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ANNUAL REPORT - NDSU Department of Agricultural and

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ANNUAL REPORT - NDSU Department of Agricultural and Powered By Docstoc
					ANNUAL REPORT
  July 1, 2008—June 30, 2009




Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
           North Dakota State University
                 NDSU Dept. 7620
                    PO Box 6050
               Fargo ND 58108-6050
                   701-231-7261
                  aben@ndsu.edu
            www.ageng.ndsu.nodak.edu
                                                                                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS

            Annual Report for Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
                                             July 1, 2008 - June 30, 2009
                                                                                                                                        Page

I. Goals for Current Year...............................................................................................................1

II. Accomplishments for Current Year ...........................................................................................1

     A. Instruction and Student Success...........................................................................................1

          1. Teaching Initiatives and Innovation...............................................................................1
          2. Advising Initiatives and Innovation ...............................................................................5
          3. Curriculum Development...............................................................................................7
          4. Accreditation or Other Reviews.....................................................................................7
          5. Activities in Student Recruitment/Retention, Enrollment Management,
                and Other Student Activities ....................................................................................8
          6. Distance Education Progress........................................................................................12
          7. Assessment ...................................................................................................................12

     B. Research/Creative Activity ................................................................................................14

          1. Highlights of Research and Creative Activities ...........................................................14
             a. Research Activity ...................................................................................................14
                            i. Canola-based Epoxy Resins for Bio-based Plastic Components
                           ii. Center of Excellence for Oilseed Development
                         iii. Development of Water Management Practices and Tools for Improved Crop
                                 Production and Natural Resource Management
                          iv. Evaluation of Ozone as an Antimycotoxin and microbiocide – Improvement of
                                 Thermal and Alternative Processes for Food
                           v. Feasibility of the Use of Tile Drainage for Subsurface Irrigation in the Red River
                                 Valley and its Impact on Soil Chemical and Physical Properties
                          vi. Impact of Water Availability on Crop Production and Natural Resources
                         vii. Impact of Subsurface Drainage on Water Availability in the Red River Basin
                        viii. Intelligent Sensors for Evaluation of Food Quality and Safety
                          ix. Intelligent Quality Sensors (IQS) for Food Safety
                           x. Livestock Waste Engineering
                          xi. Tile Drainage and Subirrigation Elevations in Richland County for Effects on Soil
                                 and Water Quality
                         xii. Use of Northern Great Plains Agricultural Resources for Bioenergy and Bioproduct
                                 Development
                        xiii. Use of Field Peas as an Ethanol Feedstock
               b. Extension Activity .................................................................................................22
                            i.   BioEPIC – NDSU Opportunities
                           ii.   Drainage
                         iii.    Energy
                          iv.    Energy Education
                           v.    eXtension – EDEN Flood Education Material
                          vi.    Irrigation
                         vii.    Livestock Waste Engineering
                        viii.    Machine Systems
TABLE OF CONTENTS
                        ix.   MidWest Plan Service
                         x.   Ozone Research
                        xi.   Post Harvest Engineering
                       xii.   Structures and Environment Engineering
                      xiii.   Tile Drainage
                      xiv.    Water Quality Program

       2. Grants/Contracts ..........................................................................................................32

       3. Articles/Books/Publications .........................................................................................33
          a. Refereed Journal Articles
          b. Books/Book Chapters
          c. Edited Works
          d. Proceedings
          e. Abstracts
          f. Department Reports
          g. Extension/Outreach Publications, Etc.
          h. Popular Articles (written)
          i. Popular Articles About You or Your Program
          j. Technical Papers
          k. Technical Reports
          l. Manuscripts, Grant Proposals, Station Projects, Etc. Reviewed
          m. Theses

       4. Presentations ................................................................................................................54
          a. Conference Presentations
          b. Extension and Other Outreach Presentations/Work

  C. Outreach .............................................................................................................................60
     1. Professional Service .....................................................................................................60
     2. Alumni Events and Other Community-Related Activities ..........................................60
     3. Fund-Raising Accomplishments ..................................................................................60

  D. Special Initiatives ...............................................................................................................61
     1. Cooperative Programming/Inter-Institutional Activities .............................................61
     2. International Activities.................................................................................................61
     3. Interdisciplinary Efforts ...............................................................................................61
     4. Economic Development Efforts ...................................................................................61

  E. Planning .............................................................................................................................63
     1. Future Challenges, Program Strengths, Plans ..............................................................63
     2. Vision – Where do we want to be as a department in 5-10 years? ..............................67
     3. ABEN Priorities 2009-2010.........................................................................................68
     4. Department’s Strategic Priorities .................................................................................69
     5. Challenges ....................................................................................................................69

  F. Enrollment, FTE Data, and Placement Summary ..............................................................71
     1. Class Enrollment of Academic Year 2008-2009 .........................................................71
     2. Student Credit Hours and FTE’s for Academic Year 2008-2009 (generated).............71
     3. Placement Summary ....................................................................................................72
                                                                                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS

G. Other Relevant Data and Materials ....................................................................................73
   1. Impact Statement .........................................................................................................73
   2. Linkage Description of Personnel ................................................................................75
   3. Personnel ......................................................................................................................77
   4. Awards and Recognition of Faculty/Staff/Students.....................................................81
   5. Faculty Involvement in Committee Activities .............................................................82
   6. Courses Taught ..........................................................................................................105
   7. Description of Teaching Methodology, Lab Books, Equipment, Etc. .......................108
   8. Experiment Station Project Reports ...........................................................................117
   9. Grant Support .............................................................................................................148
   10. Research Statistics .....................................................................................................156

H. Diversity ............................................................................................................................157
                                                                             ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



              Annual Report for Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

                                     July 1, 2008 - June 30, 2009


I. Goals for Current Year

   A. To provide high quality undergraduate educational programs in selected areas of
      Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering and Agricultural Systems Management.

   B. To provide high quality MS and PhD educational programs in Agricultural and Biosystems
      Engineering.

   C. To attract and retain larger numbers of quality and diverse undergraduate and graduate
      students.

   D. To conduct scholarly activities that extends the knowledge base to; enhance agricultural
      production efficiency, profitability, and sustainability, maintain quality and/or adding value
      to biological materials, and develop efficient use and stewardship of environmental
      resources.

   E. To provide extension and outreach education focused on; agri-production systems,
      biological materials, environmental resources management, energy production and
      efficiency, and structures and environment.

   F. To provide opportunities for professional development of faculty and staff to keep
      knowledge and skills current in their areas of professional practice.


II. Accomplishments for Current Year

   A. Instruction and Student Success

      1. Teaching Initiatives and Innovation

          This was the ninth year of the partnership of the ABEN Department with John Deere to
          educate and train future farm equipment dealership managers. Part of the curriculum
          requirement for the specialization in dealership management is two internships with
          John Deere dealerships. Participating dealerships this year include RDO Equipment in
          Moorhead, MN, Langdon Implement, Langdon, ND, Edmunds County Implement,
          Roscoe, SD, Gooseneck Implement, Kenmare, ND, and Titan Machinery in Casselton,
          ND. To date, John Deere has provided $45,000 in scholarships to students in the
          program.

          In the Fall 2008 semester, John Deere made a decision to discontinue the six remaining
          dealership management partnerships with educational universities in the U.S., to

                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                         1
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      include our program at NDSU. Since our academic specialization was simply called
      Dealership Management and wasn’t tied directly to John Deere, we are able to continue
      to offer the specialization with our without John Deere support. We have opted to
      continue the specialization for those Agricultural Systems Management students who
      want it since it costs nothing extra to the department. The primary loss is the $5,000
      annual scholarship support provided by John Deere for students in the specialization. A
      grant proposal to the John Deere Foundation was successful last year and the
      department was again able to award $5,000 in scholarships to students in the
      specialization. At the present time, we have four students in dealership management

      Engineering student program fees were again used to add hardware and software
      upgrades to the department’s student computer cluster. Four computers in the
      department computer cluster (room 222) were replaced and eight used computers from
      ITS were installed in room 217. Program fees continue to be used for specialized
      engineering software, lab supplies, and replacement tables and chairs for room 222. At
      the request of students, several cabinets and a metal band-saw were purchased for the
      Center Lab (room 124). In addition, program fees were used to help support expenses
      of the Quarter Scale Tractor team for international competition.

      Major flooding in the Fargo-Moorhead region resulted in classes being cancelled for
      nearly two weeks in Spring 2009. As a result of lost class time, faculty needed to be
      innovative in finding ways to cover planned material or to modify the remainder of
      their courses to fit the available time. Faculty, working with students in their classes
      were able to make changes that met the needs of both the faculty and the students.

      Faculty development activities were extensive. Examples include: workshops
      (instrumented classroom training, Blackboard updates, academic advising, PRS
      training, PeopleSoft academic systems training, conferences (ASABE meetings),
      seminars, and industry tours and visits.

      Significant enhancements/modifications to departmental courses were as follows:

      ABEN 110-2, Introduction to Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering – Students were
      assigned to attend the Engineering Expo to visit engineering employers. Material on
      biosystems and food engineering was incorporated to the course. Interaction between
      the ABEN 486 class was continued.

      ABEN 189-1, Skills for Academic Success – More emphasis was placed on career
      planning and resume development. Students seem to better understand that knowledge
      in this area is critical to success as they look for possible internship opportunities.

      ABEN 255-3, Computer Aided Analysis & Design – The text for the Excel part of the
      course was revised. The AutoCAD text was updated to the 2009 version of the
      software. The textbook was a much simpler text compared with those used in previous
      years. A different text may be considered for 2009.

      ABEN 263-3, Biological Materials Processing – The course included five laboratory
      exercises in the Pilot Plant (canola seed cleaning and analysis, canola screw pressing,

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                                                                 ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


visconmetry, liquid concentration by climbing-film evaporator, and double-pipe heat
exchanger), and two in the ABEN Instrument Lab (dataloggers, PLCs). A field trip was
taken to Cargill Corn Milling in Wahpeton and a guest speaker from Dakota Growers
Pasta was scheduled.

ABEN 464/664-3, Resource Conservation/Irrigation Engineering – A new textbook, the
fifth edition of Soil and Water Conservation Engineering, was selected. Preparation was
made by the course instructor for field trips with larger class sizes by taking and
passing the large passenger van training.

ABEN 458/658-3, Food Process Engineering – This course underwent major revision
with the aim of more closely integrating it with ABEN 263. Unlike ABEN 263, this
course includes a significant process design experience. Four student teams developed
and demonstrated working prototype systems for the continuous, steady-state
distillation of methanol-water solutions. These projects culminated in a formal
demonstration with sample collection and data analysis followed by oral presentations.

ABEN 473-3, Agricultural Power – Two laboratory exercises were added. The
exercises incorporated Matlab/Simulink software to model elementary component
kinematics.

ABEN 479-3, Fluid Power Systems Design – Two computer exercises were updated.
The exercises, using Automation Studio and Matlab/Simulink, introduced students to
modeling simple hydraulic systems.

ABEN 486-2, Design Project I – The credit level was raised to two. Interaction with
faculty and graduate students in the Communications Department continued in an effort
to improve student report writing and oral presentations. A faculty co-instructor was
added with that faculty assuming responsibility for the class in the 2009 academic year.

ABEN 487-2, Design Project II – A new faculty instructor too responsibility for the
course. Faculty and graduate students in the Communications Department helped
students prepare posters and presentations for the Agricultural Technology Exposition.

ABEN/ASM 491-1, Seminar (Career Planning and Placement) – Included a discussion
about applying for jobs on-line and how it differs from the traditional hard-copy
application.

ABEN 494-2, IS/Genetic Engr/Sensing Applications – This individual study consisted
of one biotech student. A project was designed for cell growth analysis and monitoring.

ABEN 499-3, ST/Biofuels – Reading assignments were mostly available online in the
form of government-sponsored reports. There was a good balance of lecture and
discussion throughout the semester. Students were asked to rate their knowledge of
course topics at the beginning and end of the semester and indicated a strong perception
of student learning.



       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                        3
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      ABEN 758-3, Applications in Computer Imaging/Sensing/Biosystems – A new
      textbook was introduced and new homework assignments, class projects, and computer
      software were developed.

      ABEN 791-3, Temp/Trial Topics/Bioprocess Engineering – The course used
      Bioprocess Engineering: Basic Concepts as a textbook. Supplementary notes were also
      provided by the instructor. The class was taught in a basic lecture format but with only
      four graduate students enrolled, it was possible to have good discussions. Students also
      led discussions on current journal articles that related to course materials.

      ENGR 402-1, Professional Ethics – Incorporated a forum of company representatives
      taking questions from the students.

      ASM 115-3, Fundamentals of Agricultural Systems Management – Another worksheet
      was added to assignments. Homework was returned in a timelier manner.

      ASM 125-3, Fabrication and Construction Technology – Enrollment increased in Fall
      2008 and Spring 2009 and the large classes put a strain on space. Teaching assistants
      kept the class focused and allowed the instructor freedom to move from group to group.

      ASM 225-3, Computer Applications in Agricultural Systems Management – The text
      for the Excel part of the course was revised. The AutoCAD text was updated to the
      2009 version of the software. The textbook was a much simpler text compared with
      those used in previous years. A different text may be considered for 2009.

      ASM/NRM 264-3, Natural Resource Management Systems – New materials were
      added to the lectures and labs. Pre- and post-tests were administered as part of learning
      assessment activities.

      ASM 323-3, Post-Harvest Technology – Students were given an interview assignment
      where they were to interview a previous generation operator regarding their farming
      operation. The goals of the assignment were to help the student understand how
      farming changes over time, help the student think forward in their planning processes,
      and understand various safety issues.

      ASM 373-3, Tractors and Power Units – Students seemed to need assistance with
      algebra and critical thinking. The number of non-math-related problems increased.

      ASM 374-1, Power Units Laboratory – The new tractor and dynamometer worked well,
      however, because the tractor was not tested at Nebraska, test results could not be compared.

      ASM 354-3, Electricity/Electronics Applications – Kits were assembled prior to the
      PLC lab and sensor lab. With the adoption of a new text, PowerPoint slides were
      updated and new ones developed.

      ASM 378-3, Machinery Principles and Management – An expanded trip to farm
      equipment dealerships was conducted. The sprayer lab worked well.


 4                    NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                         ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   ASM 429-3, Hydraulic Power Principles/Appl – A number of labs were cancelled due
   to the flood. Diagrams in the lab manual will need to be redone for the next course
   offering.

   ASM 454-3, Site Specific Agriculture – Students were instructed on the use of GPS,
   GIS, remote sensing, maps, variable rate technology, yield monitoring systems, and
   sensors in agriculture. Students learned to make maps with Surfer and ArcMap
   software.

   ASM 475/675-2, Management of Agricultural Systems – A new book, Agricultural
   Systems Management: Optimizing Efficiency and Performance, was introduced. New
   topics on project management, economic feasibility studies, reliability of ag systems,
   and optimization of resources were discussed in class. Guest lecturers were also
   included.

2. Advising Initiatives and Innovation

   Students are encouraged to complete an advising survey to assess the advising service
   they provide. The surveys are prepared anonymously. A summary of the fall 2008
   survey results are shown in Figures 1-4. Faculty take their student academic advising
   responsibility very seriously and strive to serve students to the best of their ability.
   Figure 4 appears to validate our belief that we do a good job of academic advisement.

                       Senior               Freshman
                        29%                    25%

                                                                     Freshman
                                                                     Sophomore
                                                                     Junior
                                                                     Senior
                 Junior                       Sophomore
                  21%                            25%

   Figure 1. Fall 2008 advisor satisfaction survey participation by class.


              GPA 2.5-2.99                GPA 2.0-2.49
                 29%                          8%

                                                         GPA ≥ 3.5   GPA ≥ 3.5
                                                           21%       GPA 3.0-3.49
                                                                     GPA 2.5-2.99
                                                                     GPA 2.0-2.49
                                                                     GPA <2.0
        GPA 3.0-3.49
           42%


   Figure 2. Fall 2008 advisor satisfaction survey participation by cumulative GPA.


           NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                       5
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



                                                                          ≥ 5 times
                                                                            12%
                                                                                                                    ≥ 5 times
                                                                                                                    3-4 times
                                                                                                                    1-2 times
                                                                                                                    Never
                                 1-2 times                                                   3-4 times
                                   56%                                                         32%


      Figure 3. Fall 2008 advisor satisfaction survey - times student visited advisor per semester.


                                     15
                            15                                                                               14
                                                                                                                                   13
                                                                 12
                            12                              11                        11
       Number of Students




                                                                                            9
                             9            8                                                                       8                     8


                             6
                                                                                                4

                             3                                                                                        2                     2
                                                1 1                   1     1                        1                      1                   1 1

                             0
                                   a. My advisor is well   b. My advisor is well   c. My advisor is well   d. My advisor cares e. I would recommend
                                   prepared to help me     prepared to help me     prepared to help me         about me.        my advisor to others.
                                   w/course selection.      w/career planning.       w/university life.

                                                Strongly Agree            Agree            Neutral       Disagree         Strongly Disagree

      Figure 4. Fall 2008 advisor satisfaction survey results.


      Although all faculty provide career planning advice as appropriate, one faculty serves
      as the department representative to work with students, and industry and agency
      representatives to help students find employment before they graduate. This faculty
      serves as a resource for both the students and employers. A strong relationship has been
      developed with many of the employers of department graduates. This faculty also
      teaches a course designed to strengthen students’ career search skills. He maintains
      contact with many alums and provides assistance as they change career jobs/paths
      throughout their careers. He provides similar services relative to the cooperative
      education program. Exit interviews with graduating seniors indicate that these activities
      are very much appreciated by the students.

      Five faculty serve as advisors to professional, honor, and special interest student
      organizations. One serves on the CAFSNR Advising Committee, one serves on the
      CEA Academic Affairs Committee, one serves on the CEA Graduate Committee, and
      one serves on the CAFSNR Scholarship Committee.

      No new programs were developed or deleted. There were no administrative changes.


 6                                            NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                      ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


3. Curriculum Development

   Immediately after the ABET accreditation visit in October 2006, the ABEN faculty
   started work to develop separate Agricultural Engineering (AGEN) and Biosystems
   Engineering (BSEN) curricular concentrations for the Agricultural and Biosystems
   Engineering program.

   The faculty felt this was necessary for a number of reasons. First, in addition to
   agricultural engineering criteria, ABET has established new criteria for biological
   engineering. Since the ABEN program has a plural name, the program must meet both
   sets of criteria. Since the department doesn’t have the resources (students, funding,
   faculty) to offer two separate degree programs, the faculty decided to offer two
   concentrations within one program to meet both ABET criteria.

   Secondly, the Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering name that has been in place for
   15 years has always caused confusion for students and employers. Separate
   concentrations provide the opportunity to better define the objective of each
   concentration.

   Third, the faculty feels that a concentration in biosystems engineering may be more
   attractive to a different (urban and female) clientele than does agricultural engineering.
   This may enhance recruitment of non-traditional students which will increase student
   numbers.

   The work of the faculty resulted in one program, Agricultural and Biosystems
   Engineering, with two concentrations, Agricultural Engineering and Biosystems
   Engineering. The two concentrations are distinctly different, but are at the same time
   similar enough to allow students starting in one concentration to change to the other
   concentration within the first 1-2 years of the program if they desire. It also does not
   increase the teaching load for any ABEN faculty. The two concentrations were offered
   for the first time in the 2007-2008 academic year. During the year, minor changes were
   made to accommodate unforeseen problems associated with course availability and
   scheduling. In Fall 2008, 33% of the incoming students chose the BSEN concentration
   and 67% chose the AGEN concentration.

4. Accreditation or Other Reviews

   In early Fall 2007, the final report of the ABET Commission was issued. The report
   indicated that the department’s response to the one program weakness, one program
   concern, and one observation were not adequate since approval of the proposed
   corrections were not presented to constituents for concurrence. Therefore, an interim
   report would need to be filed by July 1, 2008 addressing each item. This report was
   totally unexpected since the on-site reviewer had not indicated such a need for
   relatively minor changes. However, the accreditation process does not include
   provisions for appeal. Therefore, surveys for each constituent group (alumni,
   employers, and students) were developed to address each item in the report. Since two
   ABEN concentrations were developed in early 2007, a separate survey was developed
   to determine acceptance of constituents.

           NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                         7
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



        Results of the surveys indicated overwhelming acceptance by all constituent groups of
        all recommendations/changes made by the faculty. The results of the surveys were
        prepared in report form and provided to the Dean, College of Engineering and
        Architecture for submission to ABET as an interim report addressing the three areas of
        concern. The report was then submitted to ABET in early June 2008 for consideration
        at the ABET Commission meeting in July. On December 24, 2008, a draft statement
        from ABET was received indicating that our program weakness and program concern
        had been resolved. A final statement should be received in August-September 2009.

     5. Activities in Student Recruitment/Retention, Enrollment Management, and Other
        Student Activities

        At the invitation of Dean Smith, the chair attended the National College Career Fair in
        Minneapolis for a fourth year. This is an excellent opportunity to recruit students
        typically not reached in other ways. There has been an increase in the number of
        accepted freshmen from the Minneapolis area. Total undergraduate student numbers,
        particularly in ABEN have increased from near 60 students to 100 students. Early Fall
        2009 admission numbers indicate a slight potential increase in ABEN enrollment again.
        Early Fall 2009 admission numbers indicate a potential slight increase in ASM
        enrollment. It is impossible to know if the increase can be attributed to this activity, but
        several students have indicated that they decided to enroll in our program as a result of
        discussions at the fair.

        Faculty continue to meet with prospective students and their families as they visit NDSU.
        In addition, faculty represents the department at all Discover NDSU events.

        Faculty participate in the annual CAFSNR ice cream social for new and returning
        students each fall in addition to CEA sponsored student events.

        Several faculty are very active in conducting state (North Dakota and Minnesota) and
        regional FFA contests. This is an opportunity to bring students to NDSU and expose
        them to the department. After the contests, letters and recruitment material are sent to
        contest participants to inform them of our programs and career opportunities.

        Faculty continue to provide frequent tours/demonstrations for visiting students at the
        request of the Deans. This helps showcase NDSU, the Colleges, and the department and
        its programs.

        Recruitment material is periodically mailed to general agriculture, general engineering,
        and other students who express a possible interest in our programs. This provides the
        opportunity to introduce our programs to students who may not be aware of our programs
        and the opportunities our programs have to offer.

        As part of our “standard operating procedure,” but also to enhance student retention, the
        ABEN faculty strive to provide the best academic advising on campus. Graduating
        seniors, via exit surveys/interviews, consistently comment on the quality of service and
        advising they receive from faculty and staff.

 8                      NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                                        ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



Enrollment in the various programs offered by the department is shown below.

Student enrollment:

   Undergraduate                                           Fall 2008              Spring 2009
      Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABEN) ........ 97 ......................75
      Agricultural Systems Management (ASM) .................... 61 ......................58

   Graduate
      Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering - MS ............... 5 ........................4
      Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering - Ph D ............. 6 ........................6
      Environmental and Conservation Science - MS ............... 1 ........................1
      Natural Resources Management – MS ............................. 0 ........................1
      Food Safety – MS ............................................................. 0 ........................1

A historical undergraduate enrollment perspective is shown in Figure 5.




Figure 5. Historical Fall undergraduate enrollment in programs offered by the Department
of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering.

The department maintains ongoing contact with the Office of Admissions. As names of
prospects and/or accepted students are identified, follow-up correspondence and
recruitment materials are sent from the department to maintain contact with these
potential students. Information is also mailed to prospective students who indicate they
are undecided or intending to enroll in General Engineering or General Agriculture. As
a result, some of these students elect to major in one of our programs. The number of
these students selecting our program seems to be increasing.

A letter from the department chair describing the ABEN and ASM programs, and recruiting
materials as enclosures are sent to all high schools in ND, Western Minnesota, Eastern
Montana, and select schools in South Dakota each fall (about 465). Similarly, department
recruiting materials are supplied to the respective college deans for their use in recruitment.

        NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                                               9
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



      The chair and/or faculty participate in all Discover NDSU events representing our
      programs in both CAFSNR and CEA. The chair or another faculty also meet with all
      ABEN and ASM student prospects and parents that visit campus.

      Fact sheets and the department’s website materials pertaining to prospective students
      were reviewed and updated as needed.

      The department offers ABEN 189-1cr, First Year Experience, to ABEN and ASM majors.
      This class is taught by senior faculty. All faculty encourage students to participate in
      cooperative education experiences and in student professional organizations.

      To improve student retention, faculty and upperclass students promote involvement of
      freshman and sophomore students in department activities. A Fall Kickoff event is
      sponsored and organized by the Student Engineering Branch of ASABE and the
      Agricultural Systems Management Club. ABEN 189 students complete an early
      assignment to meet with their adviser and find information specific to their program,
      the faculty, the staff, and the ABEN building. Freshman-senior interaction takes place
      through activities between the ABEN 110 (Introduction to ABEN) and ABEN 486
      (Design I) classes. Upper level student organization members recruit lower level
      students to participate in the annual Agricultural Technology Exposition and in
      department professional student organizations. The Quarter Scale Tractor team recruits
      membership from incoming ABEN and ASM students. This is an excellent activity that
      lets upper-classmen and lower-classmen interact in hands-on activities.

      Each year, a number of students in other engineering disciplines transfer into the ABEN
      program. Students in other majors often become aware of our major from ABEN
      students in math and engineering courses. They often find that the ABEN major better
      fits with their career plans and goals. Other students change their major because of the
      quality of advising and personal attention they receive from ABEN faculty. And, some
      students are looking for a program that offers a more hands-on approach in engineering
      classes; a good mix of theory and practical application.

      Students often transfer into the ASM program from other NDSU programs. These
      students come primarily from either of two sources; current NDSU ABEN majors or
      students from other programs in the CAFSNR. Often students enter NDSU unsure if
      they want to major in ABEN or ASM. If they are in doubt, advisers typically
      encourage them to major in ABEN if they show adequate potential to be successful
      with the math requirements of the program. The rationale for doing this is because the
      requirements for the ABEN program will also satisfy requirements in the ASM
      program should they decide to change majors. However, many of the courses in the
      ASM program do not meet requirements of the ABEN curriculum. As a result, the time
      requirement to graduation would be greater for a student changing a major from ASM
      to ABEN. Students in other majors in the CAFSNR often change their major to ASM.
      They find that the ASM program is much more flexible and allows them to better tailor
      their program to meet specific career objectives.



 10                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                                                              ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Neither the ABEN or ASM programs have been able to attract many female students
(Figure 6); this, in spite of the fact that female students do very well in our programs
and are very highly sought by industry and government agencies. In the last several
years, female graduates in the ABEN program have commanded the most employment
offers and the highest salary levels. Female graduates of the ASM program are often the
first to find employment prior to graduation. In Fall 2008, female enrollment in ABEN
jumped from 0 to 8 and in ASM increased from 1 to 2. Preliminary data for incoming
female students for Fall 2009 indicate four new female ABEN students and no new
female students in the ASM program.

                 120

                 100                                                                                                97
                               84     87              91       90
                                              86
 Number of Students




                                                                       78
                      80              71                                                                                   ABEN Enrollment
                              68                                               68      70      71
                                                                59     61                              66
                                              59       57                                                                  ABEN Female
                      60                                                       65                      63
                                                                                       62      62                   61
                                                                                                                           ASM Enrollment
                      40
                                                                                                                           ASM Female
                      20
                                       7       6       9                                                        8
                               4                                4       4       4                       0
                                                                                        0       1
                       0                      4       4
                               0       0                        2      1       2        1       3       1       2
                             98/99   99/00   00/01   01/02    02/03   03/04   04/05   05/06   06/07   07/08   08/09
                                                             Year (fall semester)
Figure 6. Total undergraduate and female enrollment levels (ABEN and ASM programs),
Fall 1998-Fall 2008.

As shown in Figure 7, the majority of our students are North Dakota residents, however
students from Minnesota also make up a large percentage of our student body. Early data
on admitted students indicates that 38% of the new ABEN students are Minnesota
residents and 38% are North Dakota residents. In addition, one student has been admitted
from each of the states of South Dakota and Montana. Two students each are expected
from Wisconsin and from India. These data also show that 33% of incoming ASM
students are Minnesota residents with 60% being North Dakota residents. One student is
expected from Montana.


                                             SD, 4          MT, 1
                                             2.5%           0.6%      India, 10
                                                                        6.3%                                North Dakota
                                                                                                            Minnesota
                                                                                                            South Dakota
                                                                                                            Montana
                                                                                                            India
                           MN, 69                                                      ND, 74
                           43.7%                                                       46.8%

Figure 7. Home state distribution of undergraduate enrollment for both programs,
Fall 2008

                            NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                                                    11
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



      Assisting graduates to find employment in areas related to their field of study and
      achieve their career goals is a high departmental priority. Success in placing students
      at graduation makes it much easier to recruit students into our programs. Students
      start to receive career planning assistance in the Skills for Academic Success course
      (ABEN 189). Subsequent assistance occurs as part of student academic advising and
      through speakers and activities of the student professional organizations. The senior
      seminar classes (ABEN 491 and ASM 491) further prepares students for their
      individual job searches. To also enhance placement opportunities, the department
      actively encourages all students to pursue cooperative education placements: although
      cooperative education is not a curriculum requirement in either the ABEN or ASM
      programs (exception being the Dealership Management specialization in the ASM
      program). A department faculty provides active assistance to students in their
      placement efforts and maintains relationships with many employers of our graduates.

      For the ‘08-‘09 academic year, 12 of 13 ABEN B.S. graduates are known to be placed.
      Starting salaries reported range from $39,000 to $63,240. A placement summary is
      included in Section F.3.

      For the ‘08-‘09 academic year, 12 of 15 ASM B.S. graduates are known to be placed.
      Starting salaries reported range from $31,200 to $45,000. A placement summary is
      included in Section F.3.

      Professor Backer (33 years experience) teaches the department’s Skills for Academic
      Success (ABEN 189) course. Dr. Bon (22 years experience) teaches the ABEN 110 –
      Introduction the Agricultural and Biosystems course. Professor Solseng (31 years
      experience) teaches ASM 115 - Fundamentals of Agricultural Systems Management.
      Student evaluations continue to be very positive and students appreciate the instructor’s
      experience in teaching these introductory courses.

   6. Distance Education Progress

      Department faculty continues to consider the possibility of offering on-line courses.
      However, many ABEN and ASM courses have associated labs which require hands-on
      activities. This would make on-line offerings very difficult.

   7. Assessment

      The ABEN Department faculty submitted its annual assessment report on June 4, 2009.
      The response from the Assessment Committee was received on May 23, 2008. The 2007
      ABEN Assessment Report earned a score of 8.3 of a possible 10.

      The ABEN Department uses assessment data in its decision making activities to
      ensure that students are provided with a superior teaching and learning environment.
      After analysis, assessment data are used to modify teaching techniques and to make
      decisions relative to the material covered in classes and laboratories with the goal to
      enhance student learning. Faculty are required to develop student learning
      assessment objectives, develop methods to be used to assess those objectives, to

 12                   NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                 ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


analyze the results, and to reflect and make appropriate adjustments to the course(s)
or teaching methods. Faculties are encouraged to use several methods of assessment
for each learning objective. Assessment data are also used ensure that professional
accreditation (ABET) criteria are being met on a continuous basis.

In Spring 2009, three department faculty committees were formed; ASM Curriculum
Committee, ABEN Curriculum Committee, and Assessment Committee. The two
curriculum committees are charged with reviewing course and curriculum content for
both relevance and currency. The Assessment Committee is charged with monitoring
assessment activities and identification and implementation of appropriate assessment
methods. These committees will become active in Fall 2009.




       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                     13
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


B. Research/Creative Activity

   1. Highlights of Research and Creative Activity

      The department’s overall mission is to develop and extend knowledge in engineering
      and technology that serves to advance the productivity of agriculture, the value-added
      processing and utilization of agricultural commodities, and the sustainable
      management of environmental resources.

      Its research programs generally involve multi-disciplinary collaborations that are
      focused in the areas of: 1) value-added processing and handling technology, 2) bio-
      information and machine systems for agri-production and processing applications,
      and 3) environmental resources management.

      More detailed individual project reports are provided in the Section G.8 of the report.

      Accomplishments/impacts include the following:

      a. Research Activity

            i. Canola-based Epoxy Resins for Bio-based Plastic Composites: Dennis
               Wiesenborn

               The development of canola oil-based resins for commercial application to
               composite materials is the long-term objective of this project. Epoxies are
               already a well-established type of resin used in composites, and thus the
               current focus is on blends of canola oil-based epoxy and synthetic epoxy
               resins. The supporting objectives are stated below. By achieving these
               objectives, we are demonstrating that canola oil-based resins are suitable for
               high-value applications, thereby helping to create a new market for canola,
               fostering new business opportunities in the North Central U.S., and
               lessening our nation’s dependence on imported petroleum.

               Objective 1. Scale up the conversion of canola oil to high-quality epoxy
                    resin.

               Objective 2. Produce competitive composite materials which are high in
                    canola resin content.

               Objective 3. Identify suitable applications and partners for the transfer of
                    this technology.

           ii. Center of Excellence for Oilseed Development: Dennis Wiesenborn

               Capability for high throughput analysis of canola seed was established and
               put into action, especially to develop varieties useful to the biodiesel
               industry. Consequently, 3,100 canola samples from seven North Dakota
               locations were analyzed within four weeks in August-September, 2008 for

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                                                            ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   winter nursery selection, and an additional 350 samples in March for
   summer 2009 selection. Using this high-throughput approach, seed quality
   data can be provided to the canola breeder in timely fashion to accelerate
   development of new canola lines. Future seed analysis must also include
   analysis of biodiesel derived from advanced seed selections. The
   conventional process for extracting, refining and transesterifying the oil, as
   well as employing the various analyses for biodiesel quality, is a painstaking
   task. Work is underway to accomplish the extraction and transesterification
   simultaneously, a process known as in situ transesterification. This project is
   in partnership with the Plant Sciences and Agribusiness & Applied
   Economics Departments of NDSU, the North Central REC, and Monsanto,
   and was selected for a second Center of Excellence award in 2008. Project
   objectives follow.

   Objective 1. Develop and improve high-throughput methods for analysis of
        canola seed, oil and biodiesel

   Objective 2. Evaluate canola samples for seed, oil and biodiesel quality

iii. Development of Water Management Practices and Tools for Improved
     Crop Production and Natural Resource Management: Dean Steele

   Strategies for improved management of water in both irrigated and non-
   irrigated agricultural settings in North Dakota are needed to help producers
   improve their competitive position. In arid and semi-arid regions, with
   annual precipitation in the ranges of 100 to 400 mm and 400 to 600 mm,
   respectively, water is the most limiting factor for crop production. Much, if
   not all, of North Dakota falls within these ranges of annual precipitation.
   Improvement of water use efficiency, i.e., crop yield per unit water used,
   remains one of the largest technological challenges facing agriculture in
   general, not just irrigated agriculture. An example of research to address this
   issue is the inter-row water harvesting (IRWH) studies we have conducted
   for irrigated potato production; these are expected to be applicable to other
   crops.

   An improved understanding of, and ability to model and measure,
   components of the hydrologic cycle and its applications to agriculture are
   also important facets of agricultural water management. For example,
   remote sensing and geographic information system techniques can be
   applied on a watershed or basin scale to predict crop water use or
   evapotranspiration (ET) in the larger context of water utilization and the
   sustainability of irrigation. Specifically, understanding of water utilization
   under irrigated vs. nonirrigated conditions will help quantify the degree to
   which irrigation increases ET in the climatic, crop, and soil conditions of the
   Devils Lake basin. The resulting information can help managers and
   politicians determine whether or not to pursue development of additional
   irrigation as a means of flood mitigation in the basin.


  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                       15
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


          iv. Evaluation of Ozone as an Antimycotoxin and Microbiocide -
              Improvement of Thermal and Alternative Processes for Food: Dennis
              Wiesenborn

             Ozonated water is reported to be effective in reducing microbial load in
             foods such as fruits and vegetables. Ozonated water may also be an effective
             alternative to chlorine in treating durum used for pasta and barley used for
             malt, thereby increasing the value of infected grain. Work completed in the
             ABEN Department will allow collaborators in other departments to better
             monitor and control the use of ozonated water. Project objectives are as
             follows.

             Objective 1. Produce ozonated water with sustained, high levels of ozone.

             Objective 2. Evaluate effectiveness of ozonated water as a surface
                  microbiocide for durum wheat.

             A corresponding objective is to measure and model process dependent
             kinetic parameters which affect food quality and safety attributes.

          v. Feasibility of the Use of Tile Drainage for Subsurface Irrigation in the
             Red River Valley and its Impact on Soil Chemical and Physical
             Properties: Xinhua Jia

             Tile drainage is a process of removing excess subsurface water from the
             soil. Due to increased rainfall and prompted by higher land values and better
             crop prices, the use of tile drainage has rapidly increased in North Dakota.
             Increased rainfall and a high water table have also caused salinity to become
             a problem. Tile drainage is a promising way to control and reduce salinity
             and maintain a desirable water table for wet soils. At the present time, the
             amount of tiled land in North Dakota is unknown. Therefore, the impact of
             tile drainage on soil and water resources is also unknown. This project
             explores the possibility of controlling the water table through subirrigation
             and evaluate soil and water quality changes. Project objectives are to:

             1. Determine the feasibility of using the tile drainage for subirrigation to
                enhance crop production in the RRV;

             2. Evaluate the changes of the soil chemical and physical properties
                overlying the drained and drained-subirrigated areas compared to
                untreated areas;

             3. Monitor drainage water quantity and quality, ground water depth and water
                quality in the drained, drained and subirrigated, and controlled areas; and

             4. Determine the impact of moderate SAR irrigation water on the
                dispersivity and hydraulic conductivity of soils near the drain tiles used
                for subirrigation.

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                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



    Results indicate that it is feasible to use the tile drainage for subirrigation to
    enhance crop production. In 2008, corn yield for tiled and tiled/subirrigated
    fields were 5% and 10% higher than that for an untiled field, respectively.

vi. Impact of Water Availability on Crop Production and Natural
    Resources: Xinhua Jia

    Water availability is a function of both water quantity and water quality.
    Management of water quantity and control of water quality can improve
    crop production and preserve natural resources. This project is to determine
    evapotranspiration rates for various crops and land types and compare
    different evapotranspiration measurement methods to improve our
    understanding of water management. Water quality will be monitored and
    controlled for sustainable land and water management. The results of this
    project will provide a comprehensive water balance analysis as well as an
    evaluation of soil and water quality changes due to agricultural water
    management practices. The objectives are to:

    1. Determine evapotranspiration rates for various crops and soil types,

    2. Compare measurement methods, and

    3. To monitor and control water quality for sustainable land and water
       management.

vii. Impact of Subsurface Drainage on Water Availability in the Red River
     Basin: Xinhua Jia

    A wet weather cycle in the Red River Basin region since 1993 has brought
    the groundwater level closer to the soil surface in many areas. Subsurface
    drainage (SSD) can be an effective way to maintain crop production where
    shallow groundwater exists over a poorly drained soil or where soil salinity
    has been elevated due to high water tables. However, releasing drainage
    water into the Red River modifies the water balance and water quality
    (water availability), which, in turn, may disrupt the existing ecology and
    hydrological balance of the regional watershed and wetlands. In this project,
    one of the most important parameters in the water balance,
    evapotranspiration (ET), will be measured using eddy correlation,
    scintillometer, and soil moisture deficient on SSD and undrained fields. The
    ET rates are also compared with a satellite-based remote sensing model
    (SEBAL). It is also expected to develop remote sensing algorithms for
    identifying fields with SSD installed. The objectives of this project are to:

    1. To conduct comprehensive water mass balance measurements of drained
       and undrained fields, with emphases on validation of evapotranspiration
       estimates by satellite-based remote sensing model - SEBAL, using


   NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                          17
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


                 ground-based measurements by eddy correlation, scintillometer, and soil
                 moisture sensors, and their inter-comparison.

              2. To develop remote sensing algorithms for identifying fields with
                 subsurface drainage installed.

              3. To extend results gained from this seed grant project over a larger spatial
                 scale, watershed or regional, through a standard USDA NRI proposal.

        viii. Intelligent Sensors for Evaluation of Food Quality and Safety: Suranjan
              Panigrahi

              Computer-based advanced information technologies and intelligent sensor
              technologies have tremendous potential for evaluation and characterization
              of food and agricultural products. This research investigates the applicability
              of electronic nose technologies for predicting the safety of meat products.
              The overall goal of this project is to develop and/or adapt suitable forms of
              advanced information and sensor technologies for rapid and accurate
              evaluation of quality and safety of various agricultural and food products.
              Within this framework, the long-term goal is to develop portable and
              miniaturized intelligent sensors that can be used for rapid monitoring and/or
              evaluation of safety/quality of food and agricultural products. As meat is a
              staple food product, beef is used in this project as a model food product for
              the development of sensors. It is planned that research can be extended for
              other meat products such as pork, chicken, turkey or bison, and other
              agricultural products.

          ix. Intelligent Quality Sensors (IQS) for Food Safety: Suranjan Panigrahi

              Computer-based advanced information technologies and intelligent sensor
              technologies have tremendous potential for evaluation and characterization
              of food and agricultural products. This research investigates the applicability
              of electronic nose technologies for predicting the safety of meat and grain
              products. A long-term goal of this research is to develop miniaturized
              portable sensors that can provide specific quality information to users about
              food and agricultural products. Volatile chemicals/gases are generated
              because of the fungal and bacterial metabolism of food products. These
              chemicals/gases can be used as a food quality indicator to alert the public to
              food product safety concerns. Electronic noses or odor sensors can be
              developed and adapted for this purpose. Because the meat and grain
              industries are important segments of the U.S. agriculture and food industry,
              the research will focus on these food products.

          x. Livestock Waste Engineering: Shafiqur Rahman

              This research program focuses on air and water quality resulting from
              livestock facilities and land application of manure. No one at NDSU was
              conducting research on these two areas and it presented itself as an

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                                                         ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


 opportunity to develop a waste management research laboratory in the
 Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering.

 Some monitoring of baseline air emissions from two commercial swine
 operations in North Dakota has begun. The North Dakota Pork Council has
 partially supported this project. On-going research results were presented at
 the ASABE meeting June 21- June 24, in Reno, Nevada. Depending on
 funding availability, more livestock and poultry farms will be selected to
 monitor air emissions.

 Livestock manure and carcass disposal are environmental concerns.
 Composting is one of the best disposal options. Work has started on
 livestock/poultry carcass disposal composting. This project has been
 supported by the North Dakota Turkey Federation.

 Runoff from feedlots and manure applied lands cause surface water quality
 concerns. Funding for a demonstration project on vegetative buffer strips to
 minimize nutrient runoff from feedlots was awarded by the North Dakota
 Department of Health under EPA 319 grants in ND. One PhD student was
 recruited to work on this project. The project will continue to 2012.

 Plans are being made to monitor greenhouse gases (GHGs) including
 methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. However, no instrument
 is available to quantify GHGs intermittently or continuously at NDSU. A
 proposal has been submitted to AFRI for equipment grants to purchase the
 INNOVA 1412 for quantifying GHGs. A funding decision is expected in the
 next 2-3 months.

 Odor mitigation from livestock production facilities and manure storage
 facilities are a growing concern. A proposal for a project on “New
 Technologies to Reduce Odor Emissions from Anaerobic Swine Lagoons in
 North Dakota” was submitted to USDA-NRCS CIG grants in 2009. A
 funding decision is expected in the next 1-2 months.

 In addition to the research activities described above, time was spent to set-
 up a laboratory for research work. A Lachat® Auto analyzer (Analytical
 instrument) was purchased and will be used for nutrient analysis in research
 activities. In addition, a “vac-u-pump” was purchased for odorous air
 sampling from lagoons, animal facilities and fields following land
 application of manure. A Drager® CMS, a device for measuring ammonia
 concentration, was purchased to measure ammonia concentration. One
 Jerome meter, a hydrogen sulfide (H2S) analyzer, was also purchased. All of
 these air quality instruments are currently used to monitor gas
 concentrations from livestock facilities. A portable wind tunnel for
 quantifying air emissions from land application of manure is also being
 fabricated.



NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                      19
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


              Two graduate students were recruited to assist in research. One of them has
              already joined in the department and the other one will join in fall semester,
              2009.

          xi. Tile Drainage and Subirrigation Elevations in Richland County for
              Effects on Soil and Water Quality: Xinhua Jia

              A 116 acre field, 50 acres tiled and 66 acres untiled, was selected for
              demonstration near Fairmont, ND in Richland County. Miller Farms would
              like to demonstrate subirrigation by using the tile drainage system to irrigate
              the first 25 acres of the tiled field. The tile drainage was installed in 2002
              by Ellingson Drainage and the tile spacing is 60 feet. The plan calls for (1)
              Veris EC mapping of both shallow (0-12 in) and deep (0-36 in) soil layers;
              (2) comprehensive soil sampling to calibrate the EC map, as well as physical
              parameters and chemical analysis for modeling verification; (3) soil
              sampling in the fall for an evaluation of soil chemistry changes; (4) yield
              estimates by hand and by weigh cart; (5) weather data from an on-site
              weather station and a tipping bucket near the pump; (6) water level
              monitoring and samples (ND State Water Commission will help to install
              screen wells); (7) monitoring the tile drainage effluent and determining the
              effects of the output on the offsite county drain system. The objectives of
              this project are to:

              1.   Demonstrate the use of tile drainage for subirrigation to enhance crop
                   production in Richland County;

              2.   Monitor changes in specific soil chemical and physical properties (EC,
                   pH, bulk density, porosity, crusting potential, aggregate stability, total
                   cations, total nitrogen, and plant available phosphorus) overlying the
                   drained and drained-subirrigated areas;

              3.   Monitor drainage water quality (total ions, EC, SAR, pH, trace
                   elements) and determine ground water depth and water quantity in the
                   drained, drained and subirrigated, and undrained areas; and

              4.   Disseminate the results of this demonstration project and provide tile
                   drainage and subirrigation management strategies to the NRCS and to
                   land managers.

         xii. Use of Northern Great Plains Agricultural Resources for Bioenergy and
              Bioproduct Development: Scott Pryor

              The continued development of high-quality, environmentally benign, and
              economical biobased energy and products will add value to current
              agricultural crops for the benefit of producers, processors, and consumers in
              North Dakota and throughout the nation. Processors will have a higher
              value revenue stream for energy and important co-products and producers
              will see higher selling prices because of higher demand. Additional

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     products will also lead to economic development and more jobs in rural
     economies where processing plants tend to be located. A vibrant biobased
     economy will require the utilization of a wide variety of biomass feedstocks
     including traditional crops, agricultural residues, and dedicated energy
     crops. Biobased industries producing biodiesel, ethanol, and other biobased
     products will provide farmers with a strong market for their products, fuel
     for their vehicles and farm machinery, and more jobs for their communities.
     The aim of this work is to contribute to development of new products from
     agriculture that have previously been derived exclusively from petroleum.

     The specific objectives for this research project are: 1.) Bioenergy –
     Evaluate and increase the technical viability of using agricultural residues,
     dedicated energy crops, and other biomass resources to produce sustainable
     and economically viable fuels for transportation, heating, or electrical
     generation. 2.) Bioproducts – Increase the technical and economic viability
     of commercial and industrial bioproducts either independently or as co-
     products of related bioenergy production processes. Accomplishments
     related to this objective are also expected to affect Objective 1 through the
     economic impacts of co-product development on bioenergy processing.

xiii. Use of Field Peas as an Ethanol Feedstock: Cole Gustafson
      (Agribusiness and Applied Economics), Dennis Wiesenborn, and Scott
      Pryor

     Ethanol production capacity in the United States is rapidly expanding. In
     order to meet this new capacity, other crops, such as field peas, are being
     considered. Peas are well suited for North Dakota’s arid climate and fit well
     into cereal grain rotations while sequestering atmospheric nitrogen into the
     soil. Recent studies have also shown that pea starch can directly supplement
     the corn ethanol process, but process information is still needed to determine
     the economic feasibility. The development of engineering computer process
     models for four sequentially more complex pea processing scenarios to
     supplement a corn ethanol plant is discussed. Cleaning, cleaning and
     dehulling, and single- and double-pass pin milling and air classification
     systems were each modeled to quantify flow rates and compositions
     throughout the processes. The scenarios reported here are specific to 10%
     supplementation of a 380x106 L/y (100 million gallons per year) corn
     ethanol facility, but the models can be readily adapted to other user inputs.
     Results from the models at default settings return required pea feedstock
     rates of 16,700 to 17,800 kg/h (36,800 to 39,200 lb/h). Co-product stream
     flows are also quantified.

     The information obtained from the models was used for sizing the major
     equipment components and obtaining estimates from vendors. These
     estimates were then used for estimation of the total capital investment
     needed for the processing facility. Operating cost estimates for all four
     processes were also made. This information enables the user to identify
     which fractionation process, if any, might be competitive for ethanol

   NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                       21
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


              production supplementation and aids in capital investment and operating
              cost estimates. Estimates of total capital investment and operating costs can
              aid decisions regarding the economic feasibility for a project before steps
              are taken towards actual construction and operation of a facility.

              Access to these models is available through the Department of Agricultural
              and Biosystems Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North
              Dakota, at www.ageng.ndsu.nodak.edu/fieldpea/.

              Wilhelmi, A.J., D. P. Wiesenborn, C. R. Gustafson, S. W. Pryor. 2008.
              Models for Fractionation of Field Peas to Supplement Corn Ethanol,
              Applied Engineering in Agriculture. (Accepted for publication)

      b. Extension Activity

         The Extension Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering program annually reaches
         about 7,000 people through almost 150 educational presentations. Individual
         education and technical assistance is provided through about 1,000 telephone and
         electronic consultations, and numerous correspondence, office, and on-site
         consultations. The NDSU Extension Service is placing more emphasis on
         transformational education, which is the process of not only informing people, but
         also helping them use the information to reach a desired result. Telephone and e-mail
         consultations involve the desired transformational education. Engineering
         information is provided through the media, including 46 news releases, 10 magazine/
         newspaper articles, and 37 TV, radio, and newspaper interviews. Educational
         materials developed include 20 publications, 3 technical papers/posters, 3
         newsletters/brochures/fact sheets, and 28 electronic media avenues such as websites,
         PowerPoint presentations, and e-mail news releases. The ABEN Extension website
         is a major contributor to clientele education and service, serving 392,000 distinct
         hosts in 2008 at an average rate of 514 page requests per day.

           i. BioEPIC – NDSU BioOpportunities Initiative: Ken Hellevang

              An all day BioEPIC workshop/meeting for NDSU faculty held on March 4
              was organized and moderated. A list of current bio-energy and product
              activities of NDSU staff was developed.

              Assistance was provided to present periodic live seminars. They were
              delivered using IVN to sites across North Dakota.

              BioEPIC publicity:
              1.) BioEPIC opens at NDSU, Feb 2008, Biomass Magazine
              http://biomassmagazine.com/article.jsp?article_id=1449; 2.) BioEPIC display at the
              NDSU Extension Service Spring Conference; 3.) Discussed NDSU BioEPIC
              on Lisbon radio with Mick Kjar, April 7; 4.) Display at and participation in
              Biomass ‘08, July 15 & 16, Alerus, Grand Forks; 5.) Updated the BioEPIC
              brochure; 6.) Assisted NDSU AES Public Information Officer with article
              “Coordinating Biomass Research” in the May 2008 issue of Biomass

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                                                              ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Magazine, BBI International, www.BiomassMagazine.com; 7.) NDSU begins
   BioEPIC Journey, Biomass Magazine www.biomassmagazine.com/article-
   print.jsp?article_id=1554; 8.) wrote and distributed NDSU BioEPIC newsletter
   to NDSU staff in April, May and June.

   Material was developed and edited for “Biofocus – NDSU Advancing
   BioOpportunities” report. Projects to be included in the report written by
   Agricultural Communications were identified. Assistance was provided with
   writing the letter used by Vice President Coston to distribute the report to
   government, university, energy and agribusiness leaders. Assistance was
   provided with the development of the distribution list of energy and
   agribusiness leaders.

   Assistance was provided with organizing the Northern Plains Biomass
   Economy: What Makes Sense? held on September 29, 2008 at the Ramada
   Plaza and Suites in Fargo with about 100 participants from the region.
   Assistance was provided with organizing the poster session including
   selection and design of the posters (www.ndsu.nodak.edu/ndsu/bioopportunities/).

ii. Drainage: Tom Scherer

    Interest in tile drainage as a means of improving overall farm productivity
    continues to increase. Work was performed with Hans Kandel on his 8-acre
    tile drained research plots on campus and organize tile drainage workshops
    and a tile drainage forum. Collaborative work with Dr. Jia and Dr. DeSutter
    on the tile drainage and subirrigation project in Fairmount, ND was
    continued. Collaboration with the University of Minnesota Extension
    Service on tile drainage issues and educational programming continued. The
    flow data and rainfall data collected at Fairmount in 2008 was summarized.
    An ASABE paper on the flow measurement method was written. Assistance
    was provided to analyze and organize the tile drainage water quality data
    from Phase 1 of the tile drainage water quality-monitoring project funded by
    EPA 319 funds. Assistance was provided to implement Phase 2 of the
    project.

iii. Energy: Ken Hellevang

   Assistance was provided to the biomass subcommittee of the North Dakota
   EmPower Commission to develop recommendations to the full commission.
   The energy efficiency portion of the EmPower Commission
   recommendations was developed. EmPower Commission meetings were
   attended to keep informed of energy related activities.

   The North Dakota Energy Efficiency Partnership was organized to facilitate
   sharing of information among organizations, agencies and utilities
   promoting and providing education on energy efficiency. The group meets
   approximately quarterly.


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


             At the request of the Department of Commerce and Extension
             administration, an unsuccessful proposal was submitted to facilitate a two
             day working session of the EmPower North Dakota Commission and assist
             in the writing of an updated EmPower North Dakota energy policy.

             ABEN Extension participated in; several energy related conference calls, the
             Renewable Fuels Energy Summit in Bismarck on May 19, the ND Biodiesel
             Task Force Meetings, and the ASABE Standards Project X612 “Performing
             On-Farm Energy Audits” committee meeting and two T-11 Bioenergy
             Committee meetings.

             Assistance was provided to develop a survey instrument to assist the task
             force in conducting a SWOT analysis and develop a strategic plan for
             submission to the ND EmPower Commission. Communications were also
             continued with Department of Commerce personnel.

             Periodic reports on the NDSU Extension Service Energy Education Program
             were written. A listserv of individuals interested in wind energy was created
             and information was distributed via an online forum on wind leases.

             ND Biomass Energy Task Force: A ND Biomass Committee meeting in
             Jamestown, Sep 4 was chaired. An action plan was developed, approved by
             the group, and distributed to the North Dakota Alliance for Renewable
             Energy and to several other interested parties.

             ND Alliance for Renewable Energy (NDARE): Spring, summer and fall
             meetings were attended. Input was provided in two December meetings on
             the NDARE Policy Recommendations for North Dakota Energy
             Development (http://www.ndare.org/).

          iv. Energy Education: Carl Pedersen

             The energy educator develops and delivers a statewide educational program
             on energy efficiency. Objectives of energy education include:

             1. Coordination of Energy Efficiency Partnership. The Partnership brings
                together North Dakota agencies and companies working with energy
                efficiency education in an effort to determine services provided, and
                develop relationships and identify unmet needs and opportunities for
                cooperation.

             2. Promote the use of resources available from the NDSU Extension
                Service and other agencies, organizations, and businesses through news
                releases and educational programs.

             3. Develop web material, publications, and other educational materials
                relating to energy efficiency as needed.


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                                                           ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   4. Develop and deliver educational programs on energy efficiency using
      various mediums.

   Face to face and phone meetings were conducted with the following groups
   to discuss possible working partnerships: North Dakota Department of
   Commerce, Cass County Electric, Xcel Energy, Basin Electric Cooperative,
   Montana Dakota Utilities, Verendrye Electric Cooperative, Ottertail Power
   Company, North Dakota Association of Rural Electric Cooperatives, Energy
   and Environmental Research Center, City of Fargo, and the North Dakota
   Department of Agriculture.

   Fifteen educational news articles relating to energy were written and
   released by NDSU Ag Communications.

   An ABEN Energy Efficiency Program display was developed and presented
   at the NDSU Extension Service Spring Conference in Bismarck.

   A website was created to provide information on energy and energy
   efficiency issues (www.ndsu.edu/energy).

   Presentations on home energy efficiency were delivered to the Fargo
   Kiwanis and the Woman’s Ag Day banquet in Ashley, ND. Three energy
   efficiency presentations were given to the North Dakota Science Teachers
   Association meetings in Minot, ND, and a presentation outlining energy
   efficiency opportunities for farms and small business was given at Lake
   Region State College in collaboration with USDA grant programs.
   Presentations were also made at Research Extension Center field days
   events throughout the state.

   The Energy Education working session at the NDSU Extension Service
   Spring Conference in Bismarck was conducted with the assistance of Hans
   Kandel. The Energy Education working session at the NDSU Extension
   Service fall conference was led by ABEN Extension.

v. eXtension - EDEN Flood Education Material: Ken Hellevang

   Fifteen articles were edited and revised on the topic of, “Reduce Future
   Flood Damage.” Fifteen frequently asked questions (FAQs) were also
   edited and revised for publishing on eXtension.org.

   Hellevang served as a flooded building expert for an online Flood Recovery
   Chat “Flood Recovery: Practical Steps and Useful Resources” on April 7
   and April 25 for one hour each.

   A part-time person was hired to assist with developing flood articles and
   FAQs related to agricultural topics. A review of materials on universities
   and government agency websites was conducted. Direction was provided
   on topics and resources for about a dozen articles on preparation and

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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


             recovery related to farmsteads including agricultural buildings, crops and
             horticulture topics.

             Extensive work was done on the eXtension.org website. The eXtension
             website is an educational partnership of more than 70 universities to provide
             access to objective, research-based information and educational
             opportunities. It complements and enhances the community-based
             Cooperative Extension System of the land-grant universities
             (http://www.extension.org/).

             Iowa Flood: In response to this flood, the following activities were
             completed; 1.) answered phone calls from staff about flooding issues; 2.)
             reviewed educational materials for accuracy; 3.) served as a structural
             flooding expert for a Cedar Rapids radio station call-in-show; 4.) provided
             in-service education via teleconference for Extension Field Staff on housing
             clean-up issues; and 5.) conducted a 90-minute Webinar on flood cleanup
             and rebuilding concerns. Archived version:
             http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p46584571/

          vi. Irrigation: Tom Scherer

             The development of the site-specific web based irrigation scheduling
             program, incorporated as part of the NDAWN website, is a major
             accomplishment. Over the winter, some programming changes were made
             to improve performance and alfalfa was added to the selectable crops.
             Alfalfa was difficult to program because it can be cut which alters the water
             use pattern. This year the program was available for the entire growing
             season. User logs were examined, and after removing the entries that were
             tests and trials of the system, it was determined that 48 irrigators used the
             program to schedule irrigation on 103 irrigation systems (almost all center
             pivots). This represents about 13,000 acres. Several inquiries were received
             from Texas, Washington, Nebraska and Oregon about incorporating this
             technology into their irrigation water management programs. An ASABE
             paper was written on the program and several presentations were given at
             national meetings as well as at in-state irrigation workshops. NRCS in
             Jamestown conducted an in-house training for NRCS employees on how to
             help irrigators use the program to report water management information for
             their EQIP irrigation program.

             Irrigation is regarded as a tool of economic development in many areas of
             the state. It is also a large consumer of energy and the large increase in the
             price of diesel fuel has almost offset the economic return due to higher crop
             prices for irrigators. Providing the best information possible is the goal of
             educational programs to existing irrigators; people who want to get into
             irrigation, irrigation dealers, government agencies and private individuals.
             Objectives of irrigation outreach include:



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                                                           ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


    1. Teach irrigation water management and equipment selection. The
       December irrigation workshop is a collaborative effort with the ND
       Irrigation Association and the Missouri Slope Irrigation Development
       Association. The Williston irrigation workshop is a collaborative effort
       with Chet Hill, NDSU Extension, area diversification specialist.
       Additional workshops are organized based on interest and need in
       specific locales in ND.

    2. Edit “Water Spouts” to provide timely and useful articles for the
       irrigation community and use other media to provide information that
       affects irrigation water management.

    3. Work with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and NRCS to implement
       demonstration projects to improve irrigation water conservation.
       Continue to work with the North Dakota Irrigation Association, the
       Missouri Slope Irrigation Development Association, irrigation districts,
       irrigators and the general public to plan irrigation tours and other
       meetings. Work with the NDIA on a revised strategic plan for irrigation
       development in ND.

    4. Collaborate with Mike Liane, area irrigation agent and the ND Irrigation
       Association on various irrigation projects.

    5. Revise two irrigation bulletins: EB-68 Compatibility of North Dakota
       Soils for Irrigation and AE-92 Planning to Irrigate a Checklist.

vii. Livestock Waste Engineering: Shafiqur Rahman

    Numerous presentations were made on livestock waste engineering. A
    presentation on Livestock Carcass Disposal was given at Livestock
    Marketing Association’s Annual Meeting Forum, Ramada Plaza Suites,
    Fargo, ND, June 11. A presentation on Manure Application Technologies
    was given at Manure Applicator and CAFO Operators School. Carrington
    REC, March 12. A presentation on an Overview of Manure Management
    was given at a Livestock in-service in Washburn, ND on September 3, 2008.
    A presentation was made at the Soil and Water Conservation Society and
    Professional Soil Classifiers Association annual meeting on CNMP
    Planning in Relation to Water Quality. The meeting was held in Dickinson,
    ND on October 9, 2008. Manure Handling and Management was presented
    at Fall Conference, Fargo, ND on October 30, 2008. I also participated in
    drought conference calls.

viii. Machine Systems: John Nowatzki

     Primary educational emphasis areas were precision agriculture, conservation
     tillage, and wireless technology. Specific educational objectives follow:

    1. Precision Agriculture Technologies

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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


                -    Continue to work directly with four famers in the Dickinson area to
                     assist them with precision agriculture technology applications in
                     their farming operations. This program provides opportunities to
                     work directly with farmers applying precision agriculture
                     technologies in crop production. This program is a collaborative
                     project with Roger Ashley and Greg Endres, area agronomists at
                     Dickinson and Carrington and the cooperating farmers. Assistance
                     was provided to develop crop management zones and fertilizer
                     application maps using satellite imagery, historic yield data,
                     topographic maps and soil test analyzes. The farmers also received
                     assistance in analyzing crop yield data and with equipment
                     technology issues.
                -    Throughout 2008, twenty-one educational information presentations
                     were delivered on variable rate fertilization of field crops, sprayer
                     boom section control, developing field management zones and
                     fertilizer application maps, equipment requirements for variable rate
                     application. Presentations were made at community meetings, farm
                     shows, seminars and workshops across North Dakota, at the
                     International Conference on Precision Agriculture in Denver, and in
                     three online seminars. Several educational PowerPoint programs on
                     precisian agriculture topics were also developed.
                -    As a CoP leader of the eXtension Map@Syst Community of Practice
                     for the national Cooperative State Research, Education, and
                     Extension Service (CSREES) project, the best Land Grant University
                     materials on geospatial technologies for the national eXtension Web
                     site were assembled. This site was published on the Internet in
                     February 2008. A significant portion of this Web site is directly
                     related to precision agriculture
                     (http://www.extension.org/geospatial%20technology).
                -    As co-leader of the eXtension Precision Agriculture CoP with Bruce
                     Erickson, Director of Cropping Systems Management at Purdue
                     University, developing the eXtension precision agriculture Web site
                     with a June 2009 goal for publishing this site on the Internet is in
                     progress. Contributions to the precision agriculture CoP during 2008
                     included coordinating a face-to-face meeting of 10 CoP members in
                     San Antonio in December to organize development of the Web site.
                     Leadership is being provided for the development of the GPS and
                     Guidance section of site and coordinating adding materials to the site
                     Wiki.

             2. Conservation Tillage Technologies
                - Principle educational efforts in conservation tillage include co-
                   authoring two publications: 1) AE-1370 Strip Till for Field Crop
                   Production, Equipment, Production, Economics; and 2) A-1364
                   Bringing Land in the Conservation Reserve Program Back Into Crop
                   Production or Grazing. A strip till demonstration of leading strip till
                   equipment manufacturers in the United States and Canada was held
                   in September during the annual Big Iron Show in West Fargo.

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                                                            ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


       -   Eight educational information presentations on field crop fertilizer
           placement equipment options, strip till equipment, and no-till
           equipment for planting and fertilizing field crops were delivered at
           community meetings, farm shows, seminars and workshops across
           North Dakota. Several educational PowerPoint programs on
           conservation tillage topics were also developed.

   3. Wireless Technology for Agriculture
      - Coordination was provided for wireless technology applications to
         monitor soil moisture and temperature conditions and rainfall
         amounts at Prosper, ND in collaboration with scientists from the
         NDSU Soils and Plant Sciences Departments. Both 802.11 Wi-Fi
         and cellular modems to transfer the sensed data from the field at to
         the Internet (http://www.ageng.ndsu.nodak.edu/farmmonitor/index.php).
      - Wireless remote network and Web cameras transferring live video
         image streams from remote sites to displays on the Internet using
         802.11 wireless technologies were set up and operated.
      - Three educational information presentations on wireless
         technologies, network and Web cameras, applications of data loggers
         and electronic sensors and 802.11 and cellular modems were
         delivered at two farm shows and at the NDSU Extension Spring
         Conference. An educational PowerPoint program on wireless
         technology applications for farms was developed.

ix. MidWest Plan Service (MWPS): Ken Hellevang

   MWPS is an activity of the Iowa State University Agricultural Engineering
   Department with participation by faculty in the North Central region. Tom
   Scherer represented NDSU at the regional committee meeting.

x. Ozone Research: Ken Hellevang

   Katherine Tweed, adjunct in Mass Communications at Minnesota State
   University Moorhead, was hired to assist in writing a publication
   summarizing the results of the “Evaluation of Ozone as an Antimycotoxin
   and Microbial Treatment for Wheat and Barley” USDA-CSREES Project.
   A search for information on using ozone in grain and potato storage was
   conducted. The information will be included with the results of the NDSU
   research. Since the project ended, funding of this work was moved to funds
   remaining from the dry bean research. A second draft of the publication is
   being developed and publication should be completed in Fall 2009.

xi. Post Harvest Engineering: Ken Hellevang

   Assistance was provided to NDSU Plant Sciences, to identify why
   sunflower treated with a desiccant had varied dry down times during two
   years of trials. It was determined that evapotranspiration might explain the


  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                    29
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


             drying potential during the drying period. The evapotranspiration during the
             two years was similar even though drying times varied by a week.

             A Power Point presentation was developed on Postharvest Tips for Later
             Maturing Corn and it was run continuously during Big Iron. It was also
             placed on the Grain Postharvest website as a reference for farmers and
             others. An article on the topic was also written and distributed as a news
             release and sent by email to NDSU staff and others. The late maturing corn
             crop greatly increased the demand for information on drying and storage.
             The educational program to meet this need included numerous
             consultations, presentations, and providing information through the media.

             An update was provided at Fall Extension Conference on corn harvest and
             drying issues facing farmers in 2008.

             Corn drying options were discussed during a two hour meeting on October
             28 with seven farmers who have about 750,000 bushels of corn.

         xii. Structures and Environment Engineering: Ken Hellevang

             The accuracy of electronic and mechanical relative humidity meters for
             measuring home moisture were evaluated. It was found that the electronic
             meters commonly do not provide a measurement below about 20 percent
             and that both meters need to be calibrated to assure accuracy. This
             information was included in publications.

             In a letter sent to NDSU Extension Service County Chairs, a MidWest Plan
             Service publication listing, a reminder of the wealth of information in the
             MWPS handbooks that are in each county office, and a listing of the
             extensive engineering assistance available on the Agricultural and
             Biosystems Engineering web site were provided.

             An evaluation of a moisture and mold problem in the EML building on
             NDSU campus was conducted. A report was provided to Deb Gebeke,
             Assistant Director, NDSU Extension Service.

        xiii. Tile Drainage: Roxanne Johnson

             Phase I of the Red River Valley Tile Drainage Water Quality Assessment
             was concluded this year. Funding for a 5 year project (Phase II) to monitor
             effluent from subsurface drains on saline soils has been approved by the
             North Dakota Department of Health’s 319 Nonpoint Source Pollution funds.
             Additional funding will come from the North Dakota State Water
             Commission and the Cass County Soil Conservation District.

             With the assistance of watershed coordinators in eight soil conservation
             districts, samples will be taken on a weekly basis to determine water quality


 30                NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                           ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


    and quantity. Information will be shared with landowners, agencies,
    legislators, water boards and others to help in future management decisions.

xiv. Water Quality Program: Tom Scherer and Roxanne Johnson

    During and after the National Water Conference in February, much effort
    was put into writing the North Dakota portion of the Region 8 Water Quality
    Coordination grant. A 4-year grant was received to conduct water quality
    programs both in the state and regionally. The grant funds the water quality
    associate position. As part of this project, the Region 8 Water Quality
    summer meeting was hosted, contributions were made to the development of
    a web-based water quality interpretive tool, assistance was provided to
    develop a well and septic system video along with 7 specialty sections,
    regionally developed BMP manual for water monitoring projects was
    reviewed, and both a web-based and paper evaluation form on drinking
    water quality concerns and needs were developed. Both the public and
    county agents were surveyed. Drinking water quality screening efforts at the
    REC field days was very effective outreach. Over 150 samples were
    analyzed, more than 300 contacts were made about drinking water quality,
    several radio and TV interviews were given, and public awareness of
    drinking water concerns were heightened.

    A primary goal of this program is to develop a plan of work and renewal
    funding proposal for continuation of the Regional Water Quality (WQ)
    Coordination grant for the 2010 fiscal year. An objective is to maintain and
    expand a comprehensive educational program addressing drinking water
    quality for both humans and livestock and tile drainage water. Participation
    in meetings and conference calls with the ND Water Quality Advisory
    Committee will continue. The following additional activities are planned:
    1. Update and publish 7 water treatment bulletins in the next two years,
    2. Develop news releases on water quality topics,
    3. Do water screening at experiment station field days,
    4. Participate in drought or flood meetings, if needed
    5. Participate in the issues based programming effort entitled Rural Living
    6. Attend the ND Nonpoint Source Task Force meetings, and
    7. Review water quality project proposals submitted for EPA 319 funding.




   NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                    31
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   2. Grants/Contracts

      a. Grant Funding of Research and Academic Programs

         A listing of grant/gift/in-kind funding in support of research and academic programs
         for the period July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 is given in Section G.9. A summary of
         grants is as follows:

            Funded - PI/Co-PI ...............................................................$776,072
            Unfunded - PI/Co-PI ...........................................................$466,877
            Gifts and in-kind support for teaching programs ..................$56,675

      b. Grant Funding of Extension Programs

         A listing of grant/gift/in-kind funding in support of extension programs for the period
         July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 is given in Section G.9. A summary of grants follows:

            Funded - Total Extension grant funding (PI/Co-PI) ...........$137,500
            Unfunded - Extension grants (PI/Co-PI).............................$669,947




 32                   NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                   ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


3. Articles/Books/Publications

   a. Refereed Journal Articles (10)

      Bora G. C. 2009. Economics of Variable Rate Nitrogen Application in Florida Citrus
      Grove. Tree and Forestry Science and Biotechnology, 3(1): 164-168.

      Harmsen, E. W., V. H. Ramirez Builes, M. D. Dukes, X. Jia, J. E. Gonzalez, and L.
      R. Perez Alegia. 2009. A ground-based method for calibrating remotely sensed
      surface temperature for use in estimating evapotranspiration. WSEAS Trans. On
      Environ and Development 1(5):13-23.

      Lin, Z., D.E. Radcliffe, L.M. Risse, J.J. Romeis, and C.R. Jackson. 2009. Modeling
      phosphorus in the Lake Allatoona watershed using SWAT: II. Effect of landuse
      change. Journal of Environmental Quality, 38:121-129.

      Radcliffe, D.E., Z. Lin, L.M. Risse, J.J. Romeis, and C.R. Jackson. 2009. Modeling
      phosphorus in the Lake Allatoona watershed using SWAT: I. Developing phosphorus
      parameter values. Journal of Environmental Quality, 38:111-120.

      Baruah, D. C. and G. C. Bora. 2008. Energy Demand Forecast for Mechanized Rice
      Cultivation in Rural India. Energy Policy, 36(7): 2628-2636.

      Khot, L., S. Panigrahi, and S. Woznica. 2008. Neural-network-based classification
      of meat: Evaluation of Techniques to overcome small dataset. Biological
      Engineering. 1(2): 127-143.

      Lapen, D. R., E. Topp, M. Edwards, L. Sabourin, W. Curnoe, N. Gottschall, P.
      Bolton, S. Rahman, B. Ball-Coelho, M. Payne, S. Kleywegt, and N. McLaughlin.
      2008. Effect of liquid municipal biosolid application method on tile and ground water
      quality. Journal of Environmental Quality, 37(3): 925-936

      Mukhtar, S., S. Sadaka, A. L. Kenimer and S. Rahman. 2008. Acidic and alkaline
      bottom ash and composted manure blends as a soil amendment. Bioresource
      Technology, 99(13): 5891- 5900.

      Rahman, S., Y. Chen, J. Paliwal and B. Assefa. 2008. Models for manure
      distribution in soil following liquid manure injection. Transaction of the ASABE
      51(3): 873-879.

      Rahman, S., and S. Mukhtar. 2008. Efficacy of a microbial treatment to reduce
      phosphorus and other substances from dairy lagoon effluent. Applied Engineering in
      Agriculture, 24(6): 809-819.

      Accepted (7)

      Bora, G. C., Wangping Sun, Lian Li, Mark D. Schrock. 2009. Optimal road network
      strategy for fertilizer dealers in Kansas. Accepted for publication in Journal of
      Agricultural Systems Technology and Management.

          NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                        33
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



         Dhillon, B., D. Wiesenborn, C. Wolf-Hall and F. Manthey. Development and
         evaluation of an ozonated water system for antimicrobial treatment of durum wheat.
         Journal of Food Science, accepted June 2009.

         Espinoza-Pérez, J. D., D.M. Haagenson, S.W. Pryor, C.A. Ulven, and D.P.
         Wiesenborn. 2009. Production and characterization of epoxidized canola oil,
         Transactions of the ASABE, accepted June 2009.

         Zhang, X., L. Shi, X. Jia, G. Seielstad and C. Helgason. 2009. Zone mapping
         application for precision-farming: a decision support tool for variable rate application.
         Precision Agriculture.

         Bhattacharjee, P., S. Panigrahi, D. Lin, C. M. Logue, J. S. Sherwood, C. Doetkott,
         M. Marchello. 2008. Study of headspace gases associated with Salmonella
         contamination of sterile beef in vials using HS-SPME/GC-MS. Transactions of the
         ASABE. Accepted for publication.

         Jia, X., M. D. Dukes, and J.M. Jacobs. 2008. Bahiagrass crop coefficients from eddy
         correlation measurements in central Florida. Irrigation Science. Accepted for
         publication.

         Wilhelmi, A.J., D. P. Wiesenborn, C. R. Gustafson, S. W. Pryor. 2008. Models for
         fractionation of field peas to supplement corn ethanol, Applied Engineering in
         Agriculture, accepted June 2009.

         In Review (7)

         Bora, G. C. and Reza Ehsani. 2009. Evaluation of a self-propelled citrus fruits pick-
         up machine. In Review Applied Engineering in Agriculture. The reviewers
         recommended minor revision and the revised manuscript has been submitted.

         Doehlert, D.C., M.S. McMullen, N.R. Riveland and D.P. Wiesenborn. Effects of
         impact dehuller rotor speed on dehulling characteristics of diverse oat genotypes
         grown in different environments, Cereal Chemistry, submitted February 2009.

         Kumar, A., Y. Chen, A. Sadek and S. Rahman. 2009. Soil cone index in relation to
         soil texture, moisture content, and bulk density for no-tillage and conventional tillage
         (Submitted to The CIGR Journal)

         Scherer, T.F. and X. Jia. 2009. A simple method to measure the flow rate and
         volume from tile drainage pump stations. Applied Engineering in Agriculture.
         Submitted on 06/10/09.

         Steele, D.D., T.A. Bon, and J.A. Moos. 2009. Capstone design experiences in the
         development of a two-row plot scale potato planter. Appl. Engr. Agric. (in review,
         manuscript EDU-07553-2008.R1).


 34                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Amamcharla, J, S. Panigrahi, C. Logue, M. Marchello, and J. Sherwood. 2008.
   Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy as a tool for discriminating Salmonella
   typhimurium contaminated beef. Submitted for publication in Sensing and
   Instrumentation for Food Quality & Safety.

   Bhattacharjee, P., S. Panigrahi. D. Lin, C. Logue, M. Marchello, C. Doetkott and J.
   Sherwood. 2008. Comparative study of the profile of volatile organic compounds
   associated with Salmonella contamination of packaged aged and fresh beef at 20 C by
   HS-SPME/GC-MS. Submitted for publication in Transactions of the American
   Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers.

   In Preparation (3)

   Jia, X., X. Zhang, and D.D. Steele. 2009. Kc by corn in tile drained field in ND.
   AWM. In preparation.

   Rahman, S., and S. Mukhtar. 2009. Effectiveness of Wastewater Treatment Solution
   (WTS®) to Reduce phosphorus and other substances from dairy lagoon effluent
   (Target Journal: Applied Engineering in Agriculture)

   Rahman, S., H. Xin, J. Arthur, R. Burns, S. Roberts, Z. Zhu, H. Li, L. Moody and K.
   Bregendahl. 2009. Effects of laying hen genetics on nitrogen balance and ammonia
   emissions. (Target Journal: Transactions of the ASABE)

b. Books/Book Chapters

c. Edited Works

d. Proceedings (4)

   Gustafson C., Pryor S., Wiesenborn D., Goel, A., Haugen R., and Wilhelmi A.
   2008. Economic feasibility of supplementing corn ethanol feedstock with
   fractionated dry peas: A risk perspective. Transition to a Bioeconomy: Risk,
   Infrastructure and Industry Evolution, 90-97. Berkley, California: Farm
   Foundation.

   Harmsen, E. W., V. H. Ramirez Builes, M. D. Dukes, X. Jia, L. R. Perez Alegia,
   and R. Vasquez. 2008. An inexpensive method for validating remotely sensed
   evapotranspiration. Proceedings of the 4th WSEAS International Conference on
   Remote Sensing (REMOTE’08), Venice, Italy, November 21-23, 2008. pp 118-123.

   Jia, X., X. Zhang, and D. D. Steele. 2009. Comparison of sensible heat flux
   measurements by a large aperture scintillometer and eddy correlation method.
   ASCE World Environmental & Water Resources Congress (EWRI) Annual
   Meeting, May 17-21, Kansas City, MS.



       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                      35
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



         Jiang, F., F. Shi, R. Villarroel Walker, Z. Lin, and M.B. Beck (2009). Incremental
         infrastructure transitions towards cities as forces for good in environment. 2009
         IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics. October 11-
         14, 2009, San Antonio, TX. (Accepted)

      e. Abstracts (6)

         DeSutter, T. M., X. Jia, D.D. Steele, T.F. Scherer, D.G. Hopkins, and X. Pang.
         2009. Impacts of tile drainage and sub irrigation on water quality in southeastern
         North Dakota. ASA-CSSA-SSSA, 2009 International Annual Meetings,
         November 1-5, Pittsburg, PA.

         Jia, X. 2009. Impact of subsurface drainage on water availability in the Red River
         Basin. 2009 USDA-CSREES National Water Conference, February 8-12, St.
         Louis, MO.

         Mohapatra, P., S. Panigrahi, Catherine, L, and J. Sherwood. 2009. Evaluation
         of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based sensing methods for Salmonella
         detection in packaged beef. Abstract/Technical Presentation at the Institute of
         Biological Engineering Conference. March 19-21, Santa Clara, CA.

         Mohapatra, P. and S. Panigrahi. 2009. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy
         based Technique for Detecting Individual Compounds Associated with
         Salmonella Contamination in Packaged Beef. Abstract/Poster. Institute of Food
         Technologist. June 6 – 9, 2009. Anaheim. CA.

         Overmoe, K., X. Jia, and W. Lin. 2009. Effectiveness of aeration system on
         increasing dissolved oxygen level at Heinrich-Martin Dam in North Dakota. Great
         Plains Fishery Workers Association 58th Annual Meeting, January 26-28,
         Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.

         Dhillon, B., D. Wiesenborn, C. Wolf-Hall and F. Manthey. 2008. Evaluation of
         ozonated water as an antifungal and antimicrobial treatment of durum wheat
         grain. 2008 AACC International Annual Meeting: Diversity of Grains, Sept 21-
         24, Honolulu, HI, abstract in Cereal Foods World 53:A25.

      f. Department Reports (2)

         Backer, L.F. 2009. Department Assessment Report, 2007-2008.

         Backer, L.F. 2008-2009. Worked with CEA and CAFSNR Dean Offices to
            develop ABEN and ASM related stories for the college newsletter, 2008-
            2009.




 36                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                             ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


g. Extension/Outreach Publications, Etc.

   i. Publications (20)
      Books/Book Chapters (2)
      Wiederholt, R. J., S. Rahman and A. Ehni. 2009. Calculating Energy Efficiency
         of applying Fresh and Composted Manure to Soil. In GIS Applications in
         Agriculture – Nutrient Management for Improved Energy Efficiency. CRC
         Press (in review)
      Scherer, T.F., D. Jones, J. Frankenberger, N, Carroll, R. Persyn, G.M. Powell.
         MWPS-14 Private Water Systems Handbook, 5th Edition. Midwest Plan
         Service, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.
      Bulletins and Circulars (18)
      Johnson, R. and T.F. Scherer. 2009. WQ-1341 Drinking Water Quality: Testing
         and Interpreting Your Results, 8 pgs.
      Rahman, S., T. Dvorak, C. Stoltenow, S. Mukhtar. 2009. Animal carcass disposal
         options (in review).
      Rahman, S. R. Wiederholt, Y. Chen. 2009. Land application of manure and
         environmental concerns. NDSU Extension Publication No. NM1407
      Hellevang, K. and C. Pedersen. 2008. AE-1375 Corn and Biomass Stoves. NDSU
         Extension Service.
      Hellevang, K. and C. Pedersen. 2008. AE-1368 Insulating to Reduce Heating
         Costs. NDSU Extension Service.
      Johnson, R. and T.F. Scherer. 2008. WQ-1341 Drinking Water Quality: Testing
         and Interpreting Your Results, 8 pgs.
      Johnson, R. and T.F. Scherer. 2008. WQ-1352 What’s Wrong with My Water?
         Choosing the Right Test, 4 pgs.
      Lardy, G., C. Stoltenow and R. Johnson. 2008. AS-954 Livestock and Water, 8 pgs.
      Nowatzki, J.G. Endres, J. DeJong-Hughes, D Aakre. 2008. AE-1370 Strip Till for Field
         Crop Production, Equipment, Production, Economics. NDSU Extension Service.
      Nowatzki, J. 2008. AE-1149 Anhydrous Ammonia: Managing the Risks. NDSU
         Extension Service.
      Nowatzki, J. and C. Daigle. 2007 (Revised 2008). AE-1269 GPS Unit Fact Sheet.
         NDSU Extension Service.
      Pedersen, C. and K. Hellevang. 2008. AE-1359 No Cost/Low Cost Energy Saving
         Tips. NDSU Extension Service.
      Pedersen, C., K. Hellevang, T. Scherer, J. Nowatzki. 2008. AE-1366 Farmstead
         Energy Audit. NDSU Extension Service. 15 pgs.
      Pedersen, C. and K. Hellevang. 2008. AE-1373 Determining Insulation and Air
         Infiltration Levels Using an Infrared Thermometer. NDSU Extension Service.
      Pedersen, C. and K. Hellevang. 2008. Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers. NDSU
         Extension Service.
      Rahman, S., S. Mukhtar and R. Wiederholt. 2008. Managing odor nuisance and
         dust from cattle feedlots. NDSU Extension Publication No. NM1391
      Ransom, J. D. Aakre, D. Franzen, H. Kandel, J. Knodel, G. Lardy, J. Nowatzki, K.
         Sedivec, R. Zollinger. 2008. A-1364 Bringing Land in the Conservation Reserve
         Program Back Into Crop Production or Grazing. NDSU Extension Service.
      Wilson, J., V. Hofman, J. Nowatzki. 2008. FS 919 Choosing Drift-reducing
         Nozzles. NDSU Extension Service.
       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                    37
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


        ii. Proceedings

        iii. Technical Papers and Posters (3)

            Johnson, R. and T.F. Scherer. 2009. Red River Valley tile drainage water quality
            assessment. 2009 USDA-CSREES National Water Conference. St. Louis, MO Feb 9-
            11. Poster session.

            Scherer, T. F., and X. Jia. 2009. A simple method to measure the flow rate and
            volume from tile drainage pump stations. ASABE Annual International Meeting,
            Reno, Nevada, June 21-24.

            Akyüz, F. A., T.F. Scherer, D. Morlock, 2008: Automated Irrigation Scheduling
            application of the North Dakota Agricultural Weather Network. International
            Conference on Soil Fertility, Land Management, and Agroclimatology. Abstract
            Book, p 104. Kusadasi, Turkey. October 29-November 1, 2008.

        iv. News Releases (46)

            Kenneth Hellevang (8)
            Keep Stored Grain Cool in Spring, Mar. 13
            NDSU Offers Postharvest Tips for Later-maturing Corn, Sep. 9
            November 2008 Corn Drying, Nov. 15,

            Electronic News Releases
            Corn Drying Tips, October 27, 2008
            ND Grain Dealers Assn., ND Corn Growers Assn., and also sent to extension staff
               as a news release. Steve Strege, ND Grain Dealers Association, sent the
               information to their members by a broadcast fax.
            Corn Drying, November 15, 2008
               Sent to extension staff, RE Centers, Corn Growers Assn.
            Shelled Corn Management – Winter 08/09, December 23, 2008
               Sent to extension staff and RE Centers
            Tips for Harvesting Late-maturing Corn was used by the University of Illinois,
               http://www.farmgate.uiuc.edu/archive/2008/09/will_you_be_har.html and at
               http://www.cattlenetwork.com/content.asp?contentid=255355

            Roxanne Johnson (7)
            Water Vital for Livestock During Droughts
            Keeping Our Water Clean
            Water Testing Available at Field Days in 2009
            Blue Green Algae
            Check Your Sewer Vents
            Spring…Time to Protect Drinking Water Quality at Rural Homes and Farmsteads
            Wells Owners Need to Check for Arsenic

            John Nowatzki (10)
            Conservation Tillage

 38                NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                            ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Energy Issues
   Farm Chemicals
   Precision Agriculture

   Carl Pedersen (15)
   Corn or Pellet Stoves Offer heating Options
   Dispose of Electronic Devices Properly
   Do Not Pay for Appliances Twice
   Don’t Vent Dryer Vents into the Home
   Evaluate Space Heating Claims Carefully
   Fuel Cost Comparison Chart Helpful Tool
   Insulate Basements to Save Money
   Reduce Energy Use in Tractors, Field Operations
   Rim Joists Can Be Source of Energy Loss
   Save Money With Farmstead Energy Audit
   Study Space Heating Claims Carefully
   Thermostat Setbacks Do Pay Off
   Try These Tips for Fuel Cost Savings
   What to do if you Break a CFL
   Window Condensation a Relatively Common Problem

   Thomas Scherer (6)
   Announcing irrigation and drainage workshops as well as irrigation tours

v. Magazine/Newspaper (10)

   Kenneth Hellevang (10)
   Magazine Articles
   Optimize Drying Wet Corn, Dakota Farmer, October,
      http://magissues.farmprogress.com/DFM/DK10Oct08/dfm021.pdf
   Drying, Storing and handling Dry Edible Beans, Northarvest Bean Grower, Fall 2008
   Drying ‘Flowers in November? – Keep these pointers in mind for optimal efficiency and
      safety, The Sunflower, October/November 2008, page 11 & 12.
   NDSU Offers Postharvest Tips for Later maturing Corn, FM Extra, October 3, 2008
   Winter Corn Storage Management, December 23, 2008
   Agweek, Farm & Ranch Guide, The Forum
   NDSU Extension Helps Advance Energy Development, ND Association of Counties,
      Worked with Ag Communications
   BioEPIC opens at NDSU, Biomass Magazine, interviewed by Jerry W. Kram. Web
      exclusive posted Feb. 12, 2008. http://biomassmagazine.com/article.jsp?article_id=1449
   NDSU begins BioEPIC journey, Biomass Magazine, interviewed by Jerry W. Kram.
      April, 2008. http://www.biomassmagazine.com/article-print.jsp?article_id=1554
   Coordinating Biomass Research, Biomass Magazine, BBI International, assisted
      Mary Anne Fiebig in writing the article, May 2008

vi. TV, Radio, and Newspaper Interviews (37)

   Kenneth Hellevang (14)
   Check Stored Grain, KFYR Radio, Al Gustin, Feb. 28
    NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                     39
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


            Interview, Mikkel Pates, Agweek, Spring Corn Storage Management, March 5
            Handling DDGs, KFYR Radio, Al Gustin, May 21
            Preparing for Corn Drying, Successful Farming Radio, Daryl Anderson, August 13
            Preparing for Late Maturing Corn, Lisbon Radio, Mick Kjar, Sep. 25
            Fall Grain Management, KFYR Radio, Al Gustin, Oct. 17
            Corn Tips for 2008, Red River Farm Network, Nov. 4
            Drying Wet Corn and Soybeans, RRFN, Nov. 25
            Winter Stored Corn Management, Red River Farm Network, 18 stations, Dec. 28
            Winter Stored Corn Management, Farm & Ranch Guide, Dec. 30
            Interviewed by Jay Romano, The New York Times, How to Put Away Winter’s Blanket.
                Published December 31, 2008. A version of this article appeared in print on January 1,
                2009, on page D2 of the New York edition.
               http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/01/garden/01fix.html?_r=1&scp=2&sq=hellevang&st=cse
            Farm Energy Efficiency, Cass County Reporter, Jun. 18
            Biofuels and BioProducts, Northern Plains Biomass Economy Conference, 30 minute
               radio program with Al Amodt, WDAY Radio, Sep. 23
            NDSU BioEPIC, Lisbon radio, Mick Kjar, April 7

            Roxanne Johnson (6)
            Television:
               Dickinson – 2008 Field Days information and general water quality
               Williston – 2008 Field Days information and general water quality
            Radio:
               Dickinson – 2008 Field Days – livestock and human water quality
               Al Gustin – 2008 Field Days – livestock water quality/quantity
            Newspaper:
               Williston Daily Herald – 2008 Field Days water screening
               Dickinson Press – 2008 Field Days water screening

            John Nowatzki (8)
            Newspaper Interview (4)
               Precision Agriculture
               Chemical Application
               Alternative Energy
            Radio Interview (4)
               Wireless Technology
               Conservation Tillage
               Chemical Application

            Carl Pedersen (4)
            KEYZ Williston radio. Farmstead Energy Audit information. July 10, 2008.
            Dickinson press newspaper. Farmstead energy efficiency saves money at home, on
                farm. July 26, 2008.
            KQLX, Farm Talk with Mick Kjar. December 4, 2008.
            Prairie Public Radio, Fargo. Hear it Now with Merrill Piepkorn. December 8, 2008.

            Thomas Scherer (5)
            Conducted 4 radio interviews and one interview for TV

 40                 NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                               ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



vii. Electronic Media (patents, software, websites, PowerPoint, e-mail news, etc.) (28)

    Kenneth Hellevang (15)
    Websites
       Presentation 2008 Corn Drying Tips
            http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/abeng/Corn%20Presentation/2008%20Corn%20Drying%20Tips.pdf
       Postharvest website 10,922 pages viewed
       2008 Corn Drying Tips 2,979 visits
       Crop Storage Management AE791 2,031 visits
       Corn Presentation 1880 visits
       AE905 Moisture Content Effects and Management
       Requested URL for the energy website: www.ndsu.edu/energy
    Online Seminars/Webinars, Forums
       Flood Recovery: Practical Steps and Useful Resources. Online flood recovery
           chat. Served as a flooded building expert with Claudette Reichel, Louisiana.
           April 7 and 25, 2009.
       Iowa Flood – conducted a 90 minute webinar on flood cleanup and rebuilding
           concerns. Archived version: http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p46584571/
       Wind Energy – created a listserv of interested individuals
           - Conducted an online forum on wind leases. Jul 23
           - Participated in “Wind Energy Production – Legal Issues and Concerns for Land
               Owners” online forum, sponsored by University of Nebraska and conducted by
               Erin Herbold, Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, ISU.
    Teleconferences, Etc.
       Iowa Flood
           Answered phone calls from staff about flooding issues
           Served as structural flooding expert for a Cedar Rapids radio station call-in-show
           Provided in-service education via teleconference for Extension Field Staff on
               housing clean-up issues (question and answer format – 90 min.)
           Participated in several energy related conference calls along with, and at the
               request of Duane Hauck, Extension Director

    Roxanne Johnson (2)
    Webpage
    Water Quality http://www.ndsu.edu/waterquality
    Water Quality interpretation tool – on development committee
           http://wsprod.colostate.edu/cwis435/regional_index1.cfm

    John Nowatzki (8)
    PowerPoint Presentations (6)
       Developing Management Zones for Variable Rate Fertilization using Online
          Resources.
       Remote Monitoring with Wireless Technology.
       Energy Efficiency in Crop Production.
       Equipment Options for Returning CRP to Crop Production.
       Production Agriculture GIS Computer Programs and Functionality.
       GIS Data and Data Sources for Production Agriculture

     NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                        41
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009

            Web Pages (2)
              Remote Monitoring www.ageng.ndsu.nodak.edu/farmmonitor/
              Nozzle Comparison www.ageng.ndsu.nodak.edu/spraynozzles/

            Carl Pedersen (1)
            Webpage
               Energy http://www.ndsu.edu/energy

            Thomas Scherer (2)
            NDSU Extension Impact Report – Tile Drainage
                 http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/ext-emp/evaluation/reports/anr/anrreports.html
            Web Based Irrigation Scheduling – Part of the NDAWN website
                 http://ndawn.ndsu.nodak.edu

       viii. Articles (2)

            Hellevang, K.J., Energy and Product Innovation Center. Department newsletter.
               2008.
            Hellevang, K.J., Energy Efficiency Education. Department newsletter. 2008.

        ix. Brochures/Fact Sheets/Newsletters (3)

            Hellevang, K.J. 2008. NDSU BioEPIC newsletter.
            Liane, M. and Scherer, T.F. 2008. Funding Assistance Programs for Irrigation
               Development in ND (revised).
            Scherer, T.F. Water Spouts, editor; contributed 11 articles. Some articles were
               incorporated into other newsletters such as the Minnesota Irrigator, Central
               Minnesota Irrigation Newsletter, and the Canadian Grain News.

         x. Presentations (149)

            Kenneth Hellevang (23)
            Jan 8     Corn drying and Storage: An Update, Winter Ag Expo, Jamestown, 30
                      min., 45
            Jan 25    Corn Storage Issues, Corn Production Workshop, Live at Grand Forks and
                      IVN at Cavalier and Grafton, min., 45 people
            Feb 1     Harvesting, drying and storing corn, Profitable Corn Production Workshop,
                      Buffalo Community Center, 30 min., 40 people
            Feb 5     Natural Air Drying Corn, Farm Business Management meeting, Moorhead,
                      45 min., 15 people
            Feb 13-14 Corn Drying and Storage, NDSU Extension Service Corn Schools, 45
                      minutes, Mott, 40 people; Washburn, 35 people.
            Feb 13-14 Effect of Grain Temperature on Moisture Measurement Demonstration,
                      NDSU Extension Service Corn Schools, 30 minutes, Mott and Washburn.
            Mar 18    Grain Drying and Storage Seminar for Superior Equipment Staff, Fargo, 2
                      hrs, 6 people
            Sept 2    Pending corn harvest and storage challenges, NDSU Carrington Research
                      Extension Center Row Crop Tour, 30 minutes, 50 people

 42                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                       ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Sept 12    Temporary Grain Storage Structures, International trade program,
           participants from the Ukraine, and Kasakstan, 1 hr., 25 participants
Nov 13     Late Fall Corn Harvest, Drying and Storage Issues, Grand Forks, 1.5 hrs, 55
Nov 17     Late Fall Corn Harvest, Drying and Storage Issues, Devils Lake, 2 hrs,
           115 people
Dec 3      Planning for Corn Handling and Drying, 2008 Northern Ag Expo, 1 hr.,
           about 100
Dec 11     Corn Drying, Wells County Winter Show, Fessenden, ND, 1 hr., 30 people
Jan 16     Managing Building Moisture during Construction and Use, Wisconsin
           Frame Builders Conference, Wisconsin Dells, WI, 75 min., 73 builders
Mar 26     Mold and Mold Related Issues, ND Apartment Association Convention,
           Holiday Inn, Fargo, 1 hr., 125 property managers
Sept 15-17 Managing Building Moisture, National Healthy Homes Conference,
           Baltimore, MD, 130 participants
Spr/Fall   Energy Education working sessions
           NDSU Extension Service spring conference, Bismarck (with Hans Kandel)
           NDSU Extension Service fall conference, Fargo, Oct. 27
Apr 2      Energy Efficiency Opportunities, Mandan, 1 hr., 60
Dec 12     North Dakota Energy & NDSU, North Dakota Farmers Union State Convention,
           Bismarck, ND, 1 hr presentation given twice, 100 at each session
June       Grain Dryer Energy Audit Experiences and Data, 2009 ASABE Annual
           International Meeting. Reno, Nevada, June 21- June 24, 2009 (accepted
           for oral presentation)

Educational Outreach:
ASABE Standards Project X612, Performing On-Farm Energy Audits, participant
ASABE T-11 Bioenergy Committee meetings (2), participant
Renewable Fuels Energy Summit, Bismarck, participant, May 19
North Dakota Biodiesel Task Force meeting, Fargo, participant, Feb. 1 and Mar. 17;
   developed a survey with John Nowatzki to conduct a SWOT analysis and assist
   the task force in developing a strategic plan that was submitted to the ND
   EmPower Commission.
NDSU Extension Service Energy Education, periodic reports presented to extension staff
North Dakota Alliance for Renewable Energy (NDARE), meeting participant, Mar,
   July, and Dec. 2008
Biofocus – NDSU Advancing BioOpportunities, report of BioEPIC program
   developed for NDSU Agricultural Communications
Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense? Fargo, assisted in
   organization, September 29, 2008

Educational Aids and Materials Developed:
   Display – BioEPIC, NDSU Extension Service Spring Conference
   Display and brochure – BioEPIC, Biomass 08 Conference, Alerus, Grand Forks,
       July 15-16

Roxanne Johnson (32)
July 08 Livestock In-service for County Extension - Washburn, ND 7/24/2008.


NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                   43
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


                     Scheduled manufacture reps to demonstrate equipment for decentralized
                     watering. Included wind, solar, rural water, electric and gas powered options.
            June/July 08
                     9 Field Days or Annual Field Tours. Provided water screening for nitrates,
                     hardness, pH and total dissolved solids. Arranged for bacteria testing at a
                     reduced cost to private well owners. Over 150 samples screened.
            Oct 08 North Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society – Fall Conference,
                     Dickinson, ND 10/2008. Livestock Water Quality and Improved Rate of Gain.
            Feb 09 National Water Conference, St. Louis, MO 2/2009. Presentation: Joining
                     Forces To Assess Water Quality in Rural North Dakota
            Feb 09 2008-09 Dakota Cow/Calf Clinic. Interactive Video Networking.
                     Presentation to 5 county sites on decentralized watering systems and
                     livestock water quality.
            Feb 09 MN/ND Tile Drain Forum. Power Point presentation: Water Quality from
                     Tile Drains, Phase I.
            June and July 09
                     Field Days at Streeter, Casselton, Carrington, Minot, Langdon,
                     Dickinson, Hettinger and Williston. Water screening at all. Presentation
                     on livestock water quality during droughts and floods in Carrington.

            Educational Materials Developed – Displays:
            Feb 08 File Folders. 162 well and septic folders to well drillers/contractors. 150
                    septic and well folders to Rolette County

            Educational Outreach:
            Sept. 08 Big Iron 2008 – Boot on livestock water quality using University of
                     Wyoming data
            Sept. 08 Red River Festival Festival – “Live in a Box” water issues/education –
                     2 days – 200+ 4th graders
            Sept. 08 Eco Ed – Enviroscape model and stream impacts, Turtle River State
                     Park – 1 day of grade school students (100 students)
            May-08 Envirothon – Problem solving natural resource competition for high
                     school students; tests in areas of aquatics, forestry, wildlife, and soils;
                     2008 competition hosted 90 five member teams; State competition in
                     May held at Crystal Springs, ND.
            Dec 08 Williston High School – Careers in water resources for females. 150
                     sophomores.

            John Nowatzki (42)
            Jan 8 – Strip Tillage in Corn – Jamestown – 50 people
            Jan 9 – Strip Tillage – Devils Lake – 40 people
            Jan 9 – Choosing Drift-reducing Nozzles – 40 people
            Jan 18 – Developing Management Zones for Variable Rate Fertilization–Crosby–15 people
            Jan 31 – Remote Monitoring with Wireless Technology – 100 people
            Feb 1 – Strip Till in Corn – Buffalo – 100 people
            Feb 5 – Spatially Managed Farms Report – ManDak Zero-Till Conf.–Minot–200 people
            Feb 6 – Variable Rate Technology – Online – 15 people
            Feb 13 – Variable Rate Technology – Online – 15 people

 44                 NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                         ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Feb 20 – GIS Metadata Training Workshop – 20 people
Feb 26 – Energy Efficiency in Crop Production – McIntosh, MN – 45 people
Feb 26 – Strip Till in Corn Production – Portland – 75 people
Mar 12 – GIS for Community Development - Ashley – 15 people
April 1 – Wireless Technology Demonstration - NDSU Ext Conf–Bismarck–150 people
April 2 – Returning CRP to Crop Production - NDSU Ext Conf–Bismarck–75 people
May 19-21 – Nat. Res. Ext Professionals–GIS in Natural Resource Management –
    Madison, WI–20 people
May 22 – GIS for Youth – Nativity School – Fargo – 40 people
June 25-27 – eXtension – Geospatial Technologies Leadership Presentation–150 people
June 29 – July 2 – ASABE Conference
July 20-22 – Precision Ag Conf. – Denver
July 23 – Map@Syst and eXtension – Denver – 25 people
July 26 – Intro to Precision Ag – ASM 454 Class, NDSU – 20 people
July 28 – GPS Applications in Precision Agriculture - ASM 454 Class, NDSU–20 people
Sept 2 – Available Global Positioning Systems and Functionality - ASM 454 Class,
    NDSU–20 people
Sept 4 – GPS Functionality - ASM 454 Class, NDSU–20 people
Sept 8 - GIS Computer Programs and Functionality - ASM 454 Class, NDSU–20 people
Sept 9 – Strip Tillage Demonstration – Big Iron Show – West Fargo – 300 people
Sept 10 - GIS Data and Data Sources - ASM 454 Class, NDSU–20 people
Sept 16 - Production Agriculture GIS Applications - ASM 454 Class, NDSU–20 people
Sept 18 - Agricultural GIS Software Programs - ASM 454 Class, NDSU – 20 people
Sept 23 – Variable Rate Technology - Magic City Implement Technology Day – Minot –
    40 people
Sept 29 – Oct 2 – eXtension Working Meeting – Geospatial Technologies – New
    Hampshire – 10 people
Oct 27-29 – Tillage Systems for Field Crops – NDSU Ext Conf.- NDSU – 100 people
Nov 5 – Crop Management Zones – Online Seminar – AgrKnowledge – 15 people
Nov 20 – Variable Rate Technology – West Plains Implement GPS Day – 45 people
Nov 24 – Wireless Technology in Agriculture – Fargo – 30 people
Dec 1-3 – Precision Agriculture in eXtension Meeting – Leader – 12 people
Dec 9 – GIS Application to Agriculture – ABEN 225 Class, NDSU – 25 people
Dec 9 – GIS Applications to Agriculture – ASM 225 Class, NDSU – 25 people
Dec 17 – Strip Till in Irrigation – Irrigation Seminar in Williston – 40 people
Dec 17 – Spatially Managed Farms Program – Dickinson – 10 people
Dec 22 – Precision Agriculture in eXtension – Online – Leadership – 10 people

Carl Pedersen (24)
Home Energy Efficiency, Fargo Kiwanis. March 24, 2008.
Home Energy Efficiency, Woman’s Ag day banquet in Ashley, ND. March 25, 2008.
Three energy efficiency presentations at North Dakota Science Teachers Association
   meetings in Minot, ND. March 29-30, 2008.
Presentation at Lake Region State College in collaboration with USDA grant programs
   outlining energy efficiency opportunities for farms and small business. April 3, 2008.
North Dakota State University Extension Service energy education opportunities.
   NDSU Extension service spring conference.


NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                      45
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


            Energy Efficiency Opportunities for North Dakota Builders” in conjunction with Xcel
               energy. Fargo, ND, April 22, 2008; Grand Forks, ND, April 23, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency, West Fargo High School, Energy in Motion classes. April 29, 2008.
            Farmstead Energy Audits, Central Grasslands Research Extension center, Streeter, ND.
               June 26, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency the New Generation, presentation to rural electric cooperatives,
               member services annual meeting. Bottineau, ND. August 14, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency training for Extension Professionals Northeast MPU district meeting.
               NDSU Extension Service. St. Johns, ND. August 13, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency training for Extension Professionals, North central MPU district
               meeting. NDSU Extension Service. Washburn, ND. August 21, 2008.
            North Dakota USDA Resource Conservation District (RC&D) State meeting.
               Bismarck. September 24, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency Opportunities for North Dakota, North Dakota League of Cities
               State meeting. Fargo. September 27, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency and Health Concerns Relating to Energy Issues, North Dakota Public
               Employees Association annual meeting. Bismarck. October 9, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency Opportunities for North Dakota, Rough Riders Kiwanis meeting.
               Fargo. October 13, 2008.
            Fargo/Moorhead Chamber of Commerce. October 23, 2008.
            Home Energy Efficiency, Ladies Fall Festival. Lisbon, North Dakota. November 11,
               2008.
            Energy Efficiency, the First Fuel Source, Great Plains energy Expo. Bismarck.
               November 10, 2008.
            Home Energy Efficiency, Elim Lutheran Church, Son’s of Norway. Fargo.
               November 18, 2008.
            Bismarck State College. Energy Efficiency and Wind Energy informational talk.
               Bismarck. December 2, 2008.
            Energy Efficiency and Health Concerns Relating to Energy Issues, North Dakota
               Department of Health energy efficiency presentation. Bismarck. December 11, 2008.

            Educational Materials Developed – Posters:
            North Dakota State University Extension Service spring conference. Bismarck.
               March 31, 2008.
            Big Iron Farm Show. Fargo. September 9-11, 2008.
            North Plains Biomass Economy Conference. Fargo. September 29, 2008.

            Shafiqur Rahman (5)
            Rahman, S. 2009. Addressed a group of livestock producers and stakeholders on
               Carcass disposal options. Livestock Marketing Association’s Annual Meeting
               Forum, Ramada Plaza Suites, Fargo, ND, June 11, 2009
            Rahman, S. 2009. Addressed a group of livestock producers, technology providers
               and NRCS folks on Manure Application Technologies. Manure Applicator and
               CAFO Operators School. Carrington REC, March 12, 2009.
            Rahman, S. 2008. Address Extension specialists and agents. Manure Handling and
               Management. Fall Conference. Fargo, ND. October 30.
            Rahman, S. 2008. Addressed soil and water conservation group. CNMP Planning in
               Relation to Water Quality. The Soil and Water Conservation Society &

 46                NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                       ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Professional Soil Classifiers Association Annual Meeting. Dickinson, ND.
   October 9.
Rahman, S. 2008. Addressed a group of Livestock Extension specialists and agents.
   Overview of Manure Management. Livestock In-service. Washburn, ND.
   September 3.

Education Outreach
Participated anaerobic digester workshop.
Participated South Dakota Vegetative Buffer Strips Demonstration project, May,
    2009.
Attended 319 Watershed Coordinators Meeting, Bismarck, March 24-25, 2009.
Answered eXtension questions as assigned by eXtension Community of Practice,
    Livestock and Poultry Environmental Learning Centers, Aug.-Sept. 2008.
Discovery farm visit with Ron Wiederholt and Chris Augustin, Dazey, ND, July, 2008.
Participated in North Dakota Feedlot Tour, June 2008.
Visited Carrington REC; visited several NDSU-RECs and met with counterpart; 2008.

Thomas Scherer (23)
Teaching Activities
ASM/NRM 264, Taught class on Wells and Pumps, Feb. 22
Assisted two students with their Ag Technology Expo display – Site Specific
   Irrigation Scheduling.
ABEN 790 – Graduate class (Panigrahi). Class on the History and Operation of the
   Extension Service.

Irrigation Workshops and Field Tours
Jan 29 Turtle Lake Irrigation District Workshop, with BuRec and NDIA (40)
Jun 10 Irrigation Tour of Oakes for Alumni Tour (45)
Jun 27 Irrigation Tour, Missouri Slope Irrigation Development Association (25)
Dec 3 Potential Irrigator Workshop, Bismarck (8)
Dec 4 Irrigation Workshop, Bismarck (80)
Dec 17 Irrigation Workshop, Williston (45)
Dec 18 Irrigation Workshop, Turtle Lake (35)

Tile Drainage
Feb 14 Tile Drainage Forum, Fargo (175)

Contributed Presentations
Jan 29 Irrigation Development Potential in Turtle Lake Irrigation District,
            Turtle Lake (30)
Feb 12 Site Specific Irrigation Scheduling on NDAWN, Page, ND (8)
Feb 14 History of Tile Drainage, Fargo (175)
Mar 20 Pumping Energy Efficiency and Well Maintenance, Wadena, MN (100)
Jun 10 History of Irrigation in North Dakota, Oakes stop of Alumni tour
Jul 1    A Site-Specific Web Based Irrigation Scheduling Program, ASABE,
            Providence, RI
Jul 17 Status of Irrigation in North Dakota, WERA-202 Mtg, Amarillo, TX


NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                     47
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


            Dec 3  Water Quantity and Flow Rate for Effective Irrigation, Bismarck Irrigation
                      Workshop (8)
            Dec 3 Irrigation Power Requirements, Bismarck Irrigation Workshop (8)
            Dec 4 Diesel to Electric Pump Conversions – Options, Bismarck Irrigation
                      Workshop (60)
            Dec 4 Web Based Irrigation Scheduling, Bismarck Irrigation Workshop (50)
            Dec 17 Web Based Irrigation Scheduling, Williston Irrigation Workshop (45)

            Educational Programs and Outreach
            Provided engineering design assistance for several irrigators who were adding to,
               upgrading, and improving their irrigation systems.
            Performed an energy audit of an irrigation system in support of a grant to the
               USDA REEP Program.
            Performed irrigation pump efficiency tests and flow measurements for two
               irrigators to provide training for Mike Liane, area irrigation agent.
            Gave talk on reducing pumping costs as well as maintenance for Minnesota Valley
               Irrigation at their annual meeting.
            Conducted numerous farm visits, received many office visitors, assisted
               government agency personnel with several projects, and answered many
               requests for information.
            Sept 9-12 Big Iron – Booth containing displays and publications.
            Mar 4-6 Electric Utility Workshop, NDSCS.

               Water Quality
               Participate in monthly conference calls with the Northern Plains and
                   Mountains Region water quality team.
               Attended the National Water Conference and hosted a Region 8 Water Quality
                   group meeting and tour in Fargo.
               Updated regional team on ND water quality activities and explore methods to
                   collaborate on educational programs.
               Participated in several meetings with the ND Pesticide Water Quality task
                   force regarding testing of surface water sources for a suite of pesticides.
               Contributed to water screening offered at the Research/Extension Center field days.

            Educational Materials Developed
            Drip Irrigation Display, used at various events

        xi. Publication Reviews (13)

            Thomas Scherer (10+)
            Reviewed a paper submitted to Irrigation Science, a paper submitted the Irrigation
               Association, a paper submitted to Applied Engineering in Agriculture and 2
               submitted to Transactions of ASABE.
            Reviewed water resource investigation report no. 45 – Potential effects of subsurface
               drainage on water appropriation and the beneficial use of water in ND – about 4
               times. This report was mandated by the legislature.
               http://www.swc.state.nd.us/4dlink9/4dcgi/GetContentRecord/PB-1108.
            Reviewed several proposals, a Hatch project and several technical paper drafts for

 48                 NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


          various people in the department and other NDSU departments. Reviewed and
          contributed to several magazine articles for ND Water Magazine.

      Shafiqur Rahman (2)
      EPA-SBIR review panel (mail in reviews, Sept. 4-5, 2008).
      Proposal review panel, National Integrated Water Quality Program (NIWQP),
         USDA (June 24-25, 2008).

  xii. Editing of Publications (6)

      Hellevang, K.J. 2008. Edited and revised 15 articles on Reduce Future Flood
         Damage and 15 FAQs for publishing on extension.org.
      Hellevang, K.J. 2008. Assisted with development and editing of energy educator
         news releases.
      Scherer, T.F. Water Spouts - The Irrigators Newsletter (7 issues)
      Scherer, T.F. 2008 Evaluation Report for the Electric Utility Workshop
      Scherer, T.F. 2008 Evaluation Report for the Tile Drainage Workshop
         (w/Hans Kandel)
      Scherer, T.F. 2008 Evaluation of Irrigation Workshop in Bismarck and
         Williston (w/Chet Hill)

 xiii. Mailing Lists (3)

      Hellevang, K.J. Wind Energy listserv. 2008.
      Scherer, T.F. Water Spouts Mail List, 2008, 350 names and addresses, updated
             and corrected.
      Scherer, T.F. Water Spouts Email Delivery, 2008 – 75 addresses.

h. Popular Articles (written)

i. Popular Articles About You or Your Program (5)

   Fischer, S. 2008. Tile drainage in the Red River Valley. North Dakota RC&D
   Informer, September 2008. (Xinhua Jia)

   Pryor, S. 2008. Interviewed for article in Canola Guide (Winnipeg, Manitoba) on
   developments in biocomposites using canola. November.

   Pryor, S. 2008. Interviewed for and featured in article, “Plastics from the Prairie.”
   BIOMASS Magazine. Story on biocomposite work being done at NDSU. November.

   Pryor, S. 2008. “Brushing at Biomass,” editorial in AgWeek providing favorable review
   of the Northern Plains Biomass Economy conference and NDSU’s work in the area.
   Three NDSU “impressive” projects were specifically cited. Pryor is PI for the first two
   and Co-PI for the third. October.

   Wiesenborn, D.P. 2008. Cited as a source by R. Nickel. What’s best for biofuels,
   Successful Farming 106(10): 52-53.

       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                        49
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



      j. Technical Papers (14)

         Bora, G. C. and J. F. Nowatzki. 2009. Web based resources for precision agricultural
         technology course, ASABE Paper No. 096805. ASABE Annual International Meeting,
         Reno, NV, Jun 21-24.

         Bora, G. C. and R. Ehsani. 2009. Citrus tree canopy density measurement using an
         electromagnetic induction technique, ASABE Paper No. 096312. ASABE Annual
         International Meeting, Reno, NV, Jun 21-24.

         Espinoza-Perez, J.D., D. Haagenson, R. Brudvik, C.A. Ulven. D.P. Wiesenborn.
         2009. Epoxy resin from high-oleic oils applied to composites, ASABE Paper No. 090001.
         ASABE Annual International Meeting, Reno, NV, Jun 21-24.

         Hazarika, M. K., B.R. Parida, M. Magsud, B.C. Wilfredo, L.A. Sonia, B. Cheryll and
         G.C. Bora. Rice growth monitoring using RADARSAT data in Pangasinan and Nueva
         Ecija, The Philippines. ASABE paper no. 096320. St. Joseph, Michigan.

         Lin, H., D. Haagenson, R. Brudvik, D.P. Wiesenborn. 2009. Influence of seeds
         moisture on in situ alkaline transesterification of canola seeds for biodiesel production,
         ASABE Paper No. 096339. ASABE Annual International Meeting, Reno, NV, June 21-
         24.

         Pryor, S.W. and N. Nahar. 2009. Impact of dilute acid pretreatment conditions and
         enzyme system on switchgrass hydrolysis, Paper No. 09-6026. ASABE International
         Meeting. Reno, NV, June 21-24, 2009.

         Rahman, S., D. Newman, and Q. Zhang. 2009. Odor, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide
         emissions from swine facility in North Dakota, ASABE Paper No. 096508. ASABE
         Annual International Meeting, Reno, Nevada, June 21-24.

         Scherer, T. F., and X. Jia. 2009. A simple method to measure the flow rate and volume
         from tile drainage pump stations, ASABE Paper No. 096997. ASABE Annual
         International Meeting, Reno, NV, June 21-24.

         Bora, G. C. and R. Achemire. 2008. Undergraduate degree program in precision
         agricultural technology. ASABE paper no. 085080. St. Joseph, Michigan.

         Bora, G. C. and R. Ehsani. 2008. On-board canker decontamination of citrus harvesting
         machines. ASABE paper no. 085081. St. Joseph, Michigan.

         Manamperi, W.A., K.C. Chang, and S. Pryor. 2008. Thermal and functional properties
         of canola meal proteins precipitated at different pH values. ASABE Paper No. RRV-
         08803. St. Joseph, MI. CSBE/ASABE North Central Intersectional Conference,
         Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, September 19-20.



 50                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                 ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Rorick, R., N. Nahar, and S. Pryor. 2008. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pectin and
   hemicellulose in sugar beet pulp. ASABE Paper No. RRV-08601. St. Joseph, MI.
   CSBE/ASABE North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,
   September 19-20.

   Vargas-López, J.M., G. Figueroa-Monge, D. Wiesenborn, R. Canett-Romero, y R.
   Morales-Castro. 2008. Actividad larvicida de las semillas del árbol de neem sobre el
   desarrola de larvas de Aedes aegypti. Epistemus, August (4): 5-12 (Title in English:
   Larvicidal activity of defatted seeds of the Neem tree on the larvae of Aedes aegypti ).
      (Epistemus is a scientific publication in Spanish which may be accessed through
      Latindex: www.latindex.unam.mx)

   Vargas-López, J.M., D. Wiesenborn, K. Tostenson, R. Canett-Romero, y R. Morales-
   Castro. 2008. Procesamiento de la semilla del árbol de neem (Azadirachta indica A.
   Juss) por extracción mecánica de aceite. Epistemus, December (5): 23-28. (Title in
   English: Processing the seeds of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica A. Juss) by
   mechanical extraction of oil. (In press)
       (Epistemus is a scientific publication in Spanish which may be accessed through
       Latindex: www.latindex.unam.mx)

k. Technical Reports (2)

   DeSutter, T., and X. Jia. 2009. Report the North Dakota Department of Health for
   project: Tile drainage and subirrigation evaluation in Richland County for effects on soil
   and water quality. ND Department of Health, Bismarck, ND. p24. In review.

   Steele, D.D. 2009. Devils Lake Basin Water Utilization Test Project. Report submitted to
   the Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board, 9 June. Fargo: N. Dak. St. Univ.

l. Manuscripts, Grant Proposals, Station Projects, etc. Reviewed (24)

   Manuscripts Reviewed (19):

   Properties of fractionated poultry litter. Transactions of ASABE. 9/10/08. Reviewed by
   L.F. Backer.

   Reviewed two manuscripts for Journals of ASABE. Reviewed by G.C. Bora.

   Reviewed two manuscripts for HortTechnology. Reviewed by G.C. Bora.

   In-situ soil-water retention and field water capacity measurements in two contrasting soil
   textures. Irrigation Science. 7/9/08. Reviewed by X. Jia.

   Downscaled climate change impacts on agricultural water resources in Puerto Rico.
   Agricultural Water Management. 7/21/08. Reviewed by X. Jia.

   Temporal variations and biophysical controls of energy partitioning over a grass site in
   Florida. Hydrological Processes. 9/23/08. Reviewed by X. Jia.

       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                           51
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



         Evaluating eddy covariance cotton ET measurements in an advective environment with
         large weighing lysimeters. Irrigation Science. 11/17/08. Reviewed by X. Jia.

         Estimation of actual evapotranspiration for a drip-irrigated Merlot vineyard using a three-
         source model. Irrigation Science. 12/5/08. Reviewed by X. Jia.

         Estimating evapotranspiration crop coefficients for vegetable crops from crop canopy
         cover. Irrigation Science. 12/19/08. Reviewed by X. Jia.

         A comparison of ASCE and FAO-56 reference evapotranspiration for a fifteen-minute
         time step in humid climate conditions. Journal of Hydrology. 03/04/09. Reviewed by
         X. Jia.

         Role of net radiation on energy balance closure in grassland ecosystems. Journal of
         Geophysical Research – Atmospheres. 6/1/09. Reviewed by X. Jia.

         Uncertainty analysis on forest carbon sink forecast with varying measurement errors: A
         data assimilation analysis. Ecosystems. 4/8/09. Reviewed by Z. Lin.

         Watershed landscape services to minimize non point source nutrient pollution. Journal of
         Environmental Management. 4/28/09. Reviewed by Z. Lin.

         Nitrogen removal from swine wastewater by shortcut nitrification and denitrification in a
         Sequencing batch reactor system. 2009. Transactions of the ASABE (minor revision).
         Reviewed by S. Rahman

         Geotextile filtration performance for lagoon sludges and liquid animal manures
         dewatering. 2008. Transactions of the ASABE. 51(3): 1067-1076. Reviewed by S.
         Rahman.

         Single layer drying behavior and mathematical modeling of dairy cattle manure in a
         convective dryer. Applied Engineering in Agriculture (In review). 2008. Reviewed by S.
         Rahman.

         Bahiagrass crop coefficients from eddy correlation measurements in central Florida.
         Irrigation Science. 11/26/08. Reviewed by D.D. Steele.

         Proposals and Papers Reviewed (5):

         Paper to be submitted to Cereal Chemistry on effects of variety and environment on
         impact of hulling of oats. Reviewed by L.F. Backer.

         Grant proposal for Renewable Energy Council, Industrial Commission of North Dakota.
         Reviewed by G.C. Bora.




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                                                                 ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Implications of Converting from Conventional to Biofuel Cropping Systems for Great
   lakes Regional Water Resources. Submitted to USGS National Institutes for Water
   Resources, Water Resources Research National Competitive Grants Program. 5/5/09.
   Reviewed by Z. Lin.

   Soil respiration in a mixed-grass prairie: Its components and influence of photosynthesis,
   microclimate, grazing and drought. ND AES Project Proposal. 11/14/08. Reviewed by
   D.D. Steele.

   Irrigated crop production in central and southeast North Dakota. ND AES Project
   Proposal. 11/7/08. Reviewed by D.D. Steele.

m. Thesis (1)

   Wilhelmi, A.J. 2008. Field peas to supplement corn ethanol: Engineering process
   models, capital investment, and annual operating costs, M.S. Thesis, Agricultural &
   Biosystems Engineering, NDSU. (Advisor: D.P. Wiesenborn)




       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                      53
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   4. Presentations

      a. Conference Presentations (31)

         Bora, G. C. and J. F. Nowatzki. 2009. Web-based resources for precision agricultural
         technology course. ASABE paper no. 096805. St. Joseph, Michigan. (Presented by Bora
         and Nowatzki)

         Bora, G. C. and R. Ehsani. 2009. Citrus tree canopy density measurement using an
         electromagnetic induction technique. ASABE paper no. 096312. St. Joseph, Michigan.
         (Presented by Bora)

         Bora, G. C. 2009. Precision planting and variable rate technology for sunflower.
         Presented in 31st Sunflower Research Forum organized by National Sunflower
         Association, Fargo, ND, January 13-14. (Presented by Bora)

         Haagenson, D., R. Brudvik, H. Lin, and D. Wiesenborn. 2009. Development of high-
         throughput measurement of canola biodiesel cold flow properties, IOP-P. 100th AOCS
         Annual Meeting & Expo, Orlando, FL, May 3-6. (Presented by Haagenson)

         Hazarika, M. K., B.R. Parida, M. Magsud, B.C. Wilfredo, L.A. Sonia, B. Cheryll and
         G.C. Bora. Rice growth monitoring using RADARSAT data in Pangasinan and Nueva
         Ecija, The Philippines. ASABE paper no. 09. St. Joseph, Michigan. (Presented by Bora)

         Hopkins, D.G., and D.D. Steele. 2009. Water balance and salinity changes in the Devils
         Lake irrigation project. Presented at the Soil and Soil/Water Training workshop sponsored
         by the NDSU Ext. Serv. Fargo, ND, 21 Jan. (Presented by Hopkins and Steele).

         Jia, X., X. Zhang, and D. D. Steele. 2009. Comparison of sensible heat flux
         measurements by a large aperture scintillometer and eddy correlation method. ASCE
         World Environmental & Water Resources Congress (EWRI) Annual Meeting, May 17-
         21, Kansas City, MS. (Presented by Jia)

         Jia, X., T. M. DeSutter, T. F. Scherer, and D. D. Steele. 2009. Simulation of water table
         and salinity changes in a subsurface drainage field by Hydrus-2D. ASABE Paper no.
         096045. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International
         Meeting, June 21-24, Reno, NV. (Presented by Jia)

         Lin, H., D. Haagenson, R. Brudvik, D.P. Wiesenborn. 2009. Influence of seeds moisture
         on in situ alkaline transesterification of canola seeds for biodiesel production, ASABE
         Paper No. 096339. ASABE Annual International Meeting, Reno, NV, June 21-24.
         (Presented by Lin)

         Manamperi, W.A., J. Sehrawat, M. Fuqua, C. Ulven, S. Pryor. 2009. Influence of
         plasticizers on properties of polymers made from canola protein polyester blends, Paper
         No. 09-6327. ASABE International Meeting. Reno, NV, June 21-24, 2009. (oral plus
         paper) (Presented by Manamperi)


 54                   NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                             ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Manamperi, W.A., K.C. Chang, C. Ulven, S. Pryor. 2009. Canola proteins in
biocomposites: Protein characterization and product formulation. AOCS Annual
Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 3-6, 2009. (oral- invited) (Presented by Manamperi)

Mohapatra, P., S. Panigrahi, Catherine, L, and J. Sherwood. 2009. Evaluation of Surface
Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based sensing methods for Salmonella detection in
packaged beef. Abstract/Technical Presentation at the Institute of Biological Engineering
Conference. March 19-21, Santa Clara, CA. (Presented by Mohapatra)

Overmoe, K., X. Jia, and W. Lin. 2009. Effectiveness of aeration system on increasing
dissolved oxygen level at Heinrich-Martin Dam in North Dakota. Great Plains Fishery
Workers Association 58th Annual Meeting, January 26-28, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada.
(Presented by Overmoe)

Pryor, S.W. and N. Nahar. 2009. Impact of dilute acid pretreatment conditions and
enzyme system on switchgrass hydrolysis, Paper No. 09-6026. ASABE International
Meeting. Reno, NV, June 21-24, 2009. (Presented by Pryor)

Rahman, S., D. Newman, and Q. Zhang. 2009. Odor, ammonia and hydrogen sulfide
emissions from swine facility in North Dakota. Paper no. 096508. 2009 ASABE Annual
International Meeting. Reno, Nevada, June 21- June 24, 2009. (Presented by Rahman)

Rorick, R., N. Nahar, and S. Pryor. 2009. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of
sugar beet pulp, Paper No. 09-6193. ASABE International Meeting. Reno, NV, June 21-
24, 2009. (Presented by Rorick)

Sankaran, S., S. Panigrahi, S. Mallik, A. A. Hanson and B. Gaddam, Biomimetic
olfactory sensing for detection of volatile organic compound associated with Salmonella
contamination in meat, poster presented at 14th Annual Conference of Institute of
Biological Engineering. Santa Clara, CA, March 19-21, 2009. (Poster presented by
Sankaran)

Scherer, T. F., and X. Jia. 2009. A simple method to measure the flow rate and volume
from tile drainage pump stations, Paper No. 096997. ASABE Annual International
Meeting, Reno, Nevada, June 21-24. (Presented by Scherer)

Bon, Tom A. 2008. Visiting Uzbekistan. ASABE Paper No. RRV-08201. St.
Joseph, MI. ASABE/CSAE Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,
September 20.

Bora, G. C. and R. Achemire. 2008. Undergraduate degree program in precision
agricultural technology. ASABE paper no. 085080. St. Joseph, Michigan. (Presented by
Bora)

Bora, G. C. and R. Ehsani. 2008. On-board canker decontamination of citrus harvesting
machines. ASABE paper no. 085081. St. Joseph, Michigan. (Presented by Bora)



    NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                     55
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


         Gustafson, C., S. Pryor, D. Wiesenborn, A. Goel, R. Haugen, and A. Wilhelmi. 2008.
         Investing in fractionation technology to mitigate corn supply risk, at NC-1014:
         Agricultural and Rural Finance Markets in Transition Annual Meeting Kansas City, MO,
         September 25-26. (Presented by Goel)

         Kumar, M., J.D. Espinoza-Perez, D. Haagenson and D.P. Wiesenborn. 2008. Epoxidation
         of canola oil utilizing green solvents and recycled catalyst. ASABE/CSBE Intersectional
         Conference, Winnipeg, MAN, September 19-20. (Presented by Kumar)

         Manamperi, W.A., K.C. Chang, and S. Pryor 2008. Thermal and functional properties of
         canola meal proteins precipitated at different pH values. ASABE Paper No. RRV-08803.
         St. Joseph, MI. 2008 CSBE/ASABE North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg,
         Manitoba, Canada, September 19-20. (oral plus paper) (Presented by Manamperi)

         Manamperi, W.A., K. C Chang, D. P. Wiesenborn, and S.W. Pryor. 2008. Alteration of
         osborn sequence extraction for isolation of canola proteins. Paper 083924, 2008 ASABE
         International Meeting, Providence, Rhode Island, June 29 – July 2, 2008. (oral plus
         paper) (Presented by Manamperi)

         Manamperi, W.A., M. Fuqua, C. Ulven, S. Pryor 2008. Preparation of plastic specimens
         from canola meal protein isolate, ASABE Paper No. RRV-08-P02. St. Joseph, MI. 2008
         CSBE/ASABE North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
         September 19-20. (poster) (Poster presented by Manamperi)

         Panigrahi, S. 2008. Potential and applications of advanced imaging and sensing
         techniques for cereal grain process. International American Cereal Chemists Annual
         Meeting. Honolulu. HI. September 21-24. (Invited presentation)

         Panigrahi, S. 2008. Integrated intelligent sensor systems for biological applications:
         perspectives of associated research and teaching in engineering discipline. Department of
         Physics. Prairie A & M University, TX. November 2008.

         Panigrahi, S. 2008. Integrated intelligent sensor systems for biological applications:
         perspectives of associated research and teaching in engineering discipline. Department of
         Agricultural and Biological Engineering. Texas A & M University, College Station.
         November 2008. (Invited presentation)

         Pryor, S.W., M. Lenling, and D.P. Wiesenborn. 2008 Integrated use of field pea starch
         and corn for ethanol production. paper 083999, 2008 ASABE International Meeting.
         Providence, Rhode Island, June 29 – July 2, 2008. (oral plus paper) (Presented by Pryor)

         Rorick, R., N. Nahar, and S. Pryor 2008. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pectin and
         hemicellulose in sugar beet pulp. ASABE Paper No. RRV-08601. St. Joseph, MI. 2008
         CSBE/ASABE North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada,
         September 19-20. (oral plus paper) (Presented by Rorick)




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                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


b. Extension and Other Outreach Presentations/Work (25+)

   Jia, Xinhua. 2009. Drainage research at Fairmount. ND-MN Subsurface Drainage Forum
   2009. February 24.

   Pryor, S. 2009. Spoke with Jeff Opsahl (Twin Valley, MN) about possibilities about
   farm level biofuel production and research. Referred by another area producer. April.

   Pryor, S. 2009. Speaker for Focus the Nation, National Teach-in at NDSU, “Biofuels:
   Value and Sustainability,” February.

   Wiesenborn, D.P. 2009. Poster and oral presentations on the Oilseeds Development
   Center of Excellence, in collaboration with W. Wilson, P. McClean, M. Rahman, D.
   Haagenson, R. Brudvik as follows: ND Research & Technology Conference, Fargodome,
   Apr. 19 (poster); BioOpportunities Conference, Ramada Plaza Suites, Fargo, Sept. 29
   (poster); Northern Canola Growers Association plus ND Department of Commerce,
   NDSU Alumni Center, Oct. 29 (oral). (unpublished technical reports)

   Bon, T.A. 2008. Visited the Tashkent Institute for Irrigation and Melioration and the
   Tashkent State Agrarian University. The visit included a series of seminars on courses
   taught at North Dakota State University. Topics included the use and application of the
   Parallax Stamp Microcontroller and Automation Studio Software. July 25 – August 5.

   Jia, Xinhua. 2008. Advances in ET measurements. Soil Science seminar. October 15.
   Fargo, ND.

   Gustafson, C, and S. Pryor. 2008. Biofuel Economics: North Dakota’s Relative Biomass
   Potential. Ag News from NDSU. December 4. (non-peer reviewed report).

   Hopkins, D.G., and D.D. Steele. 2008. Devils Lake Basin Water Utilization Test Project:
   2008 Summary and Preliminary Findings. Presented at the December 2008 meeting of
   the Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board in conjunction with the 2008 North
   Dakota Water Users Convention, December 4. Bismarck.

   Pryor, S. 2008. Speaker for ABEN Department seminar series, “Biofuels, Benefits,
   Potential, and Limitations.” November.

   Pryor, S. 2008. Tour of Bioproducts Research Laboratory at NDSU Pilot Plant for NDSU
   Harvest Bowl Honorees. November.

   Pryor, S. 2008. Invited speaker for Nutrient Management program at Fall REC/Extension
   Conference, NDSU “Feedlots of the Future – A North Dakota Feasibility Assessment for
   Blue Flint Ethanol.” November. Presented by Scott Pryor and Wally Eide.

   Pryor, S. 2008. Speaker at Student ASABE meeting, “Biofuels: Benefits, Potential, and
   Limitations.” October.



       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                        57
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


         Pryor, S. 2008. Invited speaker to the 2008 FM Sustainable Engineering and Planning
         Conference (Fargo-Moorhead Council of Governments), “Biofuels: Benefits, Potential,
         and Limitations.” October.

         Pryor, S. 2008. Participant/Advisor for ND EduTech and ND Department of
         Agriculture’s “Ag in the Classroom” program. Fall.

         Pryor, S. 2008. Facilitator for technical session: “Cellulosic Processing Technology:
         Where are we?,” Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense? Fargo, ND.
         September 29.

         Pryor, S. 2008. Spoke with Basin Electric about the possibilities for using milfoil
         harvested from MN lakes as a biofuel feedstock. September.

         Pryor, S. 2008. Phone and e-mail conversations with Nikesh Parekh, Chief Operating
         Officer of BioArchitechure Lab, Inc on the possibilities and challenges of using beet pulp
         for biofuel. July.

         Pryor, S. 2008. Interviewed by Western Organization of Resources Council's Home
         Grown Prosperity Tour participants (renewable energy awareness). July.

         Rahman, S. 2008. Addressed soil and water conservation group. CNMP Planning in
         Relation to Water Quality. The Soil and Water Conservation Society & Professional Soil
         Classifiers Association Annual Meeting. Dickinson, ND. October 9.
         Posters Developed for NDSU Conference, Meetings, and Promotional Use

         Pryor, S.W., C. Gustafson, and D.P. Wiesenborn. Synergy of Using Field Peas as an
         Ethanol Feedstock
          Great Plains Energy Expo and Showcase, Nov 10-11, 2008 (Bismarck)
          Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008

         Pryor, S.W., G. Lardy, E. DeVuyst, W. Eide, R. Wiederholt. Feedlots of the Future:
         Feasibility Analysis for a Cattle Feedlot collocated with an Ethanol Plant
          Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008

         Biondini, M., L. Cihacek, C. Grygiel, W. Koo, S.W. Pryor, K. Ringwall. CRP to Ethanol
          Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008

         Pryor, S.W. From Biomass to Ethanol, Breaking it Down: The Sugar Platform.
          Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008

         Pryor, S.W. ABEN 499/696 – Biofuels.
          Great Plains Energy Expo and Showcase, Nov 10-11, 2008 (Bismarck)
          Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008




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                                                          ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Pryor, S.W., R. Rorick, N. Nahar, 2008. Ethanol Production from Sugarbeet Pulp.
 Great Plains Energy Expo and Showcase, Nov 10-11, 2008 (Bismarck)
 Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008

Manamperi, W.A., M.A. Fuqua, C.A. Ulven, S.W. Pryor, Preparation of Plastic
Specimens from Canola Meal Protein Isolates
 Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008

Ulven, C., D. Wiesenborn, C. Gustafson, S. Pryor, Z. Chen, B. Tande, M. Alcock, D.
Haagenson, Development of Biobased Composite materials for Structural Applications
 Great Plains Energy Expo and Showcase, Nov 10-11, 2008 (Bismarck)
 Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Sept 29, 2008




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


C. Outreach

   1. Professional Service

      Faculty are extensively involved in service through committee activity at the department,
      college and university levels.

      All faculty are active in professional societies (ASABE, AICE, IFT, AAAS, SME) and
      are involved in associated technical committees at section, region, and national levels.
      One faculty is on the Board of Directors of ASABE; several faculty hold technical
      committee leadership positions within ASABE. Four faculty and two students serve on
      the Executive Committee of the RRV Section of ASABE.

      Several faculties hosted and/or made presentations to foreign professional visiting
      delegations on various agricultural and biosystems engineering topics

      Faculty also participate in regional USDA-CSREES committees, field days,
      workshop/seminar presentations, and peer reviews of technical papers. Several faculty
      serve as project proposal reviewers for federal government agencies during the last year.

      Department faculty are involved in campus governance via service on numerous
      CAFSNR and CEA and university committees.

      Faculty are also involved in numerous commodity, government, and industry groups,
      committees, and boards.

   2. Alumni Events and Other Community-Related Activities

      The ABEN Department produces and distributes an annual department newsletter.
      The newsletter is distributed to alums (approximately 1650), and the campus
      community. Although it includes small sections on research and extension activities,
      the primary focus is on academic programs, student activities, and alumni updates.
      These areas are of primary interest to alums who frequently express their appreciation
      of this effort. Not only does the newsletter afford the opportunity to update alumni on
      departmental activities, it provides the opportunity for alums to update their personal
      information (new job, new address, marriage, births, accomplishments, etc.).

   3. Fund-Raising Accomplishments

      Contacts are maintained with alumni to solicit their help in obtaining gifts (monetary or
      equipment) from various sources (individuals, manufacturers, distributors, etc.) for the
      purpose of upgrading laboratory teaching equipment. Publication of the annual
      department newsletter results in a significant increase in financial gifts to both specific
      department scholarships and to the general ABEN Development Foundation fund.

      Scholarships totaling $5,000 were funded by John Deere Development Foundation as a
      result of submission of a grant proposal. Funding support for scholarships was solicited
      via the department’s newsletter. Donors to the department and to specific scholarship
      funds are recognized in our annual newsletter. Discretionary gifts are used to help
      support student activities and to systematically upgrade teaching laboratories.

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D. Special Initiatives

   1. Cooperative Programming/Inter-Institutional Activities

       Mr. Solseng represents the department on the NDUS Post-Secondary Articulation Committee
       that involves agricultural programs at NDSU and other NDUS schools with agricultural
       programs.

   2. International Activities

       As part of the “twinning” agreement with Ansal Institute of Technology (AIT) in India,
       eight AIT students entered the NDSU ABEN program in Fall 2008. Two more AIT
       students are preparing to come to NDSU in Fall 2009 to enter the ABEN program. The
       academic performance of these students has ranged from poor to excellent.

   3. Interdisciplinary Activities

       Research – Every ABEN researcher is either PI or Co-PI in at least one, and usually
       multiple, interdisciplinary research projects. The home department of some of the
       collaborators include; Agribusiness and Applied Economics, Animal Sciences,
       Veterinary and Microbiology, Plant Sciences, Soil Science, Plant Pathology, Civil
       Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering.
       Although interdisciplinary research often presents significant challenges, ABEN faculty
       are able to address these challenges well. Several ABEN faculty have significant
       responsibility in the Center of Excellence in Agribiotechnology. This is a large
       interdisciplinary group partnered with industry to study the use of canola for production
       of biodiesel. ABEN research faculty conduct research in several multiple areas,
       Environmental Conservation Science, Natural Resources, and Food Safety.

       Teaching – Dr. Bon continues to teach ENGR 402; Engineering Ethics and Social
       Responsibility to engineering students from all disciplines. ABEN faculty also often
       present lectures for classes in other agriculture or engineering courses.

   4. Economic Development Efforts

       Faculty programs are contributing to economic development by developing and extending
       knowledge and technology that advances the productivity of agriculture, enhances the
       processing and utilization of agricultural products, and/or promotes the sustainable use or
       management of environmental resources. Activities in production agriculture (precision
       farming, agri-chemical application, post-harvest handling/storage and quality maintenance,
       irrigation systems management) are providing information to help producers improve
       efficiencies and/or reduce costs of production and to produce high quality products. Activities
       in agricultural product utilization (sensors/bio-information, processing technology,
       biorenewable fuels storage/handling and new use technology) are contributing to
       entrepreneurial activity and to improved processing efficiency or product quality in ND
       processing facilities (i.e., processing or handling of potatoes, beans, crambe, flax, sunflower).
       Activities in environmental resources management are contributing to improved management


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      of irrigation systems for high value crop production and the use of BMP’s for more
      environmentally friendly production agriculture and improved water quality.

      Several faculty are significant players in the $2 million Center of Excellence for
      Agbiotechnology; Oilseed Development. This Center involves several NDSU departments
      in partnership with Monsanto, Archer Daniel Midland, and Dakota Skies Biodiesel to
      develop the biodiesel from canola industry in North Dakota.

      Department extension programs are helping people gain knowledge of GIS/GPS technology
      for improved management of their agricultural production operations. Department faculty are
      cooperating with other departments and industries in developing improved spray technology
      and management methods. Applied site-specific research and demonstration is identifying
      conditions for cost-effective variable rate application of agri-chemicals and seed.

      Students in ABEN 486-487, the capstone design course, continue to work on problems
      provided by industry. Many of these class projects ultimately become part of products
      produced by local and regional industries which are marketed nationally and world-wide.
      These efforts contribute to the economic development in the region.




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E. Planning

   1. Future Challenges, Program Strengths, Plans

      The department views the following challenges as keys to its future, i.e.:
         a. Increasing faculty numbers, vitality, and diversity
         b. Maintaining strong student numbers and diversity
         c. Being competitive for external funding
         d. Access to adequate space for faculty offices, graduate student offices, and research
             laboratories, as faculty and graduate/undergraduate enrollment grows
         e. Access to modern facilities and equipment
         f. Maintaining relevant/productive programs and curricula
         g. Maintaining supportive constituencies
         h. Maintaining professional accreditation of the ABEN program

      Department strengths in its academic programs are:
         a. Enrollments that equal/exceed those of other Agricultural/Biosystems Engineering
            departments in the region
         b. Excellent placement of graduates at salaries ranging from $45,000 to $70,000+ in the
            ABEN major and $31,300 to $50,000 in the ASM major
         c. Accreditation of the ABEN program by ABET
         d. Partnership with and support of industry
         e. A faculty and staff committed to excellent educational opportunities for and service
            to students
         f. Continuous faculty efforts in curriculum strengthening activities, i.e., curriculum
            development, course revisions/updating, new course development, development of
            students’ problem solving and communication skills, use of current technology in
            teaching, curriculum update, and assessment of both learning and teaching
         g. Faculty commitment to student advising, career planning, and graduate placement
         h. Strong faculty commitment to development activities that benefit their teaching
            programs

      Program strengths in research/extension are in:
         a. Crop production systems
              i. Irrigation systems/management/drainage/water quality
             ii. Post harvest quality
            iii. Precision/site-specific management and sensing technology
            iv. Environment protection
             v. Machine systems

         b. Livestock production systems
              i. Housing/environment
             ii. Water quality
            iii. Air quality
            iv. Livestock waste management
             v. Mortality disposal/treatment

         c. Value-added processing and new uses

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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


              i.   Oilseeds processing, new uses
             ii.   Alternative crops processing/uses
            iii.   Sensing/intelligent systems for improved processing and marketing
            iv.    Biorenewable fuels and energy conservation
             v.    Biorenewable products development

         d. Human housing
             i. Indoor air quality
            ii. Energy efficiency and conservation

      The department’s planning is focused on an annual updating of objectives to meet specific
      goals as outlined at the beginning of this report. These are based on maintaining awareness of
      needs, opportunities, and trends. Awareness is significantly based on benchmarking (internal
      and external to NDSU), by discussions with faculty and others, participation in regional and
      national professional meetings and national meetings of ABEN department chairs, and by
      being aware of local, state, regional, national, and global engineering needs.

      The department’s current planning is summarized as follows.

      Department Vision: To be an informed and growth oriented department creating and
      extending new knowledge in the application of engineering and technology to agricultural,
      food, and environmental systems through teamwork and collaborations that result in high
      quality career opportunities for departmental graduates, continuous faculty/staff development,
      and enhanced economic opportunity, productivity, and quality of life for ND citizens.

      Department Mission: To develop and extend knowledge through research, teaching and
      extension programs in engineering and technology that advances the productivity of
      agricultural production, the utilization and processing of agricultural commodities and
      products, and the sustainability of environmental resources management.

      Goal 1) To provide high quality undergraduate and graduate education in Agricultural
              and Biosystems Engineering and in Agricultural Systems Management.

      Objectives
      a. Improve facilities for teaching high quality courses
           i. Room 222-Computer hardware/software - computer upgrades, software upgrades
              (AutoCAD, ProE, Microsoft Office, Novell, ANSYS - FEA, ProMechanica, GIS-
              ArcInfo, Surfer), server-based software
          ii. Laboratory teaching equipment; Room 123- computer software for CAT engine,
              planter units/modules; Room 210C –add oscilloscope; Room 124–update machine
              tools
         iii. Industry equipment support – Bobcat, CNH, CAT, John Deere, Rust Sales, Crary
              Mfg., Amity Technology
         iv. Upgrade tables and chairs in Room 222
          v. Upgrade tables and chair sin Room 217
         vi. Upgrade quality and quantity of computers in Room 217

      b. Promote faculty development activities in:

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                                                                    ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


     i. Attending appropriate conferences, workshops, continuing education opportunities
    ii. Teaching pedagogy (department faculty seminars, workshops, continuing education
        peer teams)
   iii. Teaching technology (web-based applications/methods/materials/course, use of CD-
        based materials, Blackboard, PODCasting)

c. Curriculum review/strengthening activities
    i. ABEN
       1. Offer students more business/communications course opportunities in the ABEN
          curriculum
       2. Offer new elective course in bioprocess engineering
       3. Promote collaborations in bioengineering
       4. Continue to strengthen bioscience integration with engineering science in ABEN
          courses
       5. Continue to strengthen student abilities to use computer technology for analysis,
          design, and communications—ProE, Project Mgt., ANYSIS
       6. Continue to strengthen communication (oral, written, graphic), leadership, and
          team skills of students
       7. Develop teaching collaborations with other ABEN departments and industry
          adjuncts
   ii. ASM
       1. Consider a sophomore seminar course – careers focus
       2. Consider including web page development in computer applications course
       3. Investigate web/distance delivery of courses--ASM 115, 323
       4. Continue to strengthen communication (oral, written, and presentation),
          leadership, and team skills of students
       5. Strengthen computer software skills of students; Microsoft Office, AutoCAD,
          precision agriculture, Business Plan Pro, spreadsheet applications
       6. Review curriculum requirements for current relevancy and adjust/update as
          appropriate
       7. Investigate modification of ASM 475 to include a two semester sequence similar
          to ABEN 486-487

d. Graduate program – M.S., Ph.D.
     i. Increase grad student stipends
    ii. Develop courses to serve a wider background/interest area of ABEN and engineering
        students
   iii. Develop interdisciplinary collaborations in selected areas (environmental/water
        resources management, biomaterials processing, sensor/decision support systems,
        bioenvironmental control, drainage, and hydrology)
   iv. Investigate feasibility of having “outstanding” undergraduate students take a “dual”
        track program (beginning in Junior yr) towards both completion of their B.S. program
        and an M.S. by the end of one additional academic year.
    v. Develop a bio-nanotechnology course
   vi. Develop relationships with programs at regional, national, and international
        universities that have the potential to act as feeders of high quality students to our
        graduate programs.


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      Goal 2) To attract and retain quality students (undergraduate and graduate) to
              build/maintain enrollments.

      Objectives
      a. Maintain/revise informational brochures, displays, presentations, web pages, and related
         materials
      b. Increase emphasis on recruitment of female, urban, and minority students
      c. Develop placement opportunities for graduates with a concentration in Biosystems
         Engineering
      d. Increase scholarship funding
      e. Increase grant funded support and recruitment of graduate students
      f. Benchmark programs showing high success in retention of women and urban students in
         ABEN
      g. Increase efforts to recruit NDSU graduates to our graduate program

      Goal 3) To maintain/build scholarly activities that extend the knowledge base for: a.)
              enhancing agri-production efficiency, profitability and/or sustainability, b.)
              maintaining quality and/or adding value to North Dakota’s agricultural
              products, and c.) developing efficient use and stewardship of North Dakota’s
              soil and water resources.

      Objectives:
      a. Promote active professional development programs/plans by all faculty
      b. Conduct comprehensive annual performance reviews and annually review/set faculty
         goals/action plans
      c. Seek and participate in interdisciplinary, interdepartmental collaborations
      d. Encourage external funding activity by all faculty
      e. Increase support staffing (graduate students, postdoctoral, technical, office)

      Goal 4) To provide extension and outreach education focused on: a.) agri-production
              systems (precision agr., agri-chemical applic., ag. structures, waste mgt, air
              quality), b.) post-harvest engineering (storage, drying, quality maintenance,
              processing), c.) water resources management (irrigation systems, drainage
              systems, water quality–GIS based assessment and resource mgt), d.) bio-
              renewable fuels, and e.) energy use efficiency and conservation.

      Objectives
      a. Promote extension programming via interdisciplinary collaborations, web-based
         resources, distance education technology, and partnering with extension colleagues in the
         region and the nation, and with industry and agribusinesses and government agencies
      b. Promote applied research, grantsmanship, impact assessment/evaluation techniques, and
         anonymous peer reviewed publication of research results
      c. Use clientele and other interactions to guide changes/improvements in extension/outreach
         programming
      d. Continue integration of department faculty activities, space, and facilities
      e. Develop partnerships with industry, government agencies, and specific subject matter
         groups to expand educational efforts and to increase educational efficiency


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                                                                    ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   Goal 5) To achieve/ maintain effective constituent relationships.

   Objectives
   a. Promote greater faculty interactions with students
   b. Publish department newsletters (annually)
   c. Conduct alumni and employer surveys (at 5 year intervals)
   d. Invite visits by NDSU administration to department
   e. Promote faculty visits/interactions with industry and government agencies
   f. Develop relationships with industry, government agencies and commodity groups
   g. Work with newly formed ABEN program advisory board to ensure meeting applicable
      accreditation criteria as well as the needs of students and industries

2. Vision – Where do we want to be as a department in 5-10 years?

   a. Research/Extension Programs

         i. Focus Areas in Agri-production Systems Engineering
            1. Crop Production
               a. Water management systems – increased system efficiency through
                   intensive water management; irrigation and drainage
               b. Crop protection – application and management of precision agriculture
                   systems
               c. Post harvest technology – IP storage and quality management for
                   conventional and alternative crops, crop residue utilization for energy or
                   biomaterials, increased efficiency of crop conditioning systems
               d. Geospatial tools and decision support systems
               e. Food safety through the development and application of biosensors and
                   computer imagery
               f. Development of harvest, collection, storage, transport and preprocessing
                   of biomass for energy or biomaterials
               g. Precipitation management through water harvesting
               h. Soil protection through the use of min/no till systems

            2. Livestock production
               a. Production facilities design
               b. Development of waste handling systems appropriate for ND to control air
                  and water quality
               c. Application of precision technology

        ii. Focus Areas in Biosystems Engineering
            1. Oil seed utilization – new uses for crops, development of new renewable
               products
            2. Biomaterials processing – energy, materials, storage, sensors

        iii. Focus Areas in Bioenvironmental Engineering
             1. Watershed water management
             2. GIS – modeling and remote sensing applications


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


               3. Development of livestock waste management systems for enhanced air and
                  water quality
               4. Maintenance of water quality
               5. Surface and subsurface drainage and its effect on water quality

      b. New/Replacement Faculty
           i. Research/Extension
              1. Fill authorized bioprocess engineering position

      c. Facilities Development
           i. Laboratory equipment – update machine systems and electricity/electronics labs
               and increase capabilities of water quality and waste management labs
          ii. New/replacement building design (planning)

      d. New/Replacement Support
           i. One state supported research specialist/research faculty
          ii. One additional office support professional

      e. Student Goals
            i. 100 or more students in ABEN
               1. 50 in biosystems engineering concentration
               2. 50 in agricultural engineering concentration
           ii. 100 or more students in ASM
          iii. 15 or more graduate students
               1. A minimum of one state funded graduate student/faculty
               2. A minimum of two externally funded graduate students for each faculty

      f. External Support Goals
            i. Minimum $150K annually per research/extension FTE
           ii. Industry collaborations/partnerships
          iii. Scholarship support for entering freshman

   3. ABEN Priorities 2009-2010

      a. Academic programs
            i. Student recruitment; particularly urban and under-represented students in the
               Biosystems Engineering concentration
           ii. Facilities/laboratory updates to improve learning experiences
          iii. ASM curriculum/course review and improvements
          iv. ABEN course review and improvements
           v. Better assessment of student learning
          vi. Increase graduate student numbers and quality
         vii. Major upgrade in instrumentation and software for ASM 454

      b. Research programs
           i. Increase level and success of faculty grantsmanship
          ii. Develop collaborations with other NDSU departments and schools


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                                                                      ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


       iii. Broaden research in bioenergy, biomaterials, air and water quality, and precision
            agriculture
       iv. Develop local and regional collaboration in biorenewable products, renewable
            energy research, and water quality and water management
        v. Increase activity related to management of livestock and other agricultural
            waste or co-product materials

   c. Extension programs
          i. Increase grant-based support of extension activities
         ii. Increase applied research components in support of extension activities
        iii. Promote continuing development of department’s extension capabilities in GIS
             applications and wireless technology to agricultural production
        iv. Foster GPS/GIS applications to ag production and natural resources
             management
         v. Increase programming in the area of livestock waste management/utilization
        vi. Increase programming related to utilization of biomass products
       vii. Increase programming related to energy use efficiency
      viii. Continue programming to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of crop
             conditioning
        ix. Increase programming related to air and water quality
         x. Continue programming to improve irrigation and drainage system management and
             efficiency

4. Department’s Strategic Priorities

   a. New support position
         i. Research specialist to support biorenewable products research
        ii. Research specialist to support hydrology and water/drainage management
            research
       iii. Research specialist to support livestock waste management research
       iv. Secretary to support faculty (teaching/research/extension)
        v. Research specialist to support precision agriculture research

   b. Diversification of student body
        i. Women, urban recruitment emphasis
       ii. Diversified placement opportunities

   d. Facilities improvements
        i. New or additional building to adequately accommodate current and future
            teaching, research, and extension needs.
       ii. Updated lab equipment in each teaching/research area

5. Challenges

   a. Excessive teaching loads for the department’s academic programs results in little time
      being available for sustained productive research. As a result, research productivity,
      publications generation, and competitiveness for grants are at less than potential
      levels.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



      b. The inability to replace recent and past losses of extension specialists has created
         subject matter voids (livestock housing, safety, electricity). Little to no educational
         programming is taking place in these subject matter areas.

      c. Laboratory space is inadequate to accommodate current farm machinery. As a result,
         faculty cannot expose students to machinery typical of that used in industry. Students
         are beginning to express dissatisfaction with the program as a result.

      d. Space, or lack of it, is becoming critical. Faculty, support staff, and graduate students
         are being added. Office and laboratory space is inadequate to accommodate them.
         New faculty are expected to advise and train graduate students. There is no additional
         room for graduate students. Current faculty now occupy space in five separate
         buildings. This tends to fragment faculty and staff. Laboratories occupied in other
         buildings are inadequate in size and function to conduct and sustain high quality
         research programs.

      e. The pool of traditional student clientele is becoming smaller; particularly in North
         Dakota.




 70                    NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                                     ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


F. Enrollment, FTE Data, and Placement Summary

   1. Class Enrollment for Academic Year 2008-2009

      a. Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering – College of Engineering and Architecture

                                                                                                        Grand
                Semester       Fresh        Soph        Junior   Senior     Total         Graduate
                                                                                                        Total
               Fall 2008
                                    30       17          15       35            97           6              103
              (Term 0910)
              Spring 2009
                                    17       9           15       34            75          13               88
              (Term 0930)


      b. Agricultural Systems Management – College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural
         Resources

                Semester       Fresh        Soph        Junior   Senior          Total
               Fall 2008
                                    6        18          18       19                 61
              (Term 0910)
              Spring 2009
                                    10       14          15       19                 58
              (Term 0930)

   2. Student Credit Hours and FTE’s for Academic Year 2008-2009 (generated)

                                    Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
                                          Undergraduate                Graduate                      Total
             Student Credit Hours             1,211                       171                        1,382
                    FTE                          2.62                     0.59                       3.21
                                         Agricultural Systems Management
                                          Undergraduate                Graduate                      Total
             Student Credit Hours                962                      NA*                        962
                    FTE                          1.54                     NA                         1.54
                                                         TOTAL
                                         Undergraduate              Graduate                         Total
            Student Credit Hours              2,173                       171                        2,344
                    FTE                          4.16                     0.59                       4.75

           * NA – Not applicable




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   3. Placement Summary

      Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Program

         Number of Graduates: 13

         Placement after Graduation:                Salaries: (based on 7 reporting)
             Industry:            10                       Lowest Salary Offered:      $39,000
             Farming:              1                       Highest Salary Offered:     $70,000
             Graduate School:      1                       Lowest Salary Accepted:     $39,000
             Unknown:              1                       Highest Salary Accepted:    $63,240
                                                           Average Salary Accepted:    $51,891

         Companies That Hired:
            Cargill Inc. – Horizon Milling LLC            John Deere – Hay Equipment Division
            CNH                                           MW Industries
            Crary Company                                 North Dakota Department of Health
            Heimbuch Potatoes LLC                         Osnabrock Farmers Co-op Elevator
            Hormel Foods – Engineering Division           Sears Manufacturing Company
            Iowa State University - Engr. Grad Program    Titan Machinery

         Job Titles:
             Engineer                       Owner
             Agronomist                     Precision Farming Products Specialist
             Design Engineer                Product Engineer
             Environmental Engineer         Production Management Engineer
             Maintenance Engineer           Quality Engineer



      Agricultural Systems Management Program

         Number of Graduates: 15

         Placement after Graduation:                Salaries: (based on 3 reporting)
             Industry:       5                             Lowest Salary Offered:      $24,960
             Farming:        7                             Highest Salary Offered:     $50,000
             Unknown:        3                             Lowest Salary Accepted:     $31,200
                                                           Highest Salary Accepted:    $45,000
                                                           Average Salary Accepted:    $36,233

         Companies That Hired:
            Brantner Farms                   Osnabrock Farmers Co-op Elevator
            Gooseneck Implement              RDO Equipment Co.
            K&T Irrigation                   Wells Fargo Bank

         Job Titles:
             Aftermarket Coordinator          Owner/Operator
             Agronomist                       Sales Representative
             Irrigation Technician            Self-employed




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G. Other Relevant Data and Materials

   1. Impact Statement

      a. Relevance of Department Activities

         As a unit in a Land-grant institution, the Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
         Department subscribes to the land-grant philosophy. We have a responsibility to
         provide quality resident and outreach educational programs and conduct quality
         research programs to benefit the public. We feel our programs address this institutional
         responsibility very well.

         Teaching

         The Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Department, through its Agricultural
         and Biosystems Engineering and Agricultural Systems Management undergraduate
         degree programs and Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering graduate program,
         afford state, regional, national, and international students the opportunity to satisfy
         degree requirements that lead to excellent professional career opportunities in
         agriculture, food systems and natural resources and engineering. Nearly 100% of
         the graduates of our programs find employment in their area of career interest prior
         to or shortly after graduation each semester. Starting salary levels for these
         graduates are at the top of those offered to students in the Colleges of Agriculture,
         Food Systems, and Natural Resources (CAFSNR) and the College of Engineering
         and Architecture (CEA). Many of these students find employment in the state and
         region, which contributes to the economic and social well being of the area. Our
         program also contributes to the success of two interdisciplinary programs; Natural
         Resource Management, and Food Safety.

         Research

         Departmental research addresses problems directly affecting the people of the state,
         the region, the nation, and the world.

         With the addition of a new faculty, the ABEN department is better positioned to
         address various topics related to biorenewable fuels and products, to issues related
         to the management of livestock waste, to control air and water quality, and to
         improve agricultural profitability through the use of precision farming.
         Interdisciplinary work has resulted in much closer working relationships with other
         NDSU departments (in CAFSNR and CEA) and government agencies. This work
         has the potential to assist greatly in the economic development of the state and the
         region. Current research in these areas has brought significant positive attention to
         the department, to the CAFSNR and CEA, and to NDSU.
         Although certainly not a new objective of research at NDSU, since 9-11, food
         safety has become a critical concern for the people of the region and the world.
         Cutting edge research in our department is addressing this concern with the
         development of intelligent biosensors that will permit each level in the meat
         industry to monitor meat quality to help identify food safety issues to protect the

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         public. This technology will also be applicable to the fruit and vegetable and grain
         industries and the emerging biomass industry.

         One of the goals of a land-grant institution is to aid in the improvement of the
         quality of life of the people. One way of doing this is by increasing the profitability
         of agriculture. The Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Department is
         conducting research to increase the profitability of agriculture in a number of
         different ways. Work is being conducted in “precision agriculture” to allow
         producers to apply appropriate levels of nutrients to fields in response to real crop
         needs. Conversely, this research will allow crops to be planted in proportion to the
         availability of nutrients. It will also allow producers to apply pesticides at
         appropriate levels to only those portions of a crop requiring treatment. In each case,
         profitability can be increased through the reduction of operating and input costs.
         Additional research is being done to develop new uses/processes for crops grown in
         the region to increase the markets for these crops. In addition, regional minor crops
         have the potential to help address the nation’s energy problems and, at the same
         time, create other markets for these crops. Developing more efficient processes for
         the production of renewable fuels from these minor crops has the potential to
         develop significant new markets and to provide by-products for the expanding
         livestock industry. Additional work to increase profitability of agriculture is being
         done to develop ways to improve water use efficiency of both irrigated and non-
         irrigated crops. This work has the potential to reduce input costs and increase
         yields.

         Research is being conducted to test the feasibility of using irrigation as a
         management tool in the Devils Lake Basin. Such irrigation has the potential to
         increase crop production and to manage excess water.

         Water quality is a national as well as regional issue. Agricultural activities are a
         major source of non-point pollution affecting water quality. Work in the
         Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Department is investigating the
         adaptation of hydrologic models that can be used to plan and develop management
         plans to minimize runoff that can affect surface and ground water quality. As
         surface and subsurface drainage become more common, it is necessary to
         investigate the effects on water quality.

         A new program to document and reduce air quality problems associated with
         livestock facilities is beginning. This work has the potential to reduce the resistance
         to increased livestock production and to improve the quality of life of those living
         near these facilities.

         Extension

         The extension programs in the Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
         Department contribute to the mission of our land-grant institution. This is
         accomplished by conducting educational programs to increase the profitability of
         agriculture and improve the quality of life for the people of the state, the region, and
         the nation. Educational programs were conducted to address diverse topics that

 74                  NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
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      include subsurface drainage, irrigation system design and water management and
      quality, the use of GPS/GIS to micro-manage crop production, efficient and
      effective pesticide application, precision farming technology and applications,
      alternative energy use, crop drying, conditioning and storage, facilities design and
      management, efficient energy use, and livestock waste management. In addition,
      societal issues are addressed with educational programs that address topics such as
      water quality, livestock and human waste management, air quality, renewable fuels
      and human health by addressing topics related to indoor air quality. Each of these
      educational activities has the potential to improve the quality of life of the public in
      accordance with the land-grant mission of North Dakota State University and the
      Extension Service.

2. Linkage Description of Personnel
   Backer, Leslie (Chair)
      Teaching/Research
              Bon, Thomas (Senior Lecturer)
              Bora, Ganesh (Assistant Professor)
              Jia, Xinhua (Assistant Professor)
                     Kate Overmoe (Graduate Assistant)
                     Xiao Pang (Graduate Assistant)
                     Ishara Rijal (Graduate Assistant)
              Lin, Zhulu (Assistant Professor)
              Panigrahi, Suranjan (Professor)
                     Lin, Dongqing (Research Specialist)
                     Matthew Kasper (Graduate Assistant)
                     Lav Khot (Graduate Assistant)
                     Punyatoya Mohapatra (Graduate Assistant)
                     Ewumbua Menyoli Monono (Graduate Assistant)
                     Sindhuja Sankaran (Graduate Assistant)
              Pryor, Scott (Assistant Professor)
                     Nahar, Nurun (Research Specialist)
                     Qingwu Xue (Research Scientist)
                     Wajira Asanga Manamperi (Graduate Assistant)
                     Rachel Rorick (Graduate Assistant)
              Rahman, Shafiqur (Assistant Professor)
                     Atikur Rahman (Graduate Assistant)
              Solseng, Elton (Instructor)

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               Steele, Dean (Associate Professor)
                       Tuscherer, Sheldon (Research Specialist)
               Wiesenborn, Dennis (Professor)
                       Brudvik, Rachel (Research Specialist)
                       Haagenson, Darrin (Research Specialist)
                       Bhavnita Dhillon (Graduate Assistant)
                       Judith Espinoza-Perez (Graduate Assistant)
                       Andrew Wilhelmi (Graduate Assistant)
         Extension
               Hellevang, Kenneth (Professor)
                       Carl Pedersen (Energy Educator)
               Nowatzki, John (Extension Specialist)
               Rahman, Shafiqur (Assistant Professor)
               Scherer, Thomas (Associate Professor)
                       Johnson, Roxanne (Water Quality Associate)
         Teaching/Extension/Administrative Support Staff
               Quam, Janelle (Information Processing Specialist)
               Sholts, Lori (Administrative Assistant)
               Stroh, Nancy (Account Technician)
         Teaching/Research/Extension Support Staff
               Daeuber, Jana (Research Specialist)
               Moos, James (Maintenance Mechanic)




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3. Personnel
   a. Professional Staff (Faculty)
                                                          (1)
                                   % Budget Appointment
                Staff Name              T    R    E             Teaching                       Research                  Extension
                                                        Post Harvest Tech.            Physical Properties of
      L.F. Backer, M.S.
                                        23   72    5 Biomaterials Processing;         Materials, Crop Quality &    Administration
      Associate Prof., Chair                            Administration                Processing; Administration

                                                        Precision Agriculture
      G.C. Bora, Ph.D.                  80   20
                                                        Technology; Machine Systems Impact of Precision Planting
      Assistant Professor                               Engineering; Agricultural   on Crop Yield and Disease
                                                        Systems Management

      K.J. Hellevang,* Ph.D.                                                                                       Post Harvest Engin-
                                                  100                                                              eering, Structures, Indoor
      Professor                                                                                                    Air Quality, Bioenergy

                                                                                      Crop Consumptive Use,
      X. Jia, Ph.D.                                     Soil and Water Engineering    Surface Hydrology, Water
                                        10   90         Hydrology                     Quality, Ag-climatology,
      Assistant Professor
                                                                                      Sensors and Controls

                                                        Environmental Systems
                                                        Analysis; Surface and         Solute Transport in the
      Z. Lin, Ph.D.                     45   55         Subsurface Hydrology;         Environment; Watershed
      Assistant Professor                               Hydrologic, Hydraulic and     Assessment and Modeling
                                                        Water Quality Modeling

      S. Panigrahi, Ph.D.                               Agricultural Power and        Sensing Systems, Control,
                                        41   59         Machine Systems               Bio-information
      Professor
                                                                                      Biofuels, Bioproduct
      S. W. Pryor, Ph.D.                                Bioprocess Engineering,       Develop., Solid State &
                                        20   80         Process Optimization,         Liquid Fermentation
      Assistant Professor                               Biofuels                      Systems, Indus. & Environ.
                                                                                      Biotechnology

      S. Rahman, Ph.D.                                                                Livestock Waste              Livestock Waste
                                             80   20
      Assistant Professor                                                             Management Engineering       Management Engineering

      T.F. Scherer, Ph.D.                                                                                          Irrigation Systems, Water
                                                  100                                                              Resources
      Associate Professor

      E.G. Solseng, MS.                                 Electricity, Agric. Mechanics, Research Assistant on
                                        95   5          and Ag Power & Machinery       Department Projects
      Instructor
                                                        Computer-Aided Analysis and
      D.D. Steele,* Ph.D.                               Design, Computer
                                                                                    Irrigation Water Mgmt,
                                        25   75         Applications, Resource
                                                                                    Environmental Engineering
      Associate Professor                               Conservation and Irrigation
                                                        Engineering
                                                                                      Food and Process
      D.P. Wiesenborn, Ph.D                             Food Engineering and          Engineering
                            15 85                       Instrumentation
      Professor                                                                       Biorenewable products

      Professor Emeritus:                                                Adjunct Professors:
            L.A. Disrud,* M.S.         D. Lundstrom, Ph.D.                Robert G. Evans, Ph.D.         Prabhakar R. Guduru, MD
            H.J. Hirning,* Ph.D.       C.W. Moilanen, M.S.                 Supervisory Agricultural        Physician specializing in
                                       G.L. Pratt*, Ph.D.                     Engineer & Research Leader      internal medicine
            V.L. Hofman, M.S.                                                                              Veteran’s Administration
                                                                           Northern Plains Agricultural
            H.L. Kucera,* M.S.         E.C. Stegman, Ph.D.
                                                                             Research Lab, USDA-ARS           Hospital, Fargo, ND
            J.A. Lindley,* Ph.D.                                              Sidney, Montana
      ______________________________________________________________________________
      (1)
              T – Teaching, R – Research, E – Extension
      *       Registered Professional Engineer in North Dakota


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      b. Academic Staff
                                                     (1)
                              % Budget Appointment
                 Staff Name        T    R   E              Teaching                    Research                     Extension
         T.A. Bon,* Ph.D.         100             Engineering Design
         Senior Lecturer                          Electronics, Instrumentation
                                                                                                           Water Quality, Non-point
         R.M. Johnson, B.S.                 100
                                                                                                           Source Pollution, Water
         Specialist                                                                                        Use and Water
                                                                                                           Management

         J. Nowatzki, M.S.                  100
                                                                                                           Geospatial Technology
         Specialist                                                                                        Machine Systems

         C. Pedersen, B.S.
         Specialist                         100                                                            Energy Education


         B. Schmidt, MS.          100             Post-Harvest Technology
         Lecturer
         (1)
               T – Teaching, R – Research, E – Extension
         *     Registered Professional Engineer in North Dakota


      c. Supporting Staff

               Staff Name                   Title                                           Responsibility

          Rachel Brudvik      Research Specialist                      Assist with Biomaterials Research Projects

          Jana Daeuber        Research Specialist                      IT Support of Programs

          Darrin Haagenson Research Specialist                         Assist with Biomaterials Research Projects

          Dongqing Lin        Research Specialist                      Assist with Sensor and Imaging Research Projects

          James Moos          Maintenance Mechanic                     Assist with Teaching/Research Projects

          Nurun Nahar         Research Specialist                      Assist with Bioenergy Research Projects

          Janelle Quam        Information Processing Specialist Administrative Support

          Lori Sholts         Administrative Assistant                 Administrative Support

          Nancy Stroh         Account Technician                       Administrative Support

          Sheldon Tuscherer Research Specialist                        Assist with Irrigation Water Management Research Projects

                                                                       Assist with Biomass Production and Process Engineering
          Qingwu Xue          Research Scientist                       Research Projects (duty station in Mandan, ND)




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                                                                        ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



d. Graduate Students

   Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABEN), Natural Resource Management (NRM),
   Environmental Conservation Science (ECS), and Food Safety (FS)

                                          Degree Support                                                     Grad
           Name             Advisor       Sought Source                     Research Area                    Date

                                           PhD    Assistant- Use of Ozonated Water During Durum and
   Bhavnita Dhillon     D.P. Wiesenborn             ship     Barley Processing
                                                                                                             12/2009
                                          ABEN

   Judith Delores                          PhD    Assistant- Production and Characterization of Epoxides
                        D.P. Wiesenborn             ship
                                                                                                             10/2009
   Espinoza Perez                         ABEN               from Canola Oil

                                           MS     Assistant- Nano-sensors for Biological/Bio-medical
   Matthew Kasper       S. Panigrahi                ship     Applications
                                                                                                             6/2009
                                          ABEN

                                           PhD    Assistant- Characterization and Pattern Recognition of
   Lav Khot             S. Panigrahi
                                          ABEN      ship     Selected Sensors for Food Safety Applications
                                                                                                             6/2009


                                           MS     Assistant- High-throughput Methods for Evaluation of
   Hongjian Lin         D.P. Wiesenborn
                                          ABEN      ship     New Canola Varieties for Biodiesel
                                                                                                             8/2010


   Wajira Asanga                           PhD    Assistant- Evaluation of Canola Proteins for Biobased
                       S.W. Pryor                   ship
                                                                                                             5/2010
   Ratnayake Manamperi                    ABEN               Plastics and Composite Materials

                                           MS     Assistant- Water Balance Estimates of Evapotranspiration
   Joshua Moeller       D.D. Steele                          for the Devils Lake Basin of North Dakota
                                                                                                             6/2010
                                          ABEN      ship

                                                             Identification of Gaseous and Liquid
                                           PhD    Assistant- Metabolites in Contaminated Beef Using
   Punyatoya Mohapatra S. Panigrahi       ABEN      ship
                                                                                                             8/2009
                                                             Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy as a
                                                             Form of Artificial Taste Sensor
   Ewumbua Menyoli                         MS     Assistant-
                        S. Panigrahi                ship
                                                             Safety of Food Products                         12/2011
   Monono                                  FS
                                                             Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for Evaluation
                                           MS       Self
   Kraig Nelson         D.D. Steele
                                                   funded
                                                             of Cercospora Leaf Spot Severity in Sugar       7/2009
                                          NRM
                                                             Beets
                                                             Water Quality and Effectiveness of Artificial
                                           MS     Assistant-
   Kate Overmoe         X. Jia                      ship
                                                             Aeration on Heinrich-Martin Dam, LaMoure        12/2009
                                           ECS
                                                             County, ND
                                           MS     Assistant- Impact of Tile Drainage on Water Availability
   Xiao Pang            X. Jia
                                          ABEN      ship     in the Red River Valley
                                                                                                             8/2010


                                          Ph.D.   Assistant- Effectiveness of vegetative buffer strips to
   Md. Atikur Rahman    S. Rahman
                                          ABEN      ship     minimize pollutants in runoff from feedlot
                                                                                                             6/2012

                                                             Reference evapotranspiration estimations and
                                           MS     Assistant-
   Ishara Rijal         X. Jia                      ship
                                                             actual evapotranspiration measurements in       12/2010
                                          ABEN
                                                             North Dakota
                                           MS     Assistant- Enzymatic Pretreatment of Sugarbeet Pulp for
   Rachel Rorick        S.W. Pryor                  ship     Cellulosic Ethanol Production
                                                                                                             5/2010
                                          ABEN

                                           PhD    Assistant-
   Sindhuja Sankaran    S. Panigrahi                ship
                                                             Novel Sensing Techniques for Meat Safety        8/2009
                                          ABEN

                                           MS     Assistant- Field Peas to Supplement Corn Ethanol:
   Andrew Wilhelmi      D.P. Wiesenborn             ship     Engineering Process Models, Capital             12/2008
                                          ABEN
                                                             Investment, and Annual Operating Costs




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      e. Staff Changes

                 Resignation           Former Position                    New Position
          None

            Graduate Student
                                       Former Position                    New Position
              Resignation
                                                          Agricultural Engineer
                                  ABEN Graduate Student -
          Andrew Wilhelmi                                 NRCS – Jamestown Area Office
                                  Research Assistantship
                                                          Jamestown, ND


      f. New Appointments

            Ganesh Bora, Assistant Professor (start September 16, 2008)
            Zhulu Lin, Assistant Professor (start December 1, 2008)
            Qingwu Xue, Research Scientist (start October 20, 2008)

      g. Visiting Research Scholars

            None

      h. Post Doctoral Research Fellows

            None




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                                                               ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



4. Awards and Recognition of Faculty/Staff/Students

     Jana Daeuber
     a. 10 Years of Service, North Dakota State University

     Ken Hellevang
     a. Inducted into Gamma Sigma Delta, agricultural honor society

     James Moos
     a. Mary McCannel Gunkelman Award nominee – nominated by students

     Carl Pedersen
     a. 2008 Communicator of the Year, NDSU Agricultural Communications and the North
        Dakota Association for Communications Excellence

     Scott Pryor
     a. Gordon A. Larson Agricultural Research Award

     Janelle Quam
     a. Donald and Jo Anderson Staff Award nominee, 2008 Agriculture Faculty/Staff Awards.
     b. 10 Years of Service, North Dakota State University

     Elton Solseng
     a. North Dakota Grain Dealers Service Award - Good Egg Award

     Dean Steele
     a. CEA Teacher of the Year – nominated by ASABE students

     Nancy Stroh
     a. 25 Years of Service, North Dakota State University

     Dennis Wiesenborn
     a. Nominated for CEA Faculty Researcher of the Year, 2008

     Bhavnita Dhillon, Graduate Student
     a. Recipient of a Frank Bain Agricultural Scholarship - $1,450.

     Wajira Asanga Ratnayake Manamperi, Graduate Student
     a. Recipient of a Frank Bain Agricultural Scholarship - $1,450.

     Matt Wold, ABEN Undergraduate Student
     a. Astronaut Scholarship recipient - $10,000




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   5. Faculty Involvement in Committee Activities


      BACKER, Leslie F.

      National

             ASABE - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, 1972-present
                    P-207/1: Student Advisors Committee, 1980-present
                    P-210/1: Academic Program Administrators, 1989-1999; 2003-2005
                    ED-210/1: Academic Program Administrators, 2006-present
             Alpha Epsilon, 1982-present
                    ED-205: Engineering Technology and Management Education, 2002-present
             ASEE – American Society of Engineering Education, 2003-present

      Regional

             ASABE Red River Valley Section, 1990-present
             NCAC-16; Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department Administration,
                  1989-1990; 2003-present

      University

             President’s Agriculture Club, 1995-present

      College

             Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources
                    Excellence in Teaching Awards Committee; 1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2004
                    Coordinator for the Dealer Management specialization in the ASM and
                      Agribusiness and Applied Economics programs; 1999-present
                    Advising Committee; 1994-present
                    Two-Year Post-Secondary Agricultural Programs Committee; 1992-present
                    Scholarship Committee, member; 1994-2004
                    Distance Education Committee; 2004-present
                    Co-op Education Committee; 2005
                    Animal Science Department Head Search Committee, Chair; 2006-2007
                    Honored Alumni Committee Member, 2008-2009

             North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station
                   Project Review Committee; 1997-2004
                   Pool Equipment Fund Committee; 2007

             Department
                   Recruitment Committee, 1985-present
                   Scholarship Committee, Chair; 1991- present
                   ASM Curriculum Committee, Chair; 1991- present



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L.F. Backer - continued


              Department
                    ABEN Curriculum Committee; 1991-present
                    ABET Committee, Ex Officio
                    Building Committee, 2009-
                    Research/Extension Committee, member; 1991-present
                    Strategic Planning Committee, member; 1991-present
                    Public Relations Committee, member; 1991-present
                    Homepage Committee, 1995-present, Chair; 1995-present
                    Newsletter Committee; 1994-present
                    Dealer Management Specialization Coordinator; 1999-present
                    Advisor of student organizations:
                            Alpha Epsilon; 1982-2006
                            ASABE Student Engineering Branch; 1980-2004
                            Agricultural Technology Exposition
                               - advising to students/advisors on an informal basis

              Graduate Student Committees
                    PhD Students
                    Lav Khot, PhD, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, June 2009
                    Punyatoya Mohapatra, PhD, Agric. and Biosystems Engineering, August 2009
                    Sindhuja Sankaran, PhD, Agric. and Biosystems Engineering, July 2009
                    MS Students
                    Matthew Kasper, MS, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, August 2008
                    Szymon Woznica, MS, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, August 2007




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BON, Thomas

      National
             Tau Beta Pi, Member
             Alpha Epsilon, Member
             Instrument Society of America, Member
             ASABE - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
                    ED-412 Professional Ethics, Member
                    ED-414 Engineering Licensure, Member, Vice-Chair
                    IET-217 Finite Element and Numerical Analysis, Member
                    IET-433 Electrical Utilization and Energy Applications, Member
                    IET-435 Electrical Code for Agriculture, Member
                    P-124 AGCO National Student Design Competition, Member
             American Society of Mechanical Engineers

      Regional
            Red River Valley Section of ASABE
            Assisted with the Western Minnesota Region FFA Contest, March 2009
            Assisted with the North Dakota State FFA Senior Ag Mechanics Contest, June, 2009

      College
             Engineering and Architecture
                NDSU Board of Governors for the Order of the Engineer, Member
                North Dakota Alpha Branch of Tau Beta Pi, Faculty Co-Advisor

      Department
            ABEN Curriculum Committee
            ASM Curriculum Committee
            Faculty Teaching Position, Search Committee
            ASM Capstone Report Review Committee

             Advising Student Club
                NDSU Bison Pullers (1/4-Scale Tractor Team), Faculty Co-Advisor
                  - Accompanied the team to the competition in Peoria, IL, May 28-31,
                      2009




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BORA, Ganesh


     National

           American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), Member
             ED-205: Engineering Technology & Management Education of ASABE
             PM-48: Speciality Crop Production Engineering

           American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), Member

           Society of Automotive Engineers, Member

           NCERA101: Controlled Environment Technology and Use; North Dakota State
           Representative and Member

           NCERA180: Site Specific Crop Management; Member


     Department

           ASM Curriculum Committee, Member, 2008-present
           Assessment Committee, 2008-present
           Building Committee, 2009-
           Recruitment Committee, 2009-




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HELLEVANG, Kenneth J.

      National/International

              American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), Member
                     Board of Trustees, 2006-08
              ASABE Meetings Council, Past Chair 06-08, Chair 04-06; Vice Chair 02-04
              ASABE, FPE-702 Crop and Feed Processing and Storage Committee
                     Past Chair 01-03, Chair 99-01, Vice Chair/Sec. 97-99, Program Chair 95-97
              ASABE, FPE-712 Fruit & Vegetable Post Harvest
              ASABE, M-161 Professional Engineer of the Year Award Committee, 2006-08,
                     Chair 2008
              American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, Member
              Grain Elevator and Processing Society (GEAPS), Member
              Housing Education and Research Association
              Epsilon Sigma Phi
              Indoor Air Quality Association
              Flood Team, Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN), Leadership for
                     development of materials for eXtension, an educational partnership of more
                     than 70 universities.

      Regional

              Red River Valley Section of ASABE

      State

              North Dakota Renewable Energy Partnership (NDREP) representative
              North Dakota Energy Efficiency Partnership representative
              North Dakota Biomass Task Force, Chair, 2008

      University/Department/Extension

              University:
                     NDSU Bio Energy and Product Innovation Center, Co-Director
                     College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources (CAFSNR)
                          PTE Committee, Member, 2008-present
                          - Evaluated eight candidates for promotion and/or tenure; primary
                             author for one review and secondary author for two reviews.
                          Agribusiness and Applied Economics Bioenergy candidate interviews
                     College of Engineering and Architecture (CEA)
                          Extension Engineer selection committee, 2008-2009

              Department:
                    Extension Coordinator
                    Extension Committee



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K. Hellevang - continued

                     Social Activities, Member, 1988-2008
                     Promotion, Tenure & Evaluation, Member, 2008-present, 2004, 1999, 94-97
                            Chair, 2004, 94-97; Policy Revision, Member, 2003-07
                     ABEN Biomass Engineering Faculty Search Committee, 2007-2009
                     ABEN Research Scientist (NDSU/USDA-ARS) Search
                     Graduate Student Committee
                           Bhavnita Dhillon, Ph.D. ABEN, 2007-present

              Extension Service Committees:
                     MidWest Plan Service (MWPS), Member, 1988-present
                     Crop Production Program Planning Team, Member, 1988-present
                     Energy Education Task Force

              Faculty Mentor:
                     Mentor for Hans Kandel, Plant Science; Charlie Stoltenow, Animal Science;
                        and Jeff Stachler, Plant Science




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JIA, Xinhua

      National

              American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), Member, 2007-present
              Environmental and Water Resources Institute (EWRI) of the American Society of
                 Civil Engineers, Member, 2005-present
                   - EWRI Crop Coefficient (Kc) Task Committee, Member, 2005-present
                   - EWRI Crop Evapotranspiration (ET) Task Committee, Member, 2005-present
              American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), Member,
                 2001-present
                   - Hydrology Committee, Member, 2007-present
                   - Drainage Committee, Member, 2008-present; Moderator for SW-28,
                       Drainage Solutions for Salinity and Contaminant Control at 2009
                       ASABE meeting
              Alpha Epsilon (Agricultural Engineering honor society), Member, 2000-present
              Reviewer for Transactions of ASABE, Agronomy Journal, Irrigation Science, and
                 Agricultural Water Management, Hydrological Processes, Journal of
                 Geophysical Research – Atmosphere.

      Regional

              NCERA207: Drainage Design and Management Practices to Improve Water
                 Quality, Member, Chair for ND Sector, 2008-present
              Agricultural Drainage Management Systems Task Force Committee, Member,
                 2008-present
              Red River Valley Section of ASABE
              Engineer-in-Training, State Board of Technical Registration, State of Arizona,
                 June, 2001

      University

              Nature, supervise two Turtle Mountain Communication College students, from
                 June 8 to 12, 2009.
              Robotic Competition, oral presentation judge
              Multicultural Student Services Committee, Faculty Advisor
              Discover NDSU, welcome and recruit new engineering students
              WISMET, network with other female faculties on campus

      College

              Environmental Conservation Science, Steering Committee, 2008-2010




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X. Jia - continued

       Department

               Graduate Student Adviser
                     Kate Overmoe, M.S., Environmental and Conservation Science,
                         January 2008-present
                     Xiao Pang, M.S., Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering,
                         August 2008-present
                     Ishara Rijal, M.S., Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering,
                         January 2009-present

               Graduate Student Committees
                     Examining Committee Member
                     Matthew Baker, M.S., Civil Engineering, 2007-present
                     Robert J. Kupec, M.S., Soil Science, 2007-present
                     Qigang Chang, Ph.D., Civil Engineering, 2007-present
                     D. Aaron Swatzky, M.S., Soil Science, 2008-present
                     Jerilyn Kazeck, M.S., Computer Science, 2008-May 2009
                     Santosh Rijal, M.S., Earth System Science and Policy, University of North
                         Dakota, 2008 – present




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


JOHNSON, Roxanne


      National

              ASABE - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, Member

      Regional

              Red River Valley Tile Drainage Water Quality Assessment Phase II/319 Non-
                    Point Implementation project, Grant Writing Committee
              CSREES/EPA Region 8, North Plains and Mountain Water Quality Team –
                    Regional Meeting in Fargo 9/2008

      State

              Envirothon Aquatics Committee, Member, 2002-present
              North Dakota Department of Health, Non-Point Source Pollution Task Force
                 - 319 advisory board, as needed
              North Dakota Department of Agriculture, Pesticide Advisory Board
              Upper Sheyenne River Basin Joint Water Resource Board
              Jamestown Reservoir Management Group, 2007-present
              Nutrient Management/Livestock Waste Advisory Team, 2007-2008
              Nutrient Management Nutrient Management Advisory Committee member, 2007-present
              North Dakota Discovery Farms, 2007-present
              North Dakota Soil and Water Conservation Society, 2007-present

      Department

              Energy Educator Position, Search Committee, 2007
              Extension Committee, 2009-present
              Shop/Laboratory Safety Committee, 2009-present

      Other

              Emergency Drought Committee meetings
              Emergency Flood Committee meetings
              Tile Drainage Monitoring Project, Project Coordinator




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                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


LIN, Zhulu


      National

             American Geophysical Union (AGU), Member
             American Water Resources Association (AWRA), Member
             American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE),
               Member


      Department

             Assessment Committee, 2009-




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


NOWATZKI, John F.

      National

             ASABE - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, Member
               - Mobile GPS Accuracy Committee

             National Geospatial Extension Specialists Network

             eXtension Map@Syst Community of Practice CoP, Leader, 2007-present
                - National CSREES project assembling the best Land Grant
                    University materials on geospatial technologies for the national
                    eXtension website.

             eXtension Precision Agriculture CoP, Co-Leader
                - Website is in process: leading the development of the GPS and
                    guidance section


      University/Extension

             NDSU GIS Users Group, Chair, 2001-present

             NDSU Biomass and Bioproducts Initiative, Member, 2007


      Department

             Research Committee, 2009-

             Extension Committee, 2009-




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                                                                  ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


PANIGRAHI, Suranjan

     International/National

            ASABE - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
                   NC 1031 Nano-Technology and Biosensor Committee, 2005–present;
                       Secretary, Vice-Chair, Chair
                   Publications Council, Chair, 2007–present
            IET Division, ASABE
                   Associate Editor, IET division, 2000–present
            Reviewer for Transactions of ASABE and Applied Engineering in Agriculture
            American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE), Member
            Sensing and Instrumentation for Food Quality and Safety, Editorial Board, Invited
                   Member

     Regional

            Red River Valley Section ASABE

     University

            University Senate, representing CAFSNR, 2005-2008

     College

            Engineering and Architecture
                   Research and Extension, 2005-present; Chair, 2000-2003
                   Graduate Committee, 2003-present, chair 2006-present
                   PTE Committee, Member, 2000-present; Chair, 2008-present
                   Adjunct Faculty, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
                   Advisor to four Electrical Engineering undergraduate students developing
                       a sensor for a remote monitoring system.
            Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources
                   Director, Bio-imaging and Sensing Center
                   Food Safety Institute, Advisory Committee Member2000-present
                   Academic Affairs Committee, 2005-present
                   School of Food Systems planning committee, Member

     Department

            ABEN Curriculum Committee, 1999-present
            Biosystems Engineering Program Committee, 2006-present
            Seminar Committee, Chair, 2008-present
            Graduate Program Coordinator, 2002-present
            Faculty Search Committee, 2006-present; Search Committee Chair, 2008
            Website committee, 1999-present
            Advisory Committee


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


S. Panigrahi - continued


               Graduate Student Advisees

                      M.S. Student
                      Matthew Kasper, MS ABEN/ME, Summer 2009

                      Ph.D. Students
                      Jayendra Amamcharla, PhD ABEN, Summer 2008
                      Lav Khot, PhD ABEN, Summer 2009
                      Punyatoya Mohapatra, PhD ABEN, Fall 2009
                      Sindhuja Sankaran, PhD ABEN, Summer 2009

               Graduate Student Committees

                      M.S. Students
                      Chia-Hao Chang, MS Statistics
                      Huanzhong Gu, MS Computer Science
                      Vicky Mahadaya, MS Electrical and Computer Engineering
                      Mehdi Satter, MS Computer Science

                      Ph.D. Students
                      Mridul Diawari, PhD Plant Science
                      Krishna Kanth Kambhampaty, PhD Computer Science
                      Iswarya Mathew, PhD Chemistry
                      Shuguang Sun, PhD Chemistry

       Other

               Developed liaisons with regional and national industries and corporations to
                   develop research collaborations and funding opportunities.
               Worked with food safety institute for developing competitive research teams.
               Assisted several faculty and students in integrating required emerging
                   technologies for their research
               Liaisoned with faculty from Chemistry, Polymer Science, Statistics,
                   Microbiology, and Animal Science to promote collaborative research using
                   the research infrastructure of the Bio-Imaging and Sensing Center
               Participated in Department display for Engineering Day, 2008




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                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


PEDERSEN, Carl

     National

             National Science Teachers Association, member
             eXtension national extension website contributor


     Regional

             North Central Region Housing Specialists
             High Plains Community and Economic Development Energy Workgroup


     State

             North Dakota Alliance for Renewable Energy participant
             Fargo Renewable Energy and Conservation Committee
             North Dakota Energy Efficiency Partnership Chairman


     University/Extension

             NDSU Sustainability Task Force, Energy Focus Group team leader




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


PRYOR, Scott

      National

             Alpha Epsilon – Honor Society of Agricultural, Food, and Biological Engineering
             American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), Member
                 ASABE BE28 – Bioprocess and Bioconversion, Committee Member; Chair, 2008-09
                 Session Moderator: “Ethanol Development Research” 2009 ASABE International
                       Meeting, Reno, NV.
             American Society of Engineering Education, Member
             Institute of Biological Engineering, Member

      University

             CEA Faculty Marshall, Winter 2008, Spring 2009 Commencements
             Northern Plains Biomass Economy: What Makes Sense?, Organizing Committee
                and Session Moderator, September 2008
             BioEnergy and Products Innovation (BioEPIC) Center
                Served on committee that led to the formation of the NDSU BioEPIC Center
                2009 BioEPIC/Biomass Economy Conference, team member/organizing committee
             Biofuel Potential of Specific Plants on Standing Rock Reservation, with Dr. Dan
                Buresh for EPSCoR initiative on research capacity building in ND Tribal
                colleges, Mentor, 2008-2009
             Mississippi Valley State summer research program, 2008-2009
                Alternate advisor and judge for final presentations

      College

             College of Engineering and Architecture
                CEA Academic Affairs Committee, 2007-2009
                General Engineering Advisor – met with prospective engineering students
                    unsure of a specific major, 2007-present
                Engineers Without Borders, Co-advisor, 2008-present
                NDSU CEA Family Weekend, participant, October 2008

             College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources
                Faculty Search Committee: Agribus. & Applied Econ. Dept. (Bioenergy), 2008

      Department

             Curriculum Committee, Member, 2006-present
                 - Provided input and leadership for development and refining of the
                    Biosystems Engineering curriculum
             Research Scientist Search Committee (ARS funded position in Mandan), Chair, 2008
             ABEN Research Committee, Chair, 2009-present
             Discover NDSU, April 2009



 96                 NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                  ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


S. Pryor - continued


               Research Technician Search Committee, Chair, 2008
               Faculty Search Committee (Biomass Preprocessing), Member, 2008, 2009
               Faculty Search Committee (Instructor), Member, 2008
               Research Specialist Search Committee, Member, 2008
               ABEN Senior Design Capstone Projects: led Evaluation Revision Committee, 2008
               ABEN Senior Design Capstone Project Evaluation Committee, 2006-present
               ABEN Senior Design Capstone Project Advisor, 2006-2009
                      Project: Bench-scale Pretreatment Reactor for Cellulosic Ethanol
               Alpha Epsilon, Advisor, 2007-2009
               Scholarship Committee, 2006-present

               Graduate Student Adviser
                     Wajira Asanga Manamperi, PhD, ABEN, Expected Completion Date: 2010
                     Rachel E. Rorick, MS, ABEN, Expected Completion Date: 2010

               Graduate Student Examining Committees
                     Christopher Hill, MS, CEE, Completed 8/2008
                     Austin Decker, MS, ME, Completed: 2008
                     Andrew Wilhelmi, MS, ABEN, Completed 12/2008
                     Amol Thapa, MS, ME, Completed: 4/2009
                     Judith Espinoza-Perez, PhD, ABEN, Expected Completion: 2009
                     Jason Fewell, MS, AGEC, Expected Completion: 2009
                     James Dodd, MS, CFS, Expected Completion: 2009
                     Andrew Kurth, MS, Expected Completion: 2009
                     Honjian Lin, ABEN, Expected Completion: 2010
                     Stacy Sommer, PhD, CPM, Expected Completion: 2010
                     Michael Fuqua, MS/PhD, ME, Expected Completion: 2010

       Other
               International Friendship Family program participant
               NATURE program: Gave tour of Bioproducts Research Laboratory and discussed
                       ABEN program with 12-14 Native American students; advised 2 students
                       with research project.

               Special Advising/Consultation
                    - Advised 4 undergraduate students for research work in my laboratory
                        (Nic Hodnefield – ABEN, Chad Sietsema - ABEN)




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


RAHMAN, Shafiqur

      National

             Secretary, SW-263 committee, 2009-present
             American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE)/Canadian
                Society for Bioengineering (CSBE), Member, 1999-present
             American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), Member, 2008-present
             Asian Association for Agricultural Engineering (AAAE), Member, 1997-1998
             Agricultural Waste Management Committee, SE-412, SW-263, Member, 2006-present
             Environmental Air Quality Committee, SE-305, Member, 2006-present


      Regional

             Red River Valley Section of ASABE, 2008
             Nutrient Management/Livestock Waste Advisory Board, North Dakota State,
                2008-present


      University

             NDSU representative, CSREES Project S-1032 “Improving the Sustainability of
               Livestock and Poultry Production in the United States (S1000), 2008-present

      College

             Faculty Search Committee, Animal Sciences

      Extension

             eXtension Community of Practice, Livestock and Poultry Environmental
                Learning Centers, Member, 2008-present

      Department

             ABEN Research Committee, 2009
             ABEN Extension Committee, 2009
             ABEN Social Activities/Gift Committee, 2009

             Graduate Student Adviser
                   Md. Atikur Rahman, PhD, ABEN




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                                                                ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


SCHERER, Thomas F.

     National

             American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), 1978-present
                 - ASABE SW-241, Committee Member
                 - ASABE SW-244, Committee Member
             WERA-202, Climactic Data Applications in Irrigation Scheduling and Water
                 Conservation, Committee Member, 2000-present; Chair, 2006
             Irrigation Association, 2008-present

     Regional

             CSREES/EPA Region 8, North Plains and Mountain Water Quality Team
             Western Region Extension Water Use Specialist Group, 1991-present
             Midwest Plan Service (MWPS) NCCC-9 Committee, 1995-present
             Missouri Slope Irrigation Development Association (MSIDA), Executive Committee
     State

             NDSU Extension Water Quality Coordinator
             North Dakota State Non-Point Source Pollution Task Force, 319 Funding Committee
             North Dakota Environmental Health Association, Member, 1993-present
                - Onsite Training Needs Committee
             Red River Valley section of ASABE, 1991-present, Executive Committee
             North Dakota Irrigation Association, 1992-present
             North Dakota Water Quality Advisory Committee
             North Dakota Irrigation Association, 1998-present

     University/Extension

             NDSU Energy Task Force
             NDSU Irrigation Task Force, Chair
             NDSU Water Quality Working Group

     Department

             Livestock Waste Engineer Faculty Position, Committee Chair, 2007
             PTE Committee, 2008-present
             Building Committee, 2008-present

     Other

             Electric Utility Workshop Committee, Chair, 1995-present
                Worked with Workforce Training at NDSCS




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


SOLSENG, Elton G.

      Regional

              Agricultural Mechanics Contest Committee - North Dakota
              FFA Contest - Spring MN Region III Ag Mechanics Contest & Summer ND
                     State Contests
              ND Post-Secondary Ag Program Instructors

      University

              Chemical Safety Committee, 1993-present
              Commencement Seating Committee, Chair, 1993-present

      College

              Articulation/Transfer Common Course Numbering Committee, 1992-present
              Scholarship Committee, 2004-2008
              Award Selection Committee, 2004-2008

      Department

              ASM Curriculum Committee, 1996-present
              Scholarship Committee
              Recruitment Committee
              ASM Club Advisor, 1988-present
              Agricultural Technology Expo Staff Advisor, 1995-present
              Quarter Scale Tractor Teams; Advisor, 2000-2004; Consultant, 2005-present
              Shop/Laboratory Safety Committee, Chair, 1990-present
              Yearly Inventory, Shop Management, and Security
              Building Committee
              Social Activities/Gift Committee
              Faculty Search Committees, 2007-present

      Other
              FarmHouse Fraternity – Advisor, 1989-2001, 2006-present
              North Dakota Grain Dealers Scholarship Committee, 2006-present
              ND Post-Secondary Ag Program Instructors Meetings (2)
                     Bismarck, ND, May and August 2008
              Red River Valley Fair 4H Project Judge, 2004-2008
              Red River Valley Fair High School Ag Mechanics Judge, 1999-present
              Bonanzaville Pioneer Days, 1993-present
              Northland Federal Credit Union, Board Member, 2004-2008
              Northstar Mustang Club, Member; President, 2006-2007
                     Newsletter Editor, 1999-present




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                                                                  ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


STEELE, Dean D.

     National

            ASABE - American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers
            ASABE SW-241 Sprinkler Irrigation Committee, 1996-2000, 2002-present

     Regional

            Red River Valley Section of ASABE

     University

            Inter-College:
                Natural Resources Management Undergraduate Program, 1992-present;
                   Executive Subcommittee, 1994-present
                Natural Resources Management Graduate Program Steering Committee,
                   2000-present

     College

            College of Engineering and Architecture
                   Academic Affairs, 2003-2007, 2009-present

            College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources
                   See information in Inter-College area of the University section

     Extension

            Irrigation Task Force Committee/Water Spouts, 1991-present

     Department

            Accreditation, 2009-present
            Extension, 2009-present
            Graduate, 2009-present
            Promotion, Tenure, and Evaluation, 1998-present
            Scholarship, 2009-present
            Seminar, 2008-present
            ABEN Teaching-Research Faculty Position Search Committee, 2008

            Graduate Student Committees

                  Major Professor
                  Joshua Moeller, M.S. Agric. and Biosystems Engineering (start Summer 2009)
                  Kraig Nelson, M.S. Natural Resources Management (expected completion Summer 2009)



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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


D. Steele - continued

                  Examining Committee Member
                  Jack Brodshaug, M.S. Plant Sciences (expected completion Fall 2010)
                  Rahul Bajpai, M.S. Civil Engineering (not completed)
                  K.V. Nirodha De Silva, M.S. Natural Resources Management (completed Spring 2009)
                  Sarah Gegner, M.S. Soil Science, Plant Sciences (expected completion Summer 2009)
                  Andrea Travnicek, Ph.D. Natural Resources Management (completed Fall 2008)
                  Andrew Wilhelmi, M.S. Agric. and Biosystems Engineering (completed Fall 2008)

       Other

               Provided written reviews for the senior design reports for the ABEN program.
                  Also provided feedback at oral presentations by both ASM and ABEN
                  capstone students.




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WIESENBORN, Dennis P.

     International
            Journal of the Korean Society of Food Technologists, Editorial Board since 2003
            International Polymer Processing, refereed one journal article, 3/09
            External examiner for doctoral dissertation, Indian Institute of Technology-
                    Kharagpur, 5/09

     National
            American Oil Chemists’ Society (AOCS), Member
            Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society, Associate Editor since 2002
            Industrial Crops and Products, Refereed one journal article, 7/08
            Science and Engineering for a Biobased Industry and Economy, SDC-325
                    (formerly S-1007). Served as Vice President at USDA Waterfront Bldg. in
                    Washington D.C., Sept. 14-16, 2008.
            Invited panel member, NSF EFRI HyBi Bio Panel, 01/15/2009 - 01/16/2009,
                    Arlington, VA; review a subset of preliminary proposals to FY2009 EFRI
                    Solicitation NSF 08-599, Hydrocarbons from Biomass (HyBi).
     Regional
            Red River Valley Section of ASABE
            USDA-ARS, Fargo, invited reviewer for scientific manuscript

     College
            College of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Natural Resources (CAFSNR)
               CAFSNR PTE Committee, 2005-2008
               Served on the award panel for the CAFSNR junior faculty teaching award, Nov. 2008
               NDAES Project Review Committee, 2003-date

            College of Engineering and Architecture (CEA)
               CEA PTE Committee beginning 2009
     Department
            ABEN Biomass Systems Faculty Search, Chair, 2007-09
            ABEN Faculty Search - Dr. Zhulu Lin hired, Search Committee, 2008
            ABEN Curriculum Committee
            ABEN PTE Committee, 1995-date
            ABEN Senior Design Advisor, 2008-2009
               Project: Canola oil-based resin for composite material applications, Ross
                   Petersen, Mohammed Ansari, Aakanksha Rastogi, Vishal Verma
            Cereal and Food Science PTE Committee, 2008-date
            CSO Advisor Training workshop, 11/08
            Faculty mentor for Dr. Scott Pryor
            Food Safety Faculty Search Committee, 2009
            NCI Technical Director Search Committee, 2008
            Student Engineering Branch of ASABE, Advisor, beginning May, 2008


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


D. Wiesenborn – continued


              Graduate Student - Major Professor
                  Bhavnita Dhillon, Ph.D. Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, started Fall 2006,
                      anticipated completion Winter 2009.
                  Judith Espinoza-Perez, Ph.D. Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, started Fall
                      2006, anticipated completion Summer 2009.
                  Hongjian Lin, M.S. Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, started Fall 2008,
                      anticipated completion Summer 2010.
                  Andrew Wilhelmi, M.S. Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, started Spring
                      2007, completed Winter 2008.
              Graduate Student Examining Committee Member (active committees only)
                  Wajira Manamperi, Ph.D. Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, completion
                     anticipated in 2009
                  Vadukapuram Naveen, M.S. Cereal & Food Science, research proposal presented 2007,
                     passed thesis defense 5/09
                  Rachel Rorick, M.S, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, started Fall 2008,
                     anticipated completion Summer 2010
                  Harkanwal Sandhu, Ph.D. Cereal & Food Sciences, research proposal presented in
                     2006, preliminary exam 11/13/08, completion anticipated in 2009

      Other
              Evaluated SDSU ABEN faculty member for promotion and tenure, Fall 2008
              Invited technical peer reviewer by Industrial Commission of North Dakota, Renewable
                  Energy Council, for Renewable Energy Development Fund: 1 in 2008, 1 in 2009.
              Employed undergraduate students in Pilot Plant under supervision of Haagenson: Andrew
                  Krog, Sept-May; Mukesh Kumar Kansal, July-June; Shay Richter, Sept-May

      Service to Public
              2008 Presentations and tours of the Pilot Plant tours relating to the COE, canola biodiesel
                  and other research: ND Department of Commerce (Oct. 29), Harvest Bowl honorees
                  (Nov. 1), Neil Doty & guests (Nov. 14), NATURE program (June 2)
              Performed extraction of oil from one bushel of flaked specialty soybeans for Jerry Heise
                  and Vallabh Makadia of Monsanto and Titus Porter of Armfield, Oct. 1.
              Pressed 50 lb crambe seed for UND Chemical Engineering Dept bio-jet fuel project,
                  Sept. 3; dehulled and pressed 200 lb crambe seed for Blaine Schatz, Carrington REC,
                  Nov. 19, for use by Energy & Environment Research Center in bio-jet fuel project.
              Continue to provide assistance to Mark Askegaard in the area of small commercial
                  flaxseed milling
              Advised Mercedes Lee on high school biodiesel science fair project, Sept. 25 (project
                  advanced to national event)
              Job shadowing in process engineering for Fargo South High school student, Drew
                  Dahlvang, 5/09




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6. Courses Taught

   a. Fall Semester 2008

      Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABEN)
                                                                                        Major Total
      Number      Title                                                Credits Enrolled Enrolled                          Instructor
       110        Intro/Agricultural & Biosystems Engr .. 2 ............. 27 ...........34............. Thomas A. Bon
       189        Skills for Academic Success ................. 1 ............. 26 ...........33............. Leslie F. Backer
       255        Computer Aided Analysis & Design ..... 3 ............. 18 ...........23............. Dean D. Steele
       397        FE/Coop Ed/Internship .......................... 3 .............. 2 .............2.............. NDSU Co-op
       458        Food Process Engineering ..................... 3 ............. 12 ...........13............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
       473        Agricultural Power ................................ 3 ............. 23 ...........24............. Thomas A. Bon
       479        Fluid Power Systems Design ................. 3 ............. 17 ...........19............. Thomas A. Bon
       486        Design Project I ..................................... 2 ............. 21 ...........21............. Thomas A. Bon/Ganesh Bora
       491        Seminar ................................................. 1 ............. 19 ...........19............. Leslie F. Backer
       494        IS/Intl. Tractor Development ................ 2 .............. 1 .............1.............. Thomas A. Bon
       658        Food Process Engineering ..................... 3 .............. 2 .............2.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
       790        Graduate Seminar .................................. 1 .............. 3 .............3.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
       791        Temp/Trial Topics/Bioprocess Engr. .... 3 .............. 4 .............4.............. Scott W. Pryor
       798        Masters Thesis ....................................... 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Scott W. Pryor
       798        Masters Thesis ....................................... 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
       798R       Thesis Continued Registration .............. 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
       798R       Thesis Continued Registration .............. 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
       799        Doctoral Dissertation........................... 5-6 ............ 3 .............3.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
       799        Doctoral Dissertation............................. 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Scott W. Pryor
       799        Doctoral Dissertation........................... 3-6 ............ 2 .............2.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn

      Engineering (ENGR)
                                                                     Major Total
      Number Title                                  Credits Enrolled Enrolled                         Instructor
       402   Engineering Ethics/Social Resp. ........... 1 ............. 11 ..........166............ Thomas A. Bon

      Mechanical Engineering (ME)
                                                                      Major Total
      Number Title                                  Credits Enrolled Enrolled                            Instructor
       479   Fluid Power Systems Design ................. 3 .............. 0 ............17............. Thomas A. Bon

      Agricultural Systems Management (ASM)
                                                                                        Major Total
      Number      Title                                                Credits Enrolled Enrolled                          Instructor
       115        Fund/Agricultural Systems Mgmt ......... 3 ............. 20 ...........46............. Elton G. Solseng/Ganesh Bora
       125        Fabrication & Constr Technology ......... 3 ............. 14 ...........22............. Elton G. Solseng
       225        Computer Applic/Ag Systems Mgmt .... 3 ............. 20 ...........28............. Dean D. Steele
       354        Electricity/Electronic Applications ....... 3 ............. 20 ...........22............. Elton G. Solseng
       378        Machinery Principles/Management ....... 3 ............. 10 ...........14............. Elton G. Solseng
       454        Site Specific Agriculture ....................... 3 ............. 15 ...........18............. Ganesh Bora
       491        Seminar ................................................. 1 ............. 11 ...........11............. Leslie F. Backer
       496        FE/Teaching Asst. ASM 125 Lab ......... 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Elton G. Solseng
       496        FE/Teaching Asst. ASM 125 Lab (2) .... 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Elton G. Solseng
       496        FE/Dealership Management .................. 1 .............. 2 .............2.............. Leslie F. Backer




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      b. Spring Semester 2009

         Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABEN)
                                                                                         Major Total
         Number      Title                                              Credits Enrolled Enrolled                            Instructor
          263        Biological Materials Processing ............ 3 ............. 25 ...........34............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
          377        Numerical Modeling/ABEN.................. 3 ............. 17 ...........17............. Thomas A. Bon
          397        FE/Coop Ed/Internship .......................... 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. NDSU Co-op
          444        Transport Processes ............................... 3 .............. 9 .............9.............. Zhulu Lin
          464        Resource Cons/Irrigation Engineering .. 4 ............. 12 ...........12............. Dean D. Steele
          482        Instrumentation and Measurements....... 3 ............. 19 ...........20............. Thomas A. Bon
          487        Design Project II.................................... 2 ............. 18 ...........18............. Ganesh C. Bora
          494        IS/Genetic Engr/Sensing Applications .. 2 .............. 0 .............1.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
          496        Field Exp/Ag Tech Expo Participation.. 1 ............. 39 ...........41............. Leslie F. Backer
          499        ST/Biofuels............................................ 3 .............. 9 ............14............. Scott W. Pryor
          664        Resource Cons/Irrigation Engineering .. 4 .............. 2 .............5.............. Dean D. Steele
          682        Instrumentation and Measurements....... 3 .............. 2 .............3.............. Thomas A. Bon
          696        ST/Biofuels............................................ 3 .............. 2 .............2.............. Scott W. Pryor
          758        Appl. Computer Imag./Sens./Biosys. .... 3 .............. 3 .............4.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
          793        IS/Tutorial/Pract.Oper/Proces. Equip. ... 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
          798        Masters Thesis ....................................... 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
          798        Masters Thesis ....................................... 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Scott W. Pryor
          798        Masters Thesis ....................................... 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Xinhua Jia
          798R       Thesis Continued Registration .............. 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
          799        Doctoral Dissertation............................. 3 .............. 3 .............3.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
          799        Doctoral Dissertation............................. 6 .............. 1 .............1.............. Scott W. Pryor
          799        Doctoral Dissertation........................... 5-6 ............ 2 .............2.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn

         Engineering (ENGR)
                                                                        Major Total
         Number Title                                  Credits Enrolled Enrolled                         Instructor
          402   Engineering Ethics/Social Resp. ........... 1 ............. 14 ..........160............ Thomas A. Bon

         Agricultural Systems Management (ASM)
                                                                                       Major Total
         Number      Title                                            Credits Enrolled Enrolled                            Instructor
          125        Fabrication & Constr. Technology ........ 3 .............. 4 ............20............. Elton G. Solseng
          264        Natural Resource Mgmt Systems .......... 3 ............. 11 ...........16............. Xinhua Jia
          323        Post-Harvest Technology ...................... 3 ............. 18 ...........37............. Bradley J. Schmidt
          373        Tractors and Power Units ...................... 3 ............. 20 ...........40............. Elton G. Solseng
          374        Power Units Laboratory ........................ 1 .............. 6 .............8.............. Elton G. Solseng
          429        Hydraulic Power Principles/Appl ......... 3 ............. 22 ...........25............. Elton G. Solseng
          475        Management/Agricultural Systems ....... 2 ............. 14 ...........14............. Ganesh C. Bora
          496        Field Exp/Ag Tech Expo Participation.. 1 ............. 24 ...........28............. Elton G. Solseng
          496        FE/Dealership Management .................. 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Leslie F. Backer
          496        FE/Teaching Asst. ASM 125 Lab ......... 1 .............. 0 .............3.............. Elton G. Solseng
          496        Field Experience .................................... 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Leslie F. Backer

         Natural Resource Management (NRM)
                                                                     Major Total
         Number Title                               Credits Enrolled Enrolled                           Instructor
          264   Natural Resource Mgmt Systems .......... 3 .............. 0 ........... 22............. Xinhua Jia



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c. Summer Semester 2009

  Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABEN)
                                                                                 Major Total
  Number      Title                                             Credits Enrolled Enrolled                            Instructor
   397        FE/Coop Ed/Internship .......................... 3 .............. 3 .............3.............. NDSU Co-op
   496        Field Experience .................................... 1 .............. 1 .............1.............. Leslie F. Backer
   798        Masters Thesis ....................................... 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
   799        Doctoral Dissertation.......................... 1,2,1 ........... 3 .............3.............. Suranjan Panigrahi
   799        Doctoral Dissertation............................. 6 .............. 1 .............1.............. Scott W. Pryor
   799        Doctoral Dissertation............................3,7 ............ 2 .............2.............. Dennis P. Wiesenborn
   799        Doctoral Dissertation............................. 3 .............. 1 .............1.............. Shafiqur Rahman


  Agricultural Systems Management (ASM)
                                                                 Major Total
  Number Title                                  Credits Enrolled Enrolled                            Instructor
   494   Indiv.Study/Exam and Contest Prep...... 1 .............. 0 .............1.............. Elton G. Solseng
   496   FE/Dealership Management .................. 1 .............. 3 .............3.............. Leslie F. Backer




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   7. Description of Teaching Methodology, Lab Books, Equipment, Etc.

      a. Fall Semester 2008

         Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering – Fall 2008

         ABEN 110    Introduction to Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering            2 Cr
                     Students were assigned to attend the Engineering Expo at the
                     Fargodome to visit companies that hire engineers. I incorporated
                     new material on Biosystems and food engineering extending this
                     material to approximately 25% of the course. My goals are to
                     extend this to approximately 30% of the course in the future
                     which would balance course quite well between basics, ABEN
                     options, and Biosystems. I also want to incorporate some
                     software applications in the future. Interaction between the
                     ABEN 486 class was continued and plans are to continue this
                     interaction in the future with Dr. Bora who will be assuming
                     teaching responsibilities for ABEN 486 in the future.
                     - T.A. Bon

         ABEN 189    Skills for Academic Success                                       1 Cr
                     More emphasis was placed on career planning and resume
                     development in response to feedback from previous students.
                     Students seem to better understand that knowledge in this area is
                     critical to success as they look for internship opportunities.
                     - L.F. Backer

         ABEN 255    Computer Aided Analysis & Design                                 3 Cr
                     The text for the Excel part of the course was revised. The
                     AutoCAD text was updated to the 2009 version of the software.
                     The textbook was a much simpler text compared with those used
                     in previous years. I plan to consider a different text for 2009.

                     In-class observation of instruction by a peer was conducted.

                     Objectives for 2009 include: a.) obtain feedback from other
                     instructors on their approaches to assigning and grading
                     homework, b.) consider obtaining peer feedback in a new way,
                     c.) revise the course content and/or text based on notes collected
                     during fall 2008, and d.) consider a new textbook for the
                     AutoCAD portion of the course (including a different textbook
                     author and a textbook updated for AutoCAD 2010 software).
                     - D.D. Steele

         ABEN 458/658 Food Process Engineering                                       3 Cr
                   This course underwent major revision this year, with the aim of
                   more closely integrating this with ABEN 263. Unlike ABEN 263,
                   this course includes a significant process design experience. Four

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           student teams of two or three students per team developed and
           demonstrated working prototype systems for the continuous,
           steady-state distillation of methanol-water solutions. These projects
           culminated in a formal one-hour-long demonstration with sample
           collection and data analysis followed by oral presentations of 15-20
           min/team. The course also included two demonstrations in the Pilot
           Plant (evaporator, spray dryer), a field trip to a corn ethanol plant
           (Otter Tail Ag Resources, Fergus Falls), and two process industry
           presentations (Craig Froehling, Cargill; Peter Polansky, ADM).
           - D.P. Wiesenborn

ABEN 473   Agricultural Power                                              3 Cr
           Two laboratory exercises were added. The exercises incorporated
           Matlab/Simulink software to model elementary component kinematics.
           - T.A. Bon

ABEN 479   Fluid Power Systems Design                                       3 Cr
           Two computer exercises were updated. The exercises were performed by
           using the latest version of Automation Studio. Two computer exercises
           were also incorporated using Matlab/Simulink. The two laboratory
           exercises included one as an introduction to Simulink and the second
           exercise introduced students to modeling simple hydraulic systems using
           the Simulink add on, Simhydraulics.
           - T.A. Bon

ABEN 486   Design Project I                                                      1 Cr
           I continued the interaction with the Communications Department to
           work with the senior design teams to provide more assistance and
           practice in preparing course presentations. All teams made project
           introductions presentations to an audience of their peers, cooperators,
           interested students and faculty. Dr. Ganesh Bora was a co-instructor
           with the class and did approximately 20% of the responsibility during
           the fall semester. I turned all files over to Dr. Bora as he will be taking
           full-responsibility for the class in the 2009 academic year.
           - T.A. Bon

ABEN 491   Seminar                                                           1 Cr
           Identified appropriate web sites for potential job opportunities.
           Included discussion about applying on-line and how it differs from
           the traditional hard-copy application.
           - L.F. Backer

ABEN 791   Temp/Trial Topics/Bioprocess Engineering                          3 Cr.
           The course used Bioprocess Engineering: Basic Concepts (2nd Ed)
           by Shuler and Kargi as a textbook. Supplementary notes were also
           given from courses the instructor took as a graduate student at
           Cornell University. The class was taught in a basic lecture format
           but with only four graduate students enrolled, it was possible to

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                     have good discussions. Students also led discussions on current
                     journal articles that related to course materials.
                     - S.W. Pryor

         Engineering – Fall 2008

         ENGR 402 Engineering Ethics/Social Responsibility                         1 Cr
                  During the course I have continued include course sessions with
                  outside speakers. Mr. Howard Dahl from Amity has been a popular
                  guest speaker in the course. In addition, there has been a panel
                  discussion with industrial representatives organized by the NDSU
                  Career Center. This has proven to be a popular session with students.
                  - T.A. Bon

         Non-Credit Academic Course and Workshop
                     Engineering Ethics Review Session in Preparation for the FE
                     Exam, presented as part of the two day review session for
                     engineering students. The workshop was held in October and
                     was 50 minutes in length.
                     - T.A. Bon

         Mechanical Engineering – Fall 2008

         ME 479      Fluid Power Systems Design                                        3 Cr
                     See notes under ABEN 479.
                     - T.A. Bon

         Agricultural Systems Management – Fall 2008

         ASM 115     Fundamentals of Agricultural Systems Management                    3 Cr
                     I added another worksheet and also distributed them earlier. I also
                     returned them faster so students could use them to study. I gave the
                     students the answers to the worksheet problems and noted that they
                     needed to show all work to get credit. I also noted on tests that
                     most students could select the appropriate formula. I started using
                     Blackboard to announce tests assignments, worksheet due dates,
                     and other course specific information.
                     - E.G. Solseng

         ASM 125     Fabrication & Construction Technology                              3 Cr
                     A second fall section was added to provide room for Freshman.
                     The enrollment level was increased in the spring so everyone
                     could get in. The large classes put a strain on space. With the
                     larger group size, one has to be more concerned with students
                     being absent or not participating. The teaching assistants kept the
                     group focused and also allowed me more freedom to move from
                     group to group. As class size grows, I see more problems with


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           safety due to how close people are, noise level, and the ability to
           watch over all the students. Blackboard was implemented.
           - E.G. Solseng

ASM 225    Computer Applications in ASM                                     3 Cr
           The text for the Excel part of the course was revised. The
           AutoCAD text was updated to the 2009 version of the software.
           The textbook was a much simpler text compared with those used
           in previous years. I plan to consider a different text for 2009.
           In-class teaching evaluation was not done. However, in-class
           observation was done for ABEN 255 and is expected to be
           applicable to ASM 225 because the courses are similar.
           Objectives for 2009 include: a.) obtain feedback from other
           instructors on their approaches to assigning and grading
           homework, b.) consider obtaining peer feedback a new way, c.)
           revise the course content and/or text based on notes collected
           during fall 2008, and d.) consider a new textbook for the
           AutoCAD portion of the course.
           - D.D. Steele

ASM 354    Electricity/Electronic Applications                               3 Cr
           Kits were assembled prior to the PLC lab and Sensor lab. The
           kits were tested so the students didn’t get as frustrated because
           the sensor they chose did not seem to work. Students seemed to
           enjoy this lab. With the adoption of the new text, the Power
           Point slides were re-developed and new ones were added.
           Example problems were selected, and worked to find the
           solutions. Blackboard was implemented.
           - E.G. Solseng

ASM 378    Machinery Principles/Management                                      3 Cr
           An expanded trip to farm equipment dealerships was a good
           addition to the course and it will be continued. The sprayer lab
           was better than in the past. Small sprayers would help the lab.
           Next year, a sprayer expert will be invited to talk to the students.
           Blackboard was implemented.
           - E.G. Solseng

ASM 454    Site Specific Agriculture                                         3 Cr
           This course utilized the delivery of instruction of precision
           technology for site specific agriculture. Use of GPS, GIS, remote
           sensing, maps, variable rate technology, yield monitoring
           systems, and sensors in agriculture was taught. Students learned
           to make maps with Surfer and ArcMap software programs. Free
           resources from Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium,
           www.umac.org, were also used to make maps with NDVI. Three
           GPS receivers were tested for their operation and accuracy as
           part of the laboratory. More equipment is needed to effectively
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                     instruct students so they can learn state-of-the-art technology to
                     optimize resources for agriculture.
                     - G.C. Bora

         ASM 491     Seminar                                                           1 Cr
                     Identified appropriate web sites for potential job opportunities.
                     Included discussion about applying on-line and how it differs from
                     the traditional hard-copy application.
                     - L.F. Backer

         ASM 496     FE/Teaching Asst. ASM 125 Lab                                   1 Cr
                     Education students and ASM students assisted with the labs. The
                     education majors showed more interest in the methods and,
                     overall, handled questions better than ASM students. Both did
                     well in keeping the class focused and moving in the right
                     direction.
                     - E.G. Solseng


      b. Spring Semester 2009

         Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering – Spring 2009

         ABEN 263    Biological Materials Processing                                    3 Cr
                     The course included five laboratory exercises in the Pilot Plant
                     (canola seed cleaning and analysis, canola screw pressing,
                     viscometry, liquid concentration by climbing-film evaporator, and
                     double-pipe heat exchanger) and two in the ABEN Instrument Lab
                     (dataloggers, PLCs). Enrollment increased to 34, which strained our
                     capacity to provide a teaching lab. A portion of the class volunteered
                     to perform some lab exercises on Thursday afternoons, which allowed
                     smaller groups of students the opportunity for hands on experience in
                     the Pilot Plant. New and/or additional lab equipment units should be
                     identified for Spring 2010. Field trips were arranged for Dakota
                     Specialty Milling in Fargo and Cargill Corn Milling in Wahpeton;
                     however, the tour to Dakota Specialty Milling was cancelled due to
                     the flood. Tours last year to Busch Agricultural Resources and Cass-
                     Clay Creamery were excellent; however, my plan is to vary the tour
                     locations each year and to invite interested graduate students as well.
                     One guest speaker was scheduled: Alex Friedt with Dakota Growers
                     Pasta. This course made use of a class website via Blackboard, an
                     electronic textbook which supported 90% of classroom topics, and six
                     out-of-class problem sets.
                     - D.P. Wiesenborn

         ABEN 377    Numerical Modeling of Bioresource Systems                            3 Cr
                     Nothing new to report.
                     - T.A. Bon

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ABEN 444/644 Transport Processes                                             3 Cr
          New faculty member, Dr. Zhulu Lin taught this course for the
          first time. There were no students enrolled in the graduate
          section.
          - Z. Lin

ABEN 464/664 Resource Conservation/Irrigation Engineering                4 Cr
          A new textbook was selected for the course. The text selected
          was the fifth edition of Soil and Water Conservation
          Engineering. We used the fourth edition in 2007 and the course
          was not taught in 2008. New lecture notes, problems sets, and
          exams were prepared and used. Preparation was made for field
          trips with larger class sizes by taking and passing the large
          passenger van training. Field trips and laboratories were pre-
          arranged in 2008. Preliminary planning was done to outline the
          course, plan labs, etc.
          - D.D. Steele

ABEN 482/682 Instrumentation and Measurements                                3 Cr
           Due to flood, course basically maintained as in 2008.
           - T.A. Bon

ABEN 487    Design Project II                                                 2 Cr
            I took over responsibility of the Senior Design Project course
            from Dr. Tom Bon in Spring 2009. Experts from the
            Communication Department helped students prepare the posters
            and presentations for the Agricultural Technology Expo. I
            communicated with the collaborators of the project teams to
            constantly guide them so students could manage the time lost
            mitigating floods in Fargo, ND. The projects were completed in
            time and the teams presented their findings professionally. The
            presentations were attended by students and faculty of ABEN, the
            collaborators, and many interested persons. I guided the students
            in report writing and gave constant feedback on their work.
            - G.C. Bora

ABEN 494    IS/Genetic Engr/Sensing Applications                           2 Cr
            This independent study consisted of one biotech student. A new
            project was designed for cell growth analysis and monitoring.
            - S. Panigrahi

ABEN 499/696 ST/Biofuels                                                   3 Cr
          Some small changes were made to the syllabus and reading list but
          the reading assignments were mostly available online in the form
          of government-sponsored reports, etc. There was a good balance
          of lecture and discussion throughout the semester. Evaluation was
          based on 2 exams, a group project, and 10 HW assignments. HW

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                     assignments were open-ended with instructions and guidelines for
                     submission of short writing assignments about the given topic or
                     the development of quizzes based on the student's perception of the
                     most important points for the topic. Blackboard was used
                     extensively for such things as communication, HW submission,
                     and reading assignments. Students were asked to rate their
                     knowledge of course topics at the beginning and end of the
                     semester showing strong perception of student learning. This
                     information was confirmed through other evaluation means.
                     Midterm and final student feedback surveys showed strong support
                     of teaching methodologies and material.
                     - S.W. Pryor

         ABEN 758    Applications in Computer Imaging/Sensing/Biosystems         3 Cr
                     New material and project problems were incorporated. A new
                     textbook was introduced and new homework assignments, class
                     projects, and computer software were developed.
                     - S. Panigrahi

         ABEN 793    IS/Tutorial/Practical Oper./Processing Equipment                 1 Cr
                     - D.P. Wiesenborn


         Engineering – Spring 2009

         ENGR 402 Engineering Ethics/Social Responsibility                      1 Cr
                  See notes from Fall 2008. One lecture was changed to provide
                  more overview of various codes of ethics and discussion on FE
                  type exam questions.
                  - T.A. Bon

         Non-Credit Academic Course and Workshop
                     Engineering Ethics Review Session in Preparation for the FE
                     Exam, presented as part of the two day review session for
                     engineering students. The workshop was held in April and
                     the session was 50 minutes in length.
                     - T.A. Bon


         Agricultural Systems Management – Spring 2009

         ASM 125     Fabrication & Construction Technology                            3 Cr
                     Attendance was good and it was reflected in the grades. Two
                     labs were dropped because of the flood. The important points
                     from dropped labs were added to other labs or were covered
                     in the lectures.
                     - E.G. Solseng


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ASM 264    Natural Resource Management Systems                                3 Cr
           New materials were added to the lectures and to labs. Pre- and
           post-tests were administered as part of learning assessment
           activities. All lecture notes, assignment answers, and exam
           answers were posted on the course Blackboard. Teaching speed
           was adjusted for each section based on students’ learning ability.
           Peer review of teaching was used to improve teaching methods.
           - X. Jia

ASM 323    Post-Harvest Technology                                             3 Cr
           Flood related: The class group project assignment was deleted due
           to lack of available time. Interview assignment: This assignment
           was changed from an extra credit, to an assigned project; involved
           interviewing a previous generation operator of their farming
           operation, or some other farming operation, preferably someone
           who’s seen at least two generational transitions. The focus was on
           what changed over the course of that time period. What things
           would they have done differently? What were related to accidents
           and/or safety issues? he goal of this assignment was three fold:
           - Help the student understand how farming changes over time even
               though they may not think it does or even observe that it does;
               their exposure to the operation is so relatively short compared to
               the often times long history of the operation. Students are
               typically the 3rd or 4th generation operator.
           - Help the student think forward in their planning process, whether
               for that operation or anything they do in life – plan ahead.
           - Safety – this is a primary focal point of the class and the topic of
               different safety issues and prevention are covered repetitively.
           Given the extended absence away from class, a few things in the
           class were repeated for continuity.
           - B.J. Schmidt

ASM 373    Tractors and Power Units                                          3 Cr
           I received more questions and worked more problems in and out
           of class. Students seemed to have more problems with algebra
           and critical thinking. The number of non-math related problems
           was also up, possibly indicating that students are looking at the
           material closer. After the PowerPoint presentations were put on
           Blackboard, students had more questions.
           - E.G. Solseng

ASM 374    Power Units Laboratory                                             1 Cr
           The new tractor and dynamometer worked well. Because the
           tractor was not tested at Nebraska, test results could not be
           compared. This is the last year of small engines as the engines
           are poor quality and difficult to work on.
           - E.G. Solseng


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         ASM 429     Hydraulic Power Principles/Appl                                 3 Cr
                     Because of the flood, labs were cancelled and completing
                     projects was difficult. Also, one project for two labs does not
                     work well. The hydraulic test stand caused a lot more problems
                     this semester. The diagrams in the lab manual are not adequate
                     and need to be redone.
                     - E.G. Solseng

         ASM 475/675 Management/Agricultural Systems                                 2 Cr
                    The course consisted of classroom teaching and a team project
                    to solve a real life agricultural system problem. A new book,
                    “Agricultural Systems Management: Optimizing Efficiency and
                    Performance,” by Robert M. Peart and W. David Shoup, was
                    introduced for this course. New topics on project management,
                    economic feasibility studies, reliability of ag systems, and
                    optimization of resources were discussed during the class. A
                    lecture on a business development plan was delivered by Mr.
                    Scott Handy, an alum of the ASM program, and currently CEO
                    of Cass County Electric Cooperatives, Fargo, ND. Ms. Mary
                    Pull, the Director of NDSU Center for Writers, demonstrated
                    how to write technical reports. The course instructor constantly
                    guided the students with their projects and provided feedback on
                    report writing.
                    - G.C. Bora

         ASM 496     FE/Teaching Asst. ASM 125 Lab                                       1 Cr
                     I used students that had not taken the lab and did not plan to take
                     it because I was short of assistants. Both students said the
                     learned a lot and thought they should have taken the class. They
                     worked well but needed more assistance to be helpful.
                     - E.G. Solseng

         Natural Resource Management – Spring 2009

         NRM 264     Natural Resource Management Systems                                3 Cr
                     See notes under ASM 264.
                     - X. Jia

         Agricultural Systems Management – Summer 2009

         ASM 494     Individual Study/Exam and Contest Preparation                   1 Cr
                     This individual study was set up to give Education students an
                     idea of how written exams and hands-on activities are conducted
                     for high school students. More explicit expectations need to be
                     formalized so students understand exactly what, and more
                     importantly when, they need to turn in work.
                     - E.G. Solseng

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8. Experiment Station Project Reports


   PROJECT:       ND01459 Intelligent Sensors for evaluation of food quality and safety

   OBJECTIVES:

   The overall goal of this project is to develop and/or adapt suitable forms of advanced
   information and sensor technologies for rapid and accurate evaluation of quality and
   safety of different agricultural and food products. Within this framework, the long-term
   goal of this project is to develop portable and miniaturized intelligent sensors that can be
   used for rapid monitoring and/or evaluation of safety/quality of food and agricultural
   products. As meat is a staple food product, beef is used in this project as model food
   product for the development of sensors. It is planned that research can be extended for
   other meat products such as pork, chicken, turkey or Bison meat and other agricultural
   products. Specific objectives for this research project follow.

   1. Develop, integrate and evaluate different electronic nose modules for spoilage
      characterization of meat products and characterization of meat contamination.

   2. Quantify the production of volatile chemicals/vapors during spoilage of meat
      products and correlate the rate of production with bacterial plate counts.

   3. Determine the production of volatile chemicals in meat in the presence of specific
      pathogenic bacteria and correlate them with bacterial population.

   COOPERATING AGENCIES AND PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS:

   Dr. Suranjan Panigrahi, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, (Co-PI)
   Dr. Catherine Logue, Veterinary and Microbiology

   NATURE OF WORKS AND RESULTS:

   This hatch project just got started. This year, the scope of this project was very much
   same with the other project ND 05044.

   SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT:

   Computer-based advanced information technologies and intelligent sensor technologies
   have tremendous potential for evaluation and characterization of food and agricultural
   products. This research investigates the applicability of electronic nose technologies for
   predicting the safety of meat. Thus, this project addresses one of the critical needs of the
   region and of the nation.

   FUTURE WORK PLAN:

   Current work is underway to test our developed sensor systems for real world
   applications.

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      TECHNICAL PAPERS/PUBLICATIONS:

      Mohapatra, P., S. Panigrahi, Catherine, L, and J. Sherwood. 2009. Evaluation of Surface
      Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based sensing methods for Salmonella detection in
      packaged beef. Abstract/Technical Presentation at the Institute of Biological Engineering
      Conference. March 19-21, Santa Clara, CA.

      Mohapatra, P. and S. Panigrahi.2009. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based
      Technique for Detecting Individual Compounds Associated with Salmonella
      Contamination in Packaged Beef. Abstract/Poster. Institute of Food Technologist. June 6
      – 9, 2009. Anaheim. CA.

      Sindhuja Sankaran, Suranjan Panigrahi, Sanku Mallik, Andrea A. Hanson and Bhushan
      Gaddam, “Biomimetic olfactory sensing for detection of volatile organic compound
      associated with Salmonella contamination in meat”, poster presented at 14th Annual
      Conference of Institute of Biological Engineering. Santa Clara, CA, March 19-21, 2009.

      ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:

      USDA-CSREES for financial support of this study.




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ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                         July 2008 - June 2009

PROJECT:       ND01460 - Development of Water Management Practices and Tools for
               Improved Crop Production and Natural Resource Management.

OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

Strategies for improved management of water in both irrigated and non-irrigated
agricultural settings in North Dakota are needed to help producers improve their
competitive position. In arid and semi-arid regions, with annual precipitation in the
ranges of 100 to 400 mm and 400 to 600 mm, respectively, water is the most limiting
factor for crop production. Much, if not all, of North Dakota falls within these ranges of
annual precipitation. Improvement of water use efficiency, i.e., crop yield per unit water
used, remains one of the largest technological challenges facing agriculture in general,
not just irrigated agriculture. An example of research to address this issue is the inter-row
water harvesting (IRWH) studies we have conducted for irrigated potato production;
these are expected to be applicable to other crops.

An improved understanding of, and ability to model and measure, components of the
hydrologic cycle and its applications to agriculture are also important facets of
agricultural water management. For example, remote sensing and geographic information
system techniques can be applied on a watershed or basin scale to predict crop water use
or evapotranspiration (ET) in the larger context of water utilization and the sustainability
of irrigation. Specifically, understanding of water utilization under irrigated vs.
nonirrigated conditions will help quantify the degree to which irrigation increases ET in
the climatic, crop, and soil conditions of the Devils Lake basin. The resulting information
can help managers and politicians determine whether or not to pursue development of
additional irrigation as a means of flood mitigation in the basin.

OBJECTIVES:

1. To evaluate planting systems and related technologies for increased water use
   efficiency and yield.
2. To adapt, evaluate, and/or design sensors, equipment, and simulation models for water
   management and hydrologic applications in irrigated and non-irrigated agriculture.

COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:

Lowell A. Disrud, Associate Professor (Emeritus), ABEN
Francis X.M. Casey, Associate Professor, Soil Science
Harlene Hatterman-Valenti, Associate Professor, Plant Sciences
Paul E. Hendrickson, Irrigation Specialist, Carrington Research Extension Center
David G. Hopkins, Associate Professor, Soil Science
Thomas F. Scherer, Associate Professor, ABEN
Dean D. Steele, PI, Associate Professor, ABEN




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      NATURE OF WORK AND RESULTS:

      Objective 1) A manuscript on development of a potato planter is in review at the ASABE
      journal Applied Engineering in Agriculture.

      Objective 2) Following is the executive summary from a report submitted to the research
      sponsor. The following items should be noted:
      a.      The report was intended to be a final report on the project, but wet weather and
      late harvest prevented soil sampling at five of the ten test sites in the fall of 2008. Soil
      sampling work will continue in 2009 under a one-year, no-cost extension of the project.
      An addendum to the report will be submitted after completion of soil sampling,
      laboratory analyses, and interpretive work.
      b.      The resignation of the research specialist who developed an hourly ET map for a
      portion of the Devils Lake basin led us to arrange a subcontract in 2007 with a third party
      to develop an ET map for the entire 2006 season for part of the basin. Our effort for this
      reporting period focused on correlating the resulting ET map to spatially-distributed crop
      and soil data and interpreting the results. A parallel effort focused on developing our own
      ET modeling capabilities based on remote sensing and this proceeded as far as modeling
      net radiation and soil heat flux, while latent heat flux modeling remains to be completed.
      Additional work will be needed to complete our ET modeling capabilities, develop
      additional validations of the ET mapping results with other crop water use models, and
      develop validations of the ET mapping results with ground-based water balance
      measurements.

      Executive Summary for the Devils Lake Basin Water Utilization Test Project:
               Excessive precipitation since 1993 has led to rising water levels in Devils Lake
      and the surrounding basin, causing flooding and extensive property damage and loss.
      Solutions to mitigate flooding have included a proposal to use irrigation to divert water to
      the atmosphere via crop water use or evapotranspiration (ET). The Devils Lake Basin
      Water Utilization Test Project was conducted to determine whether irrigation can be used
      as a flood mitigation tool while providing an economic benefit. The primary objectives of
      the Test Project are to: 1) determine how much additional water from Devils Lake and
      associated water bodies can be utilized via sprinkler irrigation, 2) evaluate the effects of
      irrigation on representative soil map units within the basin, and 3) extrapolate the results
      from the test project to the broader basin.
               The Test Project was conducted on ten irrigated sites for three full growing
      seasons (2006 through 2008). Instrumentation was installed to monitor rainfall, irrigation,
      soil moisture, ground water levels, and downward fluxes of water through the soil profile.
      A remote sensing approach was used to estimate ET on a pixel-by-pixel basis for over
      one-half of the Devils Lake basin. Seasonal estimates of ET were determined for various
      crops for a best-case year with high evaporative demand and low rainfall (2006) to
      compare ET for irrigated crops on the Test Project sites with ET for largely nonirrigated
      crops in the remainder of the basin. Similar overlays of ET were used to compare ET for
      spring wheat and corn on selected soils. Spring wheat was selected for these simulations
      because of its predominance in cropped area in the basin, while corn was chosen as a
      contrast to spring wheat because of corn's longer growing season and higher expected
      seasonal ET.


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         Extensive soil sampling was conducted to monitor salinity, morphology, and other
soil properties at the start of the project, throughout its duration, and at about half of the
sites after three seasons of irrigation. Field-scale surveys were conducted each spring and
fall to monitor changes in the extent and severity of soil salinity.
         Results from ET modeling component of the Test Project indicate that irrigation
appears considerably less promising as a flood mitigation tool than previous studies
suggested. Specifically, a previous study suggested that about 9.8 inches of additional
water utilization could be attained via irrigation in the Devils Lake basin compared with
average values of water use for nonirrigated crops. Our results indicate that for the 2006
growing season, estimated ET was approximately 1.4 inches greater for irrigated corn at
two sites in the test project compared with irrigated and nonirrigated corn in a larger
study area within the basin. The 2006 season was relatively high in evaporative demand
and low in rainfall compared with other years from 1995 through 2008, perhaps
indicating that the 1.4 inches may be in the high range of the additional ET possible with
irrigation. Moreover, at two other sites in the Test Project, the ET for irrigated corn was
below the average for corn in the larger study area; this result further diminishes the
prospects for using irrigation to increase ET as a means of flood mitigation in the basin.
The dominant soil series in the basin did not exhibit strong gains in estimated median ET
for either spring wheat or corn compared with the median ET values for all soils. The
differences between soils were generally smaller than the differences between corn and
spring wheat. Specifically, switching from spring wheat to corn is expected to increase
ET because of corn's longer growing season.
         The ET modeling results lead us to believe that the Pilot Project, that is,
expansion of the Test Project to include more irrigated area, should not proceed on the
basis of using irrigation as a flood mitigation tool in the Devils Lake basin. The result of
categorizing the seasonal ET estimates into soil and crop groups indicates that perhaps
the best way to increase ET in the basin is to switch crops from spring wheat to corn. In a
more general sense, longer-season crops and full-cover vegetation offer higher seasonal
values of estimated ET compared with relatively short-season crops.
         The results for soil salinity have not been completed to date because additional
sampling during the 2009 growing season will be required. Half of the sites were
inaccessible for fall 2008 soil sampling because of wet conditions and late or no crop
removal. The Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board approved a one-year no-
cost project extension to attempt completion of the soil sampling field work in the 2009
growing season. Subsequent laboratory work and data analysis will be conducted during
late 2009 and early 2010.

PUBLICATIONS:

Citable Publications
Steele, D.D., T.A. Bon, and J.A. Moos. 2009. Capstone design experiences in the
        development of a two-row plot scale potato planter. Appl. Engr. Agric. (in review,
        manuscript EDU-07553-2008.R1).
Steele, D.D. 2009. Devils Lake Basin Water Utilization Test Project. Report submitted to
        the Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board, 9 June. Fargo: N. Dak. St.
        Univ.



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      Presentations and Proceedings
      Hopkins, D.G., and D.D. Steele. 2009. Water balance and salinity changes in the Devils
            Lake irrigation project. Presented at the Soil and Soil/Water Training workshop
            sponsored by the NDSU Ext. Serv. Fargo, ND, 21 Jan.
      Hopkins, D.G., and D.D. Steele. 2008. Devils Lake Basin Water Utilization Test Project:
            2008 Summary and Preliminary Findings. Presented at the December 2008
            meeting of the Devils Lake Basin Joint Water Resource Board in conjunction with
            the 2008 North Dakota Water Users Convention, Bismarck, ND, 4 Dec.




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ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                      July 2008 - June 2009

PROJECT:       ND01463 – Use of Northern Great Plains Agricultural Resources for
               Bioenergy and Bioproduct Development

OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

The continued development of high-quality, environmentally benign, and economical
biobased energy and products will add value to current agricultural crops for the benefit
of producers, processors, and consumers in North Dakota and throughout the nation.
Processors will have a higher value revenue stream for energy and important co-products
and producers will see higher selling prices because of higher demand. Additional
products will also lead to economic development and more jobs in rural economies where
processing plants tend to be located. A vibrant biobased economy will require the
utilization of a wide variety of biomass feedstocks including traditional crops,
agricultural residues, and dedicated energy crops. Biobased industries producing
biodiesel, ethanol, and other biobased products will provide farmers with a strong market
for their products, fuel for their vehicles and farm machinery, and more jobs for their
communities. The aim of this work is to contribute to development of new products from
agriculture that have previously been derived exclusively from petroleum.

OBJECTIVES:

The specific objectives for this research project are:

1. Bioenergy – Evaluate and increase the technical viability of using agricultural
   residues, dedicated energy crops, and other biomass resources to produce sustainable
   and economically viable fuels for transportation, heating, or electrical generation.

2. Bioproducts – Increase the technical and economic viability of commercial and
   industrial bioproducts either independently or as co-products of related bioenergy
   production processes. Accomplishments related to this objective are also expected to
   affect Objective 1 through the economic impacts of co-product development on
   bioenergy processing.

COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:

Dr. Scott Pryor, Assistant Professor, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, (PI)
K.C. Chang, Professor, Cereal and Food Science
Cole Gustafson, Agribusiness and Applied Economics
Nurun Nahar, Research Technician, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Wajira Asanga Manamperi, Graduate Research Assistant, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Rachel Rorick, Graduate Research Assistant, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Chad A. Ulven, Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
Dennis P. Wiesenborn, Professor, Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
American Crystal Sugar Company (ACSC)



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      NATURE OF WORK AND RESULTS:

      Objective 1: The goals of Objective 1 were addressed primarily through two separate
      projects in my laboratory: 1) Use of sugarbeet pulp for ethanol production, and 2)
      studying the impact of dilute acid pretreatment conditions on efficacy of cellulase and
      cellobiase enzymes.
               Specific goals of the sugarbeet pulp ethanol project are to take advantage of
      unique feedstock properties and determine feasibility of sequential enzyme treatments to:
      1. Produce separate fermentable sugar streams without conventional pretreatment
      2. Increase cellulose loading rates
      3. Increase final ethanol titers
               Two commercial enzyme systems (Viscozyme and Pectinex) were tested and both
      were effective at sugarbeet hydrolysis. Pectinex was chosen as the enzyme to continue
      with because using it resulted in better separation of the sugars derived from cellulose
      and those derived from pectin and hemicellulose. The use of a protease did not improve
      carbohydrate polymer hydrolysis and was discontinued. Initial testing was done with wet
      beet pulp and results were confirmed with pressed pulp. Pressed pulp will be used for all
      remaining experiments to maximize sucrose yields from initial processing.
               Solids loading rates were increased to 8% without a significant impact on sugar
      yields. Although it appeared that this was an upper level of solids loading based on
      mixing, increasing to 10% led to improved sugar yields (g sugars/g pulp) and
      concentrations (g/L) compared with the base 8% loading. Increasing further to 12% led
      to decreases in yield and concentration unless solids were added in a fed-batch manner.
      In this case, sugar concentrations were comparable to the 10% loading but yields were
      lower than the 10% loading and comparable to the 8% loading.
               Initial fermentations have been completed with both E. coli KO11 to ferment the
      pectin and hemicellulose-derived sugars. This fermentation is followed by a
      simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using additional cellulase enzymes and
      Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Initial studies have showed that the E. coli fermentations
      have been limited by pH control of the media and this problem is being addressed.
               The second project pertaining to Objective 1 concerns the testing of three
      conventional cellulase enzyme systems with biomass (switchgrass) treated with a range
      of dilute acid pretreatment conditions. This was done to test the adequacy of standard
      activity assays for biomass of varied quality and presence of inhibitors. Results showed
      that one of the enzyme systems (Accelerase 1000; Genencor, Rochester, NY) resulted in
      sugar yields that were significantly lower than the other systems despite equal enzyme
      loadings. This suggests that standardized activity assays cannot be taken by themselves
      when determining enzyme loading rates for a given process.

      Objective 2: Work on objective 2 has continued with the use of canola proteins as a
      feedstock for biobased plastics and composite materials. Canola meal protein isolates
      blended with polyesters were used to prepare injection-molded plastic specimens. The
      plasticization effect of four types of plasticizers (glycerol, sorbitol, polyethylene glycol,
      and polyvinyl alcohol) was investigated. Properties of canola based plastics including
      tensile strength, flexural strength, modulus, and water absorption were studied.
      Morphology of the fractured surfaces of tensile specimens was examined using scanning
      electron microscopy. Plasticized specimens showed a ductile type of fracture where as
      the specimens produced without plasticizers showed a brittle failure. The use of glycerol

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as a plasticizer resulted in the highest values for tensile strength, elongation, and
toughness. Water absorption of plasticized specimens were generally lower than that of
unplasticized specimens. The highest flexural strength and modulus were obtained using
PVA as a plasticizer.

FUTURE WORK PLAN:

Objective 1: Work on sugarbeet pulp ethanol will include stepwise hydrolysis and
fermentations using E. coli K011 with pectinase/hemicellulase enzymes, and S.
cerevisiae with cellulase enzymes. Further exploration of increasing solids loading rates
and final ethanol titers will be completed.
        Methods for detection and quantification of common inhibitors (e.g. furfural,
HMF) from acidic pretreatments will be identified. These inhibitors will be tracked along
with sugar and ethanol yields during hydrolysis and fermentation of biomass samples.
        Testing will begin on the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of
AFEX-pretreated and denisfied biomass to determine the impact of densification and
subsequent processing.

Objective 2: We will quantify the impact of solubilization and precipitation pH on the
functional properties of resulting canola protein isolates and biobased plastics produced
form them. The impacts of acetylation, succinylation and denaturation (via SDS and
SDBS) on canola-based plastics will be determined.

PUBLICATIONS:

Gustafson, C., Pryor, S., Wiesenborn, D., Goel, A., Haugen, R., and Wilhelmi., A. 2008.
      Economic feasibility of supplementing corn ethanol feedstock with fractionated
      dry peas: A risk perspective. In Transition to a Bioeconomy: Risk, Infrastructure
      and Industry Evolution, 90-97. Berkeley, California: Farm Foundation.
Espinoza-Pérez, J. D., D.M. Haagenson, S.W. Pryor, C.A. Ulven, and D.P. Wiesenborn.
      2009. Production and Characterization of Epoxidized Canola Oil, Transactions of
      the ASABE, (accepted/in press).
Wilhelmi, A.J., D. P. Wiesenborn, C. R. Gustafson, S. W. Pryor. 2009. Models for
      Fractionation of Field Peas to Supplement Corn Ethanol, Applied Engineering in
      Agriculture, (accepted/in press).

PRESENTATIONS:

Rorick, R., N. Nahar, and S. Pryor. 2009. Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Fermentation of
       Sugar Beet Pulp, Paper No. 09-6193. ASABE International Meeting. Reno, NV,
       June 21-24, 2009. (oral plus paper)
Pryor, S.W. and N. Nahar. 2009. Impact of Dilute Acid Pretreatment Conditions and
       Enzyme System on Switchgrass Hydrolysis, Paper No. 09-6026. ASABE
       International Meeting. Reno, NV, June 21-24, 2009. (oral plus paper)
Manamperi, W.A., J. Sehrawat, M. Fuqua, C. Ulven, S. Pryor. 2009. Influence of
       Plasticizers on Properties of Polymers Made from Canola Protein Polyester
       Blends, Paper No. 09-6327. ASABE International Meeting. Reno, NV, June 21-
       24, 2009. (oral plus paper)

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      Manamperi, W.A., K.C. Chang, and S. Pryor. 2008. Thermal and functional properties
             of canola meal proteins precipitated at different pH values, Paper No. RRV08-
             803. 2008 CSBE/ASABE North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg,
             Canada Sept 19-20, 2008. (oral plus paper)
      Manamperi, W.A., M. Fuqua, C. Ulven, S. Pryor. 2008. Preparation of plastic specimens
             from canola meal protein isolate, Paper No. RRV08-P02. 2008 CSBE/ASABE
             North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg, Canada Sept 19-20, 2008.
             (poster)
      Rorick, R., N. Nahar, and S. Pryor. 2008. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pectin and
             hemicellulose in sugar beet pulp, Paper No. RRV08-601. 2008 CSBE/ASABE
             North Central Intersectional Conference, Winnipeg, Canada Sept 19-20, 2008.
             (oral plus paper)
      Gustafson, C., S. Pryor, D. Wiesenborn, A. Goel, R. Haugen, and A. Wilhelmi. 2008.
             Investing in Fractionation Technology to Mitigate Corn Supply Risk, at NC-1014:
             Agricultural and Rural Finance Markets in Transition Annual Meeting Kansas
             City, MO, September 25-26, 2008. (oral)
      Pryor, S.W., M. Lenling, and D.P. Wiesenborn. 2008 Integrated Use of Field Pea Starch
             and Corn for Ethanol Production. paper 083999, 2008 ASABE International
             Meeting. Providence, Rhode Island, June 29 – July 2, 2008. (oral plus paper)
      Manamperi, W.A., K. C Chang, D. P. Wiesenborn, and S.W. Pryor. 2008. Alteration of
             Osborn Sequence Extraction for Isolation of Canola Proteins. Paper
             083924, 2008 ASABE International Meeting, Providence, Rhode Island, June 29
             – July 2, 2008. (oral plus paper)

      ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:

      The project for hydrolysis and fermentation of sugar beet pulp for ethanol production is
      funded by the American Crystal Sugar Company, ND SBARE, and the Sugar Beet
      Research and Education Board of MN and ND. Canola protein bioplastic research is
      supported by a USDA/CSREES NRI grant.




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ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                       July 2008 - June 2009

PROJECT: ND01464–Impact of Water Availability on Crop Production and Natural Resources

OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

Water availability is a function of both water quantity and water quality. Management of
water quantity and control of water quality can improve crop production and preserve
natural resources. This project is to determine evapotranspiration rates for various crops
and land types and compare different evapotranspiration measurement methods to
improve our understanding of water management. Water quality will be monitored and
controlled for sustainable land and water management. The results of this project will
provide a comprehensive water balance analysis as well as an evaluation of soil and water
quality changes due to agricultural water management practices.

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives are to determine evapotranspiration rates for various crops and soil types
and compare measurement methods and to monitor and control water quality for
sustainable land and water management.

COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:
Xinhua Jia, PI, Assistant Professor, ABEN Dept.

PUBLICATIONS:

Citable Publications

Jia, X., T.F. Scherer, T. M. DeSutter, and D. D. Steele. 2008. Change of soil hardness
and soil properties due to tile drainage in the Red River Valley of the North. ASABE
Annual Meeting, Paper No. 084369, June 30 – July 2, 2008, Providence, Rhode Island.

Presentations

Jia, Xinhua. 2008. Impact of tile drainage on water management and water quality in the
Red River Valley. NDSU Environmental Conservation Science program, Fargo, ND.
March 18, 2008.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

ND State Water Commission for a seed grant, ND Department of Health for chemical analysis
of water samples, ND Game and Fish Department for funding a graduate student summer
salary, USDA CSREES, and NRCS for funding, NDSU Graduate School for funding of
graduate student’s salary, and ND Ag. Experimental Station for support of this project.




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                       July 2008 - June 2009

      PROJECT:       ND05044 - Intelligent Quality Sensors (IQS) for Food Safety

      OBJECTIVES:

      Long-term Goal: The long-term goal of this research is to develop miniaturized portable
      sensors that can provide quality information to users about specific food and agricultural
      products. Because the meat and grain industries are important segments of U.S. agriculture
      and food industry, the research will focus on these food products in this project.

      Research Hypothesis: Volatile chemicals/gases are generated because of the fungal and
      bacterial metabolism of food products. They can be used as a food quality indicator to
      alert the public to food product safety concerns. Electronic noses or odor sensors can be
      developed and adapted for this purpose.

      Short-term Goal: The short term goal of this project is to develop hand held portable
      sensor for quality and safety evaluation of food products.

      COOPERATING AGENCIES AND PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS:

      Suranjan Panigrahi, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
      Catherine Logue, Department of Veterinary and Microbiology
      Clifford Hall, Department of Cereal Science
      Wenfang Sun, Department of Chemistry
      Curt Doetkott, Information and Technology Services
      Jacob Glower, Electrical and Computer Engineering

      RESULTS:

      Our research project focuses on the development and evaluation of intelligent sensors
      (based on electronic nose technology) for evaluation of quality and safety of selected
      food products, spoilage of beef, contamination of beef (with Salmonella). We have
      adopted sensor-fusion concept to investigate the capability of infrared gas sensing
      mechanism for quality and safety characterization of the selected food products included
      in our study.

      Sensors were developed to detect volatile organic compounds indicative to Salmonella
      contamination in packaged meat. In addition, biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance
      (QCM) based olfactory sensors were developed to detect acid and alcohol at low
      concentration at room temperature. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) based system
      integrated with synthetic peptides was developed to sense acetic acid, 3-methyl-1-butanol
      and 1-hexanol at low concentration. The two synthetic peptides (Pep1 and Pep2) were
      developed based on the binding site analysis of olfactory receptor (simulated) and
      odorant binding protein (actual) to detect specific gases, respectively. Pep1 based sensor
      was sensitive to acetic acid, while Pep2 was sensitive to alcohols, namely 3-methyl-1-
      butanol and 1-hexanol. The sensors were sensitive to acid and alcohols at low


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concentration with a lower limit of detection and linear calibration correlation coefficient
of < 5 ppm and >0.90, respectively.

Parallel approach was also undertaken to detect acetone, a compound of interests
associated with Salmonella contamination in packaged beef using SERS (surface
enhanced Raman Spectroscopy). Silver sol was used to detect various concentration of
acetone using integrated SERS system. A LDL of 11.47 ppm was obtained for acetone.
Additional investigations were conducted to develop pattern recognition techniques for
our developed olfactory sensor system. The maximum overall average accuracy for
classification of Salmonella contaminated packaged beef was found to be 85%.

SIGNIFICANCE/IMPACT:

Computer-based advanced information technologies and intelligent sensor technologies
have tremendous potential for evaluation and characterization of food and agricultural
products. This research investigates the applicability of electronic nose technologies for
predicting the safety of meat and grain products. Thus, this project addresses one of the
critical needs of the region and of the nation.

FUTURE WORK PLAN:

Current work is underway to test our sensor systems for real world applications.

PUBLICATIONS:

Mohapatra, P., S. Panigrahi, Catherine, L, and J. Sherwood. 2009. Evaluation of Surface
Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based sensing methods for Salmonella detection in
packaged beef. Abstract/Technical Presentation at the Institute of Biological Engineering
Conference. March 19-21, Santa Clara, CA.

Mohapatra, P. and S. Panigrahi.2009. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy based
Technique for Detecting Individual Compounds Associated with Salmonella
Contamination in Packaged Beef. Abstract/Poster. Institute of Food Technologist. June 6
– 9, 2009. Anaheim. CA.

Sindhuja Sankaran, Suranjan Panigrahi, Sanku Mallik, Andrea A. Hanson and Bhushan
Gaddam, “Biomimetic olfactory sensing for detection of volatile organic compound
associated with Salmonella contamination in meat”, poster presented at 14th Annual
Conference of Institute of Biological Engineering. Santa Clara, CA, March 19-21, 2009.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

USDA-CSREES for providing funding for this project.




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                        July 2008 - June 2009

      PROJECT:       ND12185 – Center of Excellence for Oilseed Development

      Contributes to ND 01458/SDC325/S1041: The Science and Engineering for a Biobased
      Industry and Economy, D. Wiesenborn, PI

      OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

      Capability for high throughput analysis of canola seed was established and put into
      action, especially to develop varieties useful to the biodiesel industry. Consequently,
      3,100 canola samples from seven North Dakota locations were analyzed within four
      weeks in August-September, 2008 for winter nursery selection, and an additional 350
      were analyzed in March for summer 2009 selection. Using this high-throughput
      approach, seed quality data can be provided to the canola breeder in a timely fashion to
      accelerate development of new canola lines. Future seed analysis must also include
      analysis of biodiesel derived from advanced seed selections. The conventional process
      for extracting, refining and transesterifying the oil, as well as employing the various
      analyses for biodiesel quality, is a painstaking task. Work is underway to accomplish the
      extraction and transesterification simultaneously, a process known as in situ
      transesterification. This project is in partnership with the Plant Sciences and Agribusiness
      & Applied Economics Departments of NDSU, the North Central REC, and Monsanto,
      and was selected for a second Center of Excellence award in 2008.

      OBJECTIVES:

      Objective 1. Develop and improve high-throughput methods for analysis of canola seed,
      oil and biodiesel

      Objective 2. Evaluate canola samples for seed, oil and biodiesel quality

      COOPERATING INVESTIGATORS:

      Rachel Brudvik, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
      Darrin Haagenson, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
      Hongjian Lin, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
      Phil McClean, co-PI, Plant Sciences
      Mukhlesur Rahman, Plant Sciences
      Dennis Wiesenborn, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
      Bill Wilson, PI, Agribusiness & Applied Economics




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NATURE OF WORK AND RESULTS:

Objective 1. Develop and improve high-throughput methods for analysis of canola seed,
oil and biodiesel

Efforts are underway to evaluate the impact of canola germplasm source on biodiesel
quality. In situ transesterfication is a method of producing fatty acid methyl esters
(FAME) directly from seed, where conventional transesterfication reactions require that
oil is extracted and degummed prior to transesterification. Establishing a canola in situ
transesterfication protocol may provide a rapid screening tool for assessing elite
germplasm biodiesel quality parameters.

Preliminary in situ alkaline transesterification was conducted at 50oC using 25 g canola
seed, containing 40% oil, in 500 mL Erlenmeyer flasks agitated by an orbital shaker at
200 rpm. Seed was first ground with a commercial coffee grinder. Reaction parameters
varied in 35 tests were reaction time, seed moisture content, methanol:oil ratio and KOH
(catalyst):oil ratio (Table 1). These tests led to the selection of the following baseline
reaction conditions which achieved high extraction and conversion to biodiesel: 16 h, 0.2
% moisture, and a 330:1:1.15 molar ratio of methanol:oil:KOH.

Table 1. Preliminary in situ transesterification of canola seed: select tests. Relative
reactants are expressed as molar ratios, and yield is expressed as crude biodiesel
weight relative to starting seed oil weight.
   Time (h)        Moisture (%)       Methanol:Oil          KOH:Oil            Yield (%)
      4                4.4               330:1               1.15                 58
      16               4.4               340:1               0.94                 26
      16               0.2               220:1               0.85                 40
      16               0.2               330:1               0.85                 44
      16               0.2               440:1               0.85                 46
      16               0.2               550:1               0.85                 56
      16               0.2               330:1               1.15                 87
      16               0.2               330:1               1.39                 87
      16               0.2               330:1               1.56                 62

The baseline in situ conditions were then scaled up to 40 g oil per flask, to compare the
quality of in situ biodiesel with biodiesel obtained from screw-pressed, degummed canola
oil via conventional alkaline transesterification. Canola seed for this study was obtained
from two North Dakota locations, Prosper and Williston. Conventional transesterification
was carried out at a molar ratio of 6:1:0.2 of methanol:oil:KOH at 60ºC for 1 h with
mechanical mixing, and optimized in situ reactions were conducted with a molar ratio of
330:1:1.2 of methanol/oil/KOH. Biodiesel samples from conventional and in situ
reactions were water washed, and dried with heat under vacuum or anhydrous Na2SO4.
Biodiesel quality was then determined by measuring kinematic viscosity, acid number,
total glycerin, moisture content, oxidative stability index (OSI) and cloud point (Figure 1).
Biodiesel from the in situ method was generally acceptable and similar to that from the
conventional method. In situ biodiesel was less acceptable for acid number, but superior
for its lower total glycerin and higher oxidative stability. Cold soak times were well


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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      below the ASTM limit of 360 sec; however, a more stringent limit may be applied in the
      future for winter use in the North-central U.S.




      Our upcoming work with the in situ method will systematically optimize reaction
      parameters for both yield and quality, examine the effect of seed size reduction method,
      and identify modifications to the method that will allow analysis of a greater number of
      canola seed samples.

      In the fall of 2008, our lab participated in the Canadian Grain Commission’s (CGC) 2008
      Lab Proficiency and Certification Program to confirm the accuracy of oil and protein
      content obtained using our NIR. The NDSU canola breeding program depends heavily
      upon our NIR data. Our NIR results for CGC samples were submitted to the CGC for
      evaluation, thereby allowing us to benchmark the accuracy and precision of our NIR with
      other participating laboratories. According to the results from the CGC, our NIR
      performed very well when compared to other laboratories. Our lab was certified based on
      the Canadian Grain Commission’s canola and rapeseed recommending committee 2008-
      2009 guidelines. Our laboratory will participate in this program again in the Fall of 2009.




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Objective 2. Evaluate canola samples for seed, oil and biodiesel quality.

Samples harvested in 2008-2009 were cleaned and analyzed using a Perten DA 7200 NIR
Analyzer. This analyzer allows for a very high sample throughput of 400 samples per
day, requires only a small amount of sample, and is nondestructive. Results from these
analyses are presented in Tables 1 and 2 and Figure 2. Desired seed qualities include a
high content of oil and oleic acid and low content of saturated (palmitic and stearic) and
polyunsaturated (linoleic, linolenic) fatty acids. Additional seed and oil characteristics,
especially characteristics of biodiesel produced from seed oil, will be monitored in the
future advanced selections. The complete data record was shared with Dr. Mukhlesur
Rahman, and aided his selection of varieties for further use in the breeding program.

    Fall 2008 Canola Campaign
     o 3100 samples
     o 7 North Dakota locations (Minot, Langdon, Carrington, Hettinger, Prosper,
        Rugby, Williston)
     o 7 undergraduate and graduate student assistants

    Table 1. Ranges and averages from Fall 2008 Canola Samples. Components marked with
    an asterisk are fatty acids, and their amounts are expressed as a proportion of the oil present.
                                                                 Low          High        Average
                                     % Moisture                  4.2          14.9           8.1
                                     % Oil_db                    28.3         56.8          48.2
                                     % Protein                   15.3         35.2          23.9
                                     % Palmitic*                 1.2           6.6           4.0
                                     % Stearic*                  0.5           3.8           1.5
                                     % Oleic*                    41.8         84.4          61.7
                                     % Linoleic*                 8.3          27.1          20.0
                                     % Linolenic*                4.2          21.7           8.9


                                  1800

                                  1600

                                  1400

                                  1200
                   # of Samples




                                  1000

                                  800

                                  600

                                  400

                                  200

                                    0
                                         30.0-34.9   35.0-39.9    40.0-44.9   45.0-49.9   50.0-54.9   55.0-60.0
                                                                        % Oil_db


                Figure 2. Distribution of Oil Content in Canola Samples from Fall 2008




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


          Spring 2009 Canola Campaign
           o Samples from winter nursery in Chile
           o 350 samples

          Table 2. Ranges and averages from Spring 2009 Canola Samples. Components marked with
          an asterisk are fatty acids, and their amounts are expressed as a proportion of the oil present.

                                               Low      High     Average
                            % Moisture         6.0       7.6        6.8
                            % Oil_db           46.7     54.3       50.8
                            % Protein          18.4     26.5       22.4
                            % Palmitic*        3.3       4.4        3.7
                            % Stearic*         1.1       2.2        1.7
                            % Oleic*           56.0     75.0       66.0
                            % Linoleic*        16.7     23.5       19.4
                            % Linolenic*       7.2      11.5        9.3



      PRESENTATIONS

      Haagenson, D. (presenter), R. Brudvik, H. Lin, and D. Wiesenborn. 2009. Development
      of high-throughput measurement of canola biodiesel cold flow properties, IOP-P. 100th
      AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo, Orlando, FL, May 3-6. (poster)

      Lin, H., D. Haagenson, R. Brudvik, D.P. Wiesenborn. 2009. Influence of seeds moisture
      on in situ alkaline transesterification of canola seeds for biodiesel production, Session
      FPE 19 - Challenges in Biodiesel Production, Distribution and Engine Performance.
      ASABE Annual International Meeting, Reno, NV, Jun 21-24. (oral & paper)

      Poster and oral presentations on the Oilseeds Development Center of Excellence, in
      collaboration with W. Wilson, P. McClean, M. Rahman, D. Haagenson, R. Brudvik as
      follows: BioOpportunities Conference, Ramada Plaza Suites, Fargo, Sept. 29 (poster);
      Northern Canola Growers Association plus ND Department of Commerce, NDSU
      Alumni Center, Oct. 29 (oral).




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ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                        July 2008 - June 2009

PROJECT:       ND43500 - Canola-based Epoxy Resins for Bio-based Plastic Composites

Contributes to ND 01458/S1041: The Science and Engineering for a Biobased Industry
and Economy, D. Wiesenborn, PI

OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

The development of canola oil-based resins for commercial application to composite
materials is the long-term objective of this project. Epoxies are already a well-
established type of resin used in composites, and thus the current focus is on blends of
canola oil-based epoxy and synthetic epoxy resins. The supporting objectives are stated
below. By achieving these objectives, we are demonstrating that canola oil-based resins
are suitable for high-value applications, thereby helping to create a new market for
canola, fostering new business opportunities in the North Central U.S., and lessening our
nation’s dependence on imported petroleum.

OBJECTIVES:

Objective 1. Scale up the conversion of canola oil to high-quality epoxy resin.

Objective 2. Produce competitive composite materials which are high in canola resin content.

Objective 3. Identify suitable applications and partners for the transfer of this technology.

COOPERATING INVESTIGATORS:

Judith Espinoza-Perez, Grad. Res. Assist., Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Cole Gustafson, Co-PI, Agribusiness & Applied Economics
Darrin Haagenson, Research Specialist, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Scott Pryor, Assistant Professor, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Chad Ulven, Co-PI, Mechanical Engineering
Dennis Wiesenborn (PI), Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Undergraduate ABEN students: Mukesh Kumar, Ross Peterson, Tafseer Ansari,
       Aakanksha Rastogi, Vishal Verma

NATURE OF WORK AND RESULTS:

Funding for this project commenced in Fall 2006. Production of the canola oil-based
epoxy resin (epoxidized canola oil, ECO) has progressed very well. For example,
process conditions have been identified that achieve >98% conversion with 90% yield
ECO, by adapting processes reported for other epoxy resins to ECO. Our process uses a
heterogeneous catalyst that is readily recovered and reused, unlike the liquid acid
catalysts traditionally used. We also showed that t-butyl alcohol can replace the toluene
solvent, thereby eliminating a significant workplace and environmental hazard. An
additional alternative was found, when using the heterogeneous catalyst, which is that the
solvent can actually be omitted without loss of product quality; yield decreased 10%, but

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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      this loss was largely eliminated with catalyst reuse. Our ECO process has thus far been
      scaled up to 300 g batches, and a new reactor recently underwent its first test to produce a
      1-kg batch of ECO. This scaled-up reactor will enable us to better demonstrate the
      practical applications of canola epoxy resin.

      Our ECO was blended with a synthetic epoxy
      system at 30, 35 and 40% of the total resin
      weight, combined with E-glass and cured
      (Figure 1). Although the resulting composite
      specimens had lower flexure strength and
      glass transition temperature than the zero-ECO
      control, the flexure modulus and toughness
      were similar to the control (Table 1). Thus,
      composites prepared using ECO-blends should
      perform well in applications requiring
      flexibility and toughness. Alternative curing
      agents will be explored to enhance flexure          Figure 1. E-glass composite samples
      strength and glass transition temperature.          prepared with 35% canola epoxy resin


      Table 1. Properties of composite samples prepared using 0, 30, 35 and 40% canola
      oil-based epoxy resin (ECO) blended with ResinfusionTM 8603 cured with ECA
      100KA.




      Composites such as those shown in Figure 1 may be used to create strong, light-weight
      exterior shields for machinery. A demonstration of the practical application of
      composites containing ECO was undertaken in 2008-09 by a group of senior-level
      students in the capstone design course for Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering at
      NDSU. A number of students in this department voluntarily participate in the national
      ASABE quarter-scale tractor competition, and the NDSU team placed 8th in the nation in
      last year’s event (Figure 2). The students anticipate that, because of competition weight
      restrictions, the low weight of ECO-composite shields relative to steel shields will give
      the team a competitive advantage. An entirely new tractor must be created for each
      competition, and the hood for the 2009 competition (Figure 3) was designed with the
      intention of incorporating canola epoxy resin.




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Figure 2. NDSU entry in 2008 Quarter-scale
tractor competition                             Figure 3. Hood design for 2009 NDSU
                                                quarter-scale tractor

Practical demonstration of the use of ECO will be invaluable as we explore the transfer of
ECO to industrial applications, much as demonstrations of biodiesel in bus fleets and
public vehicles aided public recognition and acceptance of that new, bio-based product.

ECO may be further modified for a wide variety of other applications. For example,
ECO can be converted to a polyol for conversion to a canola-based polyurethane, or it
may be converted to acrylics. We produced test samples of acrylated canola oil which
was cured using UV light by Dr. Chen in the Center for Nanoscale Science &
Engineering of NDSU. UV-curing will be attractive for some industrial applications, and
we will pursue funding to further this line of research.

Much work remains to be completed during this current, funded third year of the project.
Engineering data obtained under objectives 1 and 2 will be the foundation of cost
estimates as these relationships will delineate conversion rates and quantities of inputs
required. An industry analysis by Standard Industry Classification (SIC) code will reveal
commercial demand within the Northern Plains region as well as the rest of the country.
A competitive analysis will compare net delivery costs of new composites developed
with existing products, including transportation, by supplier. The above analyses will be
used to identify potential industry partners and specific applications, and ultimately to
measure performance and predict product costs in the most promising applications.

Outreach/Extension Audiences

This research is showcased during tours of the NDSU Pilot Plant, which in 2008 included
tours for Undersecretary of Agriculture Gail Buchanan, the NATURE program, ND
Department of Commerce, and NDSU Harvest Bowl honorees. Other visitors to the Pilot
Plant in recent years included Governor Hoeven, Senator Conrad, North Dakota
Empower, and various government staff and news media personnel who accompanied
these visits. This research was also presented via posters or talks in 2008 to ND Research
& Technology Conference, Fargodome; BioOpportunities Conference, Ramada Plaza
Suites, Fargo; and Northern Canola Growers Association, NDSU Alumni Center. This
research was also cited in the November 2008 issue of Biomass Magazine (J. Kram,
“Plastics from the Prairies”).

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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



      Key results to date on composite properties were presented at the 2009 annual meeting of
      the American Society of Agricultural & Biological Engineering (ASABE) in Reno, NV.
      Two papers on our ECO work were previously presented at ASABE meetings in 2008.
      Manuscripts based on the first two objectives were submitted to Transactions of the
      ASABE in 2009. The level of outreach activity is anticipated to increase for 2009-2010,
      as the tangible outcomes have increased in number and significance.

      PUBLICATIONS:

      Espinoza-Pérez, J. D., D.M. Haagenson, S.W. Pryor, C.A. Ulven, and D.P.
      Wiesenborn. 2009. Production and characterization of epoxidized canola oil,
      Transactions of the ASABE, accepted June 2009.

      Espinoza-Perez, J.D., D. Haagenson, R. Brudvik, C.A. Ulven. D.P. Wiesenborn.
      2009. Epoxy resin from high-oleic oils applied to composites, ASABE Paper No. 090001.
      ASABE Annual International Meeting, Reno, NV, Jun 21-24.

      Presentations:

      Kumar, M., J.D. Espinoza-Perez, D. Haagenson and D.P. Wiesenborn. 2008. Epoxidation
      of canola oil utilizing green solvents and recycled catalyst. ASABE/CSBE Intersectional
      Conference, Winnipeg, MAN, September 19-20. (Presented by Kumar)




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ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                        July 2008 - June 2009

PROJECT: FAR0011509 – Evaluation of Ozone as an Antimycotoxin and
Microbiocide

Contributes to ND01461/NC1023 - Improvement of Thermal and Alternative Processes
for Food

OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

Ozonated water is reported to be effective in reducing the microbial load in foods such as
fruits and vegetables. Ozonated water may also be an effective alternative to chlorine in
treating durum used for pasta and barley used for malt, thereby increasing the value of
infected grain. Work completed in the ABEN Department will allow collaborators in
other departments to better monitor and control the use of ozonated water.

OBJECTIVES (ABEN DEPT PORTION):

Objective 1. Produce ozonated water with sustained, high levels of ozone.
Objective 2. Evaluate effectiveness of ozonated water as a surface microbiocide for
durum wheat.

The corresponding objective (Objective B) of ND1461/NC1023 is to: measure and model
process dependent kinetic parameters which affect food quality and safety attributes.

COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:

Bhavnita Dhillon, Grad. Res. Assist., Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Ken Hellevang, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Frank Manthey, Cereal & Food Sciences
Dennis Wiesenborn, Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering
Charlene Wolf-Hall, Vet & Microbiological Science

NATURE OF WORK AND RESULTS:

Objective 1. Produce ozonated water with sustained, high levels of ozone.

A system for producing ozonated water, which includes integrated dissolved ozone
monitoring, was developed. The highest ozone concentration of 16.6 mg/L was obtained
using distilled water (pH 6.5) at 7 °C, and 21.8 mg/L was obtained in an acetic acid
solution (pH 2) at 15 °C. The system performance parameters; decay constant (0.07 to
0.30 min-1), mass transfer coefficient (0.44 to 0.63 min-1), and solubility ratio (0.21 to
0.49) were similar to the literature values under similar conditions. These parameters
may be used to better understand the limits to further improvements in performance and
scale-up of the process.



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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      Objective 2. Evaluate effectiveness of ozonated water as a surface microbiocide for
      durum wheat.

      Durum wheat was washed with ozonated water and analyzed for yeast, mold and aerobic
      bacteria. The comparative effect of wheat washing was studied with five distilled wash
      water types (Table 1). The wheat grains were washed for 3 min (wheat: water is 1:2) and
      were analyzed immediately for yeast and mold count and aerobic plate count. Ozonated
      water was only slightly effective at reducing yeast and mold count, compared to the dry
      grain control, but effectiveness was much improved in combination with acetic acid. Use
      of acetic acid + ozonated water reduced the yeast and mold count by 4 log10 CFU/g
      versus a distilled water wash; this is equivalent to destruction of 99.99% of yeast and
      mold. The next series of studies will make use of a fluid-bed system to achieve better
      contact of water with the grain surface. Also, efforts are under way to further boost the
      ozone concentration.

      Table 1 - The effect of different washing treatments on total yeast and mold count
      (YMC) and total aerobic plate count (APC) of durum wheat grain.




      CONCLUSIONS:

      This research has highlighted two areas for further study. First, the ozonated water
      showed a pronounced antimicrobial effect only when used in combination with 1% acetic
      acid. Although acetic acid does not have residue issues as does chlorine, future research
      should be conducted to strive to eliminate microbes using ozonated water alone.
      Ozonated water alone can have a significant antimicrobial effect if used at higher
      dissolved ozone concentration. Knowing current system performance and how it relates
      to system design, it is possible to achieve even higher dissolved ozone concentration, for
      example, by increasing gaseous ozone concentration. Another component of this research
      could be to find the ozonated water additives that can be used in least amount (mg/L) to
      increase dissolved ozone concentration, have an antimicrobial effect, and are also
      acceptable by cereal industry standards. Second, industry may find washing treatment
      expensive since washing results in the addition of more moisture to grain than required
      (before milling), hence the process requires a drying step. To address this concern, a
      washing system and process can be designed to accomplish rapid application of ozonated
      water, thorough moisture removal from surface, and rapid, mechanical removal of free
      water. This process helps accomplish the washing without undue drying costs or undue
      risks of grain spoilage.

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PUBLISHED ABSTRACT:

Dhillon, B., D. Wiesenborn, C. Wolf-Hall and F. Manthey. 2008. Evaluation of ozonated
water as an antifungal and antimicrobial treatment of durum wheat grain. 2008 AACC
International Annual Meeting: Diversity of Grains, Sept 21-24, Honolulu, HI, abstract in
Cereal Foods World 53:A25.

PUBLICATION:

Dhillon, B., D. Wiesenborn, C. Wolf-Hall and F. Manthey. Development and evaluation
of an ozonated water system for antimicrobial treatment of durum wheat. Journal of
Food Science, accepted June 2009.




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                       July 2008 - June 2009

      PROJECT:       FAR0013879/ND05047 – Impact of subsurface drainage on water
                     availability in the Red River Basin

      OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

      A wet weather cycle in the Red River Basin region since 1993 has brought the
      groundwater level closer to the soil surface in many areas. Subsurface drainage (SSD)
      can be an effective way to maintain crop production where shallow groundwater exists
      over a poorly drained soil or where soil salinity has been elevated due to high water
      tables. However, releasing drainage water into the Red River modifies the water balance
      and water quality (water availability), which, in turn, may disrupt the existing ecology
      and hydrological balance of the regional watershed and wetlands. In this project, one of
      the most important parameters in the water balance, evapotranspiration (ET), will be
      measured using eddy correlation, scintillometer, and soil moisture deficient on SSD and
      undrained fields. The ET rates are also compared with a satellite-based remote sensing
      model (SEBAL). It is also expected to develop remote sensing algorithms to identify
      fields with SSD installed.

      OBJECTIVES:

      The objectives of this project are to: (1) To conduct comprehensive water mass balance
      measurements of drained and undrained fields, with emphases on validation of
      evapotranspiration estimates by satellite-based remote sensing model - SEBAL, using
      ground-based measurements by eddy correlation, scintillometer, and soil moisture
      sensors, and their inter-comparison. (2) To develop remote sensing algorithms for
      identifying fields with subsurface drainage installed. (3) To extend results gained from
      this seed grant project over a larger spatial scale, watershed or regional, through a
      standard USDA NRI proposal.

      COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:

      Xiaodong Zhang, Associate Professor, Earth Science and Policy, University of North
         Dakota, Grand Forks, ND
      Dean D. Steele, Associate Professor, P.E., ABEN
      Xinhua Jia, PI, Assistant Professor, ABEN Dept.

      PUBLICATIONS:

      Citable Publications

      Jia, X., X. Zhang, and D. D. Steele. 2008. Comparison of sensible heat flux
      measurements by a large aperture scintillometer and eddy correlation method. ASCE
      World Environmental & Water Resources Congress (EWRI) Annual Meeting, May 17-
      21, 2009, Kansas City, MS.



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                                                          ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Presentations

Jia, X., X. Zhang, and D. D. Steele. 2008. Comparison of sensible heat flux
measurements by a large aperture scintillometer and eddy correlation method. ASCE
World Environmental & Water Resources Congress (EWRI) Annual Meeting, May 17-
21, 2009, Kansas City, MS.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

NSDA CSREES NRI for providing funding for this project.




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                         July 2008 - June 2009

      PROJECT:       FAR0014033 – Feasibility of the use of tile drainage for subsurface irrigation
                     in the Red River Valley & its impact on soil chemical & physical properties

      OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

      Tile drainage is a process of removing excess subsurface water from the soil. Due to
      increased rainfall and prompted by higher land values and better crop prices, the use of tile
      drainage has rapidly increased in North Dakota. The increased rainfall and high water table
      have also caused salinity to become a problem. Tile drainage is a promising way to control
      and reduce salinity and maintain the water table for wet soils. At the present time, the
      amount of tiled land in North Dakota is unknown. Therefore, the impact of tile drainage on
      the soil and water resources is also unknown. This project explores the possibility to control
      the water table through subirrigation and evaluate soil and water quality changes.

      OBJECTIVES:
      The objectives of this project are to: 1) determine the feasibility of using the tile drainage
      for subirrigation to enhance crop production in the RRV; 2) evaluate the changes of the
      soil chemical and physical properties overlying the drained and drained-subirrigated areas
      compared to untreated areas; 3) monitor drainage water quantity and quality, ground
      water depth and water quality in the drained, drained and subirrigated, and controlled
      areas; and 4) determine the impact of moderate SAR irrigation water on the dispersivity
      and hydraulic conductivity of soils near the drain tiles used for subirrigation.

      RESULTS:
      It is feasible to use the tile drainage for subirrigation to enhance the crop production. In
      2008, corn yield for tiled and tiled/subirrigated were 5% and 10% higher than that for the
      untiled field, respectively.

      COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:

      Thomas M. DeSutter, Assistant Professor, Soil Science
      David G. Hopkins, Associate Professor, Soil Science
      Thomas F. Scherer, Associate Professor, ABEN
      Dean D. Steele, Associate Professor, P.E., ABEN
      Xinhua Jia, PI, Assistant Professor, ABEN Dept.

      PUBLICATIONS:

      Citable Publications
      Jia, X., T.F. Scherer, T. M. DeSutter, and D. D. Steele. 2008. Change of soil hardness
      and soil properties due to tile drainage in the Red River Valley of the North. ASABE
      Annual Meeting, Paper No. 084369, June 30 – July 2, 2008, Providence, Rhode Island.




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                                                           ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Presentations
Jia, Xinhua. 2008. Impact of tile drainage on water management and water quality in the
Red River Valley. NDSU Environmental Conservation Science program, Fargo, ND.
March 18, 2008.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

ND State Water Commission for providing funding and ND Department of Health for
chemical analysis of water samples for this project.




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ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


      ANNUAL PROJECT REPORT                                         July 2008 - June 2009

      PROJECT:       FAR0014098 – Tile drainage and subirrigation evaluations in Richland
                     County for effects on soil and water quality

      OVERVIEW AND PROJECT IMPACT:

      The field selected for demonstration is 116 acres; 50 acres tiled and 66 acres untiled
      located near Fairmount, ND in Richland County. Miller Farms would like to demonstrate
      subirrigation by using the tile drainage system to irrigate the first 25 acres of the tiled
      field. The tile drainage was installed in 2002 by Ellingson Drainage and the tile spacing
      is 60 feet. The plan calls for (1) Veris EC mapping of both shallow (0-12 in) and deep
      (0-36 in) soil layers; (2) comprehensive soil sampling to calibrate the EC map, as well as
      physical parameters and chemical analysis for modeling verification; (3) soil sampling in
      the fall for an evaluation of soil chemistry changes; (4) yield estimates by hand and by
      weigh cart; (5) weather data from an on-site weather station and a tipping bucket near the
      pump; (6) water level monitoring and samples (ND State Water Commission will help to
      install screen wells); (7) monitoring the tile drainage effluent and determining the effects
      of the output on the offsite county drain system.

      OBJECTIVES:

      The objectives of this project are to: 1) demonstrate the use of tile drainage for
      subirrigation to enhance crop production in Richland County; 2) monitor changes in
      specific soil chemical and physical properties (EC, pH, bulk density, porosity, crusting
      potential, aggregate stability, total cations, total nitrogen, and plant available phosphorus)
      overlying the drained and drained-subirrigated areas; 3) monitor drainage water quality
      (total ions, EC, SAR, pH, trace elements) and determine ground water depth and water
      quantity in the drained, drained and subirrigated, and undrained areas; and 4) disseminate
      the results of this demonstration project and provide tile drainage and subirrigation
      management strategies to the NRCS and to land managers.

      COOPERATING AGENCIES AND INVESTIGATORS:

      Thomas M. DeSutter, Assistant Professor, Soil Science
      David G. Hopkins, Associate Professor, Soil Science
      Thomas F. Scherer, Associate Professor, ABEN
      Dean D. Steele, Associate Professor, P.E., ABEN
      Xinhua Jia, PI, Assistant Professor, ABEN Dept.

      PUBLICATIONS:

      Citable Publications

      Jia, X., T.F. Scherer, T. M. DeSutter, and D. D. Steele. 2008. Change of soil hardness
      and soil properties due to tile drainage in the Red River Valley of the North. ASABE
      Annual Meeting, Paper No. 084369, June 30 – July 2, 2008, Providence, Rhode Island.


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                                                            ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


Presentations

Jia, Xinhua. 2008. Impact of tile drainage on water management and water quality in the
Red River Valley. NDSU Environmental Conservation Science program, Fargo, ND.
March 18, 2008.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:

USDA NRCS for providing funding for this project.




       NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                       147
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



9. Grant Support

  a. Grant Activity - Department Totals (July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009)
     Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering


          DEPARTMENT TOTALS
                   Grants Funded          $913,572
                   Grants Pending        $1,919,540
                   Grants Unfunded       $1,136,824


         Faculty Activity Summary:          Approved       Pending         Unfunded

                   Backer, Leslie            $5,000           $0                $0
                   Bon, Tom                      $0           $0                $0
                   Bora, Ganesh              $1,000           $0           $17,185
                   Hellevang, Ken           $32,000     $141,237                $0
                   Jia, Xinhua             $175,339           $0                $0
                   Johnson, Roxanne         $30,000     $305,472                $0
                   Lin, Zhulu                    $0     $524,906                $0
                   Nowatzki, John           $33,500           $0          $669,947
                   Panigrahi, Suranjan       $1,200     $120,000          $249,692
                   Pedersen, Carl           $18,500           $0                $0
                   Pryor, Scott            $401,533      $49,336          $200,000
                   Rahman, Shafiqur          $5,000     $180,477                $0
                   Scherer, Tom             $18,500     $148,439                $0
                   Steele, Dean              $1,000           $0                $0
                   Wiesenborn, Dennis      $191,000           $0                $0
                   Xue, Qingwu                   $0     $449,673                $0

                   TOTALS                  $913,572    $1,919,540    $1,136,824




148             NDSU / DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                                                                                                             ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009

b. Grant Activity - Individual Recap
    Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
                                                                                                                      INVOLVEMENT            TOTAL FUNDING AND STATUS
    FACULTY                 GRANTING AGENCY                  GRANT TITLE                           DURATION PARTICIPANTS   PI  Co-PI       Approved     Fund/Proj   Pending      Denied

    BACKER, Leslie          John Deere Foundation            Dealership Management                     1 year      L. Backer       X           $5,000
                                                             Scholarships

    TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                          $5,000
    Total Grant Funding Pending                                                               $0
    Total Grant Funding Denied                                                                $0

    BORA, Ganesh            NDSU President's Office          Professional Development                6/22 - 6/24   G Bora          X           $1,000

                            Office of the Provost-NDSU       Course Development Project- Site          1 year      G Bora          X
                                                             Specific Agriculture

                            National Sunflower Association   Impact of Precision Planting on        4/09 - 3/2010 G Bora           X                                                $3,000
                                                             Sunflower Yield and Diseases                         John Nowatzki
                                                                                                                  Tom Gulya                                                        $14,185
    TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                          $1,000
    Total Grant Funding Pending                                                               $0
    Total Grant Funding Denied                                                           $17,185

    HELLEVANG, Ken          ND Dept. of Commerce             Energy Efficiency and Renewable         7/08 - 6/09   Hellevang, K.   X          $10,000 FAR0014189
                                                             Energy Education Program                              Scherer, T.         X
                                                                                                                   Nowatzki, J.        X
                                                                                                                   Pedersen, C.        X

                            ND Dept of Commerce              Energy Efficiency and Renewable         7/08 - 6/09   Hellevang, K.   X           $7,500 FAR0014570
                                                             Energy Education Program                              Scherer, T.         X
                                                                                                                   Nowatzki, J.        X
                                                                                                                   Pedersen, C.        X

                            NDSU President's Office          Professional Development                7/08 - 6/09   Hellevang, K    X           $1,000

                            Purdue University                eXtension-The Transformation of         5/08 - 6/09   Hellevang, K.   X          $13,500 FAR0014198
                                                             Cooperative Extension

                            ND Dept. of Commerce             Kansas Building Science Institute     6/1/09-12/30/09 Hellevang, K.   X                                    $7,500
                                                             Home Energy Rating System
                                                             Training

                            ND Dept. of Commerce             Agricultural Energy Efficiency and    7/1/09-6/30/10 Hellevang, K.    X                                   $30,000
                                                             Renewable Energy Education
                                                             Program

                            USDA/Rural Business Coop         REAP Energy Audit Technical            9/1/09-9/1/20 Hellevang, K.    X                                   $56,737
                            Service                          Assistance

                            ND Dept. of Commerce             Agricultural Energy Audit             7/1/09-6/30/10 Hellevang, K.    X                                   $47,000
                                                             Assistance and Education

    TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                       $32,000
    Total Grant Funding Pending                                                       $141,237
    Total Grant Funding Denied                                                              $0
                                                                                                                149
                                                                                                                                                     ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



                                                                                                                 INVOLVEMENT         TOTAL FUNDING AND STATUS
FACULTY                 GRANTING AGENCY                 GRANT TITLE                           DURATION PARTICIPANTS   PI  Co-PI    Approved     Fund/Proj   Pending      Denied

JIA, Xinhua             ND Water Commission             Feasibility of the Use of Tile          2/8/2010     Jia, X.       X          $13,283 FAR0014033
                                                        Drainage FPR Subsurface
                                                        Irrigation in the Red River
                                                        Valley and its impact on
                                                        Soil Chemical and Physical
                                                        Properties

                        USDA/CSREES                     Impact of Subsurface Drainage         1/09 -12/2010 Jia, X.        X         $100,000 FAR0013879
                        NRI Seed Grant                  On Water Availability in the
                                                        Red River Basin

                        USDA / NDNRCS                   Tile Drainage and Subirrigation         6/1/08 -     Jia, X        X          $46,056 FAR0014098
                                                        Evaluations in Richland County         5/31/2010
                                                        for Effects on Soil and Water
                                                        Quality

                        NDSU President's Office         Professional Development Grant         7/08 - 6/09   Jia, X.       X           $1,000

                        NDSU Graduate School            Graduate Student Award                 8/08 - 8/10   Jia. X.       X          $15,000

                        Division of Water Quality       Red River Valley Tile Drainage        6/09 - 11/13   Jia, X.           X
                                                        Water Quality Assessment -Phase
                                                        II


TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                       $175,339
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                              $0
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                               $0


JOHNSON,                ND Dept. of Health              Red River Valley Tile Drainage        6/09 - 11/13   Johnson, R.   X                                  $305,472
Roxanne                                                 Water Quality/Assessment/                            Scherer. T.       X
                                                        319 Non Point Implementation                         Jia, X.           X

                        Cass County Soil Conservation   Red River Valley Tile Drainage        1/09 - 12/13   Johnson, R.   X          $10,000 FAR0014968
                        District                        Water Quality Assessment -
                                                        Phase II

                        ND State Water Commission       Red River Valley Tile Drainage        1/09 - 12/13   Johnson, R.   X          $20,000 FAR0014969
                                                        Water Quality Assessment
                                                        phase II


TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                        $30,000
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                        $305,472
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                               $0




                                                                                                        150
                                                                                                                                                      ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



                                                                                                                INVOLVEMENT           TOTAL FUNDING AND STATUS
FACULTY                 GRANTING AGENCY                GRANT TITLE                           DURATION PARTICIPANTS   PI  Co-PI      Approved     Fund/Proj   Pending      Denied

LIN, Zhulu              EPA/USDA/CSREES                Multi-objective Optimization and 9/1/09-8/31/14 Z Lin                X                                  $499,819
                                                       Assessment of Ecosystem Services
                                                       from Agricultural lands in the
                                                       Watershed, ND

                        Florida St Johns River Water   Completion of Hydrologic and      7/1/09-12/31/09 Z Lin              X                                   $25,087
                        Management District            Water Quality Modeling of
                                                       Newmans, Lochloosa, and Orange
                                                       Lakes and Their Drainage Basins
                                                       Using Hydrologic Simulation
                                                       Program
TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                          $0
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                     $524,906
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                            $0

NOWATZKI, John          NDSU President's Office        Professional Development              07/08 - 6/09   Nowatzki, J.    X           $1,000

                        University of Nebraska         Map @Syst: Geospatial                 12/08 - 12/09 Nowatzki, J      X          $15,000 FAR0013947
                        CSREES                         Solutions for Rural and
                                                       Community Sustainability

                        ND Department of Commerce      Energy Efficiency and                  7/08 - 6/09   Nowatzki, J.        X       $7,500   FAR14570
                                                       Renewable Energy Ed. Prog.                           Scherer. T          X
                                                                                                            K Hellevang     X
                                                                                                            Pedersen, C.        X

                        ND Dept. of Commerce           Renewable Energy Education             7/08 - 6/09   Nowatzki, J.        X      $10,000 FAR0014189
                                                       Program                                              Scherer, T.         X
                                                                                                            Hellevang, K.   X
                                                                                                            Pedersen, C.        X

                        Federal                        ND AgrAbility Project                  10/09-9/13    Nowatzki, J.    X                                              $669,947
TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                       $33,500
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                             $0
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                        $669,947

PANIGRAHI,              NDSU President's Office        Professional Development                 FY '09      Panigrahi, S.   X           $1,000
Suranjan
                        USDA/CSREES                    Capacity Building to Engineer         8/08 - 7/2010 Panigrahi, S.    X                                              $100,000
                        ISE Funding Program            Sustainability in Energy, Envi-
                                                       ronment and Food Sectors of
                                                       Agri-Food Systems: A Model
                                                       Study with India

                        NSF                            Student Learning Centered              1/09 - 1/11   Panigrahi, S.   X                                              $149,692
                                                       Course Modules for Biomedical
                                                       Device Design: Novel Integration
                                                       of Engineering Design and
                                                       Innovation w/Regulatory Issues

                                                                                                         151
                                                                                                                                                    ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009
Panigrahi, Suranjan - continued
                                                                                                              INVOLVEMENT           TOTAL FUNDING AND STATUS
FACULTY                 GRANTING AGENCY               GRANT TITLE                          DURATION PARTICIPANTS   PI  Co-PI      Approved     Fund/Proj   Pending      Denied

                        NSF                           Center for Integrating Biotechnology 01/109-9/1/14 Panigrahi, S.    X                                  $120,000
                                                      and Rural Minority Health Issues

                        USDA-CSREES                   Recruitment and Retention of a       9/8/08-8/31/11 Panigrahi, S.   X            $200
                                                      Diverse Population of Food Safety
                                                      Students Using Market Research
                                                      For Enhanced Programs

TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                     $1,200
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                    $120,000
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                     $249,692

PEDERSEN, Carl          NDSU President's Office       Professional Development                 FY'09      Pedersen, C.                $1,000

                        ND Department of Commerce     Energy Efficiency and                 7/08 - 6/09   Nowatzki, J.        X       $7,500 FAR0014570
                                                      Renewable Energy Ed. Prog.                          Scherer. T          X
                                                                                                          K Hellevang     X
                                                                                                          Pedersen, C.        X
                        ND Dept. of Commerce          Renewable Energy Education            7/08 - 6/09   Nowatzki, J.        X      $10,000 FAR0014189
                                                      Program                                             Scherer, T.         X
                                                                                                          Hellevang, K.   X
                                                                                                          Pedersen, C.        X
TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                     $18,500
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                           $0
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                            $0

PRYOR, Scott            NDSU President's Office       Development Grant                      7/08 -6/09   Pryor, Scott    X           $1,000

                        American Crystal Sugar Co.    Enzymatic Pretreatment of             6/1/08-5/09   Pryor, Scott    X          $36,833 FAR0014095
                                                      Sugar Beet Pulp for Ethanol
                                                      Production

                        North Central Sun Grant       Transforming and Densifying                         Pryor, S.           X                               $49,336
                                                      Biomass Processing Centers

                        DOE/USDA                      Evaluation of Perennial Species                     Pryor, S.       X                                              $200,000
                                                      Mixtures for Optimum Fermentable
                                                      Sugar Yields

                        USDA/ARS                      Environmental and Economic            1/08 - 9/12   Pryor, Scott    X         $360,000 FAR0014211
                                                      Consequence of Biomass
                                                      Feedstock Production in the
                                                      Northern Great Plains

                        NDSU Development Foundation Increasing Solids Loading Rate         5/4/09-6/30/10 Pryor, Scott    X           $3,700 FAR0015777
                                                    For Ethanol Production from
                                                    Sugar Beet Pulp
TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                   $401,533
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                     $49,336
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                     $200,000
                                                                                                       152
                                                                                                                                                  ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



                                                                                                           INVOLVEMENT            TOTAL FUNDING AND STATUS
FACULTY                 GRANTING AGENCY             GRANT TITLE                         DURATION PARTICIPANTS   PI  Co-PI       Approved     Fund/Proj   Pending      Denied

RAHMAN,                 ND Pork Producers           Assessment of Odor Emissions          4/09 - 410    Rahman, S.      X           $4,000 FAR0014808
Shafiqur                                            From Swine Facilities in ND

                        ND Dept of Health           Demonstration and Evaluation                        Rahman, S.      X                                  $119,436
                                                    of Vegetative Buffer Strips to

                                                    Minimize Runoff Pollution from
                                                    Feedlot
                        NDSU President's Grant      Professional Grant                    7/08 - 6/09   Rahman, S.                  $1,000

                        USDA-CSREES                 Acquisition of Photoacoustic        8/31/09-7/31/10 Rahman, S.      X                                   $29,307
                                                    Gas Analyzer

                        USDA/NRCS/ND                Demonstration of New Technologies 8/1/09-1/31/11 Rahman, S.         X                                   $27,734
                                                    to Reduce Odor Emissions from
                                                    Anaerobic Swine Lagoon in ND

                        ND Turkey Federation        Composting Turkey Carcasses in      7/1/09-6/30/10 Rahman, S.       X                                    $4,000
                                                    the Northern Climate

TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                   $5,000
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                  $180,477
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                         $0

SCHERER,                ND Dept. Of Commerce        Energy Efficiency Education           7/08 - 6/09   Scherer, T.         X       $7,500 FAR0014570
Thomas                                              Program.                                            Nowatzki, J.        X
                                                                                                        Hellevang, K.   X
                                                                                                        Pedersen, C.        X



                        ND Dept of Commerce         Renewable Energy Education            7/08 - 6/09   Hellevang, K.   X          $10,000 FAR0014189
                                                                                                        Scherer, T.         X
                                                                                                        Nowatzki, J.        X
                                                                                                        Pedersen, C.        X

                        NDSU President's Grant      Professional Grant                    7/8 - 6/09    Scherer, T.                 $1,000

                        Colorado State University   Integrating Research, Extension     10/08 -9/2012 Scherer, T.       X                                  $148,439
                        National Integrated Water   and Education in the Northern
                        Quality Program             Plains and Mountains Region

                                                    To address Water Resource
                                                    Issues

TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                  $18,500
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                  $148,439
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                         $0



                                                                                                   153
                                                                                                                                              ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009



                                                                                                           INVOLVEMENT        TOTAL FUNDING AND STATUS
FACULTY                 GRANTING AGENCY           GRANT TITLE                           DURATION PARTICIPANTS   PI  Co-PI   Approved     Fund/Proj   Pending      Denied

STEELE, Dean            NDSU President's Office   Professional Development              7/08 - 6/09   Steele, D.                $1,000



TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                   $1,000
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                        $0
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                         $0



WIESENBORN,             NDSU President's Office   Professional Development              7/08 - 6/09   Wiesenborn, D.   X        $1,000
 Dennis
                        State of ND - COE         Center of Excellence for              7/08 - 6/12   Wiesenborn, D.   X      $190,000
                                                  Agbiotechnology Oilseed
                                                  Development II


TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                 $191,000
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                        $0
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                         $0



XUE, Qingwu             EPA/USDA                  Maintaining Services on CRP lands 5/1/10 -4/30/14 Xue, Qingwu        X                               $449,673
                                                  that are not Re-enrolled in the
                                                  Northern Great Plains

TOTAL GRANT FUNDING APPROVED                                                       $0
Total Grant Funding Pending                                                  $449,673
Total Grant Funding Denied                                                        $0




                                                                                                 154
                                                                               ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009




c. Equipment and Gift Activity for July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009
    Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering


       Date           PI          Granting Agency            Item              Value    Teaching Research
                                                    35 Copies of Solidworks
      8/8/08       Tom Bon          Solidworks         2008-2009 Student      $4,900       X
                                                     Edition with COSMOS

                                                    Bobcat Skidsteer Yearly
      9/1/08     Solseng, Elton       Melroe                                  $26,000      X
                                                       renewable loan


      9/18/08    Leslie Backer      John Deere          CCS Air Seeder        $25,000      X


     4/13/2009    Xinhua Jia        State of ND        Grow Lights, etc.       $775        X        X


                 TOTAL VALUE OF GIFTS TO DEPARTMENT                           $56,675




                    NDSU / DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTRUAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                   155
ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


   10. Research Statistics

        Department:        Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
        Fiscal Year:       July 1, 2008 – June 30, 2009


        External
                Proposals Submitted*                          Proposals Funded*
             Number             Dollar Amount            Number             Dollar Amount
                41                $3,937,236                21                 $883,872

        Internal
                Proposals Submitted*                          Proposals Funded*
             Number             Dollar Amount            Number             Dollar Amount
                14                 $32,700                  13                  $29,700

        Other (Equipment, Software, etc.)
                Proposals Submitted*                          Proposals Funded*
             Number             Dollar Amount            Number             Dollar Amount
                 4                 $56,675                   4                  $56,675


         Journal Articles Accepted                               17
         Journal Articles Published                              10
         Journal Articles in Review                               7
         Proceedings Articles Accepted                            4
         Proceedings Articles Published                           4
         Technical Papers Accepted                               14
         Technical Papers Published                              14


         Number of MS Students                                   10**
         Number of MS Students Graduated                         1
         Number of Ph.D. Students                                7
         Number of Ph.D. Students Graduated                      0


        * In the case of proposals with multiple PIs and years, multiply the dollar amount by the
          percentage done in the department and divide by the number of years.

        ** 7 ABEN, 1 Natural Resources Management (NRM), 1 Environmental Conservation Science
          (ECS), 1 Food Safety (FS)


156                    NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING
                                                                     ANNUAL REPORT 2008-2009


H. Diversity

   When hiring new faculty, staff, graduate students, etc., great effort is made to hire the
   best qualified people for each position regardless of gender, race, etc. The ABEN
   Department has been fortunate to have excellent diversity in graduate students and
   support staff. Until recently, this was not true for diversity of faculty. However, with
   recent new hires, the department now has several faculty originally from outside the
   region (Texas, New Jersey, India, China). In addition, the department hired its first ever
   female faculty about three years ago. Two new faculty were hired last year; one from
   India and one from China.

   The ABEN Department was one of the first to include the “Bias Reporting” link on our
   web homepage. Faculty and staff are encouraged to use it if appropriate.

   As search committees work to fill faculty and staff positions, special effort is made to
   identify publications and web sites which specifically target underrepresented groups for
   advertising.

   All faculty, staff, and graduate students are highly encouraged to complete the on-line
   sexual harassment training.

   The NDSU Strategic Plan of Diversity is reviewed annually by the department chair to
   ensure familiarity and to identify specific actions that might be implemented.

   The items below identify specific (Sections in parentheses) diversity-related efforts and
   activities as outlined in the NDSU Strategic Plan for Diversity.

        The FY 07 Annual Report included a report on diversity activities by the ABEN
        Department (Section 1.6).

        The ABEN Department agreed to accept about 2 additional students from AIT
        (India) into the ABEN program in Fall 2009 as part of the NDSU twinning program
        with AIT. This will add diversity to an otherwise very homogeneous (rural white
        male) student body (Section 4.2.1). One student of color joined our ABEN program
        as a freshman in Fall 2008.

        New under-represented faculty/staff are encouraged to participate in support
        groups/organizations for under-represented faculty (Section 4.5.2). Several
        faculty/staff participate in such organizations.

        Several faculty participate in programs such as “Expanding Your Horizons” and
        “Science Olympiad” to promote our department and its activities to
        underrepresented groups (Section 4.2.2).




               NDSU | DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND BIOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING                     157

				
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