a specific project must not serve on the IRB reviewing that
      project. Additional members are recommended to help avoid this conflict
      of interest and to increase the expertise of the committee. This IRB
      must include:
             a) an educator (preferably an educator with a science
               background)
             b) a school administrator (preferably, a principal or vice
                principal),
             c) and one of the following who is knowledgeable and
                capable of evaluating the physical and/or
                psychological risk involved in a given study: a medical
                doctor, physician’s assistant, registered nurse, a
                                                                                13
               psychiatrist, psychologist, or licensed social worker.




Qualified Scientist
      A Qualified Scientist should possess an earned doctoral/professional
      degree in the biological or medical sciences as it relates to the student’s
      area of research. However, a master’s degree with equivalent experience
      and/or expertise in the student’s area of research is acceptable when
      approved by a Scientific Review Committee (SRC). The Qualified
      Scientist must be thoroughly familiar with the local, state, and federal
      regulations that govern the student’s area of research. The Qualified
      Scientist and the Adult Sponsor may be the same person, if that person
      is qualified as outlined above. A student may work with a Qualified
      Scientist in another city or state. In this case, the student must work
      locally with a Designated Supervisor (see above) who has been trained in
      the techniques the student will use.

Research
     Gathering of information from print material or other references.

School Coordinator
      The School Coordinator is the official representative of the participating
      schools in the CCSRC. Their responsibility is to provide science fair
      leadership and support to the teachers and students in their home school
      during the science fair process in addition to serving as a liaison to the
      CCSRC staff.

Science Review Committee (SRC)
      The SRC is a group of qualified individuals and scientists who is
      responsible for the evaluation of student research and research plans.
      Chester County does not have an SRC but utilizes the expertise of the
      Delaware Valley Science Fairs SRC for project approval.

Society for Science and the Public (SSP)
      Founded in 1921 as Science Service, the Society for Science and the
      Public’s mission is to advance public understanding and appreciation of
      science among people of all ages through publications and educational
      programs.

      A non-profit organization based in Washington, DC, Society for Science
                                                                                14
and the Public has encouraged students, parents, teachers, and
communities to explore the vast world of science.



Society for Science and the Public began the task of promoting science
education early in its 83-year history with "Radio Adventures in Science;"
hands-on experiments for students, called "Things of Science;"
administration of Science Clubs of America; and finally, the evolution of
two of the most prestigious competitions in pre-college science.

Through publications and programs, science fairs and scholarship
competitions, Society for Science and the Public helps young people
utilize and strengthen their knowledge in science, math, and engineering.
Many credit these experiences as a decisive factor in choosing a
scientific career.




                                                                        15
                 Role of the School Coordinator
Each participating school is required to appoint a School Coordinator who will be
the school’s contact person for the Chester County Science Research
Competition. It is highly recommended but not required that the School
Coordinator is a teacher in the school. The CCSRC School Coordinator position
requires some background in scientific processes and science education. The
School Coordinator is required to:

      Attend one organizational meeting held in September or October at the
       CCIU.

      Complete and submit the School Registration form by November 4, 2011.

      Serve in a leadership role as science fair advisor/coordinator in their
       home school.

      Coordinate the dissemination of information to teachers and students.

      Serve as a resource person for the teachers who are participating in the
       science fair process.

      Establish and advise the Institutional Review Board (IRB) in their school
       for the purpose of reviewing projects that need IRB approval. This is
       mandated by Federal Law.

      Take responsibility for the completion of paperwork and approvals for
       students.

      Submit all entries needing Science Review Committee (SRC) approval to
       the CCSRC on or before November 18, 2011.

      Submit both the final paperwork and electronic entries* to the CCSRC on
       or before February 17, 2012.

* See instructions for completing electronic registration in Section 1
                                                                    16
                                             Required Approval Process

           Adult/Sponsor Approval                           IRB Approval                           SRC Approval

    All projects require Adult/Sponsor          The following type of projects also
                                                                                       The following types of projects will
    approval prior to the start of              require Institutional Review Board
                                                                                       or may require Science Review
    experimentation and data collection:        (IRB) approval prior to the start
                                                                                       Committee (SRC) approval prior to
                                                of experimentation and data
                                                                                       the start of experimentation and
      All projects categories including:        collection:
                                                                                       data collection:
      Behavioral and Social Science
      Biochemistry
                                                All Human Subject Projects                   Nonhuman Vertebrate
      Botany
                                                                                              Animals
      Chemistry
                                                                                             Potentially Hazardous
      Computer Science                          Projects categories that include
                                                                                              Biological Agents
      Earth & Space Science                          but are not limited to:
                                                                                             Recombinant DNA
      Consumer Science*
      Engineering                                    Behavioral and Social Science
                                                                                          Project categories that could
      Environmental Science                          Medicine and Health
                                                                                         include but are not limited to:
      Mathematics
      Medicine and Health
                                                                                             Biochemistry
      Microbiology                                SRC approval is not required
                                                                                             Chemistry
      Physics                                     for human subject projects
                                                                                             Medicine and Health
      Zoology
                                                                                             Microbiology
      Teams
                                                                                             Physics
                                                                                             Zoology
    * This category is used only in grades
    4 – 8 at CCSRC and grades 6 - 8 at the
    Delaware Valley Science Fairs.

                                                                                                                           17
         Guidelines for Human Subject Projects
IRB approval is required for all human subject projects. There are research projects
that would involve humans that are not considered human subject projects. Please read
the description of the exempt studies found on page 7 of the ISEF rules book.

All schools must have a formally constituted Institutional Review Board (IRB) to evaluate
the risk involved with using humans as subjects in science fair projects. This is Federal
Law. Please see the additional handout detailing IRB formation.

No more than minimal risk is defined as:
     The probability and magnitude of harm or discomfort anticipated in the
     research are not greater (in and of themselves) than those ordinarily
     encountered in DAILY LIFE or during the performance of routine physical or
     psychological examinations or tests.

More than minimal risk exists when:
      The possibility of physical or psychological harm or harm related to breach of
      confidentiality or invasion of privacy is greater than what is typically
      encountered in everyday life. These studies should require documented
      informed consent/minor assent/parental permission (as applicable).

Please refer to page 9 of the ISEF rules booklet for specific definitions of risk groups
and risk activities. Please note that students under 18 are considered vulnerable and,
                 Informed consent is required for children under 18
therefore, at risk.
years of age. There are no exceptions to this rule. The Human Subject
Form 4 (page 35) does NOT have accommodations for Informed Consent.
Student researchers will use the Informed Consent form provided on
page 36 of the ISEF Rules Book.

After risk has been determined and the student and the IRB have completed all
necessary paperwork, experimentation and data collection may begin. SRC
approval is not required for most human subject projects.
If you have students who are going to be using human subjects in their investigation,
please refer to page 7 and 8 of the ISEF Rule Book.

IRBs should require Informed Consent for most human subject projects.



                                                                                      18
                             Vertebrate Animals
                                      (Non-Human)
If students are using non-human vertebrate animals including family pets in their
research, please review pages 10 – 12 in the ISEF booklet carefully. The guidelines listed
below are helpful but adult sponsors need to study the above pages carefully.

      Studies involving behavioral observations of animals are exempt from prior SRC
       review if ALL of the following apply:
          o There is no interaction with the animals being observed
          o There is no manipulation of the environment in any way and
          o All federal or state fish, game, and wildlife laws and regulations are
              followed.

      If a student is doing an observational, behavioral or nutritional study with an animal
       in a non-regulated site like the school laboratory or home, they will need to
       complete Vertebrate Animal Form 5A and submit it for SRC approval before
       experimentation and data collection can begin.

          o   Examples: A student is trying to determine if their pet cat is left or right pawed.

                          A student is studying the affects of exercise on weight in mice in a
                          middle or high school science laboratory


      If a student is doing a vertebrate animal study in a regulated laboratory setting
       such as a pharmaceutical laboratory, a Vertebrate Animal Form 5B must be
       completed before experimentation and data collection can begin. The laboratory
       will have its own SRC or IACUC and the approval process will take place there.

          o   Examples: A student wants to alter the temperature of the environment to find out
                        when a frog will begin to hibernate.

                         A student is studying the affects of a cholesterol lowering medicine on
                         the liver function of laboratory mice.


In both types of experimentation sited above, the SRC or IACUC will make
the necessary recommendations regarding the need for a qualified scientist,
designated supervisor and/or veterinarian.




                                                                                                 19
For all projects involving vertebrate animals, the following are needed:
    Checklist for Adult Sponsor 1
    Abstract
    Student Checklist 1A
    Research Plan
    Approval 1B
    Registered Research Institution/Industrial Setting 1C (if applicable)
    Vertebrate Animal 5A or 5B as needed
    SRC or IACUC approval prior to experimentation and data collection with the SRC
        or IACUC determining the need for the Qualified Scientist 2, Designated
        Supervisor 3 and/or a veterinarian (see number one above for an exception
        regarding the SRC approval requirement.)


Note: For 2011-2012, a veterinarian must be consulted in
experiments involving prescription drugs and/or nutritional
supplements in a non-regulated setting.




                                                                                       20
            Potentially Hazardous Biological Agents


There have been major revisions in the two categories previously called:
Pathogenic and Potentially Pathogenic Agents. Projects utilizing
microorganisms could include the study of bacteria, viruses, viroids, prions,
rickettsia, fungi and parasites. In addition, projects involving Recombinant
DNA, human and vertebrate animal fresh or frozen tissue, blood and bodily
fluids may involve working with potentially hazardous biological agents. Please
review page 13, 14, and 15 of the ISEF booklet carefully if students are
proposing research in these areas.




            All Projects Involving Pathogenic Agents

Studies involving pathogenic agents in a home environment are prohibited.
This includes investigations where bread molds, fruit molds and bacteria are
going to be cultured. Specimens may be collected at home but must be
transported in secure containers and cultured in a laboratory setting.

The ISEF has established Biological Safety Level guidelines for determining
the risk factors involved with the use of pathogenic or potentially pathogenic
agents. It is the responsibility of the student and involved adults to conduct a
risk assessment. A risk assessment defines the potential level of harm, injury
or disease to plants, animals and humans that may occur when working with
biological agents.

Laboratories are identified by their level of biological safety: BSL-1, BSL-2,
BSL-3 and BSL-4. A more detailed description of these facilities can be
found on page 16 of your ISEF rules booklet. If you have a student who is
interested in working with these agents, please know that these guidelines
must be adhered to with the utmost precision.

Again, these projects cannot be done at home, and the paper work listed
below MUST be submitted to our SRC for approval prior to
experimentation and data collection.


                                                                               21
 Required forms include:

       Checklist for Adult Sponsor 1
       Abstract
       Student Checklist 1A
       Research Plan
       Approval 1B
       Registered Research Institution/Industrial Setting 1C (if
        applicable)
       Qualified Scientist 2 and/or Risk Assessment 3
       Potentially Hazardous Biological Agents 6A

SRC approval prior to experimentation and data collection is mandatory.



            Human and Vertebrate Animal Tissue Form

 When students are using fresh or frozen tissue, primary cell cultures, blood,
 blood products, or bodily fluids, they must also complete the Human and
 Vertebrate Animal Tissue Form 6B found on page 40 of the ISEF booklet in
 addition to the Potentially Hazardous Biological Agents Form 6A.

 Some tissues have been excluded from this list and do not require the use of
 forms 6A or 6B. In addition, these projects do not require SRC approval.

 They include:

           Plant tissue
           Established cell and tissue cultures
           Meat and meat by-products obtained from a grocery store,
            restaurant, or packing house
           Hair
           Teeth that have been sterilized through use of an autoclave or
            chemical disinfection
           Fossilized tissue or archeological specimens
           Prepared fixed tissue slides




                                                                                 22
If you have questions about required forms, please check with
Kathy Pettiss or Dave Jarvie for clarification.


          Hazardous Chemicals, Activities or Devices

Please review page 17-19 of the ISEF booklet carefully if students are using
hazardous chemicals, controlled substances such as prescription drugs,
tobacco, alcohol, firearms or explosives or radioactive substances or
devices in their experimentation. Additional supervision on the part of the
adult sponsor and either a Qualified Scientist or Designated Supervisor is
required. A Risk Assessment Form 3 must be completed prior to
experimentation and data collection. Required forms include:

         Checklist for Adult Sponsor 1
         Abstract
         Student Checklist 1A
         Research Plan
         Approval 1B
         Registered Research Institution/Industrial Setting 1C (if applicable)
         Risk Assessment 3
         Either a Qualified Scientist 2 or Designated Supervisor 3



If the hazardous materials used for the student’s research require a state or
federal permit, the SRC must receive a copy of the permit prior to the
student’s participation at the CCSRC.




                                                                               23
 Your School’s Institutional Review Board (IRB)

To help facilitate the approval of projects involving human subjects, each
school is required to organize an Institutional Review Board (IRB). This
is mandated by federal law. The IRB must include:

      An educator other than the student’s science fair advisor, sponsor
       or parent
       (preferably and educator with a science background)
      A school administrator
      One of the following medical professionals: a registered nurse,
       psychologist, psychiatrist, licensed social worker, physician’s
       assistant or medical doctor.

Upon review and approval, the IRB must sign Approval Form
1B and Human Subject Form 4. Please see the IRB
checklist found on the next page.



Guidelines for the IRB when reviewing student
projects:

All human subject paper work must be reviewed. This includes:

     Checklist for Adult Sponsor 1
     Abstract
     Student Checklist 1A
     Research Plan
     Approval 1B
     Human Subjects Form 4
     Copy of any test, survey, or questionnaire must be provided for
      parental review for subjects under 18 years of age.
    IRB approval prior to the start of experimentation and data
     collection.



                                                                             24
   The primary job of the IRB is to determine risk. Risk is
   defined in the following three statements:

No more than minimal risk is defined as:
     The probability and magnitude of harm or discomfort anticipated in
     the research are not greater (in and of themselves) than those
     ordinarily encountered in DAILY LIFE or during the performance of
     routine physical or psychological examinations or tests.

More than minimal risk exists when:
      The possibility of physical or psychological harm or harm related to
      breach of confidentiality or invasion of privacy is greater than what
      is typically encountered in everyday life. These studies should
      require documented informed consent/minor assent/parental
      permission (as applicable).

The IRB must refer to page 9 of the ISEF rules booklet for specific
definitions of risk groups and risk activities. Please note that students under
18 are considered vulnerable and, therefore, at risk. Informed consent is
required for children under 18 years of age. There are no exceptions to
this rule. The Human Subject Form 4 does NOT have accommodations for
Informed Consent. Student researchers will use the Informed Consent
form provided on page 35 of the ISEF Rules Book.

After risk has been determined, the job of the IRB is to be sure that all
necessary forms are completed and IRB signatures appear on Forms 1B and 4
prior to experimentation and data collection.


If informed consent is required, all sections of the Human Informed
Consent Form must be completed prior to experimentation and data
collection. Please review pages 7 and 8 and pages 35 and 36 in your
ISEF handbook if you have a student who will be using human subjects in
their investigation. Again, the IRB must be certain that the informed
consent sections are completed prior to experimentation and data
collection. Multiple copies of the Human Informed Consent Form may be
made and signed by all participants in a study that requires informed
consent. These copies must be at the student’s project, in a binder and
available for CCSRC fair officials to review on the day of the
competition.

                                                                            25
     Checklist for the Institutional
          Review Board (IRB)

For all human subject projects, the following
steps must be completed by the IRB:

  Review of the student’s project

  Determination of risk as described in the
   CCSRC guidelines and the Intel Science and
   Engineering Fair booklet

  Select and check the Risk category listed
   on Human Subjects 4

  Complete IRB signatures on the Human
   Subjects 4

  The IRB chair must also complete and sign
   Section 2 box A on the student’s Approval
   Form 1B


                                                26
                                   2012
                        Delaware Valley Science Fair
                Chester County Science Research Competition
                           Category Descriptions

Behavioral and Social Science
Human and animal behavior, social and community relationships---psychology,
sociology, anthropology, archaeology, ethology, ethnology, linguistics, learning,
perceptions, urban problems, reading problems, public opinion surveys,
educational testing, etc.

Biochemistry
Chemistry of life processes---molecular biology, molecular genetics, enzymes,
photosynthesis, blood chemistry, protein chemistry, food chemistry, hormones,
etc.

Botany
Study of plant life---agriculture, agronomy, horticulture, forestry, plant
taxonomy, plant physiology, plant pathology, plant genetics, hydroponics, etc.

Chemistry
Study of nature and composition of matter and laws governing it---physical
chemistry, organic chemistry (other than biochemistry), inorganic chemistry,
materials, plastics, fuels, pesticides, metallurgy, soil chemistry, etc.

Computer Science
Study and development of computer hardware, software engineering, Internet
networking and communications, graphics (including human interface),
simulations/virtual reality or computational science (including data structures,
encryption, coding and information theory).

Consumer Science
The science of the normal use of consumer products including product testing
and comparison. Only applies to students in grades 4-8 for CCSRC and grades
6-8 for DVSF.

Earth & Space Science
Geology, mineralogy, physiology, oceanography, meteorology, climatology,
speleology, seismology, geography, astronomy, planetary science, etc.




                                                                                 27
Engineering
Technology; projects that directly apply scientific principles to manufacturing
and practical uses---civil, mechanical, aeronautical, chemical, electrical,
photographic, sound, automotive, marine, heating and refrigerating,
transportation, environmental engineering, etc.

Environmental Science
Study of pollution (air, water, and land) sources and their control; ecology

Mathematics
Development of formal logical systems or various numerical and algebraic
computations, and the application of these principles---calculus, geometry,
abstract algebra, number theory, statistics, complex analysis, probability.

Medicine & Health
Study of diseases and health of humans and animals---dentistry, pharmacology,
pathology, ophthalmology, nutrition, sanitation, dermatology, allergies, speech
and hearing, etc.

Microbiology
Biology of microorganisms---bacteriology, virology, protozoology, fungi,
bacterial genetics, yeast, etc.

Physics
Theories, principles, and laws governing energy and the effect of energy on
matter---solid state, optics, acoustics, particle, nuclear, atomic, plasma,
superconductivity, fluid and gas dynamics, thermodynamics, semiconductors,
magnetism, quantum mechanics, biophysics, etc.

Zoology
Study of animals---animal genetics, ornithology, ichthyology, herpetology,
entomology, animal ecology, paleontology, cellular physiology, circadian rhythms,
animal husbandry, cytology, histology, animal physiology, invertebrate
neurophysiology, studies of invertebrates.

Team
Projects can be in any of the scientific areas listed above.




                                                                               28
                  2012
     Chester County Science Research
               Competition

In order to participate, your school must register by
                 November 4, 2011.

      1. Visit: www.cciu.org/sciencefair
      2. Log in an select “School Coordinator Information”
      3. Select “Application and Registration Forms”
      4. Select “School Registration Form”
      5. Complete form and click Done.




                                                             29
         Guidelines for Completing Paperwork
The paperwork required by ISEF and the CCSRC is for the
education, welfare and protection of the students who participate in
our event. This paperwork is also designed to provide a high degree
of oversight so the adult sponsor who works with the children is
afforded a level of protection.

Please, all students who are taking part in the CCSRC must have
completed the required paperwork prior to experimentation and data
collection. Failure to follow this requirement could lead to
disqualification from participation in the CCRSC. The paper work
that must be completed is as follows:

     Checklist for Adult Sponsor 1
     Abstract
     Student Checklist 1A
     Research Plan
     Approval 1B
     All other applicable ISEF forms as dictated by the nature of
      the student’s research

Please address the following areas carefully when
completing your student’s forms:

   All information must be typed or printed clearly on the
    students’ forms. Please review paperwork before submission.

   Please check all areas of the forms to be sure there is no
    missing information.




                                                                     30
 All signatures must be complete before the beginning of
  experimentation and data collection. Please be sure that there
  is consistency in the signatures. The teacher/sponsor and
  parent name must be the same throughout the paperwork.

 Be sure you have completed the project category section on the
  Chester County Science Research Competition Entry Form. We
  will not be following the categories listed in the ISEF booklet
  for 2012. Please use the category description page provided in
  the School Coordinator’s Handbook as your guide for selecting
  categories for student projects.


 Qualified Scientists, Designated Supervisors, Adult Sponsors
  and other adults approving, commenting on or overseeing
  student work must fill out their own forms.


 Designated Supervisor forms must be used when students are
  working with hazardous materials or devices. When in doubt,
  err on the side of safety and require that a Designated
  Supervisor be selected and the Designated Supervisor form be
  completed.


 Please do not submit originals. Retain all originals for your
  records.

 Students must accurately record starting and ending dates for
  experimentation.

 Only 2011-2012 forms may be used to enter students in the
  CCSRC. We are not permitted to accept forms from previous
  years.



                                                                  31
Completing Team Project forms:

   Each team member must complete and submit a separate
    Approval Form 1B and a separate Chester County Science
    Research Competition Entry Form for each team member who is
    advancing to the CCSRC.

   All other forms for team members are to be submitted jointly.

   Please staple all forms in the same order as individual projects.

   Full names of all team members must appear on all forms where
    required.

   Team projects cannot be converted to an individual project or
    vice versa.


CCSRC Entry Form

In addition to the ISEF paperwork, all students who are advancing to
the CCSRC must complete a Chester County Science Research
Competition Entry Form. This form is to be attached to the top of
the ISEF forms. Again, please check for complete information and a
parental signature that matches the signatures found in the ISEF
paperwork.




                                                                    32
      Guidelines for Submitting Paperwork
1. 2012 Adobe Chester County Science Research Competition
   Entry Form
     a. Complete, print, and submit a 2012 Adobe Chester County Science
        Research Competition Entry Form for each student
     b. Instructions:
            i. Upon registering your school for the CCSRC, you will receive
               an Adobe Invitation email from me
           ii. Click the link in the email which will take you to a website
          iii. Select “Download” (NOT OPEN)
          iv. Find the 2012 Adobe Chester County Science Research
               Competition Entry Form file on your computer and open with
               Adobe Acrobat or Adobe Reader
           v. Complete one form per student making sure to select the
               appropriate category from the list so it is highlighted
          vi. Click “Print” at the bottom of the page. Sign and attach
               to the front of each students paperwork
         vii. Click “Submit Form” at the top right of the page. You will
               get a pop-up that says the form was successfully sent.
         viii. Once you print and submit, save your changes and quit.
          ix. Re-open the file using the same method above. Now you may
               change the information to your next student’s information,
               then print and submit for again. Repeat for each student.

2. All project entries must include the following required forms stapled
   together in this order:
       o 2012 Adobe Chester County Science Research Competition Entry
          Form
       o Project Application Signature Form
       o Checklist for Adult Sponsor 1
       o Abstract
       o Student Checklist 1A
       o Research Plan
       o Approval Form 1B
       o Additional ISEF forms required by the type of investigation
          conducted by the student



                                                                         33
   3. Please adhere strictly to all deadlines.

   4. Submit only copies of original documents and retain originals.

   5. All paperwork must be complete, and clearly printed/typed.

All forms must be submitted by the designated date to:

                               Jennifer Shealy
                          Special Events Coordinator
                       Chester County Intermediate Unit
                                455 Boot Road
                            Downingtown, PA 19335
                              JenniferF@cciu.org

Please remember registration is in two parts. The submitted copy
and printed copy with the student paperwork must be received by
Jennifer Shealy on or before February 17, 2012.




                                                                       34
     2012 CHESTER COUNTY SCIENCE RESEARCH COMPETITION
                       Signature Form

To complete your entry form, please attest to your compliance with CCSRC Rules and the requirements
below by signing in the appropriate places.

1.    The exhibit described on the preceding page, which I plan to enter, is my own work and has been
      completed by me within the rules of the Chester County Science Research Competition, and the
      International Science and Engineering Competition, with which I am familiar.

2.    I am acquainted with the rules for the Chester County Science Research Competition. If the CCSRC
      Committee finds that my project does not meet the standards, it reserves the right to remove it
      from the competition.

3.    I understand that the exhibit is entered at my own risk and that the Center for Arts & Technology –
      Pickering Campus and/or any other sponsors are not responsible for the loss of or damage to my
      exhibit or any of it parts.

4.    An abstract of no more than two hundred and fifty (250) words will accompany my project and be
      displayed on the project board or in a vertical position with my project.

5.    I agree to set up my project at the Center for Arts & Technology – Pickering Campus at the
      designated time on the day of the competition.

6.    At the conclusion of the Open House, all projects must be removed.



                       Date                                      Signature of Student

My child ( ) or ward ( ), whose name appears above and who has signed the above statement, has my
permission to participate in the Chester County Science Research Competition in accordance with it’s rules
and regulations.



                       Date                                  Signature of Parent/Guardian

To the best of my knowledge, the exhibit described above is the work of the student entering it, and all
information given is correct.



                       Date                                  Signature of Adult Sponsor



                       This form MUST be returned by February 17, 2012 to:
                                          Jennifer Shealy
                                 Chester County Intermediate Unit
                               455 Boot Road, Downingtown, PA 19335


                                                                                                        35
        Fair Day Requirements and Expectations
The following items are required for student projects:

   A project board showing the student’s work.

   Each student is required to display a project notebook showing a chronological
    accounting of his/her project. Having a project notebook increases the overall
    score. Notebooks should represent the student’s day-to-day entries. Please
    discourage students from typing or copying over their notebook for neatness.

   An abstract of 250 words or less must be displayed vertically on or at the project.
    Please follow the Abstract Guidelines found in the “student handbook” located in the
    middle of your ISEF rules book. Do not use the abstract form found on page 23 of
    the ISEF booklet.

   The student’s name and address may not appear on the project board or other
    materials. If you wish to put the student’s name on the back of the project board
    for identification purposes, please tape a file card over it.

   The correct project category is a necessity. For a list of categories, please refer to
    the Project Category section of your CCSRC School Coordinator’s Handbook. Please
    remember that we do not follow the ISEF categories found in the ISEF rules
    booklet. Do not submit an entry without the correct project category
    information. Consumer Science (grades 4-8 only) has been added for the CCSRC and
    the DVSF only. If you have any questions about the project category, please
    contact Kathy Pettiss or Dave Jarvie for clarification.

   Projects that are not properly entered will not be permitted to be exhibited at the
    competition.


Project Set-up and Removal

    •   Each student must set up his/her own exhibit or have obtained special
        permission from the CCSRC Committee for an exception.
               Rorke Fair setup     -      Between 8:00 – 9:00 a.m.
               Salk Fair setup      -      Between 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
       Exhibits not completely set-up at the end of this period will not be considered by
        the judges. Students will not have access to the exhibit hall until their allotted
        time.




                                                                                       36
     Strict guidelines have been established concerning the display of materials used
      in the student’s project. A list of prohibited items is found on page 7 of the
      ISEF Rules Booklet. Please review these guidelines. Students are encouraged
      to display pictures, drawings, and photographs as a substitute for experimental
      materials.

     At the conclusion of the Open House, all projects must be removed.

     Exhibits not removed will be discarded.



Student Supervision and Expectations

     Students must have transportation provided by the school or parent for their
      travel to and from school.

     All students must be accompanied by an administrator, teacher, advisor, parent
      or approved parent representative of the school. A supervisor or school-
      approved representative must be available at all times during student judging. A
      waiting area for parents will be provided. Please advise students of their
      responsibilities and of your expectations prior to arrival at the United Sports
      Training Center.

     Cell phones and all other communication devices may NOT be used or worn
      by students. In addition, they must remain off and stored in a backpack or
      other suitable container during judging. Failure to follow this rule could
      result in disqualification.

     All students will be required to be with their projects unless excused from the
      floor by CCSRC officials or judges. Students are not permitted to wander
      around the hall while judging is taking place. It is highly recommended that
      students bring a book or some other quiet activity to do while waiting for the
      judges to examine their project. They are NOT to remain for the afternoon
      judging.

     No one will be allowed on the floor during the judging period except students,
      judges and the CCSRC Committee. If a student has a specific need and the
      assistance of a professional is required, please notify Jennifer Shealy prior to
      fair day.




                                                                                         37
Project Exhibit Security and Electrical Availability

     While every effort will be made to protect all exhibits against loss or damage, all
      projects are entered at the risk of the exhibitor. Neither the CCSRC
      Committee, the host, nor the Chester County Intermediate Unit is responsible
      for damage to any exhibit or its components.

     Projects that include small items or that may be damaged by handling should be
      protected with plastic shields.

     NOTE: Valuable equipment, such as computers, laptops, microscopes, lenses,
      meters, electronic components and the like, should be bolted, chained or secured
      to the baseboard or platform that is a part of the exhibit. Nothing may be
      bolted or fasted to the tables. Each school should investigate the advisability of
      having projects insured against loss.

     Any missing item should be reported immediately to the CCSRC
      Committee.

     Electricity will not be available for exhibits at the CCSRC.




                                                                                      38
                                         Judging
    Rules and Criteria

    Judging is done in a manner consistent with the International Science and Engineering
    Fair rules for science competitors.

    Judging Schedule and Guidelines:

   Students are interviewed during the morning phase of the judging.

   After students are dismissed, judges, working individually and/or in teams, continue to
    evaluate projects through the afternoon.

   Projects are judged in the category selected by the sponsor and the students. No
    classification changes can be made after the project has been accepted for judging.

   Students must remain at the Center for Arts & Technology – Pickering Campus for
    interviewing until dismissed by the CCSRC Committee.

   Students will be interviewed by the judges about their project. A number of logistical
    considerations determine how a group of judges is organized on a given day. An
    individual judge(s) or a team of judges may evaluate a student’s project. Please advise
    students that they should be prepared to discuss their work enthusiastically and in
    detail.

   Projects may not be set up in absentia.

   Individuals not involved in judging will not be permitted in the exhibition hall once the
    judging process has begun.

    Judging Criteria:
   Creative Ability and Originality of Topic
   Scientific Thought and Engineering Goals
   Thoroughness
   Skills
   Clarity
   Teamwork

   Judging forms will be returned to CCSRC School Coordinator for dissemination to
    students.
   The decisions of the judges are final.




                                                                                                39
40
                                  Awards
The CCSRC presents a variety of awards to students who participate in our
competition. While special awards may vary from year to year depending on
sponsorship, the following awards have been mainstays of our program:

Each student will receive an award for participation.

Best of Show awards will be presented for:

      Level A, grade 12
      Level B, grade 11
      Level C, grade 10
      Level D, grade 9
      Level E, grades 6 - 7 - 8
      Level F, grades 4 – 5

First, Second, Third Place and Honorable Mention ribbons are awarded in each
category for Levels A, B, C, D, E and Team Projects (Grades 6-8, and 9, 10, 11
and 12). Awards for the Lucy Balian Rorke Fair will be presented on Monday,
March 8, at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of the Downingtown West High School, 455
Manor Avenue, Downingtown, PA. Only those students who have an award
designation attached to their project board are asked to attend.

Distinguished Honors, High Honors and Honors ribbons are presented recognizing
the top students and their projects in each category in grades 4 and 5.
Students pick up their awards during the Open House at our reception desk. A
separate awards program is not held.

In addition, special awards are given from corporate or organization sponsors.
These awards vary from year to year.




                                                                                 41
                  2011-2012 Dates to Remember

                Deadline for submitting School Registration Forms
                               November 4, 2011

           Deadline for submitting projects to the SRC for approval *
                             November 18, 2011

        * Projects needing SRC approval include those projects involving the following:
                Vertebrate animals                   Pathogenic Agents
                Recombinant DNA                      Human and Animal Tissue*
                                                       * Dependent on the source of the tissue


              Deadline for submitting entries to the Chester County
                          Science Research Competition
                               February 17, 2012

                  Chester County Science Research Competition
                 Center for Arts & Technology (Pickering Campus)
                     1580 Charlestown Road, Phoenixville, PA
                  March 8, 2012 – Rorke Fair (Grades 6 – 12)
                   March 9, 2012 – Salk Fair (Grades 4 & 5)

                           The Rorke Fair Awards Ceremony
                                       T.B.D.
                            Downingtown West High School
                          455 Manor Avenue, Downingtown, PA

Delaware Valley Science Fairs
               Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks
                               Oaks, PA
                          April 3 - 5, 2012

Note:          All deadlines will be strictly adhered to and enforced. There will be
               no extensions or exceptions.
               In the event of inclement weather or other emergency, please see
               the CCIU Web site (www.cciu.org) for updated information.
                                                                                   42
                 Dates and Times for the
             Chester County Science Research
                     Competition Day
                                 March 8, 2012

             Dr. Lucy Balian Rorke Fair      (Grades 6 through 12)

•     Arrival and Set Up                       8:00 AM       -    9:00 AM
•     Special Program                          9:00 AM       -   10:00 AM
•     Judging                                 10:00 AM       -   12:30 PM
•     Dismissal                               12:30 PM
•     Open House                               6:00 PM       -   7:00 PM
•     Breakdown and removal of projects after 7:00 PM

Awards Ceremony – Only those students who have an award designation attached
to their project board are asked to attend.

**    There will be a mandatory meeting for all students advancing to the
      Delaware Valley Science Fair immediately after the grades 6 - 12 awards
      program. If you do not attend, you will not be permitted to go to the Del-Val
      Science Fairs.

                                 March 9, 2012

                 Dr. Jonas Salk Fair          (Grades 4 and 5)

•     Arrival and Set Up                         9:00   AM -     10:00 AM
•     Judging                                   10:00   AM -     12:30 PM
•     Dismissal                                 12:30   PM
•     Open House                                 6:00   PM -     7:00 PM
•     Breakdown and removal of projects          7:00   PM

*     Awards for Grades 4 & 5 will be distributed during the Open House.




                                                                                43
Delaware Valley Science Fairs
                Set Up
             April 3, 2012


                Judging
             April 4, 2012


                Awards
             April 5, 2012


Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks
         Egypt Road & Rt. 422
          100 Station Avenue
                Oaks, PA


            INTEL
     International Science
     and Engineering Fair
            May 13-18, 2012

                                           44
                     Inclement Weather
In the event of inclement weather, the threat of inclement weather or

other emergency situations, please refer to the Chester County

Intermediate Unit website for the most accurate and current

information. If a change in a CCSRC event should occur, information

will be scrolled across the CCIU’s homepage. The Chester County

Intermediate Unit website is:



                 http://www.cciu.org/

Please provide teachers, parents and other key personnel with dates,

times and directions prior to fair day. A map and written directions

are in your handbook for both the Center for Arts & Technology –

Pickering Campus and the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at Oaks.



Please inform all teachers and parents:

Do not contact the Center for Arts & Technology (Pickering

Campus) for fair information or directions.




                                                                       45
  Directions to the Center for Arts & Technology (Pickering)
                  1580 Charlestown Road, Phoenixville, PA 19460


FROM THE EAST:
  Take Route 30 West to the intersection of Route 100.
  Turn right onto Route 100 North.
  Follow Route 100 to the intersection of Route 113.
  Turn right onto Route 113 North.
  Continue on Route 113 until the traffic light at Coldstream Road.
  Turn right onto Coldstream Road.
  Go approximately one mile to the stop sign at Charlestown Road.
  Turn left on Charlestown Road.
  CAT Pickering is approximately 1/4 mile on the right.

FROM THE WEST:
  Take Route 30 bypass east to Route 113 exit.
  Turn left on Route 113 and follow Route 113 North.
  Follow Route 113 North. (Will cross Route 100 and Route 401.)
  After the intersection of Route 401, continue to the next traffic light which is
  Coldstream Road.
  Turn right onto Coldstream Road.
  Go approximately one mile to the stop sign at Charlestown Road.
  Turn left on Charlestown Road.
  CAT Pickering is approximately 1/4 mile on the right.

FROM PA TURNPIKE:
  Take Downingtown exit #312 (old exit #23).
  Follow Route 100 South to the intersection of Route 113.
  Turn left on Route 113 North.
  Continue on Route 113 until the traffic light at Coldstream Road.
  Turn right onto Coldstream Road.
  Go approximately one mile to the stop sign at Charlestown Road.
  Turn left on Charlestown Road.
  CAT Pickering is approximately 1/4 mile on the right.




                                                                                 46
         Directions to the Downingtown West High School
                         455 Manor Avenue, Downingtown, PA
From the North: Pottstown (Rt. 100)
   Take PA-100 South
   Take "US-30 West to Downingtown/Lancaster"
   Bear right on US-30 and go West
   Take Exit "US-322 to Manor Ave"
   Turn left on US-322, Horseshoe Pike and go Southeast
   Turn left on Rock Raymond Rd and go North
   DHS-West Campus is the first right

From the East: King Of Prussia (via US 202)
   Take US-202 South
   Take Exit "US-30 East US-30-BR US-30 West to Frazer/Exton/
      Dowiningtown/Coatesville" and go Southwest
   Continue on US-30 and go West
   Take Exit "US-322 to Manor Ave"
   Turn left on US-322,Horseshoe Pike and go Southeast
   Turn left on Rock Raymond Rd and go North
   DHS-West Campus is the first right



From the South: Wilmington, DE (via US 202)
   Take US-202 N toward West Chester. PA
   Merge onto US-202 N toward Paoli/Downingtown
   Merge onto PA-100 N toward US-30 W
   Take the US-30 W bypass toward Downingtown/Lancaster
   Take the exit at PA-322/Manor Avenue
   Turn left on US-322,Horseshoe Pike and go Southeast
   Turn left on Rock Raymond Rd and go North
   DHS-West Campus is the first right

From the West: Harrisburg (via PA Turnpike)
   Take I-76 E / Pennsylvania Turnpike E toward Phildelphia
 (Portions toll).
   Take the PA-100 Exit (312) "Pottstown/West Chester"
   Merge onto N Pottstown Pike / PA-100 S toward Downingtown
   Turn right onto W Uwchlan Avenue / PA-113 South
   Merge onto US-30 W toward Downingtown
   Take the exit at PA-322/Manor Ave.
   Turn left on US-322,Horseshoe Pike and go Southeast
   Turn left on Rock Raymond Rd and go North
                                                                                47
DHS-West Campus is the first right




                                     48
  Directions to the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center at
                          Oaks
                           Egypt Road & Rt. 422
                    100 Station Avenue, Oaks, PA 19456




From Rt. 76 (Schuylkill Expressway):
Follow Rt. 76 west to King of Prussia
Exit to Rt. 202 South (West Chester)
Stay in right lane for Rt. 422 West (Pottstown)
Exit Rt. 422 at Oaks, left onto Egypt Road
Left at Station Ave. (3rd light)
Follow signs for the Expo Center



From PA Turnpike:
Exit at Valley Forge and stay to the right
Exit Rt. 202 South (West Chester)
Stay in right lane for Rt. 422 West (Pottstown)
Exit Rt. 422 at Oaks, left onto Egypt Road
Left at Station Ave. (3rd light)
Follow signs for the Expo center



From Rt. 422 West:
Rt. 422 to the Oaks exit, left onto Egypt Road
Left at Station Ave. (3rd light)
Follow signs for the Expo center



From Rt. 422 East:
Rt. 422 to the Oaks exit, left onto Egypt Road
Left at Station Ave. (2nd light)
Follow signs for the Expo center




                                                          49
              Science Fair Website Resources

Chester County Intermediate Unit
http://www.cciu.org

Chester County Science Research Competition
http://www.cciu.org/Departments/LER/SpecialEvents/sciencefair.html

Chester County Science Research Competition School Coordinator’s Site
http://sciencefair.cciu.org

Society for Science and the Public (SSP) (contains our forms as well as a
rules wizard)
www.societyforscience.org

Delaware Valley Science Fairs
http://www.drexel.edu/dvsf/

Science Fair Central
http://school.discovery.com/sciencefaircentral/

Science Fair Project Resource Guide
www.ipl.org/youth/projectguide/

Science Fair
www.scifair.org

Science Fair
www.cyberbee.com/science/scifair.html

Science Fair Materials
www.showboard.com

Science Fair Awards
www.jonesawards.com

Science Fair Tri-fold Project Boards
www.educationalproducts.com


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          Navigating www.societyforscience.org

   Go to www.societyforscience.org
   Select “Intel ISEF” from the menu
   Scroll down to the “Documents Library” section
   Select from “Rules” the 2012 International Rules & Guidelines or the
    Complete Intel IFEF 2012 Rules and Guidelines booklet (contains the
    typeable student forms.)
   Under “Forms” you can open the individual forms needed for the
    various types of student projects.




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