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					2 Wonewoc-Center
0    High School
1
2 Course Registration
        Guide
-
2     Wonewoc-Center High School

0
             101 School Road
            Wonewoc, WI 53968
            Phone: 608.464.3165
            Fax: 608.464.3325

1
3
          Updated October 11, 2012

                                     Page 1 of 52
Introduction
Dear Students and Parent/Guardians of the Classes of 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016:
You hold in your very hands, the 2012-2013 edition of the Wonewoc – Center High School Course
Registration Guide. It is my hope that this guide will give you a full understanding of the educational
opportunities offered to you at Wonewoc-Center.
This Course Registration Guide will serve as a valuable resource in the course selection process and is
designed to provide students and parent/guardians with an overview of the courses offered at Wonewoc-
Center High School. This Registration Guide will provide information in relation to graduation
requirements, post-secondary school requirements and preparation, policies and practices pertaining to
scheduling and graduation, and career interests. The primary purpose is to allow parent/guardians and
students to learn about each individual course and any pre-requisite requirements to be met prior to
enrollment in those courses.
Please remember that due to the size of our small school there are not as many electives to offer the
students and not every course listed in this registration guide will be offered during the 2012-2013 school
year. After I meet with students to discuss the changes, it will be up to students to lay out a plan for the
coming year and potentially years beyond. I will gather their course selections in the coming weeks and
courses are then dropped if there are not enough students requesting them. (HINT: If you want to be
certain a class is offered, make sure you talk to your friends and classmates and ALL sign up for the
course…we cannot give you a “magic” number)
The courses you select at this time are the courses that you will be allowed to take. Take time to read
through the materials you were given, talk to teachers, and talk to students who have had the
class, as your course selections are the ones that I will make you stick to! If it is not on your list – it may
not be an option, so be safe and LIST ALTERNATES! Too many students come to their scheduled
appointments unprepared and then do not like the schedule that they are given in the spring. If you do
not list alternates, I will choose some for you and you will not be allowed to change them. With a
little bit of preparation, your appointment will go smoothly and the scheduling process will become a little
easier.
Each school year brings a few changes, so it is imperative that you spend some time reviewing the Course
Registration Guide:
           School-Wide
              * Fewer block courses: to try and make the scheduling process go a little smoother, we
                 have eliminated most of the block classes – very few will remain in the schedule.
           Agri-Science
              * Potential Science Equivalency: General Horticulture – potentially available for Science
                 credit
           Life Skills
              * Combined Course: Career Readiness – Education for Employment and Personal Finance
                  have been combined into one 0.50 credit class that is a graduation requirement for all
                  students.
As you plan your course selections, please know that the school counselor, teachers, and administrators
will be available to discuss the Course Registration Guide and your choices with you and your
parent/guardians; however the final decision regarding course selections will be the ones that you make.


                                                                                                   Page 2 of 52
For this reason it is extremely important that you thoroughly familiarize yourself with the contents of the
guide.
Finally, as you consider your options for 2012-2013, be open to trying different and exciting things. High
school gives you the opportunity to try new things and take a variety of courses to see if they are the right
fit for you. You have the ability to take courses that stretch your talents to newfound limits. Sign up for
courses that not only interest you, but that will challenge you, for it is through such efforts that true growth
occurs!
Sincerely,

Mrs. Nemec
School Counselor




Non-Discrimination Statement
It is the policy of Wonewoc-Center School District that no person may be denied admission to school or be denied
participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any curricular, extracurricular, pupil
services, recreational or other program, on the basis of sex, race, national origin, ancestry, creed, color, religion,
pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation or physical, mental, emotional, or learning disability. If you
feel that you have been discriminated against, you should contact the district administrator or principal.

                                                                                                           Page 3 of 52
Table of Contents
      Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................2
      Non-Discrimination Statement......................................................................................................................................3
      Advanced and Modified Classes ....................................................................................................................................7
      Advanced Placement (AP) Courses ..............................................................................................................................7
      Career Information
           The Sixteen Career Clusters ................................................................................................................................ 8
           Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources ......................................................................................................... 10
           Architecture & Construction ............................................................................................................................ 11
           Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication .................................................................................................... 12
           Business Management & Administration ........................................................................................................ 13
           Education & Training ........................................................................................................................................ 14
           Finance ................................................................................................................................................................. 15
           Government & Public Administration ............................................................................................................ 16
           Health Science ..................................................................................................................................................... 17
           Hospitality & Tourism ....................................................................................................................................... 18
           Human Services .................................................................................................................................................. 19
           Information Technology ................................................................................................................................... 20
           Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security ................................................................................................... 21
           Manufacturing ..................................................................................................................................................... 22
           Marketing ............................................................................................................................................................. 23
           Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics ...................................................................................... 24
           Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics ....................................................................................................... 25
      Class Rank ...................................................................................................................................................................... 26
      College Admission Requirements Student referral .................................................................................................. 26
      College Admission Tests .............................................................................................................................................. 26
      Course Add/Drops ...................................................................................................................................................... 27
      Course Offerings ........................................................................................................................................................... 27
      Credit Alternatives ........................................................................................................................................................ 28
      Credit Make-Up/Failed Courses ................................................................................................................................ 29
      Four-Year Plan .............................................................................................................................................................. 30
      Four-Year Plan: Notes ................................................................................................................................................. 31
      Grade Point Average .................................................................................................................................................... 32
      Graduation – Early ....................................................................................................................................................... 32
      Graduation – Exercises ................................................................................................................................................ 32
      Graduation – Participation .......................................................................................................................................... 32
      Graduation Requirements............................................................................................................................................ 33
      High School Classification ........................................................................................................................................... 34
      Independent Study ........................................................................................................................................................ 34
      Schedule – Daily............................................................................................................................................................ 34
      Schedule – Design & Definition ................................................................................................................................. 34
      Schedule – Process ....................................................................................................................................................... 34
                                                                                                                                                               Page 4 of 52
School Counseling Activities/Services ...................................................................................................................... 35
Special Education.......................................................................................................................................................... 36
Teaching Assistants ...................................................................................................................................................... 36
Transfer Students .......................................................................................................................................................... 36
Course Offerings
     Agri-Science ......................................................................................................................................................... 37
     Art ......................................................................................................................................................................... 38
     English.................................................................................................................................................................. 38
     Foreign Language ............................................................................................................................................... 40
     Instructional Technology................................................................................................................................... 41
     Life Skills .............................................................................................................................................................. 41
     Mathematics......................................................................................................................................................... 42
     Music .................................................................................................................................................................... 43
     Physical Education and Health ......................................................................................................................... 44
     School-to-Work .................................................................................................................................................. 44
     Science .................................................................................................................................................................. 47
     Special Education ............................................................................................................................................... 48
     Social Studies ....................................................................................................................................................... 49
     Technology Education ....................................................................................................................................... 51




                                                                                                                                                                Page 5 of 52
Course Selection and Registration Timeline
Here is what you can look forward to in the coming months:

        Step 1:         Course Selection Informational Meetings                                             late March
            The school counselor will be meeting with each grade level,   through
                                                                         6th             sometime during the last two weeks
                                                                                      11th,
            of March. Course selection information will be distributed, they will have the opportunity to meet some of the
            high school teachers, and learn about the Wonewoc-Center graduation requirements and course offerings.
            Students (and parent/guardians) from St. Paul’s Lutheran School or any other incoming students may call and set
            up an appointment with Mrs. Nemec, School Counselor at 464-3165 ext. 124 or nemechol@wc.k12.wi.us to
            discuss course selection and registration.

        Step 2:         Student and Parent Discussion/Decisions                                             late March
            Use this time to discuss course selections, graduation requirements, and future education plans with your student.
            An individualized learning plan should be discussed and the importance of high school in “the big picture” should
            be stressed. Course selection contracts should be completed and SIGNED! Students will bring them to the
            Collection Meetings.
            If you have questions regarding the course selection process, please contact Mrs. Nemec at 464-3165 ext. 124 or
            nemechol@wc.k12.wi.us.

        Step 3:         Course Contract Collection                                            late March/early April
            All students at Wonewoc-Center School will have individual scheduled meeting times with the school
            counselor. Parent signatures are strongly encouraged on these contracts, however due to the strict scheduling
            timeframe; they will be collected with or without the parent signature.

        Step 4:         8th Grade Shadow Day                                                                    Spring 2012
            All current 8th grade students at Wonewoc-Center and St. Paul’s Lutheran School will shadow a high school
            student. The objective is to learn about life as a Wonewoc-Center high school student from a student’s
            perspective, meet the teachers they will have in high school, and to help ease the transition from middle school to
            high school.

        Step 5:         Schedule Distribution                                                            End of May 2012
            Schedules will be distributed to students once the master schedule is finalized and the majority of course conflicts
            have been resolved. Students are advised to look over these schedules immediately and make an appointment to
            discuss conflicts that still exist or errors that may have occurred.




                                                                                                                  Page 6 of 52
Advanced and Modified Classes
Placement in these classes will be based on standardized and individual test scores, subject area grade point average (GPA)
and/or teacher recommendation. Students will need to have a teacher signature in order to sign up for the course. Examples:
AP English, AP Statistics, Calculus, Field Biology, etc.

Advanced Placement (AP) Courses
The Advanced Placement Program (AP) is a cooperative educational endeavor between high schools and colleges or
universities. It allows students to enroll in college-level courses while in high school, and gives them the opportunity to show
mastery by taking an AP exam. The course is graded by a certified Wonewoc-Center teacher and the class does count toward a
student’s grade point average. AP courses are designed to allow students to earn college credit, advanced placement in college,
or both.
Wonewoc-Center High School offers the following AP Courses:
  Advanced Placement Biology
  Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition
  Advanced Placement Statistics
  Advanced Placement U.S. History

AP Exams
AP exams are given during the month of May. Every student takes the same exam at the same time. Each exam consists of
two sections. The first section is made up of multiple-choice questions. The other section consists of free-response questions
in various formats: essays, analysis of historical documents, extended problem solving, etc.
Students are not required to take the College Board Advanced Placement Exam; however if they choose to do so, the AP
Exam is not figured into the student’s class grade and does not count toward a student’s grade point average.

AP Grades
Students will receive their grade report in July. The AP grading scale is as follows:
5 ........................................................................................ Extremely well qualified
4 .......................................................................................................... Well qualified
3 .................................................................................................................. Qualified
2 ....................................................................................................Possibly qualified
1 ............................................................................................. No recommendation
Most colleges and universities accept AP scores of 3 or above. It is the student’s responsibility to check with your intended
college or university to ensure that they will accept and reward credits for AP grades for any tests taken.

Benefits of AP
Students have the opportunity to receive credit, advanced placement or both at most colleges and universities. The amount of
credit received varies on the college, AP score, and the subject. Some colleges grant up to six college credits for a score of 5.
Students are also able to move into a higher level class at college as a freshman. This not only translates into time saved, but
also a financial savings for each credit earned while in high school. It is possible for a student to take enough AP exams to
enter college at a sophomore standing.

Cost of AP Exams
The exams are given at the student’s expense. The 2012 cost is $87 per exam taken. A $13 deposit is required upon registering
for an exam. This covers the cost of returning unused exams. Students with acute financial need should notify the school
counselor, as they may be eligible for a fee reduction or waiver.

AP Exam Timeline
February............................................................... Receive letter from school listing AP exam eligibility
March .................................................................................... Registration for AP exams and deposit due
May .................................................................................................................................................. AP exams
July .......................................................................................................................... Results of exams mailed


                                                                                                                                                                  Page 7 of 52
The Sixteen Career Clusters
1
                                The production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing, and development
                                of agricultural commodities and resources including food, fiber, wood products,
                                natural resources, horticulture, and other plant and animal products/resources.

2
                                Careers in designing, planning, managing, building and maintaining the built
                                environment.


3
                                Designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing, and publishing multimedia
                                content including visual and performing arts and design, journalism, and
                                entertainment services.

4                               Business Management and Administration careers encompass planning, organizing,
                                directing and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive
                                business operations.        Business Management and Administration career
                                opportunities are available in every sector of the economy.
5
                                Planning, managing and providing education and training services, and related
                                learning support services.


6
                                Planning, services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance, and
                                business financial management.


7
                                Executing governmental functions to include Governance; National Security;
                                Foreign Service; Planning; Revenue and Taxation; Regulation; and Management
                                and Administration at the local, state, and federal levels.

8
                                Planning, managing, and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health
                                informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development.


9
                                Hospitality & Tourism encompasses the management, marketing and operations of
                                restaurants and other foodservices, lodging, attractions, recreation events and
                                travel related services.

10
                                Preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and
                                human needs.


     Check out www.careerclusters.org and www.wicareerpathways.org for more detailed information

                                                                                                     Page 8 of 52
Career Clusters (continued)
11                                       Building Linkages in IT Occupations Framework: For Entry Level, Technical, and
                                         Professional Careers Related to the Design, Development, Support and
                                         Management of Hardware, Software, Multimedia, and Systems Integration
                                         Services.
12
                                         Planning, managing, and providing legal, public safety, protective services and
                                         homeland security, including professional and technical support services.


13                                       Planning, managing and performing the processing of materials into intermediate
                                         or final products and related professional and technical support activities such as
                                         production planning and control, maintenance and manufacturing/process
                                         engineering.
14
                                         Planning, managing, and performing marketing activities to reach organizational
                                         objectives.


15
                                         Planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional and
                                         technical services (e.g., physical science, social science, engineering) including
                                         laboratory and testing services, and research and development services.

16                                       Planning, management, and movement of people, materials, and goods by road,
                                         pipeline, air, rail and water and related professional and technical support services
                                         such as transportation infrastructure planning and management, logistics services,
                                         mobile equipment and facility maintenance.
          Check out www.careerclusters.org and www.wicareerpathways.org for more detailed information

     My top three Career Clusters are:
     1.
     2.
     3.

     For more information, check with a counselor at your high school, career technical center, higher education
     institution, or one-stop career center.




                                                                                                                Page 9 of 52
Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources
Careers in agriculture, food and natural resources involve the production, processing, marketing, distribution, financing and
development of agricultural commodities and resources. These include food, fuel, fiber, wood products, natural resources,
horticulture and other plant and animal products/resources.

                                                 Do you have an interest in:
     Animals                                                                         Foods
      Working with sick or injured animals                                           What makes bread rise and pop fizz
      Working with companion animals like dogs and cats                              Being a food scientist
      Working with unique species such as fish for food                              Designing new food and flavors
      A medical field                                                                How science is used to process your food
      Marine biology                                                                 Chemistry and its application to food

     Plants                                                                          Natural Resources
      Caring for plants in your home or yard                                         Native fish and their aquatic habits
      Designing landscapes for homes or businesses                                   Forest ecosystems
      Developing new plants or modifying existing ones                               Preservation of endangered species
      What plants need to grow successfully                                          Wolves and Whitetails in Wisconsin

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Bee Keeper                           Fisherman                           Nursery Worker             Stable Worker
     Crop Sprayer                         Landscape Laborer                   Pet Groomer                Vet Hospital Worker
     Farm Worker                          Logger                              Pet Shop Worker

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Arborist                             Crop/Animal Farmer                  Genetic Technologist       Quality Food Control Specialist
     Animal Control Officer               Environmental Technician            Golf Course Manager        Turf Manager
     Animal Nutritionist                  Farrier                             Greenhouse Manager         Veterinary Technician
     Bio-Tech Lab Technician              Fish and Game Officer               Horticulturist             Waste Water Technician
     Cheese Maker                         Forestry Technician                 Landscape Designer

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Agricultural Commodities Broker                      Animal Scientist      Geneticist               Toxicologist
     Agricultural Economist                               Biochemist            Greenhouse Operator      USDA Inspector
     Agricultural Educator                                Botanist              Landscape Architect      Veterinarian
     Agricultural Engineer                                Entomologist          Marine Biologist         Wildlife Biologist
     Agricultural Sales & Communications                  Food Scientist        Plant Pathologist        Zoologist
     Agricultural Banker                                  Forester              Soil Geologist
     Animal Psychologist                                  Game Warden           Soil Scientist

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills

                                                                                                                              Page 10 of 52
Architecture & Construction
Careers in architecture and construction range from designing, planning, managing and building a structure, to maintaining the
built environment.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                                School Subjects
      Curious                                                                          Math
      Good at following directions                                                     Drafting
      Pay attention to detail                                                          Physical Sciences
      Good at visualizing possibilities                                                Construction Trades
      Patient and persistent                                                           Electrical Trades/Heat, Air Conditioning and
                                                                                            Refrigeration/Technology Education

     Working with your hands                                                           Activities
      Visit and learn from beautiful, historic, or interesting                         Picture in my mind what a finished product
           buildings                                                                        looks like
      Solve technical problems                                                         Read and follow blueprints and/or instructions
      Perform work that requires precise results
      Follow logical, step-by-step procedures

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Construction Laborer                      Fence Builder                           Roofer        Grading & Leveling Machine Operator
     Construction Worker/Helper                Highway Maintenance Worker              Tile Setter   Heavy Equipment Operator
     Groundskeeper and Gardener

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     HVAC Technician                      Cement Mason                        Pipefitter                 Civil Engineering Technician
     Architectural Drafter                Drywall Installer                   Plasterer                  Electrical Engineering Technician
     Bricklayer                           Electrician                         Plumber
     Carpenter                            Glazier                             Tile Setter

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Architect                            Civil Engineer                      Electrical Engineer          Interior Design
     Building Contractor                  Cost Estimator                      Grounds Supervisor           Landscape Architect
     CAD Designer

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                            Page 11 of 52
Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication
Arts, audio/video technology and communication careers include designing, producing, exhibiting, performing, writing and
publishing multimedia content. This field also involves the visual and performing arts, journalism and entertainment services.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                               School Subjects
      Creative and imaginative                                                        Art/Graphic design
      Good communicator/vocabulary                                                    Music
      Curious about new technology                                                    Speech and drama
      Relate well to feelings and thoughts of others                                  Journalism/Literature
      Determined/tenacious                                                            Audiovisual Technologies

     Activities
      Perform in front of others                                                      Use video and recording technology
      Read and write                                                                  Design brochure and posters
      Play a musical instrument                                                       Use my imagination to communicate new
      Perform creative, artistic, activities                                                 information to others


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Floral Designer                      Proofreader                         Stained Glass                   Photographer
     Food Stylist                         Sign Designer/Painter               Mural Painter                   Pre-Press
     Musician

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Animator                        Communications Line Maintainers              Recording Technician          Potter
     Bookbinder                      Craft Artist                                 Taxidermist                   Graphic Designer
     Broadcast Technician            Prepress Technician                          Public Relations Manager      Music Repair Technician
     Caption Writer                  Printing Press Operator                      Sign Painter                  Recording Technician

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Animator                        Potter                                   Art Teacher                     Musician
     Artist                          Set Designers Reporter                   Art Professor                   Music Teacher
     Cinematographer                 Illustrator                              Art Therapist                   Music Therapist
     Composer                        Jeweler                                  Graphic Designer                Composer
     Copy Editor                     Architect                                Videographer                    Recording Engineer
     Dancer                          Interior Decorator                       Journalist                      Music Repair
     Photographer

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                              Page 12 of 52
Business Management & Administration
Business management and administration careers encompass planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business functions
that are essential to efficient and productive business operations. These career opportunities are available in every sector of the
economy.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                              School Subjects
      Organized                                                                      Accounting
      Practical and logical                                                          Math
      Patient                                                                        English
      Tactful                                                                        Economics
      Responsible                                                                    Computer Applications/Business and
                                                                                          Information Technology

     Activities
      Work with numbers and detailed information                                     Create reports and communicate ideas
      Be the leader in a group                                                       Work with computer programs
      Make business contact with people                                              Perform routine, organized activities but can be
      Plan my work and follow instructions without close                                 flexible
           supervision

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Bank Teller                          Meter Reader                        Typist                      Billing, Cost & Rate Clerk
     Caterer                              Receptionist                        Human Resource Clerk        Hospital Admitting Clerk
     File Clerk                           Sales Clerk                         Hotel Clerk                 Data Entry Clerk
     Mail Clerk                           Telephone Operator

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Accountant                         Kennel Owner                          Tax Preparer                Word Processor
     Administrative Assistant           Small Business Owner                  Funeral Director            Retail Sales Supervisor
     Computer Operator                  Stenographer                          Management Trainee          Industrial Clerk
     Court Reporter

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Accountant-CPA                                  Health Care Administrator             Sales Representative   Travel Agency Manager
     Advertising Manager                             Human Resource Manager                Theater Manager        Musician’s Agent
     Art Director                                    Instrument Sales/Manufacturing        Marketing Manager      Event Planner
     Business and Industry Consultant                Marketing Music Jingle Writer

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                            Page 13 of 52
Education & Training
Careers in education and training involve planning, managing, and providing education and training services, as well as related
learning support services.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                               School Subjects
      Friendly                                                                        Language Arts
      Decision maker                                                                  Social Studies
      Helpful                                                                         Math
      Innovative/Inquisitive                                                          Science
      Good listener                                                                   Psychology

     Activities
      Communicate with different types of people                                      Handle several responsibilities at once
      Help others with their homework or learn new things                             Acquire new information
      Go to school                                                                    Help people overcome their challenges
      Direct and plan activities for others

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Aerobics Instructor                  Dance Teacher                       Library Assistant           Self-Enrichment Teacher
     Child Care Assistant



     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Computer Installation &            Preschool Teacher                     Library Technician          Sign Language Interpreter
     Demonstration                      Teacher Assistant



     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Apprenticeship Consultant             Music Teacher                       Vocational Education Teacher   Training Program Manager
     Bilingual Educator                    Music Therapist                     Librarian                      Elementary School Teacher
     Educational Administrator             School Psychologist                 Speech-Language Pathologist    Special Education Teacher
     Instructional Coordinator             Secondary School Teacher            School Counselor               Adult Literacy Teacher
     Kindergarten Teacher                  Teacher of the Blind                University Professor

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                           Page 14 of 52
Finance
People working in finance are involved in developing services for financial and investment planning, banking, insurance and
business financial management.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                                 School Subjects
      Trustworthy                                                                       Accounting
      Orderly                                                                           Math
      Self-confident                                                                    Economics
      Logical                                                                           Banking/Financial Services
      Methodical or efficient                                                           Business Law

     Activities
      Work with numbers                                                                 Handle money with accuracy and reliability
      Work to meet a deadline                                                           Take pride in the way I dress and look
      Make predictions based on existing facts                                          Analyze financial information and interpret it to
      Have a framework of rules by which to operate                                         others


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Bill & Account Collector             Brokerage Clerk                     Cashier

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Accountant                       Claim Adjuster                          Insurance Agent                Loan Officer
     Brokerage Clerk                  Financial Institution Manager           Investigator & Adjustor        Personal Property Appraiser

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Accountant, CPA            Controller                                          Investment Advisor           Economist
     Actuary                    Credit Analyst                                      Music Store Accountant       Financial Advisor
     Auditor                    Credit Card Operations Manager                      School District Business     Stockbroker
     Brokerage Clerk            Insurance Underwriter                               Manager                      Real Estate Appraiser
     Business & Industry Consultant

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                              Page 15 of 52
Government & Public Administration
People working in government and public administration careers execute governmental functions including governance,
national security, foreign service, planning, revenue and taxation, regulation, and management and administration at the local,
state and federal levels.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                               School Subjects
      Good communicator                                                               Government
      Competitive                                                                     Language Arts
      Service minded                                                                  History
      Well organized                                                                  Math
      Problem solver                                                                  Foreign Language

     Activities
      Be involved in politics                                                         Analyze information and interpret it to others
      Negotiate, defend, and debate ideas and topics                                  Travel and see things that are new to me
      Plan activities and work cooperatively with others                              Perform a variety of duties that may change
      Work with details                                                                   often


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Mail Carrier                         Driver’s License Examiner License Clerk                          Infantry Forces
     Postal Clerk                         Mail Handling Machine Operator

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Coroner                          Title Examiner                          Postmaster                   Infantry Forces
     City Planning Aid                Accountant                              Transportation Inspector     Special Forces
     Building Inspector               Associate Executive

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Accountant                             Emergency Mgmt. Specialist            Urban Planner           Occ. Health & Safety Specialist
     Apprenticeship Consultant              Equal Opportunity Specialist          Legislator              Peace Corps Volunteer
     Aviation Security Specialist           Infantry Officer                      Music Administrator     Social Services Administrator
     City Manager                           Lawyer                                Political Scientist     Translator/Interpreter
     Dean of Students                       Special Operations Officer            Public Utilities Mgr.

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                             Page 16 of 52
Health Science
Planning, managing and providing therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support services, and
biotechnology research and development are all functions of health science careers.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                              School Subjects
      Compassionate and caring                                                       Biological Sciences
      Good at following directions                                                   Chemistry
      Conscientious and careful                                                      Math
      Patient                                                                        Occupational Health classes
      Good listener                                                                  Language Arts

     Activities
      Work under pressure                                                            Respond quickly and calmly in emergencies
      Help sick people and animals                                                   Work as a member of a team
      Make decisions based on logic and information                                  Follow guidelines precisely and meet strict
      Participate in health and science classes                                          standards of accuracy


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Certified Nursing Assistant            Clerk                             Food Service Worker         Hospital Admitting


     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Emergency Medical Technician                 Radiology Technologist Ultrasound Technician            Dental Hygienist
     Home Health Aide                             Registered Nurse           Medical Assistant            Dialysis Technician
     Massage Therapist                            Surgical Technician        Dental Assistant             Occupational Therapy Assistant
     Physical Therapy Aide                        Translator and Interpreter

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Athletic Trainer                       Music Therapist                      Geneticist              Registered Nurse
     Chiropractor                           Pharmacist                           Statistician            Nurse Practitioner
     Dentist                                Primary Care Physician               Podiatrist              Anesthesiologist
     Dietician                              Psychiatrist                         Oral Surgeon            Hemotherapist
     Occupational Therapist                 Surgeon

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                              Page 17 of 52
Hospitality & Tourism
Hospitality and tourism encompasses the management, marketing and operations of restaurants and other facilities and
services including lodging, attractions, recreation events and travel-related services.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                              School Subjects
      Tactful                                                                        Language Arts/Speech
      Self-motivated                                                                 Foreign Language
      Works well with others                                                         Social Sciences
      Outgoing                                                                       Marketing
      Slow to anger                                                                  Food Services

     Activities
      Investigate new places and activities                                          Communicate easily, tactfully, and courteously
      Work with all ages and types of people                                         Learn about other cultures
      Have a flexible schedule                                                       Organize activities in which other people enjoy
      Help people make up their minds                                                      themselves


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Baggage Porter & Bellhop               Food Attendant                    Usher                         Waiter/Waitress
     Cake Decorator                         Furniture Refinisher              Wardrobe & Dressing           Short Order Cook
                                                                                 Room Attendant
     Concierge                              Gaming Change Person              Janitor                       Restaurant Host/Hostess
                                              & Booth Cashier
     Day Worker                             Guide                             Hotel Clerk                   Hotel/Motel Cleaner

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Club Manager                                Household Manager              Restaurant Manager          Caterer
     Conference Planner                          Motel & Hotel Manager          Taxidermist                 Concierge
     Food Service Supervisor                     Recreation Director            Translator (Interpreter)    Restaurant Cook/Chef

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Archivist                              Curator                              Park Ranger               Theatre Manager
     Coach                                  Historian                            Recreation Director       Translator/Interpreter
     Conservation Technician                Musicians Agent                      Resort Manager            Zookeeper

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                             Page 18 of 52
Human Services
Employment in human services focuses on families and human needs.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                                School Subjects
      Good communicator/listener                                                       Language Arts
      Caring                                                                           Psychology/Sociology
      Non-materialistic                                                                Family and Consumer Sciences
      Uses intuition and logic                                                         Finance
      Non-judgmental                                                                   Foreign Language

     Activities
      Care about people, their needs, and their                                        Work with people from preschool to old age
       promotions
      Participate in community services and/or                                         Think of new ways to do things
       volunteering
      Listen to other people’s viewpoints                                              Make friends with different kinds of people
      Help people be at their best

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Aerobics Instructor                    Crossing Guard                     Household Cook              Nanny

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Community Organization Worker                   Institutional Cook           Shoe Repairer            Embalmer
     Cosmetologist                                   Nail Technician              Skin Care Specialist     Child Care Assistant
     Funeral Director                                Preschool Teacher

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Dietician                            Placement Counselor                 Sociologist                      Career Counselor
     Investment Advisor                   Psychiatrist                        Social Worker                    Financial Counselor
     Liturgical Minister                  Psychologist                        Vocational Rehab Counselor       Personal Counselor
     Clergy                               School Counselor                    Alcohol & Drug Abuse Counselor   Religious Worker
     Music Therapy

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                            Page 19 of 52
Information Technology
Information technology entry level, technical and professional careers relate to the design, development, support and
management of hardware, software, multimedia and systems integration services.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                              School Subjects
      Logic/analytical thinker                                                       Math
      See details in the big picture                                                 Science
      Persistent                                                                     Computer Tech/Applications
      Good concentration skills                                                      Communications
      Precise and accurate                                                           Graphic Design

     Activities
      Work with computers                                                            Play video games and figure out how they work
      Reason clearly and logically to solve complex                                  Concentrate for long periods without being
       problems                                                                           distracted
      Use machines, techniques, and processes                                           Read technical materials and diagrams, and solve
      Adapt to change                                                                    technical problems


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Careers in this field require more than minimal experience or on-the-job training

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Computer Support Specialist                  Recording Engineer            Tool Programmer           Webmaster
     Computer Systems Analyst                     Sound Manager

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Animator                             Illustrator                         Video Game Designer         Computer Programmer
     Computer Engineer                    Software Engineer                   Computer Systems Analyst    Computer Security Specialist
     Computer Network                     Scientific & Engineering            Medical & Scientific        Information Scientist
       Coordinator                            Programmer                         Illustrator
     Database Administrator               Webmaster


     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                            Page 20 of 52
Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security
Planning, managing and providing legal, public safety and protective services and homeland security are some of the functions
of law, public safety, corrections and security careers. This field includes professional and technical support services.

                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                                School Subjects
      Adventurous                                                                      Language Arts
      Dependable                                                                       Psychology/Sociology
      Community-minded                                                                 Government/History
      Decisive                                                                         Law Enforcement
      Optimistic                                                                       First Aid/First Responder

     Activities
      Work under pressure or in the face of danger                                     Respect rules and regulations
      Make decisions based on my own observations                                      Debate and win arguments
      Interact with other people                                                       Observe and analyze people’s behavior
      Be in position of authority

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Correctional Officer                   Dispatcher                        Parking Enforcement Officer   Security Guard
     Crossing Guard

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Bailiff                           Emergency Medical Technician               Musician Law              Police Officer
     Copyright Law                     Firefighter                                Paralegal Assistant       Fire Inspector
     Court Reporter                    Legal Secretary                            Park Ranger               Police Canine Trainer

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Adjudicator                            Judicial Law Clerk                     Judge                       Private Detective
     Arbitrator                             Lawyer                                 Fingerprint Examiner        State Patrol Officer
     FBI Agent                              Park Ranger                            Conservation Warden         Police Officer
     Forensic Science                       Probation and Parole                   Emergency Management        Correctional Officer
        Technician                             Officer                                Specialist                  Supervisor

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                             Page 21 of 52
Manufacturing
Careers in manufacturing involve planning, managing and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final
products and related professional and technical support activities such as production planning and control, maintenance and
manufacturing/process engineering.


                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                               School Subjects
      Practical                                                                       Math (Geometry)
      Observant                                                                       Chemistry
      Physically active                                                               Trade and Industry courses
      Step-by-step thinker                                                            Physics
      Coordinated                                                                     Language Arts

     Activities
      Work with my hands and learn that way                                           Apply math to work out solutions
      Put things together                                                             Visualize objects in three dimensions from flat
                                                                                           drawings
      Do routine, organized and accurate work                                            Use hand and power tools and operate
      Perform activities that produce tangible results                                    equipment/machinery


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Apparel & Home Furnishings Dyer                     Hand Worker             Order Filler                         Production Assembler
     Brush Painter                                       Oil Well Driller        Production and Planning Clerk        Tire Builder
     Engraver


     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Apparel Pattern Maker              Electric Motor Technician             Machinist                   Electronic Engineering Technician
     Combination Welder                 Locksmith                             Tool and Die Maker          Electrical Engineer
     Computer Technician                Musical Instrument                    Quality Control             Industrial Engineering Technician
     Electrical Appliance                  Repairer                             Technician
        Servicer

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Communications                     Engineering Manager                   Mechanical Engineer           Production Supervisor
        Operations Mgr.
     Electrical Engineer                Environmental Engineer                Musical Instrument Design     Stage & Sound Equipment Mfg.
     Electronic Engineer                Industrial Engineer                   Occupational Health &
                                                                                Safety Inspector

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills


                                                                                                                             Page 22 of 52
Marketing
People working in marketing careers plan, manage and perform marketing activities to reach organizational objectives.


                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                         School Subjects
      Enthusiastic                                                              Language Arts
      Competitive                                                               Math
      Creative                                                                  Business Education/Marketing
      Self-motivated                                                            Economics
      Persuasive                                                                Computer Applications

     Activities
      Shop and go to the mall                                                   Communicate my ideas to other people
      Be in charge                                                              Give presentations and enjoy public speaking
      Make displays and promote ideas                                           Persuade people to buy products or to
      Take advantage of opportunities to make extra money                           participate in activities


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Antique/Collectible Dealer             Counter Clerk                       News Vendor            Telemarketer
     Cashier                                Customer Service Representative     Street Vendor          Wedding Planner
     Classified Ad Clerk

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Advertising Layout Designer                     Auctioneer               Buyer                    Real Estate Agent
     Advertising Sales Representative                Auto Salesperson         Instrument Sales

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Advertising Account Executive                Marketing Manager           Research Analyst                   Purchasing Manager
     Advertising Manager                          Public Relations Manager    Public Relations Practitioner      Market Research Analyst
     Business Agent                               Purchasing Agent            Insurance Agent                    Real Estate Broker

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                          Page 23 of 52
Science, Technology, Engineering, &
Mathematics
The fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics involve planning, managing and providing scientific research
and professional and technical services (such as physical science, social science and engineering). These may include laboratory
and testing services, as well as research and development.


                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                           School Subjects
      Detail oriented                                                             Math
      Inquisitive                                                                 Science
      Objective                                                                   Drafting/Computer Aided Drafting
      Methodical                                                                  Electronics/Computer Networking
      Mechanically inclined                                                       Technical Classes/Technology Education

     Activities
      Interpret formulas                                                          Experiment to find the best way to do something
      Find answers to questions                                                   Pay attention to details and help things be precise
      Work in a laboratory                                                        Figure out how things work and investigate new
      Explore new technology                                                          things


                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Statistical Clerk

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Biological Technician                    Environmental Technician        Veterinary Technician    Petroleum Technician
     Chemical Technician                      Mathematical Technician         Nuclear Technician       Electronics Engineering
     Civil Engineering Technician             Industrial Engineering          Mechanical Engineering      Technician
                                                 Technician                      Technician

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Aerospace Engineer                     Chemical Engineer                 Industrial Engineer      Nuclear Engineer
     Anthropologist                         Civil Engineer                    Mathematician            Physicist
     Archaeologist                          Computer Engineer                 Mechanical Engineer      Solar Engineer
     Astronomer                             Electrical Engineer               Metallurgist             Statistician
     Biomedical Engineer                    Geologist                         Mining Engineer

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                          Page 24 of 52
Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics
Careers in transportation, distribution and logistics involve planning, management and movement of people, materials and
goods by road, pipeline, air, rail and water, as well as related professional and technical support services such as transportation
infrastructure planning and management, logistics services and mobile equipment and facility maintenance.


                                                      Interests and Abilities
     Personal Qualities                                                               School Subjects
      Realistic                                                                       Math
      Mechanical                                                                      Trade and Industry courses
      Coordinated                                                                     Physical Sciences
      Observant                                                                       Economics
      Planner                                                                         Foreign Language

     Activities
      Travel                                                                          Anticipate needs and prepare to meet them
      See well and have quick reflexes                                                Drive or ride
      Solve mechanical problems                                                       Move things from one place to another
      Design efficient processes

                                                              Career Options
     From High School
     On-the-job training and/or minimal experience

     Bus Driver                     Highway Maintenance Worker                Shipping and Receiving Clerk      Taxicab Driver
     Deckhand                       Reservation and Ticket Clerk              Traffic Clerk                     Light Truck Driver
     Delivery Driver                Service Station Attendant

     Certification/Associate Degree
     Community college, technical college, and/or apprenticeship experience

     Aircraft Mechanic                        Cartographic Technician            Railroad Conductor           Travel Agent
     Auto Body Technician                     Diesel Technician                  Security Consultant          Flight Attendant
     Automobile Painter                       Motorcycle Technician

     Bachelors, Pre-Professional or Higher Degree
     Colleges/Universities

     Airline Pilot                          Environmentalist                      Mechanical Engineer        Public Health Sanitarian
     Air Traffic Controller                 Locomotive Engineer                   Mining Engineer            Travel Agency Manager
     Astronaut

     Cluster Knowledge and Skills
     Academic Foundations, Communications, Problem Solving & Critical Thinking, Information Technology Application Systems,
     Safety/Health/Environment, Leadership & Teamwork, Ethics & Legal Responsibility, Employability & Career Development, Technical Skills




                                                                                                                                 Page 25 of 52
Class Rank
Class rank is based on a students’ cumulative grade point average and is recalculated at the end of each semester (January and
June). A student’s GPA is determined by dividing grade points by the number of credits attempted.

College Admission Requirements Student referral
The college admission process is not an isolated event that happens in the fall of a student’s senior year. As admission to
colleges and universities becomes more competitive, it is more important than ever to build a solid academic record beginning
on the first day of ninth grade. It is crucial to select a course of study which meets or exceeds the minimum standards for
admission. Since record numbers of students are applying to four‐year institutions in recent years, a solid transcript and strong
ACT scores become crucial. The selection and completion of demanding courses during the senior year is crucial, as students
need to maintain high academic standards in their final year. A student’s admission to a college is never guaranteed until the
final senior transcript is received by colleges in early summer.
The UW‐System requires 17 core high school credits to meet minimum admission consideration. These credits
must be distributed as follows: English 4.0, Social Studies 3.0, Math 3.0, Natural Lab Science 3.0, and Electives 4.0 –
foreign language, fine arts, computer science or technology education.
Not all courses offered by Wonewoc-Center qualify as college preparatory courses. The school counselor is available to assist
students in course selection throughout their high school careers and to identify the requirements for specific colleges.
Information is available for the University of Wisconsin System Colleges at www.uwhelp.wisconsin.edu. Wisconsin Technical
College System information can be located at www.witechcolleges.org. Wisconsin’s Private College and University
information can be located at www.PrivateCollegeZone.org.

College Admission Tests
Which test is required? All colleges and universities, and some vocational schools, require prospective students to take the
ACT or SAT test as part of their admission requirements. All UW‐System schools require the ACT or SAT 1, with the ACT
being the preferred test. Students should check at www.actstudent.org/writing to see if the writing requirement is needed for
your selected school(s). UW-Madison is the only school in Wisconsin that requires the writing test as of this time; however
several other schools may recommend that you may take it.
Dates for the ACT are posted in the school counseling office, listed on the school calendar, and the school website at
www.theclasslist.com/wcschools  Faculty  Mrs. Nemec’s Homepage  Events Calendar. If in doubt as to which test
your prospective school prefers, check that school’s website or contact their admission office.
What is the best way to prepare for these tests? The most important prerequisite for success on college admissions tests is
a solid, comprehensive educational plan. ACT data show that students who elect to take four or more years of English and
three or more years of coursework in mathematics, science (including Chemistry) and social studies earn higher ACT scores.
Wonewoc-Center also tests all juniors through the use of the ASVAB, which can give students a good indication of how they
will score on the ACT. There is also a “Preparing for the ACT” Assessment Booklet available outside the school counselor’s
office. Students are also encouraged to take some time to do some test preparation and studying.
When should the tests be taken? Students typically take these tests in the spring of their junior year, and they may be taken
more than once. April and June are the most common test dates for Wonewoc-Center juniors, but circumstances
might dictate that you take an earlier test. It is highly recommended that students do not take the ACT until they
have completed three years of math, three years of English as well as three years of science (including Chemistry).
Choose the available test date closest to the completion date of these courses.
What if I am going to a Technical College? The ACT may be sufficient for some Technical college systems, however you
should check your specific campus at www.witechcolleges.org to see which test they require. Students need to take the test at
the Technical College System in which they plan to attend. Each system has different score requirements for each
program. These can be found on the respective college websites. You may need to schedule an appointment ahead of time to
take this test.
What is a Placement Test? University of Wisconsin Placement Tests are designed for the sole purpose of placing students
into college level courses. The questions on the placement tests are specifically selected with this single purpose in mind. The
tests are not intended to measure everything that is learned in high school. Neither are the tests designed to compare students
from one high school with students from another or to measure success in college-level courses. These tests are intended as

                                                                                                                 Page 26 of 52
part of the information to be used by advisors for placing students into the most appropriate course in an introductory
college-level sequence in English, French, German, mathematics, or Spanish.
To this end, the tests are designed only to measure enough of a student’s achievement to provide an initial screen for course
placement. The tests are not intended to be used as the sole piece of data for determining where students should be placed.
The experienced teacher also will quickly realize, upon examining the objectives that are measured in the placement tests, that
many skills which are taught in high school and which are necessary for success in college are not measured by the UW
Placement Tests. Placement tests do not need to measure everything that is taught in high school in order to help place
students into the most appropriate course.

Course Add/Drops
Students are given ample time and information to make their decisions for the course registration process and are
encouraged to take it very seriously. Parental involvement during this process is both encouraged and expected. If a
student changes his or her mind regarding their course selections, they are instructed to notify the school counselor immediately
and before the scheduling process is complete. Once the master schedule is finalized, the staff and administration budget for
the class rosters as established at that time.
If a student wishes to make a schedule change after they have made their course selections, students will need to complete an
“Add/Drop Request” form, which requires a parent and teacher signature to initiate a course change. Approval of change
requests are subject to course availability and the impact on class/section size. Teacher preference changes are not allowed.
Students are required to take a minimum course load of 3.5 credits and seven (7) courses per semester. No student will be
allowed to drop courses if these drops place him or her below the minimum course load requirements, unless an exception is
granted by the administration. Add/Drops will only be considered until the third (3rd) day of each semester without penalty.
If a student wishes to drop a course at that time, he or she will receive a failing grade for the course(s) dropped. Please note
that situations will be reviewed on an individual basis and exceptions to this will be subject to administrative approval.
Schedule changes may be granted based on the following criteria:
    * Failure or low grade in a course that is a prerequisite to another scheduled course
    * Recommendation by the teacher for academic purposes
    * Transcript deficiencies indicate a need to change
    * Parents request a course change due to a verifiable change in post-graduation plans; must have administrative approval
    * Recommendation by administration based on a review of the request
Seniors: If you make a schedule change after you have applied to any colleges, it is your responsibility to notify them of the
change as it may affect their acceptance/wait-list decision. Colleges have had to revoke student admissions based on schedule
changes from time of acceptance to final transcript receipt.

Course Offerings
It is extremely important that students take the course registration process serious. Add/drops after the initial
scheduling process will be extremely limited!
Students will be given ample time to review their registration materials and return their Course Selection Contracts back to the
school, completed and signed by their parents. Students who meet the registration deadline requirements will be given first
priority in class selection.
If a student fails to have their Course Selection Contract signed by their parents, it will still be collected, however it will be
considered the same as a late form. Course selections can NOT be guaranteed for students turning their Course Selection
Contracts late. They will be the first students dropped if space is not available for every student in the course.
If the student fails to turn in their registration sheet within 1 week past the deadline, they will have their courses
assigned for them by the school counselor, in accordance with their transcript, graduation requirements, and the
classes available at that time. These students will not be able to add/drop classes.
The course offerings are listed on pages 37-52, organized by subject area. Please read through the course descriptions and ask
a teacher in that subject area if you want more information.
It is essential to reiterate that students take the course registration process serious. Add/drops after the initial
scheduling process will be extremely limited!



                                                                                                                  Page 27 of 52
Credit Alternatives
Wonewoc-Center is committed to providing each student with a quality education. In most cases, this education can be
obtained through the regular educational program offered at the high school. However, some students will be better served
through an alternative education program. Students must see their counselor and receive school approval before enrolling in
any of the following programs for Wonewoc-Center High School credit.
    A. Alternative Academic Programs. Present modifications include:
         * Homebound Instruction. This requires a letter from a physician. If the student is unable to attend school, a
             homebound instruction plan will be developed.
         * Work Experience Program. Students may receive credit for employment. The student must have completed
             Education for Employment and Personal Finance before, or concurrently with, signing up for the program.
         * A+nyWhere Learning System. This software program is an e-learning solution that consists of study the
             material, working practice exercises, taking a mastery test, and finally showing assimilation of the information and
             skills through an essay exercise.
         * Correspondence and Internet Courses. These options are available for students wanting courses not offered at
             Wonewoc-Center. In many cases students are responsible for their own fees for these courses. In exceptional
             cases, like transfer students in a traditional math program or an upper level foreign language not offered at
             Wonewoc-Center School, this fee may be paid by school. If the district pays the fee for a course and the student
             does not complete the course, or if he or she fails the course, the student and parent are responsible for
             reimbursing the district for the costs of the course. Sign up for these courses is the responsibility of the student in
             consultation with their school counselor. Upon successful completion of the course, the grade and credit the
             student earned will be added to the student’s transcript if the course has been pre-approved by the administration.
    B. Alternative High School. These programs are available to a limited number of students. Each program has options
       for a diploma.
       * Goal-Oriented Adult Learning. Western Technical College offers instruction for individuals who want to
            improve their academic skills, to complete their GED, HSED or high school credential, to prepare for college
            level classes, or to improve English language skills in our English Language Learners (ELL) program.
       * Juneau County Adolescent Needs. JCAN is an alternative school for students with special needs. Students
            must have a current Individualized Education Plan. Their goal is to provide an alternative learning environment
            to secondary students who have experienced problems engaging in more conventional forms of education.
       * Juneau County Charter School. JCCS is based on the philosophy that many students’ educational needs cannot
            be met through traditional models. Their goal is to provide an alternative learning environment to secondary
            students who have experienced problems engaging in more conventional forms of education. Students seeking
            admission to this school setting, relating to the purpose of school, gaining a positive sense of self-esteem, or
            perhaps failing to understand the relevance of school to the “real-world”. JCCS will remove barriers to learning
            as students receive an education based on the concept that each person learns best when engaging in activities,
            which applies directly to their lives.
       Questions regarding placement in the alternative high school programs should be addressed to the student’s
       counselor.
    C. College-level Programs:
       * Youth Options Program. This program entitles juniors and seniors enrolled in a public high school to attend a
           postsecondary institution (4-year College or university, and technical colleges) for the purpose of taking one or
           more nonsectarian courses. Applications for fall semester courses are due March 1, while applications for the
           spring semester are due by October 1.
    D. Other:
       * Summer School. Wonewoc-Center offers summer school for students who have already taken a course during
          the previous school year and have not met the essential mastery outcomes necessary for success. Summer school
          is offered free to high school students in the four core areas: English, math, science, and social studies. Summer
          school is typically Monday – Thursday from 8:00 AM until 12 Noon and run in 2 three week sessions. Students
          may make-up a maximum of 2.0 credits:
               2 hours/day for 3 weeks = 0.5 credit              4 hours/day for 3 weeks = 1.0 credit
               2 hours/day for 6 weeks = 1.0 credit              4 hours/day for 6 weeks = 2.0 credits
          Further information about summer school opportunities is provided in late spring.

                                                                                                                    Page 28 of 52
        *   Medically-Related Education. Upon receipt of appropriate documentation from a treatment facility, Wonewoc-
            Center may grant academic credit for education and coursework completed by students while they are in inpatient
            treatment. A review of such documentation will be made by the School Counselor and Administrator to
            determine credit granted. Exceptions to these following guidelines may be made in extenuating circumstances by
            the School Counselor and Administrator. Guidelines for this determination include:
            1. 0.5 maximum credit granted per discipline area; 0.25 credit may be granted in some circumstances.
            2. 60 hours of instruction or its equivalent equals 0.50 credit per North Central Association guidelines.
            3. All credit granted will be identified in student transcripts to distinguish courses from regular W-C course titles.

Credit Make-Up/Failed Courses
Students failing required courses will be required to repeat the course. All grades of “F” will remain on a student’s transcript.
Students will be recommended to sign up for summer school to make up the credit deficit. If a student does not take summer
school, elective courses will be dropped from their schedule to fit in graduation requirements.
Credit make-up options should be discussed and approved with the school counselor or principal. The following methods can
be used to make up credit deficiencies:
    1. Repeat the class if it is a graduation requirement
    2. Satisfactory completion of a school approved alternative course/delivery program
            a. A+nyWhere Learning System Program
            b. Online courses
            c. School approved independent study
    3. Satisfactory completion of a school approved summer school course of equal curriculum content, not to exceed 2 credits
        a summer. Hours must be equivalent to time spent in a W-C summer course.
    4. Other summer school programs (at student expense) that are pre-approved by the principal
    5. Enroll in an elective course of the same subject area.




                                                                                                                  Page 29 of 52
Four-Year Plan
As you prepare to register for courses for the 2012-2013 school year take some time to review your four-year plan to ensure
that you are meeting all requirements. You will have to plan accordingly for the classes that will not be offered every year.
Please be sure to note the UW admission requirements listed on the Graduation Requirements page (page 33).

                    9th Grade                Met              10th Grade                   Met            11th Grade                  Met        12th Grade                    Met       Total
 English                                                                                                                                                                       Required: 4.0
           English/Lang Arts I – Sem 1                English/Lang Arts II – Sem 1                English Elective                       English Elective                     
           English/Lang Arts I – Sem 2                English/Lang Arts II – Sem 2                English Elective                       English Elective                     

 Math       (Core Math or Equivalent)                                                                                                                                             Required: 3.0
           Integrated Math I – Sem 1                  Integrated Math II – Sem 1                  Integrated Math III – Sem 1            Integrated Math IV – Sem 1           
           Integrated Math I – Sem 2                  Integrated Math II – Sem 2                  Integrated Math III – Sem 2            Integrated Math IV – Sem 2           
                                                                                                                                            Not required; however STRONGLY encouraged!

 Science                                                                                                                                                                       Required: 3.0
           Earth Science – Sem 1                      Biology – Sem 1                             Science Elective                       Science Elective                     
           Earth Science – Sem 2                      Biology – Sem 2                      
                                                                                               

 Social Studies                                                                                                                                                                   Required: 3.0
           World History – Sem 1                      US History – Sem 1                          Social Studies Elective                Social Studies Elective              
           World History – Sem 2                      US History – Sem 2                   

 Physical Education/Health                                                                                                                                                        Required: 2.0
           Health                                                                                  Phy Ed Elective                        Phy Ed Elective                      
           Physical Education 9                

 School-to-Work                                                                                                                                                                   Required: 1.0
           Computer Applications                      Career Readiness                     

 Electives                                                                                                                                                                         Required: **
                                                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                                                                 


              Must have 7.0 credits each year;             Must have 7.0 credits each year;            Must have 7.0 credits each year;       Must have 7.0 credits each year;           * See
              Total of 10.0 credits in Electives           Total of 10.5 credits in Electives          Total of 11.0 credits in Electives     Total of 11.5 credits in Electives         Below

 Totals


                      *Class of 2013 must earn 27.5 credits to graduate; ** 11.5 credits in Electives
                      *Class of 2014 must earn 27.0 credits to graduate; ** 11.0 credits in Electives
                      *Class of 2015 must earn 26.5 credits to graduate; ** 10.5 credits in Electives
                 *Class of 2016 (and beyond) must earn 26.0 credits to graduate; ** 10.0 credits in Electives



                                                                                                                                                                             Page 30 of 52
Four-Year Plan: Notes
 Department       Required Credits   Four-Year Planning Notes
 English                4.0           * Students are required to take four credits of English including
                                          English/Language Arts I, English/Language Arts II, and two additional
                                          credits of English (four – 0.5 credit courses).
 Math                   3.0           *   Three years of sequential math are required for admission into four-year
                                          colleges.
                                      *   College-bound students are strongly encouraged to take a fourth year of math
                                          or beyond
                                      *   Student’s wishing to take Calculus or AP Statistics their senior year may sign up
                                          for the block section of Integrated Math III and Integrated Math IV their junior
                                          year.
 Science                3.0           *   Three years of lab sciences are required for admission into four-year colleges.
                                      *   College-bound students looking at careers in science-related fields should
                                          strongly consider a fourth year of a lab science.
                                      *   Students considering going in to a Health Science career are required to take
                                          Chemistry to get into their program – even for the technical college programs!
                                      *   Agricultural Biotechnology, Animal Production/Science, and General Horticulture
                                          (pending), (Agri-Science Department) are considered acceptable lab science
                                          courses by four-year colleges.
 Social Studies         3.0           *   College-bound students are strongly encouraged to take a fourth year of social
                                          studies.
 Physical               1.5           *   While you earn 0.5 credits of PE in your freshman year, students must take at
 Education                                least one more PE course in either their sophomore, junior, or senior year.
                                      *   Students often forget about this requirement until the end and it becomes
                                          difficult to schedule it among AP and music classes your senior year!
 Health                 0.5           *   Required, typically taken as a freshman opposite of PE 9
 Life Skills            0.5           *   Career Readiness is a graduation requirement for all current sophomores.
 Foreign
 Language
                         -            *   Consideration of two years of the same foreign language should be given to
                                          meet the entrance or global perspectives requirements for some colleges.
Notes:




                                                                                                            Page 31 of 52
Grade Point Average
All credit is awarded at the grade period (quarter or semester) upon successful completion of the coursework.
Grade point averages (GPA’s) include the grade period grades for all classes attempted. GPA’s are calculated by first
converting grades to their numerical values (see below). Finally, the sum of these grade values are divided by the total value of
credit earned.

Grade values are:
                              A    = 4.00         A-    = 3.67
         B+     = 3.33        B    = 3.00         B-    = 2.67
         C+     = 2.33        C    = 2.00         C-    = 1.67
         D+     = 1.33        D    = 1.00         D-    = 0.67
                              F    = 0.00

Graduation – Early
Wonewoc-Center High School students who have met all graduation requirements can opt to graduate one semester early.
Students requesting early graduation should meet with the school counselor to verify eligibility. Student must then write a
letter to the Board of Education indicating the reasons for the request by June 1st of his or her junior year. Parental consent
is required if the student is under the age of 18.
Early graduates are entitled to participate in graduation ceremonies. However they will relinquish eligibility for valedictorian or
salutatorian status and the Academic Excellence scholarship. Students electing to graduate early will be eligible for
scholarships and awards unless otherwise indicated by the guarantor of the award or scholarship. Students will be advised of
this at the time they submit requests for early graduation.
The Board of Education reserves the right to approve or deny requests for early graduation.                  (Board Policy 351.1)
Please be aware that UW admissions directors do not look favorably upon early graduation. They believe students
are best prepared by a challenging eight semesters of high school experience.

Graduation – Exercises
Graduation exercises shall be held each spring for the graduating class at Wonewoc-Center High School. Only those students
who are enrolled in approved course work to meet credit requirements for graduation will be eligible to participate in the
graduation exercise. Students may have completed, or be enrolled in, no more than one correspondence course to be counted
as part of the required credits needed for graduation, from the end of their junior year to the end of their senior year to be
eligible to participate in graduation exercises for that school year.                                      (Board Policy 351)

Graduation – Participation
Wonewoc-Center students not meeting all the necessary requirements needed for graduation will not be permitted to
participate in the graduation ceremonies on graduation day.                                   (Board Policy 351.2)




                                                                                                                   Page 32 of 52
Graduation Requirements
Listed below are the specific course and credit requirements that students must achieve to earn a Wonewoc-Center High
School diploma. Due to some course changes the graduation requirements have also changed: Class of 2013 – 27.5
credits; Class of 2014 – 27.0 credits; Class of 2015 – 26.5 credits; and Class of 2016 (and beyond) 26.0 credits. All
students will maintain a minimum course load of 3.5 credits (7 courses) per semester. Exceptions to this will be subject to
administrative approval.




                                                                                   Scheduled




                                                                                                   Still Need
                                                                                                                   Minimum UW             Typical UW




                                                                         Met
                                                             Credits                                             System Admission      Madison Admission
   Subject                 Grade & Course                    required
   English                                                         4.0                                          English                               4.0
              9     English/Lang Arts I – Semester 1         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                                        Literature            Literature
              9     English/Lang Arts I – Semester 2         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                                  College Writing       College Writing
             10     English/Lang Arts II – Semester 1        0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                                       Adv Level             Adv Level
             10     English/Lang Arts II – Semester 2        0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
             11     English Elective                         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
             11     English Elective                         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Math                                           3.0
             12     English Elective                         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                       Core I/Algebra                   Core I/Algebra
             12     English Elective                         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Core II/Geometry                  Core II/Geometry
                                                                                                  Core III/Adv Math                 Core III/Adv Math
                                                                                              




   Math               (Integrated Math or Equivalent)              3.0        
                                                                                              
                                                                                                        
              9     Integrated Math I – Semester 1           0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
              9     Integrated Math I – Semester 2           0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
             10     Integrated Math II – Semester 1          0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Science                            4.0
             10     Integrated Math II – Semester 2          0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                         Earth Science       Earth Science
             11     Integrated Math III – Semester 1         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                               Biology             Biology
             11     Integrated Math III – Semester 2         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                            Chemistry           Chemistry
                                                                                                    



                                                                                                            AP or Adv Chem or Biology
   Science                                                         3.0        
                                                                                              
                                                                                                        
            9       Earth Science – Semester 1               0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
            9       Earth Science – Semester 2               0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
           10       Biology – Semester 1                     0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Social Studies                                  4.0
           10       Biology – Semester 2                     0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                         World History                  World History
        11/12       Science Elective                         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                             US History                    US History
        11/12       Science Elective                         0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                           Government                     Government
                                                                                                                                        AP Social Studies
                                                                                                    


   Social Studies                                                  3.0        
                                                                                              
                                                                                                        
            9       World History – Semester 1               0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
            9       World History – Semester 2               0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
           10       US History – Semester 1                  0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Foreign Language
           10       US History – Semester 2                  0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                                      2.0                     4.0
        11/12       Social Studies Elective                  0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Foreign Language is not a Wonewoc-
        11/12       Social Studies Elective                  0.5                                graduation requirement. However, you are
                                                                                                      advised to take at least 2 years of the same
                                                                                              


                                                                                                    


   Physical Education                                              2.0        
                                                                                              
                                                                                                    language if you are considering attending a
            9       Health                                   0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    4-year university.
            9       Physical Education 9                     0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
        10/11       Physical Education Elective              0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                   
        11/12       Physical Education Elective              0.5             
                                                                                             
                                                                                                    Electives
   School-to-Work Transition                                       1.0                                Dependent       on      specific     school’s
         9/10       Computer Applications                    0.5                                requirements, however no less than 2.0
                                                                                                    units, with an emphasis on college bound
                                                                                              




        10/11       Career Readiness                         0.5                 
                                                                                              



                                                                                                      instruction.
                                                                              
                                                                                              
                                                                                                   
                                                                                                    




   Electives                                                       **         
                                                                                              
                                                                                                        
        9 - 12      In any area                                                                                 Must be in academic areas listed above or
                                                                                                                in fine arts, communication arts, computer
                                                                                                                science, or statistics.

                                                    Totals          *
        *Class of 2013 – 27.5 credits; ** 11.5 credits in Electives
        *Class of 2014 – 27.0 credits; ** 11.0 credits in Electives
        *Class of 2015 – 26.5 credits; ** 10.5 credits in Electives
        *Class of 2016 (and beyond) – 26.0 credits; ** 10.0 credits in Electives
                                                                                                                                            Page 33 of 52
High School Classification
        Freshman         =    7.0 credits or less
        Sophomore        =    7.0 credits but less than 14.0
        Junior           =    14.0 credits but less than 21.0
        Senior           =    21.0 credits or more

Independent Study
The following policy shall exist for any learner enrolling in an Independent Course of Study:
   1. Student is a junior or senior in High School.
   2. There is no possible means of fitting a required course into a schedule.
   3. All other elective courses have been exhausted.
   4. Learner excels in a particular course area, or is gifted.
   5. Learner maintains a 2.5 overall GPA.
   6. Teacher agrees and an administratively approved curriculum is on file (prior to the scheduling process).
   7. Learner is a transfer student, and must fulfill graduation requirements in which they are deficient according to the
        Wonewoc-Center Schools Graduation Requirement Policy.
   8. Recommendation from teacher, counselor, or administrator.
   9. Learner must be in classroom or Library during Independent Study.
   10. Student must file a formal Independent Study Request before consideration will be taken. Formal request forms can
        be found in the Guidance Office.

Schedule – Daily
                         High School Schedule                            Junior High Schedule
                         1            8:05   –    8:52                  1            8:05   –    8:52
                         2            8:55   –    9:42                  2            8:55   –    9:42
                         3            9:45   –    10:32                 3            9:45   –    10:32
                         4           10:35   –    11:22                 4           10:35   –    11:22
                         5           11:25   –    12:12              JH Lunch       11:25   –    11:55
                      HS Lunch       12:15   –    12:45                 5           11:58   –    12:45
                         6           12:48   –    1:35                  6           12:48   –    1:35
                         7            1:38   –    2:25                  7            1:38   –    2:25
                         8            2:28   –    3:15                  8            2:28   –    3:15

Schedule – Design & Definition
Wonewoc-Center High School operated on a modified 4-block schedule. There are many variations to block scheduling, and
often the terminology is confusing
Modified Block Schedule       Wonewoc-Center High School operates on a modified 4-block schedule.
                              Class periods are offered in block and skinnies.
                              A true-block or 4x4 block school would only offer 4 block classes per day/quarter – Wonewoc-
                              Center as a modified block offers a few block classes and mostly skinnies.
Block Classes                 Operate in 97 minute class periods
                              Generally meet periods 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, and 7-8
                              Meet 2 periods a day for a quarter and will earn 0.5 credit
Skinny Classes                Operate in a 47 minute class period (8 per day)
                              Meet 1 period a day for a semester and will earn 0.5 credit

Schedule – Process
After the initial Course Registration meetings (see page 6), the school counselor will meet individually with every student to
gather the students’ course selections and list of alternates. Once the selections have been entered into the computer, the
number of students requesting particular courses determines the number of sections that will be offered. Courses not meeting
the minimum number of students’ requirement are dropped and alternate course requests are entered for those students. (If an
alternate is not listed, one will be chosen by the school counselor.)
                                                                                                               Page 34 of 52
To help minimize problems, before turning in course selection sheets, students are asked to study the Course Registration
Guide, Graduation Requirements, pre-requisites, and their Graduation Status carefully, to meet with their parent/guardians for
approval and to make sound decisions based upon career interests, talents, graduation requirements, and college admission
requirements.
Once the Master Schedule is set, add/drops will be extremely limited! Teachers and Administration have to budget from the
numbers they are given. It is extremely important that students take the course registration process serious.

School Counseling Activities/Services
The following summary highlights some of the services provided and contacts made with students by the School Counselor
during their years at Wonewoc-Center. By providing timely information, and facilitating the decision‐making process with
students and parents, the school counseling program aims to help students make good choices and appropriate plans prior to
graduation.
Eighth Grade Year
    *   Counselor meets with students in a classroom setting to share information relevant to their transition to high school
        and preparation of their Individualized Learning Plan (ILP).
    *   Counselors schedule and have an individual conference with every eighth grader and parent(s)/guardian as part of the
        “Leader of the Pack” program in December‐January. *This will start with the Class of 2017.
Freshman Year
Prior to the start of freshman year, the administration and school counseling teams meet with parents and students to assist
them in the course selection process, orient them to the high school and begin the process of developing a four‐year plan
toward graduation. During the freshman year, the school counseling staff works with students in the following areas:
    *   Counselor meets individually with students to schedule courses.
    *   Course Selection assistance is provided in the spring for all students.
    *   Counselor continues to work with students on the development of their Individualized Learning Plan (ILP).
    *   Intervention and assistance is provided to students who are experiencing course failures.
    *   Individual counseling is provided as necessary.
Sophomore Year
Sophomores update their course of study as necessary, and are eligible for more elective courses. Statewide testing is required
during the sophomore year and the school counseling staff works with students in the following areas:
    * Counselor meets individually with students to schedule courses.
    * Counselor continues to work with students on the development of their Individualized Learning Plan (ILP).
    * Course Selection assistance is provided in the spring for all students.
    * Youth Options information related to junior and senior year options is presented.
    * Individual counseling is provided as necessary.
    * Review status in the Wisconsin Covenant Program with students.
Junior Year
The junior year takes on special significance, as the transcript of grades at the end of this year becomes the record that
post‐secondary schools review for admission. Students have more options related to electives and special courses offered
outside of the regular school day. During the junior year, the school counselor works with students in the following areas:
    * Counselors meet individually with students to schedule classes.
    * Counselors will schedule and have individual “Leader of the Pack” conferences with each junior student and parent
        during February‐March. *This will start with the Class of 2014.
    * Course Selection assistance is provided in the spring for all students.
    * Counselors continue to work with students on the development of their Individualized Plan (ILP).
    * Advise students as to the availability of college fairs, tech expos, college visits and other resources to help them make
        post‐secondary plans.
    * Meet with students to discuss post‐secondary plans.
    * All juniors attend the Wisconsin Education Fair at UW-Richland Center in the fall.
    * Encourage college visits – it is never too early to start.
    * Encourage visits with college representatives at Wonewoc-Center.
    * ACT/SAT/COMPASS tests taken in spring by college‐bound students.
    * Review graduation status and credit check prior to start of senior year.
                                                                                                                 Page 35 of 52
    *   Individual and group counseling provided as necessary.
    *   Review status in the Wisconsin Covenant Program with students.
Senior Year
The senior year requires special attention to due dates and organizational skills, as the final post‐secondary planning process
gets underway from the first day of school. As this can be a very stressful period for students, support and encouragement
from the counselor and parents is very important. The year culminates with participation in the Senior Banquet and
Graduation. During the senior year, the school counselor works with students in the following areas:
    * Ensure that each student has the necessary schedule to meet graduation requirements.
    * Conduct senior interviews with each student in early fall.
    * Counselors continue to work with students on the development of their Individualized Plan (ILP).
    * Assist in the process of applying to post‐secondary institutions, providing help with applications, scholarship
        information and recommendations.
    * Encourage college visits.
    * Encourage visits with college representatives at Wonewoc-Center.
    * Assist with transition planning for employment or military options.
    * Write letters of recommendation as requested.
    * Financial Aid Night (with Hillsboro) for parents and students in January.
    * Individual counseling is provided as necessary.
    * Assist students in reviewing completed courses at high school and the requirements for entry to post‐secondary
        education.
    * Review status in the Wisconsin Covenant Program with students.

Special Education
Some students who are having problems in school may need extra help through special education. Special education is
designed to meet the special learning needs of students. Schools must follow certain procedures to determine if a student is
eligible for special education. These procedures are written in Public Law 94‐142 and Wisconsin Chapter 115. Contact the
school counselor or school psychologist if you suspect your student may have a special educational need. Students already
identified with special educational needs should also read the course offerings section regarding the Special Education
department.

Teaching Assistants
Teaching Assistants (TA) help teachers, tutor, or assist in various school activities during the school day. Teaching Assistants
will not be put into student schedules until the master schedule is built. Students wanting to be a TA should only sign up for
7.0 or 7.5 credits, and the unscheduled time is where they will TA. Teaching Assistants are scheduled in place of a study hall
and not in addition to.
The school counselor will gather a list of teachers requesting a TA and students will be assigned/chosen from that list.
Students should NOT approach teachers regarding being their TA.
Freshmen who want to be a TA may not be considered until after 1st semester grades unless they have a teacher request them
as a TA. They still must meet all the requirements.

Transfer Students
Students transferring to Wonewoc-Center from other high schools face unique challenges in acclimating to their new
surroundings. The office staff and school counselor make every effort to ensure a smooth transition. This includes meeting
with students and parents before the start of the school year (if possible), providing a tour of the school, and reviewing the
student’s school records to facilitate the appropriate selection of courses.
Each school has its own schedule set-up and course offerings. Mid-year transfers will be scheduled into classes as close to the
ones the student was taking at their previous school; however the student runs the risk of losing credits or potential credits if
schedules do not match up.
We understand that many circumstances do not allow a student to choose their transfer date, and Wonewoc-Center is willing
to work with these students with the complete understanding that there is a potential to lose credits.



                                                                                                                 Page 36 of 52
Agri-Science
                                 Course Titles                                                         Grade Level      Credit
                                 Agricultural Mechanics/Equipment/Structures                       9     10   11   12       0.50
                                 Home Maintenance (Must take with Turf and Landscape Management)   9     10   11   12       0.25
                                 Large Animal Care                                                 9     10   11   12       0.50
                                 Turf and Landscape Management (Must take with Home Maintenance)   9     10   11   12       0.25
                                 Wildlife Management                                               9     10   11   12       0.50
                                 Agricultural Biotechnology (Science Equivalent)                         10   11   12       0.50
                                 Agri-Business                                                           10   11   12       0.50
                                 Animal Production/Science (Science Equivalent)                          10   11   12       0.50
                                 Food Product Processing                                                 10   11   12       0.50
                                 General Horticulture (Potential Science Equivalent)                     10   11   12       0.50

Agricultural Mechanics/Equipment/Structures                                                  0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Want some hands-on experience with agriculture equipment? This class is for you! In this class we will study ag-mechanics
careers, metalworking, power tools, tool fitting, welding, painting, power mechanics, electricity and electronics, plumbing and
hydraulics, concrete and masonry, and agriculture structures. Hands-on is a must!

Home Maintenance                                                                             0.25 Credit/1 Quarter Skinny
Co-Requisite: Turf and Landscape Management
This class will cover basic home maintenance and repairs inside the home; to include tool identification and general indoor fix-
ups. Students will learn the value of do-it-yourself projects, as well as recognize when to call in the professionals. Home
maintenance is focused on learning how to take care of one of your largest purchases in your lifetime!

Large Animal Care                                                                            0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course will cover the selection, judging, feed, management and marketing of large agriculture animals.
Including, but not limited to, beef, dairy, swine, sheep, poultry, horses, and exotics. We will cover basic veterinary
care, including anatomy and physiology, as well as entrepreneurship practices involving large animals.

Turf and Landscape Management                                                                0.25 Credit/1 Quarter Skinny
Co-Requisite: Home Maintenance
This class covers the maintenance and appearance of the outside of the home. Students will learn how to design and install
landscape designs from gardens to retaining walls, lawn maintenance and aesthetics, as well as gain some hands-on experience
in the community implementing what they have learned.

Wildlife Management                                                                          0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Have an interest in the outdoors? Hunting, fishing, camping, etc? Then this is the class for you! In this class we will explore
the environment around you, the life you share it with, and ways to respect and manage those resources. Students will learn
wildlife identification, regulations, as well as the many ways wildlife provides recreation for us.

Agricultural Biotechnology (Science Equivalent)                                              0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Working toward the eventual manufacture of biodiesel, we will be studying renewable energy sources in a hands-on setting.
What would it be like to have a clone? Is it ethical? How do we use science and agriculture to create ethanol?

Agri-Business                                                                                0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Learn the facets of the business world as they relate to agriculture. This class will study the social, economic, and scientific
concepts related to adding value to a product for sale. We will focus on enhancing your general accounting skills, and
accompanying those skills with managing a business.


                                                                                                                     Page 37 of 52
Animal Production/Science (Science Equivalent)                                              0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course will study the science aspect of the animal industry, including the anatomy and physiology of large animals. We
will study health, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and animal markets. In this class, we will focus on 5 primary animal
industries, each of which will be accompanied by labs.

Food Product Processing                                                                     0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Limit: 10 Students per Section
This course will focus on food processing, cooking methods, additives, nutrition, and food preparation. In particular, we will
study the different cooking methods and foods of different societies. We will examine the American eating habits and discuss
marketing and media scams affecting the food industry. Lab activities are an integral part of this class.

General Horticulture (Potential Science Equivalent)                                         0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course is designed to offer an introduction to the plant science world. The primary focus is on plants used for beauty.
This includes flower and plant arrangements, bouquet designs, corsages, boutonnières, and landscape designs.




Art
                                               Course Titles                                          Grade Level        Credit
                                               High School Art                                    9     10   11     12        0.5

High School Art                                                                             0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course is a hands-on introduction to a wide variety of art methods and techniques. Students may explore ceramics, crafts,
drawing, jewelry making, painting, sculpture and more. Students will be encouraged to use their creative minds. This class is
repeatable for credit.




English
                                                      Course Titles                                   Grade Level        Credit
                                                      English/Language Arts I (required)         9                            1.0
                                                      English/Language Arts II (required)               10                    1.0
                                                      Historical Fiction                                10   11   12          0.5
                                                      Oral Communications                               10   11   12          0.5
                                                      College Prep Writing                                   11   12          0.5
                                                      Creative Writing                                       11   12          0.5
                                                      Mystery Novels                                         11   12          0.5
                                                      Mythology                                              11   12          0.5
                                                      Poetry/Shakespeare                                     11   12          0.5
                                                      AP English (see prerequisite)                               12          1.0

English/Language Arts I – Semester 1 & 2                                               1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                          Prerequisite: 8th grade English/Language Arts
Literature, Composition, and Grammar is a course designed to improve students’ writing skills and reading comprehension.
Literature units will include short stories, novels, poetry, drama, essays, and biographies. Grammar units covered will include
punctuation, capitalization, subject-verb agreement, verb tenses, and parallel structure. Composition will emphasize correct
sentence structure and paragraphing, working from short assignments up through longer themes.


                                                                                                                    Page 38 of 52
English/Language Arts II – Semester 1 & 2                                               1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                                Prerequisite: English/Language Arts I
Comprehensive English is a comprehensive language arts course. It covers all aspects of the LA curriculum including grammar,
composition, reading, literature appreciation, speaking, and listening. The first semester focuses on writing in different
rhetorical modes, while second semester covers the symbols and themes of literature.

Historical Fiction                                                                      0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Students will read and discuss some of the more famous novels of this genre. Students will be given a chance to explore some
selected periods of U.S. and World History through the works of important historical novelists like James Fennimore Cooper,
Kenneth Roberts, Walter D Edmunds, CS Forester and others. Grades will be determined by a combination of quizzes,
research reports, themes, and book reports. An important objective will be to appreciate how historical events can be
understood and appreciated by the “life” they are given through these wonderful books.

Oral Communications                                                                     0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Oral Communications involves the way we communicate with one another verbally and nonverbally. Students will have to
create and deliver several types of speeches and presentations, including Forensics, commercials, and a news program.

College Prep Writing (Limit: 15 Students per Section)                                   0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
College Prep Writing is designed for those students who intend to further their education. Students will write numerous
essays based on the four types of writing: expository, narrative, descriptive, and persuasive. Students will also write a 7-10
page typed research paper. Grammar and mechanics will be reviewed and college-level vocabulary will be studied. This course
must be taken prior to AP English.

Creative Writing (Limit: 15 Students per Section)                                       0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Students will spend the majority of their time writing creatively in such areas as short stories, essays, poetry, scripting/play
writing, and children’s literature. Students will be expected to read and discuss models from recognized authors as well as their
own writing. Students may attend a creative writing workshop for inspiration and will compile a portfolio of their best work,
perhaps contributing to a class publication or public performance.

Mystery Novels                                                                          0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
If you like a good suspense story, mystery novels are a good place to start. From classical to detective to modern mysteries,
this class covers the elements and ingredient of a good mystery through authors such as Sherlock Holmes’ creator Arthur
Conan Doyle, Edgar Allen Poe, and Dashiell Hammett. Also, play detective yourself as you “solve” unsolved real-life crime
stories.

Mythology                                                                               0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Mythology is a comprehensive course covering the myths of various cultures. The stories we tell about ourselves reflect our
culture. Mythology is our best attempt at explaining the unexplainable and the origins of a culture. It also provides that
culture’s best models – its heroes. This course goes beyond Greek mythology to the common bonds of all humans.

Poetry/Shakespeare (Limit: 15 Students per Section)                                     0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This is an introductory course to the works of Shakespeare, his poetry, and various poetic forms. Students will read and study
some of Shakespeare’s comedies and tragedies, as well as some of the history of his life and times. They will also study various
poets and culture, and write analytically and creatively.

AP English – Semester 1 & 2 (Limit: 15 Students per Section)                         1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                   Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA in English courses, College Prep Writing, and Instructor Consent
Advanced Placement English is a course designed for seniors to earn college credit, advanced placement in college, or both.
The course stresses college-level language, composition, and the analysis of literature. See page 7 for more information
regarding AP courses and testing.




                                                                                                                 Page 39 of 52
Foreign Language
                                                                      Course Titles             Grade Level         Credit
                                                                      Spanish I             9     10    11    12          1.0
                                                                      Spanish II                  10    11    12          1.0
                                                                      Spanish III                       11    12          1.0
                                                                      Spanish IV                              12          1.0




Spanish I – Semester 1 & 2                                                            1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Spanish I is a fun, activity-filled introduction to Spanish language and culture through various interactive games and speaking
activities.
Students will learn basic Spanish vocabulary and present tense verbs. They will also celebrate the Mexican holidays of Día de
los muertos and Cinco de Mayo, prepare several authentic Mexican recipes, participate in a Spanish fashion show, and design a
Mexican restaurant and menu.
While this course offers fun and excitement, it also requires dedication on the part of the student in terms of class
participation and in completing daily homework.

Spanish II – Semester 1 & 2                                                           1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                                                   Prerequisite: Spanish I
Spanish II is a continuation of Spanish I, with emphasis on developing competency in the language skills: listening, speaking,
reading and writing.
Students will prepare several authentic Mexican recipes, create a Video Dating Service DVD, read a short Spanish novel, and
perform in the Spanish version of skits such as “Cinderella” and “Little Red Riding Hood”.

Spanish III – Semester 1 & 2                                                          1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                                     Prerequisite: C or better in Spanish II
Spanish III focuses on expanding the knowledge and activities gained in Spanish II to provide students with opportunities to
express themselves with more freedom and creativity. Emphasis will be placed on active language use through speaking,
listening and writing.
Special projects and activities include:
         Creating a Spanish “Quack” type video
         Watching a mini Spanish soap opera
         Field Trip to a Latin American or Spanish dance performance or play
         Preparing authentic recipes from South and Central America, and the Caribbean

Spanish IV – Semester 1 & 2                                                           1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                                     Prerequisite: C or better in Spanish III
Spanish IV stresses conversation and oral work while continuing to study vocabulary and grammar.
Special projects and activities include:
         Watching a 52 episode Spanish soap opera
         Teaching the basics of Spanish to elementary students
         Writing a Spanish children’s book or fairy tale
         Preparing authentic recipes from Spain
         Writing and producing a Spanish soap opera




                                                                                                                Page 40 of 52
Instructional Technology
                                                    Course Titles                                         Grade Level                          Credit
                                                    Computer Applications                           8     9                                              0.5
                                                    Publication Productions/Yearbook                             10        11        12                  1.0

Computer Applications                                                                                   0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement*
This class will explore a wide variety of applications on the Apple Platform. Students will learn from the iLife and iWork suite
of applications as well as many internet based programs. All work in this class is hands on and contained within the class time.
Students are expected to progress at an acceptable pace within each area of study. Students will be required to do individual
and collaborative projects throughout the semester.
*This is the last year that Computer Applications will be offered at the high school level. Every effort will be made to fit it into student’s
schedules, and it will be a priority over other one semester electives. If this class does not fit into their schedules, it will not be held against
them at graduation.

Publication Productions – Semester 1 & 2                                                                1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
This class focuses on the production of the school yearbook. Students will develop skills using desktop publishing and photo
editing software. The class places a high emphasis on photography, layout, cropping, and computer enhancement skills of
digital images. Students must be independent workers. They must have the ability to lead and also work as a team member.
This class has high expectations of accuracy, dependability, confidentiality, and creativity. Students must be willing to go above
and beyond minimum standards for design responsibility and time commitments.




Life Skills
                                                             Course Titles                                      Grade Level                      Credit
                                                             Driver Education                                 9       10        11        12            0.25
                                                             Teaching Assistant (see prerequisite)            9*      10        11        12            0.50
                                                             Leadership                                               10        11        12            0.50
                                                             Personal Development                                               11        12            0.50

Driver Education                                                                                  0.25 Credit/1 Quarter Skinny
This course offering is open to grades 9-12, based on age requirements and seat availability. Older students will be placed into the class before
younger students will be allowed in. Students should be 15 ½ by the time they complete the classroom portion in order to start with the behind-the-
wheel component.
Classroom instruction is intended to help students gain awareness of the driving task and the responsibilities that accompany
it. They demonstrate knowledge of traffic laws and regulations that help provide safe and efficient patterns. Students
understand the impact that natural forces and conditions have concerning driving. They learn to identify hazardous conditions
and react appropriately to avoid or minimize problems. Students develop an attitude of safe, courteous, and defensive driving.
The in-car observation and student driving time will occur during the semester and possibly during the summer. The cost of
the class is $125.

Teaching Assistant                                                                                   0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                      Prerequisite: Good academic standing (2.5 Cumulative GPA) and regular attendance
Teaching Assistants (TA) help teachers, tutor, or assist in various school activities during the school day. Teaching Assistants
will not be put into student schedules until the master schedule is built. Students wanting to be a TA should only sign up for
7.0 or 7.5 credits, and the unscheduled time is where they will TA. Teaching assistants are scheduled in place of a study hall
and not in addition to.

                                                                                                                                           Page 41 of 52
The school counselor will gather a list of teachers requesting a TA and students will be assigned/choose from that list.
Students should NOT approach teachers regarding being their TA.
*Freshmen are typically not considered for TA positions unless a teacher specifically requests them. If this is the case, the freshman student must
meet the prerequisites.

Leadership                                                                                            0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
What makes a good leader? Am I a good leader? This class uses teambuilding activities and class discussion to bring out the
best in you! You can be a great leader with the right tools. Sign up for leadership to develop your personal life skills and have
fun doing it!

Personal Development                                                                                  0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                                      Prerequisite: Leadership
This course is a follow-up to Leadership. Learn what your character really is, and what it says about you! Are you sending the
right message? Character Development will help you tweak those leadership skills you’ve developed into the well-rounded
person you need to be for success.




Mathematics
                                                                     Course Titles                                 Grade Level        Credit
                                                                     Integrated Math I (required)              9                             1.0
                                                                     Integrated Math II (required)                   10                      1.0
                                                                     Integrated Math III (required)                       11    12           1.0
                                                                     Integrated Math IV                                   11    12           1.0
                                                                     Calculus                                                   12           1.0
                                                                     AP Statistics                                              12           1.0




Integrated Math I – Semester 1 & 2                                                                  1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                                             Prerequisite: 8th grade math
Core I integrates algebra, geometry, statistics, and discrete mathematics. Instruction emphasizes active learning in groups and
individually with the use of technology to promote mathematical thinking. Topics include: representing and describing data
using tables and graphs; solving linear, quadratic and exponential equations; simulations; plane and solid geometry; problem-
solving procedures.

Integrated Math II – Semester 1 & 2                                                                 1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                                     Prerequisite: Integrated Math I
Core II continues a four-year integrated mathematics program of algebra and functions, geometry and trigonometry, statistics
and probability, and discrete mathematics. Instruction emphasizes active learning in groups and individually with use of
technology to promote mathematical thinking. Specific topics in the course will include: matrices, coordinate geometry, data
analysis, power models, networks, and trigonometry.




                                                                                                                                 Page 42 of 52
Integrated Math III – Semester 1 & 2                                                    1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                                      Or 1.0 Credit/1 Semester Block
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                                     Prerequisite: Integrated Math II
Core III continues a four-year integrated mathematics program of algebra and functions, geometry and trigonometry, statistics
and probability, and discrete mathematics. Instruction emphasizes active learning in groups and individually with use of
technology to promote mathematical thinking.

Integrated Math IV – Semester 1 & 2                                                     1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                                      Or 1.0 Credit/1 Semester Block
                                                                         Prerequisite: C or better in Integrated Math III
Core IV builds upon the theme of mathematics as sense-making. Through investigations of real-life contexts, students
develop an understanding of important mathematics that makes sense to them. Major themes are Multiple-Variable Models,
Modeling Public Opinion, Symbol Sense and Algebraic Reasoning, Shapes and Geometric Reasoning, Patterns in Variation,
Families of Functions, and Discrete Models of Change.

Calculus – Semester 1 & 2                                                                    1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                      Prerequisite: C or better in Integrated Math IV and Instructor Consent
Calculus is helpful to students pursuing careers in biological and physical sciences, finances, and economics. It introduces the
techniques of differential and integral functions. Topics include: algebraic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their
inverses, composites, graphs, derivatives, and integrals; the mean value theorem; maxima and minima; curve plotting; the
fundamental theorem of calculus; and geometric and physical applications of functions.

AP Statistics – Semester 1 & 2                                                               1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                         Prerequisite: C or better in Integrated Math IV and Instructor Consent
This course is helpful to those students interested in careers in the social sciences. AP Stats acquaints students with the major
concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will work on projects involving the
hands-on gathering and analysis of real world data. Ideas and computations presented in this course have immediate links and
connections with actual events. Computers and calculators will allow students to focus deeply on the concepts involved in
statistics. AP Statistics covers exploratory analysis, planning and conducting a study, probability, and statistical inference.




Music
                                             Course Titles                                             Grade Level        Credit
                                             General Band                                          9     10   11     12       1.0
                                             Chorus                                                9     10   11     12       1.0
                                             Music Theory (see prerequisite)                       9     10   11     12       0.5
                                             Music History/Appreciation (see prerequisite)                    11     12       0.5

General Band – Semester 1 & 2                                                                 0.5 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
The high school band program focuses on instrumental techniques that include group and solo performance skills.
Experience is not mandatory, but is very helpful at this upper level of performance. The band performs at formal concerts (1
per quarter) as well as local/regional events & festivals (Veteran's Day, Memorial Day, Commencement, Conference Band,
Honor Bands, etc.). Performances at home sporting events with the pep band are also a fun part of the instrumental music
experience.

Chorus – Semester 1 & 2                                                                       0.5 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Various aspects of music are covered to teach students basic concrete musical knowledge and skills, poise and self-assurance.
Each student is shown the possibilities of his/her talents and help is given each to explore his/her creative self-expressions.
Treble choir experiences are offered within the class. The choir performs at a fall musical production, Holiday concert, large
group festival, spring concert, and possibly at Graduation. Individual achievement can be attained through solo and ensemble
festivals, music camps, and various festivals held on college campuses.

                                                                                                                     Page 43 of 52
Music Theory (Independent Study)                                                           0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                          Prerequisite: Instructor Consent
Music Theory is a non-performing music course focusing on the analysis of music. This self-guided course is designed for the
student who has had previous music education and wants to learn more about music. Students will learn the basics of melody
construction and four-voice part writing.

Music History/Appreciation (Independent Study)                                             0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
         Prerequisite: 2 years high school instrumental music study, 4 years of private piano study, or Instructor Consent
This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance. The students will discuss the elements of sound
and music, and stylistically explore four major periods in Western art and music. The design of this course is to heighten your
enjoyment of music and improve your listening skills by exposure to new styles and forms of music.




Physical Education and Health
                                                Course Titles                                        Grade Level        Credit
                                                Health Education (required)                      9                           0.5
                                                Physical Education 9 (required)                  9                           0.5
                                                General PE                                             10   11   12          0.5

Health Education                                                                        0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement
This course will cover information in the field of health, giving students the opportunity to make positive health decisions for
today and the future. It will explore the meanings of mental, social and physical well-being. It will explore new developments
in health and medicine. We will also examine the many health careers available.

Physical Education 9                                                                    0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement
PE 9 objectives are to present sports type games and activities, along with several social activity units. This gives the students
the opportunity to build on the sports skill levels and to establish their strength in sports and social physical activity.

General PE                                                                              0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Skills and rules are reviewed from various units such as Archery, Badminton, Fitness Management, Floor Hockey, Pickle ball,
Softball, Volleyball. However, majority of time is spent playing games in a tournament setting.




School-to-Work
                                   Course Titles                                                     Grade Level        Credit
                                   Career Readiness (required)                                         10                    0.5
                                   Health Occupations                                                       11     12        1.0
                                   Supervised Work (see prerequisite)                                       11     12        0.5
                                   Youth Apprenticeship Programs                                            11     12       varies
                                   Youth Options: Nursing Assistant (Block Class)                           11     12        1.0




                                                                                                                   Page 44 of 52
Career Readiness                                                                            0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement
Students will learn skills that can be utilized to apply to college, for scholarships, and eventually a career. This class will also
help students learn to better plan, manage, and increase their money potential. Self-discovery, career discovery, educational
options, earning potential, wise budgeting and spending, and life’s financial decisions are the focus of this class.

Health Occupations (Independent Study)                                                      0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This independent study course is a great exploration for any       11th or 12th graders interested in a health career. It covers the
skills needed for health-related careers in general, such as teamwork and communications, and for specific jobs within career
clusters, such as medical assistant and pharmacy technician. The text presents materials related to five career pathways and
career specialties: therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and
development; primarily focusing on the first four clusters. This text helps students build a solid foundation for success, no
matter which health care career they choose.

Supervised Work                                                                               0.5 Credit/1 Quarter Block
                                                                                                Prerequisite: Career Readiness
The course gives the student the opportunity to explore the world of work and gain job experience. The student must meet
these conditions to be enrolled in the course (program):
    (1) Obtain a job site off of school grounds, before the semester starts; (2) Sign up is for an entire semester; (3) Sign up is
    limited to two blocks; (4) Student is responsible for transportation to work site
Students must register concurrently for classes, before registering for supervised work, in case the student must return to
school because of loss of job site.

Youth Apprenticeship Programs                                                                 0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Wisconsin's Youth Apprenticeship program is a part of a statewide School-to-Work initiative. It is designed for high school
students who want hands on learning in an occupational area at a worksite along with classroom instruction.
This one or two year elective program combines academic and technical instruction with mentored on-the-job learning.
Youth Apprenticeship (YA) integrates school-based and work-based learning to instruct students in employability and
occupational skills defined by Wisconsin industries. Local programs provide training based on statewide youth apprenticeship
curriculum guidelines, endorsed by business and industry. Students are instructed by qualified teachers and skilled worksite
mentors. Students are simultaneously enrolled in academic classes to meet high school graduation requirements, in a youth
apprenticeship related instruction class, and are employed by a participating employer under the supervision of a skilled
mentor.
Students could begin:
    * As early as JUNE after sophomore year or as late as JUNE after the junior year for a Level Two
    * As early as JUNE after junior year for a Level One senior year or as late as FALL of the senior year
Complete:
   * By high school graduation
Programs Available:
    *    Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources                           *     Hospitality, Lodging, and Tourism
              Animal Production                                            *     Information Technology
              Crop Production                                              *     Welding
    *    Architecture & Construction                                        *     Manufacturing
    *    Drafting & Design                                                  *     Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math
    *    Graphic Arts: Printing                                                        Biotechnology
    *    Finance                                                            *     Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics
    *    Health Services




                                                                                                                       Page 45 of 52
Youth Options: Nursing Assistant (NA)                                                    1.0 Credit/1 Semester Block
                                                                   Prerequisite: Successful completion of the COMPASS test
The Nursing Assistant Program is strongly recommended for all students considering a career in health care. It is a 1.0
credit high school/3.0 credit college, 120 hour program. It is offered both fall and spring semesters.
The Nursing Assistant Program prepares students for employment as nursing assistants. Students learn communication skills,
basic nursing and personal care skills, client rights, and care of clients with dementias. A supervised clinical experience with
direct client care is a major component of the course. This program is recognized by the Department of Health Services as a
nurse aide training program. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible for certification testing (written
& skills) for the Wisconsin Nurse Aide Registry. Certification is required for employment in nursing homes, hospitals, home
health agencies, hospices and home for the developmentally disabled.
This course is offered by Wonewoc-Center in arrangement with Technical College system. Students can begin the Youth
Options paperwork, campus-specific paperwork, and take the COMPASS prior to admission into the program. The classes
are offered at various times, however you will be expected to put in time outside of the school day. Attendance is mandatory
for each scheduled date.
Unique Requirements for Admission for MATC:
        COMPASS Reading test scores – Students must recently have satisfactorily complete the Reading portion of the
        COMPASS (80 or higher) or ASSET (40 or higher) or ACT (18 or higher) testing. The COMPASS must be taken at a
        MATC site.
        Health History form – Applicants will be required to complete a health history form including a tuberculosis skin
        test and/or chest x-ray, if indicated, and a blood specimen to determine immunity from measles, mumps and chicken
        pox. Evidence of current immunization for diphtheria and tetanus is also required.
        Caregiver Background Check – All students must have a Caregiver Background Check and a Caregiver License
        Check completed in order to participate in the clinical portion of this course. Some criminal convictions will prevent
        participation in the clinical portion of this course. Refer to Caregiver Background Check (CBC) on the Madison
        College Website. Contact the Nursing Assistant Program Coordinator, 258-2479, if you have concerns regarding your
        Criminal History.
        Functional Abilities – All students are required to meet the requirements listed in the FUNCTIONAL ABILITIES
        and complete all skills listed on the MASTER SKILLS CHECKLIST regardless of disability, health status or religious
        beliefs. All students must complete the Health History form and should be reexamined at the student’s expense
        should health status change during the course. These forms can be found by going to the program’s webpage.
Unique Requirements for Admission for WTC:
        COMPASS Reading test scores – Western accepts COMPASS, ASSET or ACT There is a $20 fee for this
        assessment (fee subject to change). If you have taken the ACT, ASSET or COMPASS within the last five years, you
        can request that your scores be submitted to Western. The testing requirements are:
                                   Assessment Area           ACT ASSET COMPASS
                                        English               14      35          38
                                        Reading               13      35          61
                             Math/Numerical/Pre-Algebra       16      38          32

        Caregiver Background Check – All students must have a Caregiver Background Check completed in order to
        participate in the clinical portion of this course. Some criminal convictions will prevent participation in the clinical
        portion of this course. The background check will be processed by Western.

        Immunization form – Applicants will be required to complete an immunization form including a tuberculosis skin
        test and/or chest x-ray, if indicated, and a blood specimen to determine immunity from measles, mumps and chicken
        pox. Evidence of current immunization for diphtheria and tetanus is also required.


                                                                                                                Page 46 of 52
        Essential Functions – Applicants must read through and sign off on the WTC essential functions and functional
        ability criteria.

        Program Overview – Applicants should read and review the online program overview.




Science
                                           Course Titles                                                   Grade Level        Credit
                                           Earth Science (required)                                    9                          1.0
                                           Biology (required)                                                10                   1.0
                                           Agricultural Biotechnology (Science Equivalent)                   10   11     12       0.5
                                           Animal Production/Science (Science Equivalent)                    10   11     12       0.5
                                           General Horticulture (Potential Science Equivalent)               10   11     12       0.5
                                           AP Biology (see prerequisite)                                          11     12       1.0
                                           Chemistry (Block Class)                                                11     12       1.0
                                           Natural Resources (Block Class)                                        11     12       1.0
                                           Physics                                                                11     12       1.0

Earth Science – Semester 1 & 2                                                                   1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                           Prerequisite: 8th grade Science
This course demonstrates the interconnectedness of the Earth Science System Disciplines – Astronomy, Geology,
Meteorology and Oceanography.

Biology – Semester 1 & 2                                                                         1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                                               Prerequisite: Earth Science

Biology is designed to increase knowledge about yourself and the natural world. Topics include cells, animal systems, plant
development, microbiology, genetics, environmental education, and current events in science. Lab exercises, research projects,
and class activities are included to increase understanding of the topics.

Agricultural Biotechnology (Science Equivalent)                                                  0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Working toward the eventual manufacture of biodiesel, we will be studying renewable energy sources in a hands-on setting.
What would it be like to have a clone? Is it ethical? How do we use science and agriculture to create ethanol?

Animal Production/Science (Science Equivalent)                                                   0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course will study the science aspect of the animal industry, including the anatomy and physiology of large animals. We
will study health, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, and animal markets. In this class, we will focus on 5 primary animal
industries, each of which will be accompanied by labs.

General Horticulture (Potential Science Equivalent)                                              0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course is designed to offer an introduction to the plant science world. The primary focus is on plants used for beauty.
This includes flower and plant arrangements, bouquet designs, corsages, boutonnières, and landscape designs.

AP Biology – Semester 1 & 2                                                                      1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                              Prerequisite: Biology and Instructor Consent
AP Biology is geared for science-oriented college bound students. Topics include molecules, cells, genetics, evolution,
organisms, anatomy, and populations. Lab work and research projects will challenge students to draw conclusions, to think
analytically and develop hypothesis. See page 7 for more information regarding Advanced Placement courses and testing.

                                                                                                                       Page 47 of 52
Chemistry – Semester 1 & 2                                                                1.0 Credit/1 Semester Block
                 Students considering the health care field will need to take Chemistry to get into a technical or 4-year program
         College-bound students are strongly encouraged to take Chemistry – preferably in their junior year to help on the ACT
Chemistry is the study of physical science which deals with interaction of the structure and properties of matter and energy, the
changes they undergo, atomic structure, chemical reactions, and bonding. Basic concepts of science will be reinforced as the
student learns new concepts in chemistry through numerous classroom and laboratory activities. Skills in handling lab
equipment and solving problems are emphasized. Basic math skills are required.

Natural Resources – Semester 1 & 2                                                        1.0 Credit/1 Semester Block
Natural Resources is an outdoor, field experience course. Students will learn about Wisconsin’s natural resources. Students will
also work on projects involving construction, maintenance and development of the Outdoor Learning Area. Topics of study
include ecology, forestry, outdoor skills, wildlife management and plant identification.

Physics – Semester 1 & 2                                                                  1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Physics is an introduction into the laws that govern what happens around us. The main areas of emphasis are kinematics; how
things move, dynamics; why things move, waves and sound, and the relationship between electricity and magnetism. This is a
class where you learn by doing experiments and solving mathematical problems (major portion of this course). This is a good
class for anybody who plans on going to a four-year college, not just students who are going into a science field.




Special Education
The Special Education Department provides support for disabled students identified by an Individual Education Plan (IEP)
Team. The support is provided through leadership, advocacy, and collaboration among parents, educators, students and the
community to ensure that students have available a free, appropriate, public education. Special education students are enrolled
in one or more of the following by the Individual Education Plan: a Study Skills/Transition class, special education
coursework and/or a monitoring program. This list is not an all-inclusive list of courses offered through special education.
Each student’s needs are looked at and accommodations are made accordingly with the assets that we have available.

Study Skills/Transition – Semester 1 & 2                                                  1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                       Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor
Students in Study Skills/Transition courses receive academic assistance and are taught study strategies and social skills.


English/Language Arts I – Semester 1 & 2                                                  1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                        Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

English/Language Arts II – Semester 1 & 2                                                 1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                        Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

English/Language Arts III – Semester 1 & 2                                                1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                        Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

English/Language Arts IV – Semester 1 & 2                                                 1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                        Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

Math 9 – Semester 1 & 2                                                                   1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                        Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

Math 10 – Semester 1 & 2                                                                  1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                        Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

                                                                                                                 Page 48 of 52
Consumer Math – Semester 1 & 2                                                             1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                         Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor

Math 12 – Semester 1 & 2                                                                   1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                         Prerequisite: IEP Placement and Consent of Instructor
This math class is for the college bound special education student.




Social Studies
    Note: Geography courses (I, II, & III) are independent of each other and can be taken in any order

                                                       Course Titles                                   Grade Level      Credit
                                                       World History (required)                    9                         1.0
                                                       Geography I – Physical                      9     10   11   12        0.5
                                                       Geography II – Cultural                     9     10   11   12        0.5
                                                       US History (required)                             10                  1.0
                                                       Economics                                         10   11   12        0.5
                                                       Geography III – Economics                         10   11   12        0.5
                                                       History of American Government                    10   11   12        0.5
                                                       Psychology                                             11   12        0.5
                                                       Sociology                                              11   12        0.5
                                                       Twentieth Century US History                           11   12        0.5
                                                       AP US History (see prerequisite)                            12        1.0

World History – Semester 1 & 2                                                           1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement                                                 Prerequisite: 8th grade Social Studies
World History is an introductory social studies course that discusses various topics as: Early cultures, Religions of the World,
Europe during a period called Feudalism through the Renaissance, the Age of Imperialism, the Industrial Revolution, World
War I, World War II, the Cold War Ear, and Recent World History.

Geography I – Physical                                                                   0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                          Geography courses (I, II, & III) are independent of each other and can be taken in any order
Geography I offers the student a chance to learn about the planet earth and the variety of places on it. Topics covered will
include: continents, oceans, islands, rivers, the atmosphere, climate and weather, vegetation (forest types, grasslands, deserts,
etc.), landforms (mountains, hills, and plains), soil types, minerals, fuels and many more interesting things. Natural disasters
such as earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes and volcanic eruptions will be emphasized though not actually experienced.

Geography II – Cultural                                                                  0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                          Geography courses (I, II, & III) are independent of each other and can be taken in any order
Cultural Geography will study the nations of the world, their languages, religions, political traditions and ethnic backgrounds. In
the course, we will look at ten major regions of the world. Map activities will accompany our textbook work and map tests
will be given with each chapter test.

US History – Semester 1 & 2                                                              1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
Wonewoc-Center Graduation Requirement
This is a required, comprehensive course on United States History. We will begin with the first Americans, follow the
European exploration and settlement of the United States, and then onto the birth of the USA. We'll follow the growth of our
country from a fledgling nation, through hard times like the Civil War and the Great Depression, to our emergence as a world
power. The course is divided into eight units, each taking about a month. There will be a comprehensive test for each unit.
Students will also be expected to complete an assigned project during each unit.

                                                                                                                   Page 49 of 52
Economics                                                                                0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course is a basic study of economic concepts. Topics include: Supply and demand, types of economic systems, business
competition and prices. We will also study how Economics is concerned with things like banking and investments, including
the stock market, bonds and mutual funds. Finally, areas such as inflation, unemployment, taxes, international trade and the
global economy in current events will be looked at.

Geography III – Economics                                                                0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                          Geography courses (I, II, & III) are independent of each other and can be taken in any order
Economic Geography will explore the various regions of the world and learn about their economic strengths and weaknesses.
Factors such as trade, agriculture, manufacturing, transportation, and technology will be covered. We will also focus on some
of the important aspects of International Economics which are playing an ever increasingly important part of our lives,
commonly referred to in the media as the Global Economy.

History of American Government                                                           0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course features valuable information about our US Government and how it functions. We will read and discuss material
about all types of issues such as Supreme Court decisions, voting rights and responsibilities, governments at all levels, political
parties, public opinion, and your personal rights guaranteed to you in the Constitution.

Introduction to Psychology                                                               0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Introduction to Psychology is a one semester course that introduces students to the vocabulary and major concepts of general
psychology. It includes a survey of the history of psychology, research methods, the life span, the working of the mind and
body including altered states, learning and the cognitive processes, personality and individuality, psychological disorders, and
social psychology.

Introduction to Sociology                                                                0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Introduction to Sociology is a one semester course that introduces students to the vocabulary and major concepts of sociology.
This course examines human social behavior, social structure, culture, institutions, and social change. Major topics include
socializing the individual, adolescence and society, conformity, deviance and social control, and racial and ethnic relations.

Twentieth Century US History                                                             0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Twentieth Century US History is a one semester course that takes an in-depth look at some of the problems this nation has faced
in the past 100 years. Students will analyze the causes of these problems, as well as understand how solutions were selected.
Finally, the students will evaluate the success or failure of these solutions. Since changes in technology, society and foreign
affairs continue to face our country, an effort to relate the situations of the past to the present will be a high priority.

AP US History – Semester 1 & 2                                                           1.0 Credit/1 Full Year Skinny
                                                                                           Prerequisite: Instructor Consent
AP US History develops a sound knowledge of American History from the pre-colonial period to the present. Students will be
able to describe the major political, economic, social, and intellectual trends present in US History. See page 7 for more
information regarding Advanced Placement courses and testing.




                                                                                                                   Page 50 of 52
Technology Education
                                                  Course Titles                                    Grade Level         Credit
                                                  Digital Photography                          9     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Drafting I                                   9     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Small Engines and Electricity                9     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Transportation                               9     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Video Production                             9     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Welding I                                    9     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Carpentry (see prerequisite)                       10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Drafting II (see prerequisite)                     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Engineering (see prerequisite)                     10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Manufacturing (see prerequisite)                   10    11    12         0.5
                                                  Welding II (see prerequisite)                      10    11    12         0.5

Digital Photography                                                                     0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Students learn the basics of photography such as composition, lighting, setting up a portrait etc. We use common point-and-
shoot digital cameras, so the skills you learn in this class can be used with your own camera at home.

Drafting I                                                                              0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
Drafting is the universal language used in every industry to take complex ideas and put them into a form that can be used as a
guide to produce a part or structure. CAD (computer aided design) has become an absolute necessity for businesses to survive
and compete. This course will give students an introduction and understanding of basic drafting concepts through the use of
CAD and is a must for any student entering an engineering related field.

Small Engines and Electricity                                                             0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course will study the care, maintenance, and repair of small engines the first half of the quarter. Students are required to
have a small engine for their repair project and are responsible for the cost of parts. The second half of the quarter, students
will gain an understanding of how and why electricity works. This class will give students a chance to gain hands-on
experience in working with and manipulating electricity through various wiring labs. Future home owners will understand
what is going on in their walls and learn how to do some simple wiring projects. With input from local electricians, students
interested in a possible career in the electrical field can get an idea of what employers are looking for in potential employees.

Transportation                                                                            0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This is an introductory class that will take a look into the different forms of transportation throughout history and how
technological advances have changed the way we move around. We will also take a look at the effects those changes in
technology have had on our lifestyles, economy, environment, etc. With labs geared toward exploring different forms of
transportation this class will give the student a better understanding of how and why products and people are transported the
way they are as well as design considerations for certain modes of transportation.

Video Production                                                                          0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
This course starts with learning the basics of how to use a video camera. You will then use what you learn in the production
and editing of several different types of videos: e.g. news report, commercial, how-to-video, and a feature video (drama, sports,
music video).

Welding I                                                                                 0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
In this course students will learn the basics of welding and cutting metal. Use of arc and MIG welders, oxy-acetylene torches,
and various welds and cuts will be taught in a block time frame.




                                                                                                                  Page 51 of 52
Carpentry                                                                               0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                        Prerequisite: C or better in Drafting I
Students will learn basic framing techniques through class lecture and hands-on experience constructing scale model homes.
Demonstration and practice on general skills needed in the carpentry trade include: reading a tape measure, layout and framing
a stud wall, shingling, using a speed square, skill saw and other power tools.

Drafting II                                                                             0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                    Prerequisite: C or better in Drafting I
This class will start where you left off in Drafting I and take you deeper into the world of CAD. We will get onto the
computers and gain more experience with the CAD software. When you finish this course you will have a better
understanding of drafting concepts as well as the complex Vectorworks program. A must for anyone interested in any kind of
engineering or just an advanced understanding of this program and its capabilities.

Engineering                                                                             0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                      Prerequisite: C or better in Drafting I
Everything around you that has been manufactured has first been designed and tested by engineers. In this class we will take a
closer look at this interesting and vital field. We will learn about how ideas move from concept to reality by using the
concepts you learn in math and science classes and applying them in the real world. There will be a lot of problem solving and
opportunities for you to come up with your own designs. One example of a project we will work on is a cardboard chair.
This class isn’t easy, but it sure is fun.

Manufacturing                                                                           0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                  Prerequisite: C or better in Drafting I
Student will learn some wood working techniques in a manufacturing type setting. As a class we will decide on a project to
mass produce. We will learn about how to manufacture a product in a way that saves time and eliminates as much human
error as possible by using jigs and fixtures. We will mass produce our product and sell it to the public. This is a great
opportunity to learn about all the different aspects of manufacturing.

Welding II                                                                              0.5 Credit/1 Semester Skinny
                                                                                        Prerequisite: C or better in Welding I;
                                                                       Designed to be taken immediately following Welding I
Students will take what was learned in Welding I and apply it here. Planning, design, and completion of a project is required
and students will also learn welding repair. Students will be responsible for buying and paying for project materials.




                                                                                                                Page 52 of 52

				
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