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Tenth International Dabrowski Congress Program Draft

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					            Institute for the Study of Advanced Development
                                         presents
              The Tenth International Dabrowski Congress
                                    July 19-21, 2012
                               Curtis Doubletree Hotel
                                    Denver, Colorado
                                www.gifteddevelopment.com



   “From Conflict to Peace Both Personally and Globally”
  The theme of this conference reflects on the process of development in Dabrowski’s theory,
                     extending it beyond the personal to our global world.

                                      Co-sponsored by
                  SENG (Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted)




                                              and
                           The Rosenstiel Foundation


   An interdisciplinary conference on Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration—
           development, the psychology of giftedness, counseling, education, research




The propensity for changing one's internal environment and the ability to influence positively
         the external environment indicate the capacity of the individual to develop.
                     (Dabrowski, 1964, Positive Disintegration. p. 112)


                                               1
                                          Welcome
                            Lady Blanka Rosenstiel




On behalf of The Rosenstiel Foundation, I welcome you to the Tenth International Dabrowski
Congress. I regret that I am unable be with you and to reap the benefits from such an important
conference. What a wonderful opportunity to come together for three days of lively conversation
and to exchange ideas. The Institute for the Study of Advanced Development is largely the result
of Kazimierz Dabrowski’s vision, and this Congress is proof that his theory grows stronger every
year. It is gratifying that you have traveled from all corners of the earth to celebrate and learn
more about this profound theory of human development.

Humanity’s complexity and multi-layered self has inspired scientists, artists, poets, writers,
philosophers—really all humankind—throughout millennia. But it was specifically the eternal
mystery of what differentiates us from other species to which Dabrowski dedicated his life. He
never wavered from his mission to develop a clear understanding of how all of our personal
motivations and decisions, no matter how they are expressed, can make a positive impact on us
as we mature into fulfilled adults with enriched lives.

Like all of you, I too wanted to help others reach their full potential, but as an artist I approached
it from a different angle. I founded the American Institute of Polish Culture with the dream of
sharing Poland’s rich heritage of art, culture and scientific achievement with Americans. And I
can now say after four decades of working to achieve this goal that there’s no doubt we are
always thirsty for knowledge and we continue to strive to better our positive experiences
throughout life.


                                                  2
Help us spread the word about Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration and encourage
more professionals and laymen to practice this life-changing way of viewing and working in the
fields of mental wellness. Their own lives will never be the same.

Thank you again. I hope your days will be enlightening and your time transforming as you all
become living witnesses to the power of Dabrowski's vision.




Lady Blanka Rosenstiel was born in Warsaw, Poland, and after World War II studied art in
Brussels, Belgium. In 1956 she moved to the United States and decided to make it her home.
She married Lewis S. Rosenstiel, Chair of Schenley Industries, a great humanitarian and
philanthropist. Widowed in 1976, she has become a great humanitarian and philanthropist in her
own right.

Her avid interest in the arts, dedication to helping young artists, and desire to promote Poland’s
heritage to Americans of Polish descent prompted Mrs. Rosenstiel to establish The American
Institute of Polish Culture in Miami in 1972. The Institute has created, sponsored and organized
hundreds of events, projects and award programs over the years, such as granting scholarships
every year to students from all studies in U.S.-based universities; creating and developing several
lecture series presented at universities throughout America; establishing a Kosciuszko Chair of
Polish Studies in 1998 at the University of Virginia, which then moved to its permanent home at
the Institute of World Politics in Washington, D.C; conceptualizing and sponsoring a huge
traveling art exhibit depicting Poland’s history to over 100 educational facilities throughout the
States; and translating and publishing numerous books and other Polish-related materials.

In 1977, Mrs. Rosenstiel founded The Chopin Foundation of the United States, a national
organization dedicated to helping young American musicians and promoting Chopin’s music in
the United States. Dozens of promising pianists compete in a national piano competition held in
Miami, and the three winners then compete in the International Chopin Piano Competition in
Warsaw. She was also appointed an Honorary Consul of the Republic of Poland in 1998.

Lady Blanka has received numerous awards and distinctions, including Honorary Doctorates from
several universities; Lady of the Sovereign Order of St. John of Jerusalem, Knights of Malta, 1984;
Cavalier’s Cross of Polonia Restituta Order, 1996; Polish Commander Cross of the Order of Merit,
2004; Gloria Artis Medal, 2007; and many more. She resides in Miami Beach during the winter
and at her Blandemar Farm in Charlottesville, Virginia in the summer.




                                                 3
                       Conference Program
                                 Thursday July 19, 2012

12:00 – 5:00 PM On-site Registration, Second Floor

              Workshop: Introduction to the Theory of Positive Disintegration
                   Cheryl M. Ackerman, Ph.D. and Michele Kane, Ed. D.
                                     1:30 - 5:00 PM
                                   Keep Away Room
                      3.5 hours APA Continuing Education credits

If you are a relative newcomer to Dabrowski’s work or would like a refresher experience, this
pre-conference workshop will be a helpful precursor to the more in-depth and diverse work to be
discussed during the conference. During the preconference, the major theoretical elements and
how they are interconnected will be presented. The five levels of development, developmental
dynamisms, overexcitabilities, and other foundational aspects of the theory will be discussed.

Cheryl M. Ackerman and Michele Kane have been making presentations, conducting research,
and publishing on Dabrowski’s work for many years. They bring a wealth of experience and
knowledge about the theory with them and will encourage lively dialogue to facilitate the
understanding of workshop participants.

Cheryl M. Ackerman, Ph.D. [cma@udel.edu] recently guest-edited a special issue of Roeper
Review on Dabrowski’s theory. She is a former chair of the Conceptual Foundations Network of
NAGC and president of Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG). Cheryl works at the
University of Delaware, where she conducts program evaluations in several areas.

Michele Kane, Ed.D. [michelekane1@aol.com] is an Associate Professor in the department of
Special Education and the Coordinator of the Master of Arts in Gifted Education Program at
Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago.




                        Welcome Reception: Wine and Cheese
                                        5:00 – 6:30 PM
                                       Peek-a-Boo Room
Meet the Presenters and the Board of the Institute for the Study of Advanced Development.




                                               4
                                        Art Exhibit
                                    Witold Kaczanowski
                                      (www.witoldk.com)

Witold Kaczanowski’s work is illustrative of Dabrowski’s theory, portraying the almost
unlimited possibilities of growth available to gifted individuals. The dominant themes of his
creative output are mystery, pain, empathy, uncertainty, disintegration and transcendence.

Born in Warsaw, Witold studied at the Fine Arts Academy in Warsaw. In 1964, he was sent to
Paris by the Polish Ministry of Culture, carrying manuscripts from dissident Polish writers. He
received an award from the American Congress for Freedom of Culture, but was not allowed to
return to Poland for many years. He immigrated to the United States in 1968 and has been a
resident of Denver, Colorado since 1980.

Pablo Picasso painted Witold’s portrait in 1967. He received the Medal of Esteem from Pagart,
Polish Artists Agency in 1990 and the Medal of Achievement and Honor from the Republic of
Poland in 1997. In honor of his 65th birthday, Denver Mayor Wellington Webb proclaimed May
15th “Witold-K. Day in Denver.” The National Art Museum in Krakow recently acquired 20
pieces of his original paintings as a permanent collection.




6:30 Dinner on Your Own

In keeping with the atmosphere of the Congress, we recommend:

                                       Polished Tavern
                                  1501 Lawrence Street R35
                                   Denver, Colorado 80202
                                (Corner of 15th and Lawrence)
                                        303-534-5082
                                  www.polishedtavern.com




                                                5
                         Presentation Schedule

Presentations are organized into four general strands, which have been color-coded in the
schedule: development (advanced development, therapeutic approaches to growth and
development); theory (theoretical and philosophical aspects of Dabrowski’s theory); OEs
(research and discussion of overexcitabilities) and gifted (the psychology of giftdness and
classroom applications). However, there is considerable overlap and many sessions address more
than one strand. The attached abstracts provide more detailed information.

                                Friday July 20, 2012

8:00 – 10:00 AM On-site Registration, Second Floor

8:30 – 8:45 AM: Welcome and Announcements
Hosts: R. Frank Falk and Linda Silverman
Peek-a-Boo Room

                                  Keynote Address

             Sudden Dynamic Insight: Moving from Conflict to Peace
                        Elizabeth Mika, M.A., LCPC
                                     8:45 – 10:00 AM
                                    Peek-a-Boo Room
                       1.25 hours APA Continuing Education credits

Sudden dynamic insight is the term Dabrowski used to describe the point of demarcation between
living life as it is and as it ought to be. Theoretically, sudden dynamic insight signals the
Copernican shift in perception when an individual realizes the existence of higher values and
their positive role in guiding his or her development. It may mark the transition between
unilevelness and multilevelness, or, perhaps more accurately, the shift from the conflicts of
spontaneous multilevel disintegration toward inner harmony and peace growing and guided by
dynamisms of multilevel organized disintegration. We’ll examine the reality of this transition,
looking more closely at the sudden dynamic insight and the role it played in lives of several
contemporary and historical exemplars of advanced moral development.

Elizabeth Mika, M.A., LCPC [elamika@yahoo.com], of Gifted Resources in Northern Illinois
(in the Chicago area), specializes in assessment of gifted children and counseling for gifted
adults. She became fascinated by Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration (TPD) in her
native Poland almost 30 years ago.




                                              6
                                     10:00-10:10 AM BREAK
Friday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
Does Thinking Make it So?
Richard Michelle-Pentelbury, M.A., Calgary Board of Education
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand

The variety of habituations and thinking styles suggested by Dabrowski, Dillinger, Graves, or
Kohlberg (amongst others) provides the instinctually meta-cognitive with tools by which one
may more effectively evaluate one’s thinking, nurture the potential in us all, and more
perspicuously assist us to accept, integrate, absorb, assimilate and have compassion for the
paradigms of mankind’s proclivities. Personally and globally, how does each of us indeed
become what we think?

Richard Michelle-Pentelbury, MA. [rpentelbury@shaw.ca] comes with a dynamic and
entertaining presentation; his wheelchair, his guitar, his paintings, his indelible story of escape
from Africa, his theatre background, and his writings very much an integration of style,
substance, and inspiration.

Friday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
An Overview of Dabrowski’s Ethical Theory
Jeffery Lee Geller, Ph.D., University of North Carolina—Pembroke
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand

This presentation will offer a broad and concise summary of the main features of Dabrowski's
theory of moral development. The implications of Dabrowski’s theory will be discussed for our
understanding of the ethics of leadership and the potential for human evolution.

Jeffery Geller, Ph.D. [gellerp@uncp.edu] obtained his Ph.D. at Duke University in 1983 and
has taught philosophy at the U. of North Carolina at Pembroke for the last 27 years. He has
studied in England, Singapore, Germany and France, as a Fullbright Fellow and a Fellow of the
Camargo Foundation. In addition to teaching philosophy, he is a painter
[http://jefferygeller.com]. He splits his time between New York City and Red Springs, NC, a
town noted for its art community, where his work is also on display: [http://redspringsart.com].

Friday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
Overexcitabilities? Or Just Plain OverSights? 2e Learners Who are Diagnostically
Homeless — a View from Australia
Carol Barnes, New South Wales Association for Gifted and Talented Children
Dodgeball Room
Gifted Strand

This session will re-examine the orthodox “overexcitabilities” theory, using a more modern
medical lens, and focus on why some gifted and 2e learners are not well served by being labeled
as “overexcitable.”



                                                  7
Carol Barnes is convenor of 2 support groups for parents and teachers of 2e children, and a
sessional lecturer on 2e at Griffith University. Carol is also a lawyer but, most importantly, the
mother of two gifted university students, each with multiple learning disabilities.




                                   11:10 – 11:20 AM BREAK

Friday, 11:20 AM – 12:20 PM
Unreasonable States of Excitement: Women Writing Their Way Through Positive
Disintegration
Lisa Rivero, M.A., SENG Director, College Instructor at Milwaukee School of Engineering
Patty-Cake Room
Development, Theory, Gifted, and Overexcitabilities Strands

This presentation explores how two women writers—one public and one private—documented
their continual and often elusive search for personal peace amidst both cultural and internal
conflict. The discussion focuses on Dabrowski’s Personality-shaping Through Positive
Disintegration, in particular the aspects of self-education, personal advisers, the third factor, and
overexcitabilties.

Lisa Rivero [lisarivero@sbcglobal.net], director for the non-profit organization SENG
(Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted), is the author of four non-fiction books on giftedness
and education, She has an M.A. in literary studies and teaches writing and creative thinking at
Milwaukee School of Engineering.


Friday, 11:20 AM – 12:20 PM
Dabrowski’s Theory and Advanced Development Journal
Linda Kreger Silverman, Ph.D., Nancy B. Miller, Ph.D., and Betty Maxwell, M.A., Gifted
Development Center
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand
1 hr. APA CE Credits

We will discuss how Dabrowski’s theoretical perspective found a home in Advanced
Development and how it continues to challenge authors to identify examples of
overexcitabilities, explore cases of moral exemplars, and show the impact of emotional processes
on moral development. We will analyze the content of the first 13 volumes, highlighting the
influence of Dabrowski’s theory; discuss recurring themes; and provide illustrative examples.

Linda Silverman [gifted@gifteddevelopment.com], licensed psychologist, directs the Gifted
Development Center. She founded Advanced Development with the assistance of Betty Maxwell,
and both served as past editors.


                                                  8
Nancy Miller [nmiller@uakron.edu] is current editor of Advanced Development and does
research and testing at the Gifted Development Center in Denver, Colorado.

Betty Maxwell is a certified psychosynthesis educator and counselor, and author of Picture This:
See Yourself Teaching Visual-Spatial Learners.


Friday, 11:20 – 11:50 AM
Guiding to Peace Through Picture Books: Addressing Dabrowski’s Overexcitabilities
Robert (Bob) Seney, Ed.D., Professor Emeritus, Mississippi University for Women
Dodgeball Room
Overexcitabilities Strand

By connecting Dabrowski, picture books, and gifted learners’ love for reading, we have an
avenue on which we can guide our gifted learners to peace and to a celebration of self. In this
presentation, a list of current picture books connected to the overexcitabilities will be shared.
Possible outcomes of these connections will be discussed.

Bob Seney [bseney@muw.edu] has spent over 35 years in the field of gifted education, and has
developed and taught in two Masters of Gifted Studies programs. He contributes two columns in
gifted publications related to the use of literature with gifted learners.

Friday, 11:50 AM – 12:20 PM
Understanding Conflict and Growth: Teaching TPD to a Homeschooling Community
Josh Shaine, Cambridge College
Dodgeball Room
Gifted Strand

I will be presenting a weekly class on Positive Disintegration to a group of homeschooling
parents and adolescents. We will be exploring the Dabrowskian linkage between conflict and
growth and how it is reflected in and avoided through homeschooling.

Josh Shaine [josh_shaine@yahoo.com] has been teaching and advising for more than 30 years,
working with students across the age span and in a broad variety of educational environments.




                          12:20 – 1:30 PM LUNCH ON YOUR OWN
                                  We suggest Sam’s #3 Diner
                                   Corner of Curtis and 15th




                                                  9
Friday, 1:30 – 2:15 PM
Inner Conflict—The Pathway to Personal and Global Peace: A Psychological Perspective
Names: Norbert J. Duda Ph.D., and Jean Duda M.S., LMHC, Private Practice
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand
.75 hour APA CE credits

This presentation will deal with methods used in our practice that help the client begin the
process of personality reshaping. Inner conflict according to the Theory of Positive
Disintegration is a very strong indicator that the time may be ripe for change. Inner conflict can
be transformed into inner peace which, in turn, can influence family, community, and global
peace on a multi-dimensional scale.

Norbert Duda, Ph.D., was a student of Dr. Kazimierz Dabrowski at Laval University. He is a
follower of the Theory of Positive Disintegration, which he has used in his private psychological
practice since the mid-1970s. He has been very active in promoting TPD and hosted the 3rd and
5th International Conferences on TPD, held in 1980 and 2002 respectively.

Jean Duda, LMHC [jvfduda@gmail.com] is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and is also
Certified as a Thanatologist with ADEC (The Association for Death Education and Counseling).
She holds a graduate degree in counseling as well as a graduate certificate in Loss and Healing.


Friday, 1:30 – 2:15 PM
Dimensions of Giftedness and Self-Perception Among Children
Brittany Kinard, M.A., University of Texas
Keep Away Room
Overexcitabilities Strand
.75 hr. APA CE Credits

The purpose of this study is to further examine Dabrowski's Theory of Overexcitability and to
explore possible implications of heightened excitability as it relates to self-perception in
children. Participants included samples of identified and non-identified GT students between the
ages of 8 and 13. Analyses revealed significant differences between students enrolled in Gifted
and Talented programs and students not enrolled in Gifted and Talented programs.

Brittany Kinard [brittanyleighkinard@gmail.com] received her bachelor’s degree in
Psychology from the University of Texas, where this study was performed as an undergraduate
honors thesis. She recently graduated from with a master's degree in Counseling Psychology at
the University of Denver.




                                                10
Friday, 1:30 – 2:15 PM
Authentic Educational Practice: Knowing the Good and Doing It
Janneke Frank, Ph.D., Frank Gifted Endeavours; University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta;
University of British Columbia Okanagan, British Columbia, Canada
Dodgeball Room
Gifted Strand

This session presents a portrait of an inspirational teacher of the gifted through the lens of the
teacher effectiveness literature and the lens of TPD with a focus on the concepts of dynamisms
and developmental potential. The theory’s moral lens presents a view of an authentic teacher of
the gifted that otherwise would be invisible.

Janneke Frank, Ph.D. [jannekefrank@shaw.ca] is the Principal Consultant of Frank Gifted
Endeavors. She is also an Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Education at University of British
Columbia, Okanogan, and Coordinator and Instructor, Gifted Education Graduate Certificate
Program, Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary.




Friday, 2:15 – 3:00 PM
Creative Life as a Survival
Krystyna Laycraft, M.Sc., University of Calgary Faculty of Education
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand

The life and creativity of Teresa is a fascinating example of transformation from turbulent and
traumatic into a satisfying, complex, caring, and peaceful life. In order to analyze her
psychological development and creativity, Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration, theory
of self-organization, and Plutchik's theory of primary emotions are applied.

Krystyna Laycraft [krystyna@platinum.ca] finished her study at the University of Warsaw as a
theoretical physicist. After moving to Canada, she continued her graduate study and worked as a
scientist at the University of Calgary. She runs the Center for Chaos Studies and gives lectures
on the application of Chaos Theory in creativity, psychology, and education.

Friday, 2:15 – 3:00 PM
A Mixed-Methods Comparison of Vocational and Identified-Gifted High School Students
on The Overexcitability Questionnaire (OEQ)
Jane Piirto, Ph.D., Ashland University
Keep Away Room
Overexcitabilities Strand
.75 hr. APA CE Credits




                                                11
Two groups of adolescents, 61 identified gifted adolescents and 51 vocational school adolescents
were compared on the Overexcitability Questionnaire (OEQ). Each of the five OE scores—
Psychomotor, Sensual, Imaginational, Intellectual, and Emotional — was subjected to a two-way
ANOVA by classification and gender. Any statistically significant interaction effect was further
analyzed by testing the group means with six two-group comparison tests. A qualitative textual
analysis was also conducted. The results were compared with another study of the same gifted
population that used the OEQ-II.

Jane Piirto [jpiirto@ashland.edu] is the author of the textbook Talented Children and Adults:
Their Development and Education (3 editions), Understanding Those Who Create (2 editions),
Understanding Creativiry, and Creativity for the 21st Century Skills. She is a well-known author
and professor in the psychology of giftedness, talent, and creativity.

Friday, 2:15 – 3:00 PM
Overexcitabilities and Classroom Strategies for Young Gifted Children
Ellen Honeck, Ph.D., Institute for the Development of Gifted Education, University of Denver
Dodgeball Room
Gifted Strand

Young gifted learners display both characteristics of giftedness and Dabrowski’s
overexcitabilities. Using data from teachers, researcher observations, and the OEQ-II
questionnaire, this session will provide insight into students within gifted preschool and
kindergarten classrooms.

Ellen Honeck, Ph.D., [ehoneck@du.edu] serves as an Associate Director of the Institute for the
Development of Gifted Education and an Administrator at the Ricks Center for Gifted Children,
both located at the University of Denver in Denver, Colorado.




                                    3:00 – 3:15 PM BREAK

Friday, 3:15 – 4:15 PM
Crafting a Life Mosaic: Living with Positive Disintegration
Michele Kane, Ed.D., Northeastern Illinois University, and Susan Daniels, Ph.D., Cal State
University- San Bernardino
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand
1 hr. APA CE Credits

One hallmark of the Theory of Positive Disintegration is the disintegrative process. A synthesis
of semi-structured interviews with gifted adults who have faced significant life challenges that
have created fissures and fragmentation in the personality, and that resulted in life altering and
life renewing changes, will be provided. These narratives emphasize the experiential aspects of
several dynamisms, specifically, the education of one’s self and auto-psychotherapy.


                                                12
Additionally, common life themes and the implications for a deeper contextual understanding of
life “in a higher key” will be explored.

Michele Kane, Ed.D. [michelekane1@aol.com] is an Associate Professor in the Department of
Special Education and the Coordinator of the Master of Arts in Gifted Education Program at
Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago.

Susan Daniels, Ph.D. [dr.sdaniels@yahoo.com] is Cofounder and Educational Director of the
Summit Center and Professor of Educational Psychology and Counseling at California State
University – San Bernardino where she also directs the Graduate Certificate in Gifted Education.

Friday, 3:15 – 4:15 PM
Kazimierz Dabrowski - Life, Theory, and Application to Gifted Education
Sal Mendaglio, Ph.D., University of Calgary; and Marjorie M Battaglia, Ph.D. George Mason
University (with Michael Piechowski, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, Northland College and Senior
Fellow, Institute for Educational Advancement—not in attendance)
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand
1 hr. APA CE Credits

This presentation traces the roots of Dabrowski’s thought, and his life’s mission, to his youthful
absorption in Kierkegaard and the study of suicide and self-mutilation. He created an Institute of
Mental Hygiene founded on a holistic program that was well ahead of its time. Dabrowski’s life
provided the underpinnings for the development of his theory and its application to gifted
education.

Sal Mendaglio, Ph.D. [mendagli@ucalgary.ca] is a professor in the Faculty of Education,
University of Calgary, where he teaches courses in gifted education and educational leadership.
A licensed psychologist, he has a long standing interest in Dabrowski’s theory and its application
to gifted education and counseling. He edited Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration.

Marjorie M. Battaglia, Ph.D. [mbattag1@gmu.edu] is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology
Department of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Dabrowski’s life and theory was
the subject of her doctoral dissertation.

Michael M. Piechowski, Ph.D. [spirgif@earthlink.net] worked closely with Dabrowski for eight
years and is the author of “Mellow Out,” They Say and co-author of Living with Intensity. He is a
Senior Fellow of the Institute for Educational Advancement and Professor Emeritus from
Northland College, Ashland, Wisconsin. (He is unable to attend.)

Friday, 3:15 – 4:15 PM
Multi-Generational Overexcitability
Norma Hafenstein, Ph.D., University of Denver
Dodgeball Room
Overexcitabilities Strand
1 hr. APA CE Credits



                                                13
This session will provide a glimpse across time with descriptions of individuals and families. All
descriptive work is grounded in Dabrowski's theory and provides a context for understanding
both personal and family growth and development.

Norma Hafenstein, Ph.D. [nhafenst@du.edu] is founding Director of the Ricks Center for
Gifted Children and the Institute for the Development of Gifted Children in the Morgridge
College of Education at the Univeristy of Denver.




                                      4:15 – 4:30 BREAK

                                    Leadership Workshop
              Facilitated by Cheryl M. Ackerman, Ph.D. and R. Frank Falk, Ph.D.
                                       4:30 – 5:30 PM
                                       Dodgeball Room

Have you ever wanted to become more involved in the Dabrowski community? Wanted to edit
The Dabrowski Newsletter or be part of organizing a Dabrowski conference? Thought about
ways to use social media or other mechanisms to build a stronger Dabrowski community?
This workshop is designed for the purpose of succession planning. Many dedicated members of
the Dabrowski community who have been involved over the span of several decades want to
ensure there will be others who will continue to carry and share the Dabrowski torch. Workshop
discussion will include leadership activities and tasks that historically have served the
community, and new ideas that will actively engage members and strengthen the community. If
you would like to be involved in these discussions or take a leadership role, please join us. No
matter how long (or short) your involvement with the theory has been, you are welcome to
participate in this workshop.

Cheryl M. Ackerman, Ph.D. [cma@udel.edu], recently guest-edited a special issue of Roeper
Review on Dabrowski’s theory. She is a former chair of the Conceptual Foundations Network of
NAGC and President of Supporting Emotional Needs of the Gifted (SENG). Cheryl works at the
University of Delaware, where she conducts program evaluations in several areas.

R. Frank Falk, Ph.D. [rfalk@uakron.edu] is a Social Psychologist and Director of Research at
the Institute for the Study of Advanced Development in Denver, CO. Since 1980, he has
conducted research on Dabrowski’s theory. He co-founded the Dabrowski Study Group at the
University of Denver, where he began an 18-year process of creating and validating the
Overexcitability Questionnaire II (OEQ-II). He has contributed chapters on the OEQ-II in Living
with Intensity (S. Daniels & M. Piechowski, Eds.) and Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive
Disintegration (S. Mendaglio Ed.).




                                                14
                                          Banquet
                                        6:00 – 7:30 PM
                                       Peek-a-Boo Room

                                    Keynote Address

                            Dabrowski Was Right!
             Neurophysiology of Temperament Supports Dabrowski’s
                            Developmental Potential

                            Marti Olsen Laney, Psy.D., MFT
                                         7:30 – 9:00 PM
                                       Peek-a-Boo Room
                                    1.5 hr. APA CE Credits

In my research about the underlying physiology of introverted and extroverted temperaments, I
have found extensive support for Dabrowski’s theories regarding the differences in our
“Developmental Potential.” While human brains are similar, ALL brains are not the same. We
are all born with dominant features like handedness, footedness, eyes, ears and brains, to name a
few. Introverts are dominant on the system governing our internal world and extroverts are
dominant on the system managing our external world. I will discuss how the human brain has
evolved over centuries into five separate functional layers that correlate with Dabrowski's notion
of "Levels of Development." Innate dominant functions give humans diversity, flexibility and
balance. Our dominant capacities impact our struggle to climb up our brain stem to create
pathways and networks that will link our functional layers together. Integration is the only path
to develop a mature brain. Introverts have innate advantages, often perceived as disadvantages,
to help them make this rugged climb toward “secondary integration.”

Marti Olsen Laney, Psy.D., MFT [mormor50@aol.com], is a researcher, educator, author and
psychotherapist. She earned her doctoral degree in psychoanalysis. She is the author of three
books about the underlying physiology that creates introverted advantages and challenges: The
Introvert Advantage (which has sold over 100,000 copies), The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted
Child, and The Introvert and Extrovert in Love. Signed copies will be available.




                                                15
                                Saturday July 21, 2012

8:00 – 10:00 AM On-Site Registration, Second Floor

8:30 – 8:45 AM Announcements
Hosts: R. Frank Falk and Linda Silverman
Peek-a-Boo Room

                                     International Panel
                                         8:45-10:00 AM
                                       Peek-a-Boo Room
                                   Linda Silverman, Moderator

Ewa Hyzy, Ph.D. Panelist [e_hyzy_1@msn.com], a philosopher, joins us from the Sociology
Department of the Medical University of Lodz, Poland. In 2005, after many years at American
colleges and universities, she returned to her native Poland, and for two years lectured at the
University of Maria Curie Sklodowska in Lublin. She served as Assistant Editor of Advanced
Development Journal and chaired the Gender Studies Section of the Polish Society of Social
Communication. Author of Woman, Body and Identity (Cracow 2003), she is currently writing
Feminism as a Critical Dialogue with Ethical and Political Theories.

Elizabeth Mika, M.A., LCPC, Panelist [elamika@yahoo.com], of Gifted Resources in
Northern Illinois (in the Chicago area), specializes in assessment of gifted children and
counseling for gifted adults. She became fascinated by Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive
Disintegration (TPD) in her native Poland almost 30 years ago and has allowed that interest to
influence her personal and professional life. She has written and presented at local, national and
international conferences.

Janneke Frank, Ph.D., Panelist [jannekefrank@shaw.ca], is the Principal Consultant of Frank
Gifted Endeavors. She is also an Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Education at University of British
Columbia, Okanogan, and Coordinator and Instructor, Gifted Education Graduate Certificate
Program, Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary.

Michele Kane, Ed.D., Panelist [michelekane1@aol.com], is an Associate Professor in the
department of Special Education and the Coordinator of the Master of Arts in Gifted Education
Program at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. Michele is the past President of the
Illinois Association for Gifted Children and past Chair of the Global Awareness Network of the
National Association for Gifted Children.

Krystyna Laycraft, M.Sc., Panelist [krystyna@platinum.ca], completed her studies at the
University of Warsaw as a theoretical physicist. After moving to Canada, she continued her
graduate study and worked as a scientist at the University of Calgary. She directs the Center for
Chaos Studies and gives lectures on the application of Chaos Theory in creativity, psychology,
and education. She is an active member of Federation of Canadian Artists. www.KrystynaArt.ca.




                                                16
Linda Kreger Silverman, Ph.D., Moderator [gifted@gifteddevelopment.com] founded the
Institute for Advanced Development, the Gifted Development Center, and Advanced
Development Journal, and co-founded, with Frank Falk, the Dabrowski Study Group at the
University of Denver. Her 300 publications include several on Dabrowski’s Theory.




                                       10:00-10:10 Break

Saturday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
Benevolently Witnessed: A Subject’s Experience of a 15-Year Qualitative Study
Mariam Willis, M.A., National Association for Gifted Children
Patty-Cake Room, [Table 1, Round Table]
Development Strand

After a brief review of the purpose, methods, findings, and implications of a 15-year qualitative
study examining the intersection of giftedness and trauma, as presented at the Ninth International
Congress in 2010, the subject will offer perspectives on being the subject of such a case study,
which involved extensive interviews and written correspondence.

Mariam Razian Willis, M.A. [mariam.willis@gmail.com], is the Parent Outreach Specialist for
the National Association for Gifted Children. Additionally, she is adjunct faculty for The Dial
Center for Written & Oral Communication at the University of Florida.

Saturday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
Dark Tales and Dynamism
Kathee Jones, M.A., http://giftedjourney.blogspot.com
Patty-Cake Room, [Table 2, Round Table]
Gifted Strand

What is the appeal to many gifted individuals in reading or films about difficult issues such as
social injustice, depression, and dystopia? Readers intentionally seeks provocations of emotional
distress, grappling with important inner conflict. Working toward positive disintegration, they
find empathetic connection with humanity and re-evaluate their moral structure.

Kathee Jones [a.gifted.journey@gmail.com] is a board member of the Colorado Association for
Gifted and Talented, has been with CAGT’s local affiliate since 2001, is a SENG Liaison, and
serves on the Colorado State Advisory Committee for Gifted Education. She has a BFA in
Painting, an MA in Anthropology (Linguistics), and writes fiction.

Saturday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
Examining the Levels of Overexcitabilities in Sophomores Attending a Specialized
Mathematics and Science High School
Taylor Imburgia, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy
Keep Away Room


                                               17
Overexcitabilites Strand

To investigate the presence of overexcitabilities in gifted students, the Overexcitability
Questionnaire II (OEQ-II) has been administered to half of a 70-person sample at a specialized
mathematics, science, and technology high school. From the study, the investigators hope to
spark awareness of overexcitabilities in the gifted population, to allow students to understand
their own feelings and behaviors, and to help the school’s community to more effectively assist
students in handling these overexcitabilities.

Taylor Imburgia is a junior at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA). “The
mission of IMSA…is to ignite and nurture creative, ethical scientific minds that advance the
human condition.”

Saturday, 10:10 – 11:10 AM
The Challenge to Regain Intensity of Feelings
Willem Kuipers, Kuipers & van Kempen
Dodgeball Strand
Gifted Strand

In our career coaching practice, we challenge ‘extra intelligent people’ (XIPs) to regain
awareness of their uncommon intensity as a prerequisite for unfolding their excellence.
Overexcitabilities and TPD are a helpful map of quality and history of their intensity, but the real
territory is inside and around them. Through this reassessment, they work with less sensory
overload or social alienation.

Willem Kuipers [wkuipers@xi2.nl] is a counselor on career choice and development of identity
in Voorburg, the Netherlands. He has been working for over ten years with extra intelligent
adults and has developed various concepts and tools to accommodate their specific needs. He is
the author of various books and publications on the subject. His most recent (2010) book is
Enjoying the Gift of Being Uncommon; Extra Intelligent, Intense, and Effective.




                                      11:10 – 11:20 BREAK


Saturday, 11:20 AM – 12:20 PM
Group Development Through Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration
Hal Curties, M. Ed., Westmount Charter School, Calgary, Alberta; and Janneke Frank, Ph.D.,
Frank Gifted Endeavours, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand

This presentation offers a vision of school staff development that is closely aligned with
Dabrowski's five levels of personality development. The theory provides a conceptual


                                                18
framework, through which we will describe the progression of a team of educators across its five
levels, and discusses the influence of heredity, environment and third factor.

Hal Curties [hal.curties@westmountcharter.com] is Assistant Principal at Westmount Charter
School, a public, K-12, congregated setting for gifted students in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Janneke Frank, Ph.D. [jannekefrank@shaw.ca] is the Principal Consultant of Frank Gifted
Endeavors. She is also an Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Education at University of British
Columbia, Okanogan, and Coordinator and Instructor, Gifted Education Graduate Certificate
Program, Faculty of Education at the University of Calgary.

Saturday, 11:20 AM – 12:20 PM
1. The Crisis in Individual Development: Erikson and Dabrowski
Dagmara Musiał, Ph.D., The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand
.5 APA CE Credit

An important theory of human development, highlighting the importance of crises in human
development, is Erik H. Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development. Another concept that
indicates the validity of crises in development is Kazimierz Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive
Disintegration. This presentation is an attempt to identify similarities and differences resulting
from both theoretical approaches relating to the individual functioning and in a global world.

2. Autonomy and Initiative in Entrepreneurship Among Young Adults
Dagmara Musiał, Ph.D., The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand
.5 APA CE Credit

The purpose of this presentation is a psychosocial approach to the development of
entrepreneurship in relation to autonomy and initiative in young people, including the conditions
and developmental changes in the process of entrepreneurship. The results indicate
developmental changes in the entrepreneurship in young adulthood in relation to autonomy and
initiative taking place in the process of positive disintegration at three levels.

Dagmara Musiał, Ph.D. [dagmus@kul.lublin.pl] is a member of staff of Faculty of Psychology
in the Developmental Psychology Department at the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin
in Poland.

Saturday, 11:20 AM – 12:20 PM
Beyond Academics: Discussion Groups that Nurture Affective Growth
Terry Bradley, M.A., President, Boulder Valley Gifted and Talented, and Gifted Education
Consultant
Dodgeball Room




                                                 19
Gifted Strand

In this session, I will explain the value and importance of facilitating a Discussion Group for
gifted students that encourages understanding of self-awareness and acceptance of others. I will
share examples of various significant manifestations of overexcitabilities my high school
students have demonstrated over the years. The Discussion Group approach is true to
Dabrowski's theory: the process of learning and developing is as important as the outcome.

Terry Bradley, M.A. [terbradley@comcast.net] is the GT Advisor at Fairview High School in
Boulder, Colorado. She is the President of Boulder Valley Gifted and Talented, and is a board
member of the Colorado Association for Gifted and Talented (CAGT).




                              12:20 – 1:30 LUNCH on your own


Saturday, 1:30 – 2:15 PM
Dabrowski and Poetry: A Fit
Bruce Allen, M.A., Board Member, Institute for the Study of Advanced Development
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand

In “Dabrowski and Poetry: A Fit,” I plan to present poetry of students and adults to show the
efficacy of poetry writing as a function of Dabrowski theory. The structure of the session will be
to examine Intellectual OE, Imaginational OE, and Emotional OE.

Bruce Allen [atstirlingbridge@hotmail.com] is a public school educator, poet and author. He
teaches literature, writing, creative writing and history. He was the G/T Coordinator at
Northglenn High School, Adams 12 SD, and the language arts instructor at Bridge School in
Boulder, CO. As a Board Member of the Institute for the Study of Advanced Development
(ISAD), Bruce spearheaded a “This I Believe” project with the ISAD Board. His book, Pearl in
the Petri Dish: Poetry, Gifted and the Visual-Spatial Learner (Royal Fireworks), is in press.

Saturday, 1:30 – 2:15 PM
Dabrowski’s Third Factor Dynamism: The Pivotal Component of TPD
Mariam Willis, M.A., National Association for Gifted Children; and Danae Deligeorges, M.A.,
Hellenic American Academy
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand

The presenters seek to restore Dabrowski’s position that the Third Factor is the pivotal
component of TPD, propelling developmental dynamisms and overexicitabilities leading to
disintegration and potential for reintegration at higher levels of personality development. An



                                                20
operational definition of the Third Factor dynamism and suggestions for further research are
provided.

Mariam Razian Willis, M.A. [mariam.willis@gmail.com], is the Parent Outreach Specialist for
the National Association for Gifted Children and an adjunct lecturer at The Dial Center for
Written and Oral Communication at the University of Florida—Gainesville.

Danae Deligeorges, M.A. [ddelig@hotmail.com], is a Counselor and Educator of Gifted and
Talented Students at the Hellenic American Academy in Deerfield, IL.

Saturday, 1:30 – 2:15
When You Wish Upon a Star: Imaginational OEs and Learning Style
Linda Powers Leviton, M.A., LMFT, Gifted Development Center
Dodgeball Room
Overexcitabilities Strand
.75 hr. APA CE Credits

Visual-Spatial Learners (VSLs) and Tactile-Kinesthetic Learners (TKLs) spend their lives
wondering “What if...” and qualifying answers with “It depends...” because they are responding
to highly attuned Imaginational Overexcitability. It is both their gift and their challenge since
even art and creative writing can often reinforce conformity and following directions. This
presentation will provide concrete ideas for validating and expanding children’s gifts.

Linda Powers Leviton, M.A., L.M.F.T. [becalmer@aol.com], is the Director of the West Coast
Office of the Gifted Development Center. She counsels and coaches children, parents, teachers
and administrators on how to maximize gifts and accommodate challenges.




Saturday, 2:15 – 3:00 PM
Developmental Role of Loss in the Lives of Buddhist Monks
Laurence F. Nixon, Ph.D., Dawson College, Montreal, Quebec
Patty-Cake Room
Development Strand

Dabrowski states that for the experience of loss to serve a developmental function, the individual
must possess emotional and imaginational overexcitability, experience some degree of
multilevelness, and, in certain cases, receive some measure of emotional support. In this
presentation I will show how Dabrowski’s idea of the developmental function of loss applies to
the lives of several Buddhist monks.

Laurie Nixon [nixon3694@hotmail.com] is the Chair of the Religion Department at Dawson
College, Montreal, Quebec. His research interests range from religion and art to contemporary
expressions of religion in Canada, but, his primary area of investigation is the psychological



                                                21
analysis of mystical lives on which subject he has published a number of articles in Advanced
Development and other journals.

Saturday, 2:15 – 3:00 PM
Disasters and Positive Disintegration
Rita Marie Kepner, Ph.D., independent researcher
Keep Away Room
Theory Strand

Major disasters inspire positive disintegration. As a disaster reservist for FEMA, I responded to
some 70 major disasters, helping survivors with information they needed for recovery. I
disintegrated, dropped out and went back to school. My Ph.D. research clearly shows that US
law makes warning messages (and other social services) optional. I will offer a framework for
discussing how we might use insights gleaned from my dissertation to improve understanding of
our current political dysfunction and perhaps inspire a move from conflict to peace.

Rita Kepner, Ph.D. [rita.kepner@email.wsu.edu], is a disaster reservist for FEMA. Her
dissertation, “The Efficiency of the Emergency Alert System,” earned her a Ph.D. from the
Edward R. Murrow College of Communication, WSU, in 2010. Earlier, she published
informational articles, produced broadcast videos, earned awards for photojournalism,
newspaper/newsletter writing/editing and radio programming.

Saturday, 2:15 – 3:00 PM
Pervasive Aspects of Visual-Spatial Thinking in Imaginational Overexcitability
Steven C. Haas, M.A., The Gifted Development Center
Dodgeball Room
Overexcitabilities Strand

Of the five overexcitabilities deriving from the work of Dabrowski, Intellectual OE is the one
most often associated with the high-level cognitive ability related to giftedness. However, an
equally compelling case can be made for the importance of Imaginational OE in characteristics
of gifted children and their identification. The effortless association of images and impressions,
frequent use of image and metaphor, facility for invention and fantasy, detailed visualization, and
elaborate dreams that indicate giftedness derive from high Imaginational OE.

Steven C. Haas [sandjhaas@mac.com] has worked in gifted education as a GT resource
consultant, mentor, classroom teacher, Advanced Placement instructor, school administrator,
researcher, and middle school principal. He serves as Project Director for the Visual-Spatial
Identifier Project under the auspices of the Gifted Development Center in Denver, CO.




                                    3:00 – 3:15 PM BREAK

                                       General Session


                                                22
  Inspiration from Experts: A Discourse on Theory of Positive Disintegration and
  Overexcitabilities—What We Know, What We Don’t Know, and Where We Go
                                   From Here
 Amy H. Gaesser, M S. Ed., and Merzili Villanueva, M. Ed., Doctoral Students; Department of
        Educational Psychology, University of Connecticut; and Experts in the Field
                                         3:15 – 4:15 PM
                                        Peek-a-Boo Room
                                          Theory Strand

In this session, we will present collective findings from reviews of the literature on TPD and
OEs, as well as implications for findings in these fields. We will invite participants and experts
on Dabrowski’s theory to engage in stimulating dialogue about the current understanding of
these constructs and potential directions for future research.

Amy H. Gaesser, MS Ed., NYSSC, NCC [amy.gaesser@uconn.edu], has 20 years of
experience in mental health and academia and is presently pursuing her Ph.D. as a Graduate
Research Assistant at the University of Connecticut in Educational Psychology with
concentrations in Gifted and Talented Education and Counseling Psychology.

Merzili Villanueva, M.Ed. [merzili.villanueva@uconn.edu], is a former Chicago Public School
elementary teacher of students who are culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse, and
gifted. Merzili is presently a Graduate Research Assistant at The National Research Center on
the Gifted and Talented, and pursuing a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with a concentration in
Gifted and Talented Education at the University of Connecticut.




                                     4:00 – 4:15 PM BREAK

                                 Closing and Future Plans
                                R. Frank Falk and Linda Silverman
                                         4:30 – 5:30 PM
                                       Peek-a-Boo Room

                            “Nothing Can Be Changed Here”
                             A Play by Kazimierz Dabrowski
                             Translated by Elizabeth Mazurkiewicz
                                  Edited by Peter A. Rolland
                         Directed by Penny Choice and Michele Kane
                                           5:30 PM
                                      Peek-a-Boo Room




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