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BOARD OF DIRECTORS - Campus Compact

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS - Campus Compact Powered By Docstoc
					                BOARD	
  OF	
  
                DIRECTORS	
  
                dinner	
  &	
  meeting	
  
                Monday	
  
                March	
  12,	
  2012	
  
                5:00	
  pm	
  to	
  8:00	
  pm	
  
                Cohen Center Room #214
                Florida Gulf Coast University
                10501 FGCU Boulevard South
                Ft. Myers, FL 33965

                	
  
                	
  
                Tuesday	
  
                March	
  13,	
  2012	
  
                8:00	
  am	
  to	
  2:00	
  pm	
  
                Cohen Center Ballroom
                Florida Gulf Coast University
                10501 FGCU Boulevard South
                Ft. Myers, FL 33965




educat i ng c i t i zens
bu i ld i ng commun i t i es
CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012   2
                                 Table	
  of	
  Contents	
  
                                                          	
  
Agenda.............................................................................4	
  
	
  
FGCU	
  Campus	
  Map ..........................................................6	
  
	
  
Minutes	
  from	
  October	
  2011	
  Meeting..............................7	
  
	
  
Key	
  Programs	
  and	
  Projects ............................................11	
  
	
  
	
  	
         Fund	
  Development........................................11	
  
	
             Academic	
  and	
  Strategic	
  Initiatives ................12	
  
	
             Communications ...........................................13	
  
	
             Connect2Complete........................................16	
  
	
             Developing	
  Compacts....................................17	
  
	
             Policy	
  Initiatives.............................................18	
  
	
  
Speaking	
  Engagements,	
  Workshops	
  &	
  Presentations ...19	
  
	
  
Board	
  Information .........................................................21	
  
	
  
                   Contact	
  Information ..................................21	
  
                   Board	
  Terms	
  of	
  Service..............................23	
  
                   2011-­‐12	
  Board	
  Committees ......................24	
  
	
  
Board	
  Elections ..............................................................26	
  
	
  
Biographies	
  of	
  Board	
  Candidates...................................27	
  
	
  
Guest	
  Biographies..........................................................32	
  
	
  
Campus	
  Compact	
  Staff	
  Information ..............................34	
  
	
  
2011-­‐12	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  Dashboard ..........................37	
  
	
  
Compact	
  in	
  the	
  News.....................................................39	
  
	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                      3
Agenda	
  
*All	
  times	
  are	
  in	
  Eastern	
  Standard	
  Time	
  
	
  
Monday,	
  March	
  12	
  
Cocktails	
  and	
  Dinner	
  5:00	
  pm	
  to	
  8:00	
  pm	
  
	
         Cohen	
  Center	
  Room	
  #214	
  
           Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
	
         Hosted	
  by	
  Wilson	
  Bradshaw,	
  President,	
  Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
                      There	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  video	
  from	
  Florida	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  Each	
  board	
  member	
  
                      is	
  then	
  invited	
  to	
  briefly	
  describe	
  a	
  noteworthy	
  civic	
  engagement	
  initiative	
  
                      on	
  their	
  campus	
  or	
  in	
  their	
  organization	
  	
  
           	
                          	
  
Tuesday,	
  March	
  13	
  
Board	
  Meeting	
  8:00	
  am	
  to	
  2:00	
  pm	
  
           Cohen	
  Center	
  Ballroom	
  
           Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
           Conference	
  Call:	
  1-­‐888-­‐808-­‐6959	
  
           Access	
  Code:	
  5901067#	
  (press	
  *6	
  to	
  mute/unmute)	
  
	
  
7:30	
  	
   Breakfast	
  
	
  
8:00	
   Executive	
  Session	
  
             • New	
  Business	
  
             • Strategic	
  Directions	
  (w/	
  Maureen	
  Curley)	
  
	
  
9:00	
   Welcome	
  and	
  Introductions	
  –	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Chair	
  
	
  
             • Anthony	
  DiGiorgio	
  introduction	
  
             • Approval	
  of	
  October	
  2011	
  minutes	
       VOTE	
  (pg.	
  7)	
  
             • Review	
  Agenda	
  
	
  
9:15	
   Nominating	
  Committee	
  Report	
  –	
  Jane	
  Karas,	
  Chair	
  
	
  
             • Election	
  of	
  new	
  members	
  	
     	
        VOTE	
  (pg.	
  26)	
  
             • Election	
  of	
  officers	
       	
      	
        VOTE	
  (pg.	
  26)	
  
             • Re-­‐election	
  of	
  members	
   	
      	
        VOTE	
  (pg.	
  26)	
  
	
  
9:45	
   President’s	
  Report	
  –	
  Maureen	
  Curley	
  
	
  
10:15	
   Break	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                            4
	
  
10:30	
     Network	
  Report	
  –	
  Lisa	
  Keyne,	
  Dee	
  Dee	
  Rasmussen	
  	
  
	
  
11:00	
     Finance	
  Committee	
  Report	
  and	
  Discussion	
  –	
  David	
  Giunta,	
  Chair	
  
	
  
11:15	
     Fund	
  Development	
  Committee	
  –	
  Bernie	
  Milano	
  	
  
	
  
11:30	
     Presidents	
  Leadership	
  Summit:	
  “Developing	
  Vital,	
  Vibrant	
  &	
  Healthy	
  
            Communities	
  through	
  Democratic	
  Partnerships	
  and	
  Civic	
  Engagement	
  “	
  
            –	
  Jim	
  Harris,	
  Amanda	
  Wittman,	
  Terah	
  Crews	
  
            	
  
                   • White	
  Paper	
  
                   • Outcomes	
  
	
  
12:30	
   Lunch	
  
	
  
1:00	
  	
   Fall	
  Board	
  Meeting	
  –	
  Jim	
  Dworkin	
   	
  
	
  
                     • Planning	
  for	
  meeting	
  with	
  State	
  Chairs	
  
	
  
1:30	
  	
   Other	
  Business	
               	
  
	
  
2:00	
   Board	
  Meeting	
  Adjourn	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                     5
CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012   6
                   Campus	
  Compact	
  Board	
  Meeting	
  Minutes
                                            October	
  18,	
  2011	
  
                                        Columbia	
  College	
  Chicago	
  
                                               Chicago,	
  IL	
  
	
  
Attendance	
  
	
  
Board	
  Members	
  in	
  Person:	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  David	
  Giunta,	
  Jim	
  Harris,	
  Mary	
  Lyons,	
  
Bernie	
  Milano,	
  Warrick	
  Carter,	
  Karen	
  Gross	
  
	
  
Board	
  Members	
  via	
  Conference	
  Call:	
  Sally	
  Mason	
  
	
  
State	
  Directors:	
  Melissa	
  Mace,	
  Kathy	
  Engelken	
  
	
  
National	
  Staff:	
  Maureen	
  Curley,	
  Mark	
  Esté,	
  Amy	
  Smitter,	
  Bruce	
  Hain	
  (via	
  phone),	
  
Amanda	
  Wittman	
  (via	
  phone)	
  
	
  
Guests:	
  Robin	
  Kelly	
  (via	
  phone)	
  
	
  
Introductory	
  Items	
  
	
  
Welcome	
  and	
  Introductions	
  
	
  
Jim	
  Dworkin	
  welcomed	
  everyone	
  to	
  the	
  meeting	
  and	
  introduced	
  new	
  board	
  
member,	
  Sally	
  Mason.	
  
	
  
Approval	
  of	
  April	
  2011	
  Board	
  Meeting	
  Minutes	
  
	
  
Action:	
  Motion	
  made	
  by	
  Jim	
  Harris	
  and	
  seconded	
  by	
  David	
  Giunta	
  to	
  approve	
  the	
  
minutes.	
  Motion	
  passed	
  unanimously.	
  
	
  
President’s	
  Report	
  
	
  
Maureen	
  discussed	
  the	
  Compact’s	
  goals	
  for	
  2011-­‐12	
  (see	
  attached).	
  In	
  future	
  
meetings	
  Maureen	
  will	
  use	
  a	
  dashboard	
  to	
  report	
  on	
  the	
  progress	
  of	
  annual	
  goals.	
  
Maureen	
  talked	
  about	
  the	
  National	
  Office’s	
  work	
  to	
  develop	
  and	
  support	
  state	
  
Compact	
  offices	
  and	
  announced	
  the	
  addition	
  of	
  two	
  new	
  state	
  offices	
  in	
  New	
  Jersey	
  
and	
  Nebraska	
  and	
  the	
  involvement	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Board	
  and	
  network	
  in	
  new	
  state	
  
office	
  development.	
  Maureen	
  also	
  talked	
  about	
  the	
  current	
  development	
  of	
  the	
  first	
  
multi-­‐entity	
  Compact	
  between	
  Maryland	
  and	
  the	
  District	
  of	
  Columbia.	
  The	
  board	
  
expressed	
  support	
  for	
  this	
  new	
  entity	
  however	
  agreed	
  that	
  three	
  support	
  letters	
  
from	
  presidents	
  of	
  institutions	
  not	
  currently	
  Compact	
  members	
  were	
  needed	
  in	
  
order	
  to	
  document	
  widespread	
  support	
  from	
  DC.	
  	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                      7
	
  
Maureen	
  discussed	
  the	
  increased	
  outreach	
  to	
  national	
  members	
  and	
  campaigns	
  to	
  
increase	
  members	
  both	
  domestically	
  and	
  international.	
  Maureen	
  noted	
  the	
  
Compact’s	
  increased	
  involvement	
  with	
  international	
  members	
  through	
  the	
  Tallories	
  
Network,	
  National	
  Members,	
  and	
  the	
  International	
  SL	
  Network.	
  
	
  
Maureen	
  presented	
  an	
  overview	
  of	
  the	
  Connect2Complete	
  program	
  funded	
  by	
  the	
  
Gates	
  Foundation.	
  Maureen	
  talked	
  about	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  receiving	
  the	
  grant	
  and	
  how	
  
the	
  five	
  competing	
  states	
  were	
  chosen.	
  She	
  acknowledged	
  increased	
  academic	
  
resources	
  available	
  through	
  the	
  new	
  Manager	
  of	
  Academic	
  and	
  Strategic	
  Initiatives	
  
and	
  journals	
  from	
  state	
  Compact	
  offices,	
  including	
  the	
  most	
  recent	
  Journal	
  of	
  Public	
  
Scholarship	
  in	
  Higher	
  Education	
  by	
  the	
  Missouri	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  and	
  Missouri	
  
State	
  University	
  and	
  the	
  online	
  journal	
  produced	
  by	
  the	
  North	
  Carolina	
  Campus	
  
Compact.	
  
	
  
Maureen	
  then	
  discussed	
  the	
  attempts	
  by	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  to	
  increase	
  visibility	
  of	
  
the	
  networks	
  efforts	
  in	
  local,	
  state	
  and	
  national	
  media	
  outlets.	
  	
  She	
  mentioned	
  that	
  
throughout	
  2011,	
  student	
  philanthropy	
  projects	
  received	
  a	
  significant	
  amount	
  of	
  
coverage	
  in	
  many	
  national	
  media	
  news	
  outlets.	
  Some	
  other	
  coverage	
  revolved	
  
around	
  The	
  Thomas	
  Ehrlich	
  Award,	
  OpEd	
  pieces	
  for	
  CNCS	
  and	
  responses	
  to	
  issues	
  
regarding	
  our	
  work	
  and	
  network.	
  	
  
	
  
Finance,	
  Investment,	
  and	
  Audit	
  Committee	
  
	
  
FY	
  ‘2012	
  Budget	
  
	
  
Bruce	
  Hain	
  presented	
  a	
  revised	
  FY’2012	
  Budget,	
  which	
  was	
  approved	
  by	
  the	
  
Finance	
  Committee	
  on	
  September	
  1,	
  2011.	
  
	
  
Audit	
  Report	
  
	
  
Robin	
  Kelley	
  of	
  Alexander,	
  Aronson	
  and	
  Finning	
  &	
  CO.,	
  P.C.	
  discussed	
  the	
  2011	
  Audit	
  
of	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  They	
  were	
  happy	
  to	
  report	
  that	
  there	
  were	
  no	
  audit	
  findings	
  
and	
  that	
  no	
  management	
  letter	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  prepared.	
  	
  
	
  
Investment	
  Policy	
  	
  
	
  	
  
As	
  a	
  follow-­‐up	
  to	
  the	
  April	
  2011	
  Board	
  Meeting,	
  the	
  Finance	
  Committee	
  met	
  to	
  
discuss	
  the	
  investment	
  policy	
  adopted	
  in	
  October	
  2010.	
  The	
  committee	
  
recommends	
  that	
  this	
  policy	
  stay	
  in	
  place	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  
	
  
The	
  Board	
  agreed	
  that	
  there	
  would	
  be	
  no	
  changes	
  to	
  the	
  investment	
  policy	
  at	
  this	
  
time.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                        8
Nominating	
  Committee	
  
	
  
Maureen	
  informed	
  the	
  board	
  of	
  the	
  resignations	
  of	
  Carole	
  Falcon-­‐Chandler,	
  JoAnn	
  
Haysbert,	
  and	
  Preston	
  Pulliams.	
  Maureen	
  then	
  discussed	
  the	
  balance	
  that	
  the	
  
Compact	
  needs	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  types	
  of	
  colleges,	
  regions,	
  and	
  gender	
  of	
  board	
  members.	
  
Maureen	
  discussed	
  possible	
  candidates	
  and	
  asked	
  the	
  Board	
  Members	
  for	
  potential	
  
candidates.	
  The	
  nominating	
  committee	
  will	
  meet	
  following	
  the	
  board	
  meeting	
  and	
  
continue	
  to	
  search	
  for	
  new	
  members.	
  New	
  candidates	
  will	
  be	
  presented	
  at	
  the	
  
March	
  2012	
  meeting.	
  	
  
	
  
Fund	
  Development	
  Committee	
  
	
  
Bernie	
  Milano	
  discussed	
  the	
  Individual	
  Giving	
  Campaign	
  and	
  encouraged	
  the	
  board	
  
members	
  to	
  donate	
  to	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  as	
  to	
  receive	
  100%	
  of	
  board	
  support.	
  Amy	
  
Smitter	
  briefly	
  talked	
  about	
  grants	
  and	
  discussed	
  the	
  individual	
  giving	
  campaign	
  
piloted	
  by	
  the	
  Massachusetts,	
  Indiana	
  and	
  Florida	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  offices.	
  Amy	
  
also	
  talked	
  about	
  working	
  with	
  the	
  states	
  to	
  diversify	
  their	
  funding.	
  Amy	
  expressed	
  
the	
  struggles	
  of	
  working	
  with	
  the	
  states,	
  and	
  helping	
  states	
  take	
  the	
  next	
  step	
  as	
  
non-­‐profits	
  for	
  them	
  to	
  secure	
  their	
  own	
  funding.	
  	
  
	
  
Bernie	
  Milano	
  discussed	
  the	
  idea	
  of	
  convening	
  all	
  the	
  Board	
  Chairs	
  from	
  their	
  states	
  
with	
  the	
  Chair	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Board.	
  	
  
	
  
Network	
  Report	
  
	
  
Melissa	
  Mace	
  presented	
  need	
  for	
  Compact	
  to	
  assess	
  our	
  work.	
  This	
  topic	
  was	
  
covered	
  in	
  great	
  detail	
  at	
  the	
  recent	
  network	
  meeting.	
  A	
  committee	
  has	
  been	
  formed	
  
under	
  Amanda	
  Wittman	
  for	
  further	
  exploration	
  and	
  a	
  potential	
  funder	
  has	
  been	
  
identified.	
  	
  Melissa	
  stated	
  that	
  for	
  the	
  assessment	
  to	
  be	
  successful,	
  the	
  Compact	
  
would	
  need	
  4	
  things	
  from	
  the	
  board:	
  
	
  
     1. Support	
  in	
  principle	
  for	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  a	
  theory	
  of	
  change	
  and	
  an	
  	
  
          assessment	
  tool.	
  
     2. Participation	
  on	
  a	
  state	
  level	
  as	
  leaders	
  and	
  board	
  members	
  
     3. Funds	
  to	
  match	
  the	
  grant	
  
     4. Recommendations	
  for	
  possible	
  consultants	
  to	
  engage.	
  
	
  
Melissa	
  then	
  went	
  on	
  to	
  talk	
  about	
  the	
  overall	
  status	
  of	
  the	
  network.	
  While	
  the	
  
Compact	
  added	
  two	
  new	
  states,	
  one	
  office	
  also	
  closed	
  in	
  Mississippi.	
  Melissa	
  stated	
  
that	
  there	
  has	
  not	
  been	
  significant	
  growth	
  in	
  the	
  network	
  within	
  states,	
  and	
  that	
  
there	
  have	
  been	
  considerable	
  partnerships	
  set	
  up	
  between	
  the	
  states	
  for	
  
conferences,	
  grants,	
  etc.	
  The	
  unclear	
  future	
  of	
  the	
  Corporation	
  for	
  National	
  and	
  
Community	
  Service	
  is	
  also	
  causing	
  some	
  uncertainty	
  for	
  the	
  state	
  offices	
  that	
  rely	
  
heavily	
  on	
  that	
  organization	
  for	
  funding	
  and	
  services	
  to	
  members.	
  
	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                         9
	
  
Presidents	
  Leadership	
  Summit	
  
	
  
Jim	
  Harris	
  talked	
  briefly	
  about	
  the	
  Compact’s	
  history	
  of	
  partnering	
  with	
  
organizations	
  to	
  have	
  Presidents	
  Summits.	
  He	
  discussed	
  the	
  2012	
  meeting	
  and	
  its	
  
focus	
  on	
  Community	
  and	
  Economic	
  Development	
  and	
  partnership	
  with	
  the	
  Coalition	
  
of	
  Urban	
  and	
  Metropolitan	
  Universities	
  (CUMU).	
  	
  
	
  
Some	
  of	
  the	
  pros	
  of	
  partnering	
  with	
  CUMU	
  include	
  that	
  they	
  are	
  a	
  like-­‐minded	
  
organization,	
  Jim	
  Harris	
  serves	
  on	
  their	
  Board,	
  their	
  conference	
  in	
  Chattanooga	
  is	
  
affordable,	
  and	
  the	
  Compact	
  may	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  attract	
  more	
  presidents	
  than	
  usual.	
  
Concern	
  was	
  expressed	
  that	
  by	
  partnering	
  with	
  CUMU,	
  the	
  summit	
  may	
  seem	
  too	
  
focused	
  on	
  urban	
  campuses.	
  Jim	
  Harris	
  also	
  talked	
  about	
  the	
  Anchor	
  Institutions	
  
Task	
  Force	
  and	
  their	
  possible	
  involvement	
  in	
  the	
  summit	
  pending	
  data	
  and	
  also	
  a	
  
possible	
  follow	
  up	
  from	
  the	
  2010	
  PLS.	
  	
  
	
  
Amanda	
  Wittman	
  joined	
  via	
  phone	
  to	
  discuss	
  the	
  progress	
  of	
  the	
  white	
  paper	
  for	
  the	
  
summit	
  and	
  her	
  work	
  with	
  Terah	
  Crews,	
  a	
  graduate	
  assistant	
  from	
  Harvard	
  
University.	
  The	
  Board	
  discussed	
  possible	
  outcomes	
  for	
  the	
  white	
  paper	
  and	
  agreed	
  
that	
  the	
  research	
  needs	
  to	
  be	
  very	
  in-­‐depth.	
  	
  
	
  
The	
  Board	
  decided	
  to	
  continue	
  with	
  the	
  initial	
  theme	
  of	
  Community	
  and	
  Economic	
  
development	
  and	
  partner	
  with	
  CUMU.	
  The	
  PLS	
  Committee	
  will	
  meet	
  again	
  soon	
  and	
  
Board	
  Members	
  were	
  invited	
  to	
  participate	
  in	
  the	
  ad-­‐hoc	
  committee.	
  
	
  
Dues	
  Structure	
  
	
  
Maureen	
  discussed	
  the	
  dues	
  structure	
  of	
  the	
  last	
  five	
  years	
  and	
  the	
  lack	
  of	
  increase	
  
in	
  the	
  past	
  three	
  years.	
  Maureen	
  noted	
  that	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  has	
  significantly	
  lower	
  
dues	
  than	
  other	
  organizations	
  and	
  many	
  have	
  continued	
  to	
  raise	
  their	
  dues	
  during	
  
the	
  economic	
  downturn.	
  The	
  board	
  decided	
  not	
  to	
  increase	
  the	
  dues	
  at	
  this	
  time.	
  
David	
  Giunta	
  suggested	
  the	
  Finance	
  Committee	
  develop	
  a	
  policy	
  around	
  when	
  it	
  is	
  
appropriate	
  to	
  raise	
  dues.	
  	
  
	
  
Jim	
  Dworkin	
  will	
  draft	
  a	
  message	
  informing	
  the	
  network	
  of	
  the	
  Board’s	
  decision	
  to	
  
keep	
  dues	
  at	
  the	
  same	
  rate.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Conclusion	
  of	
  Meeting	
  	
  
	
  
Action:	
  Bernie	
  Milano	
  made	
  a	
  motion	
  to	
  adjourn	
  the	
  meeting,	
  seconded	
  by	
  David	
  
Giunta.	
  The	
  meeting	
  was	
  adjourned	
  1:27pm.	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                         10
Key	
  Programs	
  and	
  Projects	
  
	
  
Fund	
  Development	
  
Amy	
  Smitter,	
  Director	
  of	
  Institutional	
  Development	
  
	
  
Individual	
  Giving	
  
Campus	
  Compact	
  solicited	
  individual	
  support	
  from	
  board	
  members,	
  past	
  donors,	
  and	
  
national	
  staff	
  with	
  a	
  goal	
  of	
  raising	
  $40,000.	
  	
  Since	
  October	
  2011	
  we	
  have	
  raised	
  
$20,009.00.	
  To	
  date,	
  77%	
  of	
  the	
  board	
  has	
  contributed	
  and	
  100%	
  of	
  the	
  staff.	
  	
  
	
  
Presidents	
  Leadership	
  Summit	
  Sponsorship	
  
To	
  date,	
  we	
  have	
  raised	
  $30,000	
  in	
  sponsorship	
  for	
  the	
  October	
  Presidential	
  Leadership	
  
Summit,	
  thanks	
  to	
  Jenzabar,	
  Inc.,	
  Allstate	
  Foundation,	
  National	
  Student	
  Loan	
  
Program/Inceptia,	
  Columbia	
  College	
  Chicago,	
  Natixis	
  Global	
  Asset	
  Management,	
  
University	
  of	
  Iowa,	
  Widener	
  University,	
  and	
  Winthrop	
  University.	
  Our	
  goal	
  is	
  $40,000.	
  	
  
	
  
Proposals	
  Funded	
  
Lumina	
  Foundation	
  -­‐	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  received	
  a	
  third	
  year	
  of	
  funding	
  of	
  $25,000	
  for	
  
the	
  National	
  Youth	
  Serving	
  Organization	
  grants.	
  The	
  majority	
  of	
  this	
  grant	
  is	
  being	
  used	
  
to	
  train	
  the	
  network	
  on	
  College	
  Positive	
  Volunteerism	
  and	
  support	
  discussions	
  on	
  
creative	
  partnerships	
  for	
  funding.	
  
	
  
Proposals	
  Submitted	
  
Assessment	
  Project	
  –We	
  are	
  approaching	
  Fidelity	
  Charitable	
  Trust	
  to	
  fund	
  a	
  Theory	
  of	
  
Change	
  and	
  our	
  assessment	
  and	
  evaluation	
  work	
  for	
  the	
  network.	
  	
  
	
  
Update	
  on	
  Past	
  Proposals	
  
Tribal	
  Mentoring	
  –	
  A	
  grant	
  from	
  the	
  Department	
  of	
  Justice	
  is	
  on	
  hold,	
  as	
  the	
  department	
  
deals	
  with	
  budget	
  cuts.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  is	
  still	
  working	
  with	
  six	
  state	
  affiliates	
  to	
  find	
  
other	
  possible	
  funding	
  sources.	
  
	
  
Development	
  Support	
  to	
  State	
  Offices	
  (Since	
  July	
  2011)	
  	
  
       •   4	
  states	
  have	
  received	
  funding	
  through	
  national	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  	
  
       •   5	
  states	
  have	
  been	
  written	
  into	
  one	
  or	
  more	
  grants	
  
       •   Grant	
  opportunities,	
  resources	
  and	
  information	
  have	
  gone	
  to	
  all	
  35	
  states	
  
       •   28	
  states	
  so	
  far	
  were	
  informed	
  one	
  or	
  more	
  times	
  about	
  an	
  eligible	
  grant	
  in	
  their	
  
           state	
  
       •   116	
  viable	
  grant	
  options	
  were	
  sent	
  out	
  to	
  the	
  states	
  (27	
  more	
  than	
  last	
  year	
  
           already)	
  
       •   11	
  state	
  executive	
  directors	
  have	
  called	
  the	
  Director	
  of	
  Institutional	
  
           Development	
  to	
  discuss	
  a	
  fund	
  raising	
  idea	
  or	
  issue.	
  These	
  are	
  on	
  topics	
  ranging	
  
           from	
  individual	
  donors,	
  discussions	
  with	
  foundations	
  in	
  their	
  states,	
  ideas	
  for	
  
           new	
  revenue	
  streams,	
  and	
  things	
  they	
  hope	
  to	
  fund.	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                    11
     •    15	
  state	
  executive	
  directors	
  sought	
  and	
  received	
  fund	
  development	
  advice	
  or	
  
          help	
  in	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  way	
  from	
  the	
  Director	
  of	
  Institutional	
  Development.	
  	
  
	
  
State	
  Direct	
  Support	
  
Currently	
  Amy	
  is	
  working	
  directly	
  with	
  six	
  state	
  campus	
  compacts	
  that	
  have	
  immediate	
  
needs	
  for	
  fund	
  development	
  and	
  fund	
  diversification.	
  These	
  states	
  are:	
  Colorado,	
  
Connecticut,	
  Nebraska,	
  Rhode	
  Island,	
  Tennessee,	
  and	
  Vermont.	
  	
  
	
  
	
  

Academic	
  Initiatives	
  
Amanda	
  Wittman,	
  Ph.	
  D.,	
  Manager	
  of	
  Academic	
  and	
  Strategic	
  Initiatives	
  	
  
	
  
Academic	
  and	
  Strategic	
  Initiatives	
  have	
  focused	
  on	
  providing	
  a	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
presence	
  at	
  national	
  conferences,	
  supporting	
  state	
  academic	
  efforts,	
  research	
  and	
  
assessment.	
  	
  
	
  	
  
Conferences	
  
Amanda	
  attended	
  the	
  IARSLCE	
  (International	
  Association	
  for	
  Research	
  on	
  Service-­‐
Learning	
  and	
  Civic	
  Engagement)	
  Conference	
  in	
  Chicago	
  in	
  October.	
  	
  Jim	
  Dworkin	
  also	
  
attended	
  to	
  present	
  the	
  Distinguished	
  Research	
  Award,	
  which	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
sponsors,	
  to	
  Jeff	
  Howard.	
  	
  Amanda	
  and	
  Jim	
  also	
  attended	
  the	
  annual	
  AAC&U	
  (American	
  
Association	
  of	
  Colleges	
  &	
  Universities)	
  Conference	
  in	
  Washington	
  DC	
  in	
  January.	
  	
  Jim	
  
presented	
  the	
  Thomas	
  Ehrlich	
  Civically	
  Engaged	
  Faculty	
  Award	
  to	
  Dr.	
  Sherril	
  Gelmon	
  
from	
  Portland	
  State	
  University.	
  	
  Amanda	
  attended	
  the	
  pre-­‐conference	
  symposium	
  on	
  
civic	
  learning	
  as	
  a	
  representative	
  of	
  the	
  Civic	
  Learning	
  and	
  Democratic	
  Engagement	
  
planning	
  committee.	
  	
  She	
  also	
  attended	
  her	
  initial	
  meeting	
  as	
  a	
  board	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  
AAC&U	
  publication	
  Diversity	
  &	
  Democracy.	
  
	
  	
  
State	
  Support	
  
Amanda	
  participated	
  in	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  activities	
  to	
  support	
  state	
  Compact’s	
  academic	
  
efforts.	
  	
  In	
  November,	
  she	
  presented	
  a	
  workshop	
  on	
  Writing	
  and	
  Publishing	
  Engaged	
  
Scholarship	
  to	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  for	
  New	
  Hampshire.	
  	
  She	
  also	
  attended	
  a	
  SENCER	
  
(Science	
  Education	
  for	
  New	
  Civic	
  Education	
  and	
  Responsibilities)	
  workshop	
  for	
  
Massachusetts	
  Campus	
  Compact,	
  and	
  her	
  visit	
  to	
  Minnesota	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  focused	
  
on	
  national	
  efforts	
  surrounding	
  assessment	
  and	
  evaluation.	
  	
  Amanda	
  is	
  also	
  working	
  
with	
  a	
  subgroup	
  of	
  State	
  Directors	
  from	
  West	
  Virginia,	
  Minnesota,	
  California	
  and	
  
Vermont	
  on	
  supporting	
  graduate-­‐only	
  institutions	
  through	
  networking	
  and	
  a	
  listserv.	
  
	
  	
  
Assessment	
  
The	
  assessment	
  project	
  has	
  moved	
  forward	
  in	
  the	
  past	
  few	
  months.	
  	
  Amanda	
  wrote	
  and	
  
disseminated	
  a	
  Request	
  for	
  Proposals	
  that	
  focused	
  on	
  finding	
  organizations	
  willing	
  to	
  
lead	
  the	
  Network	
  through	
  a	
  Theory	
  of	
  Change	
  process	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  help	
  the	
  Network	
  
develop	
  and	
  pilot	
  a	
  sustainable	
  assessment	
  tool.	
  	
  Three	
  proposals	
  were	
  received,	
  and	
  
OMG,	
  Inc.	
  was	
  chosen	
  in	
  January	
  as	
  the	
  organization	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  will	
  work	
  with	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                         12
over	
  the	
  next	
  year	
  on	
  this	
  effort.	
  	
  Their	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  Network,	
  focus	
  on	
  
secondary	
  data	
  analysis	
  and	
  experience	
  with	
  theory	
  of	
  change	
  processes	
  were	
  what	
  set	
  
them	
  apart	
  as	
  the	
  best	
  fit	
  for	
  our	
  assessment	
  needs.	
  
	
  	
  
Research	
  
Amanda	
  has	
  been	
  working	
  on	
  two	
  research	
  projects.	
  	
  The	
  first	
  continues	
  the	
  work	
  for	
  
the	
  2012	
  Presidential	
  Leadership	
  Summit	
  on	
  civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  economic	
  
development.	
  	
  Working	
  with	
  a	
  student,	
  Terah	
  Crews,	
  from	
  the	
  Harvard	
  Graduate	
  School	
  
of	
  Education,	
  and	
  with	
  input	
  from	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Jim	
  Harris,	
  Barbara	
  Canyes,	
  Marcine	
  
Pickron-­‐Davis	
  and	
  Maureen	
  Curley,	
  we	
  have	
  conducted	
  a	
  thorough	
  literature	
  review,	
  
established	
  a	
  working	
  definition	
  of	
  an	
  engaged	
  learning	
  economy,	
  and	
  begun	
  to	
  collect	
  
case	
  study	
  interviews	
  of	
  powerful	
  practices	
  from	
  across	
  the	
  Network.	
  	
  In	
  addition,	
  
Amanda	
  has	
  begun	
  work	
  on	
  a	
  research	
  project	
  which	
  collects	
  the	
  experiences	
  of	
  
practitioners	
  who	
  work	
  with	
  non-­‐traditional	
  students.	
  	
  She	
  is	
  working	
  with	
  a	
  recent	
  Ph.	
  
D.	
  graduate	
  of	
  UMass	
  Amherst	
  on	
  this	
  project,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  community	
  partners	
  in	
  
Massachusetts.	
  	
  We	
  have	
  used	
  snowball	
  sampling	
  to	
  collect	
  25	
  participants	
  thus	
  far.	
  	
  
Using	
  web	
  and	
  telephone	
  interviews,	
  we	
  hope	
  to	
  develop	
  a	
  research-­‐based	
  
practitioner’s	
  e-­‐guide	
  for	
  use	
  throughout	
  the	
  Network.	
  
	
  
TRUCEN	
  
The	
  7th	
  Annual	
  Meeting	
  of	
  the	
  The	
  Research	
  Universities	
  and	
  Civic	
  Engagement	
  
Network	
  (TRUCEN)	
  was	
  held	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Wisconsin	
  -­‐	
  Madison	
  on	
  February	
  24	
  -­‐	
  
25,	
  2012.	
  	
  (Campus	
  Compact,	
  along	
  with	
  Tufts	
  University,	
  was	
  the	
  initiator	
  of	
  the	
  group	
  
and	
  serves	
  as	
  its	
  secretariat).	
  Thirty	
  individuals	
  representing	
  20	
  very	
  high	
  research	
  
universities	
  (plus	
  Maureen	
  and	
  Amanda),	
  attended.	
  Topics	
  included	
  Graduate	
  Students	
  
Involvement	
  in	
  Engaged	
  Scholarship;	
  International	
  Programs;	
  and	
  Challenges	
  and	
  
Strategies	
  in	
  Achieving	
  Community	
  Outcomes.	
  Final	
  edits	
  are	
  being	
  made	
  to	
  the	
  Special	
  
TRUCEN	
  Issue	
  of	
  the	
  Journal	
  of	
  Higher	
  Education	
  Outreach	
  and	
  Engagement	
  by	
  guest	
  
editors	
  Maureen	
  Curley,	
  Ira	
  Harkevy	
  (University	
  of	
  Pennsylvania)	
  and	
  Kathy	
  O'Byrne	
  
(UCLA).	
  The	
  online	
  journal	
  is	
  scheduled	
  to	
  be	
  released	
  in	
  the	
  summer.	
  Significant	
  
additions	
  will	
  be	
  made	
  to	
  the	
  TRUCEN	
  Toolkit	
  this	
  spring.	
  For	
  more	
  information	
  about	
  
TRUCEN,	
  including	
  a	
  list	
  of	
  participating	
  institutions	
  go	
  to:	
  
http://www.compact.org/initiatives/civic-­‐engagement-­‐at-­‐research-­‐universities/	
  
	
  
	
  
Communications	
  	
  
Sue	
  C.	
  Kelman,	
  Director	
  of	
  Communications	
  
	
  
MEDIA	
  
In	
  the	
  area	
  of	
  media	
  relations,	
  please	
  see	
  the	
  attached	
  highlights	
  of	
  press	
  coverage	
  (see	
  
page	
  39).	
  	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               13
	
  
INITIATIVES	
  
	
  
2012	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  Name	
  160	
  Awardees	
  
The	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  Award	
  honors	
  inspiring	
  college	
  student	
  leaders	
  who	
  have	
  
demonstrated	
  an	
  investment	
  in	
  finding	
  solutions	
  for	
  challenges	
  facing	
  communities	
  
throughout	
  the	
  country.	
  Through	
  service,	
  research,	
  and	
  advocacy,	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  
Fellows	
  are	
  working	
  to	
  better	
  understand	
  the	
  root	
  causes	
  of	
  social	
  issues,	
  and	
  help	
  
devise	
  effective	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  creating	
  lasting	
  change.	
  This	
  year	
  we	
  have	
  exceeded	
  
the	
  137	
  nominations	
  received	
  in	
  2011,	
  and	
  will	
  name	
  160	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  from	
  32	
  
states.	
  	
  
	
  
2011	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  Annual	
  Member	
  Survey	
  Achieves	
  60%	
  Response	
  Rate	
  
Of	
  the	
  1,185	
  member	
  institutions	
  in	
  2011,	
  716,	
  or	
  60%,	
  responded	
  to	
  the	
  2011	
  Campus	
  
Compact	
  Annual	
  Member	
  Survey.	
  Of	
  the	
  Compact’s	
  36	
  member	
  states,	
  26	
  states	
  
achieved	
  a	
  response	
  rate	
  of	
  50%	
  or	
  better	
  from	
  their	
  member	
  institutions.	
  

EVENTS	
  
	
  
January	
  Network	
  Gathering,	
  The	
  Carolina	
  Inn,	
  Chapel	
  Hill,	
  North	
  Carolina	
  
January	
  22-­‐25,	
  2012	
  
The	
  Carolina	
  Inn	
  was	
  the	
  site	
  of	
  the	
  January	
  Network	
  Meeting	
  with	
  a	
  total	
  of	
  34	
  
participants	
  from	
  32	
  states,	
  or	
  94%	
  of	
  all	
  state	
  directors	
  represented.	
  The	
  meeting	
  was	
  
largely	
  focused	
  on	
  professional	
  development,	
  with	
  two	
  outside	
  consultants	
  from	
  the	
  
Center	
  for	
  Creative	
  Leadership,	
  and	
  in-­‐depth	
  conversations	
  among	
  the	
  state	
  directors	
  
themselves.	
  The	
  goal:	
  to	
  explore	
  and	
  begin	
  to	
  institutionalize	
  a	
  more	
  intentional	
  
collaborative	
  leadership	
  model	
  in	
  which	
  state	
  directors	
  assume	
  more	
  responsibility	
  for	
  
the	
  success	
  of	
  the	
  network	
  as	
  a	
  whole,	
  and	
  for	
  each	
  other.	
  Outside	
  speakers/presenters	
  
included:	
  Edward	
  Marshall	
  and	
  Beth	
  Gullette	
  of	
  the	
  Center	
  for	
  Creative	
  Leadership;	
  
Leslie	
  Parkins	
  and	
  Leslie	
  Boney	
  of	
  UNC-­‐Chapel	
  Hill;	
  Lynn	
  Blanchard	
  and	
  Jenny	
  Huq	
  of	
  the	
  
Carolina	
  Center	
  for	
  Public	
  Service;	
  and	
  Dr.	
  Julianne	
  Malveaux,	
  president	
  of	
  Bennett	
  
College—the	
  oldest	
  historically	
  black	
  all	
  women’s	
  college	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  	
  
	
  
WEBSITE	
  &	
  SOCIAL	
  MEDIA	
  
	
  
On	
  www.compact.org	
  
Here	
  are	
  the	
  related	
  web	
  statistics	
  for	
  www.compact.org	
  for	
  the	
  period	
  of	
  July	
  1,	
  2011	
  
through	
  February	
  29,	
  2012:	
  
	
  	
  
         • 125,570	
  unique	
  visitors	
  visited	
  the	
  website	
  
         • 167,560	
  visits	
  were	
  made	
  to	
  the	
  website	
  
         • 412,220	
  page	
  views	
  were	
  opened	
  
         • 72.71%	
  of	
  visitors	
  were	
  new	
  visitors	
  to	
  the	
  website	
  
         • 27.19%	
  were	
  returning	
  visitors	
  to	
  the	
  website	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                              14
	
  
On	
  Facebook	
  
We	
  have	
  had	
  a	
  53%	
  increase	
  in	
  ‘likes’	
  of	
  our	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  Facebook	
  page	
  which,	
  as	
  
of	
  March	
  2,	
  2012,	
  translates	
  to	
  a	
  total	
  540.	
  	
  On	
  average,	
  we	
  are	
  reaching	
  250-­‐500	
  
individuals	
  weekly	
  (that	
  number	
  is	
  subject	
  to	
  large	
  fluctuations	
  based	
  on	
  school	
  
vacations	
  and	
  holidays).	
  Meanwhile,	
  at	
  our	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  Facebook	
  profile,	
  we	
  
currently	
  have	
  116	
  ‘friends.’	
  	
  92	
  of	
  these	
  ‘friends’	
  are	
  from	
  the	
  initial	
  class	
  of	
  137	
  
Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  and	
  they	
  added	
  to	
  a	
  private	
  Facebook	
  group,	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  
Connections.	
  
	
  
PUBLICATIONS	
  
	
  
Hard-­‐copy	
  communications:	
  	
  
	
  
Compact	
  Current	
  -­‐	
  Winter	
  2011-­‐2012	
  Edition	
  	
  
The	
  Winter	
  2011/2012	
  issue	
  of	
  Current,	
  funded	
  by	
  the	
  KPMG	
  Foundation,	
  was	
  focused	
  
on	
  highlighting	
  global	
  initiatives	
  being	
  undertaken	
  by	
  our	
  members	
  and	
  through	
  state	
  
Compacts.	
  Features:	
  an	
  interview	
  with	
  Dr.	
  Helen	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  of	
  Keene	
  State	
  College	
  who	
  
discussed	
  how	
  service-­‐learning	
  has	
  been	
  woven	
  into	
  the	
  fabric	
  of	
  campus	
  life.	
  We	
  also	
  
featured	
  an	
  introduction	
  to	
  Chancellor	
  James	
  B.	
  Dworkin	
  in	
  his	
  role	
  as	
  Chair	
  of	
  Campus	
  
Compact.	
  Other	
  stories	
  included	
  an	
  extensive	
  piece	
  on	
  Indiana	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  
sponsorship	
  and	
  participation	
  in	
  their	
  4th	
  International	
  Symposium	
  on	
  Service-­‐Learning	
  
at	
  the	
  Ningbo	
  Institute	
  of	
  Technology	
  at	
  Ningbo,	
  China,	
  and	
  how	
  this	
  reverberates	
  back	
  
home	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Indianapolis.	
  	
  
	
  
E-­‐Communications:	
  	
  
	
  
Presidents’	
  Update	
  -­‐	
  January	
  9,	
  2012	
  
This	
  is	
  a	
  brief	
  email	
  to	
  all	
  Compact	
  member	
  presidents.	
  January’s	
  edition	
  reached	
  1,152	
  
presidents/chancellors.	
  	
  
	
  
PROFILES	
  in	
  Engagement	
  -­‐	
  November	
  2011	
  &	
  February	
  2012	
  
This	
  is	
  an	
  electronic	
  “touch	
  point”	
  to	
  donors	
  and	
  potential	
  donors.	
  February’s	
  issue	
  
reached	
  458	
  contacts.	
  
	
  
HORIZONS:	
  Reaching	
  Beyond	
  the	
  Quad	
  -­‐	
  January	
  2012	
  
This	
  publication	
  is	
  an	
  e-­‐newsletter	
  for	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  VISTAs	
  and	
  VISTA	
  alumni,	
  
written	
  by	
  the	
  Compact	
  VISTA	
  Leader.	
  Our	
  January	
  issue	
  went	
  out	
  to	
  678	
  contacts.	
  
	
  
Special	
  Note	
  from	
  President	
  Dworkin	
  on	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  Awards	
  
This	
  message	
  was	
  intended	
  to	
  spur	
  nominations	
  for	
  the	
  2012	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows.	
  It	
  
went	
  to	
  1,192	
  presidents	
  and	
  chancellors.	
  
	
  
BOOK	
  STORE	
  SALES	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               15
Total	
  revenues	
  from	
  October	
  15,	
  2011	
  -­‐	
  March	
  1,	
  2012	
  were	
  $11,544.	
  Total	
  revenues	
  
from	
  the	
  same	
  period	
  last	
  year	
  were	
  $11,322.	
  Three	
  most	
  popular	
  titles	
  are:	
  
Introduction	
  to	
  Service-­‐Learning	
  Toolkit:	
  Reading	
  and	
  Resources	
  for	
  Faculty;	
  The	
  
Fundamentals	
  of	
  Service-­‐Learning	
  Course	
  Construction,	
  and	
  Looking	
  In	
  Reaching	
  Out.	
  
	
  
	
  
Connect2Complete	
  (C2C)	
  
Shana	
  Berger,	
  Project	
  Manager	
  C2C	
  
	
  
Connect2Complete	
  is	
  a	
  pilot	
  program,	
  funded	
  by	
  the	
  Bill	
  and	
  Melinda	
  Gates	
  Foundation,	
  
which	
  uses	
  peer-­‐to-­‐peer	
  mentoring,	
  service	
  learning	
  and	
  community	
  service	
  to	
  increase	
  
community	
  college	
  access	
  and	
  retention.	
  After	
  issuing	
  the	
  C2C	
  Request	
  for	
  Proposals	
  in	
  
September,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  received	
  five	
  strong	
  applications.	
  Our	
  review	
  committee	
  
awarded	
  C2C	
  funds	
  to	
  nine	
  community	
  colleges	
  (three	
  in	
  each	
  state)	
  in	
  Florida,	
  Ohio	
  and	
  
Washington	
  and	
  to	
  the	
  three	
  state	
  Compact	
  offices.	
  	
  Following	
  the	
  notice	
  of	
  awards,	
  on	
  
November	
  9th	
  and	
  10th	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  brought	
  the	
  awardees	
  together	
  in	
  Boston	
  for	
  a	
  
meeting	
  to	
  celebrate	
  the	
  work,	
  build	
  the	
  C2C	
  learning	
  community	
  and	
  review	
  roles	
  and	
  
responsibilities.	
  	
  The	
  meeting	
  was	
  incredibly	
  successful	
  with	
  lively	
  participation	
  from	
  the	
  
awardees,	
  our	
  partner	
  evaluators	
  at	
  Brandeis	
  University,	
  the	
  Gates	
  Foundation	
  and	
  staff	
  
at	
  OMG	
  Center	
  for	
  Collaborative	
  Learning	
  who	
  facilitated	
  discussion	
  of	
  the	
  C2C	
  theory	
  of	
  
change.	
  	
  	
  	
  
	
  
In	
  January,	
  the	
  campuses	
  hit	
  the	
  ground	
  running,	
  launching	
  their	
  C2C	
  programs,	
  hiring	
  
program	
  coordinators,	
  recruiting	
  and	
  training	
  peer	
  advocates	
  and	
  partnering	
  them	
  with	
  
C2C	
  students.	
  Also	
  in	
  January,	
  Shana	
  launched	
  the	
  C2C	
  website	
  with	
  an	
  overview	
  of	
  the	
  
program,	
  profiles	
  of	
  each	
  of	
  the	
  community	
  college’s	
  C2C	
  programs,	
  C2C	
  press	
  and	
  
more.	
  	
  The	
  website	
  can	
  be	
  viewed	
  at:	
  
http://www.compact.org/initiatives/connect2complete/	
  	
  
	
  
The	
  C2C	
  National	
  Leadership	
  Team	
  was	
  established	
  and	
  held	
  its	
  first	
  meeting	
  on	
  
February	
  28,	
  2012.	
  	
  The	
  leadership	
  team	
  will	
  serve	
  primarily	
  to	
  conduct	
  C2C	
  model	
  
development	
  work	
  that	
  will	
  lead	
  to	
  the	
  codification	
  of	
  essential	
  elements	
  of	
  a	
  C2C	
  
model.	
  	
  The	
  leadership	
  team	
  includes	
  administration	
  and	
  faculty	
  from	
  the	
  pilot	
  
community	
  colleges,	
  staff	
  from	
  the	
  state	
  Compacts,	
  the	
  evaluation	
  partners,	
  the	
  
program	
  officer	
  at	
  the	
  Gates	
  Foundation,	
  the	
  	
  Executive	
  Director	
  of	
  Philanthropy	
  for	
  
Active	
  Civic	
  Engagement	
  (PACE)	
  and	
  a	
  staff	
  member	
  at	
  Completion	
  by	
  Design.	
  	
  The	
  
leadership	
  team	
  feeds	
  into	
  what	
  we	
  are	
  calling	
  “The	
  System	
  of	
  Collaborative	
  Learning”	
  
which	
  includes	
  learning	
  communities	
  at	
  the	
  national	
  and	
  state	
  level	
  where	
  lessons	
  will	
  
be	
  shared	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  strengthen	
  the	
  C2C	
  model.	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Finally,	
  Shana	
  shared	
  with	
  the	
  leadership	
  team	
  an	
  outline	
  for	
  a	
  C2C	
  resource	
  book,	
  
which	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  living	
  document	
  used	
  both	
  as	
  a	
  resource	
  to	
  the	
  pilot	
  sites	
  and	
  as	
  the	
  first	
  
step	
  towards	
  identifying	
  the	
  essential	
  elements	
  of	
  a	
  C2C	
  model.	
  	
  The	
  leadership	
  team	
  
provided	
  helpful	
  feedback	
  moving	
  the	
  process	
  forward.	
  	
  	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                           16
	
  
	
  
Developing	
  Compacts	
  
Maggie	
  Grove,	
  Consultant	
  
	
  
New	
  State	
  Affiliates:	
  New	
  Jersey	
  and	
  Nebraska	
  
We	
  are	
  delighted	
  to	
  officially	
  welcome	
  two	
  new	
  state	
  affiliates	
  to	
  our	
  network.	
  Both	
  
New	
  Jersey	
  and	
  Nebraska	
  Campus	
  Compacts	
  have	
  begun	
  providing	
  services	
  to	
  member	
  
institutions.	
  Margaret	
  Gilbride	
  joins	
  New	
  Jersey	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  as	
  the	
  first	
  Executive	
  
Director	
  and	
  has	
  re-­‐located	
  from	
  Indiana.	
  Nebraska	
  is	
  operating	
  under	
  the	
  part-­‐time	
  
direction	
  of	
  Juan	
  Franco,	
  University	
  of	
  Nebraska-­‐Lincoln’s	
  Vice	
  President	
  for	
  Student	
  
Affairs.	
  
	
  
Affiliations	
  Pending:	
  Maryland-­‐District	
  of	
  Columbia	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  	
  
When	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  national	
  board	
  last	
  convened	
  to	
  consider	
  Maryland-­‐District	
  of	
  
Columbia’s	
  request	
  for	
  affiliation,	
  it	
  was	
  determined	
  that	
  there	
  needed	
  to	
  be	
  additional	
  
documentation	
  of	
  support	
  from	
  DC	
  presidents	
  beyond	
  those	
  that	
  have	
  historically	
  been	
  
involved	
  in	
  the	
  Compact	
  as	
  national	
  members.	
  To	
  date,	
  we	
  have	
  received	
  letters	
  from	
  
University	
  of	
  the	
  District	
  of	
  Columbia	
  and	
  Gallaudet	
  University.	
  The	
  presidents	
  of	
  
Gallaudet	
  and	
  George	
  Washington	
  University	
  have	
  offered	
  to	
  serve	
  on	
  the	
  board.	
  The	
  
Maryland-­‐District	
  of	
  Columbia	
  request	
  to	
  affiliate	
  is	
  therefore	
  still	
  pending	
  approval.	
  
	
  
Affiliate	
  Closings:	
  Louisiana	
  
Louisiana	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  officially	
  closed	
  on	
  March	
  1,	
  2012	
  because	
  of	
  a	
  lack	
  of	
  both	
  
service	
  provision	
  and	
  presidential	
  leadership.	
  The	
  national	
  office	
  will	
  continue	
  to	
  
provide	
  services	
  to	
  Louisiana	
  members	
  for	
  the	
  remainder	
  of	
  the	
  calendar	
  year.	
  The	
  
balance	
  of	
  Louisiana’s	
  funds	
  will	
  be	
  transferred	
  to	
  the	
  national	
  office	
  and	
  applied	
  to	
  its	
  
outstanding	
  affiliation	
  fee	
  debt.	
  	
  
	
  
National/International	
  members	
  
The	
  national	
  office	
  continues	
  outreach	
  to	
  members	
  in	
  areas	
  without	
  state	
  affiliates	
  
through	
  regular	
  electronic	
  updates,	
  listserv	
  offerings,	
  phone	
  calls	
  and	
  technical	
  
assistance	
  upon	
  request.	
  We	
  have	
  finalized	
  updates	
  to	
  our	
  linked	
  listserv	
  and	
  database	
  
which	
  will	
  provide	
  for	
  greater	
  monitoring	
  and	
  support	
  of	
  our	
  national	
  membership.	
  We	
  
have	
  also	
  updated	
  outreach	
  materials	
  for	
  international	
  members	
  based	
  on	
  increasing	
  
interest	
  in	
  the	
  Compact’s	
  work	
  from	
  abroad.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  even	
  doubled	
  its	
  
membership	
  in	
  Wyoming.	
  	
  
	
  	
  
National	
  Service	
  Policy	
  Initiatives	
  
Mark	
  Esté,	
  Special	
  Assistant	
  to	
  the	
  President	
  
	
  
Compact	
  Policy	
  Initiatives	
  	
  
The	
  Corporation	
  for	
  National	
  and	
  Community	
  Service	
  is	
  once	
  again	
  facing	
  significant	
  cuts	
  
and	
  possible	
  elimination	
  in	
  proposed	
  budgets	
  for	
  2013.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  continues	
  to	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               17
be	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  Voices	
  for	
  National	
  Service,	
  a	
  national	
  coalition	
  of	
  organizations	
  
dedicated	
  to	
  educating	
  decision	
  makers	
  on	
  the	
  importance	
  and	
  value	
  of	
  National	
  
Service.	
  Mark	
  Esté	
  attended	
  a	
  Legislative	
  Strategy	
  Meeting	
  with	
  Voices	
  in	
  February	
  and	
  
is	
  aiding	
  the	
  Compact	
  network	
  with	
  a	
  specific	
  timeline	
  for	
  outreach	
  to	
  elected	
  officials	
  
over	
  the	
  next	
  few	
  months.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Also	
  in	
  February,	
  Voices	
  honored	
  Dr.	
  Eduardo	
  Padrón,	
  President	
  of	
  Miami	
  Dade	
  College,	
  
with	
  the	
  Citizen	
  Service	
  Award	
  at	
  their	
  annual	
  Friends	
  of	
  National	
  Service	
  Reception.	
  
Campus	
  Compact	
  nominated	
  Dr.	
  Padrón	
  and	
  he	
  is	
  the	
  first	
  college	
  president	
  to	
  win	
  this	
  
award.	
  	
  
	
  
CNCS	
  Updates	
  
CNCS	
  is	
  still	
  looking	
  for	
  a	
  new	
  CEO.	
  Robert	
  Valesco	
  has	
  been	
  the	
  interim	
  director	
  since	
  
the	
  former	
  CEO,	
  Patrick	
  Covington,	
  resigned	
  in	
  May	
  2011.	
  Wendy	
  Spencer,	
  Director	
  of	
  
Volunteer	
  Florida,	
  was	
  nominated	
  in	
  late	
  2011,	
  but	
  has	
  not	
  been	
  approved	
  by	
  Congress	
  
as	
  of	
  March	
  2,	
  2012.	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               18
Speaking	
  Engagements,	
  Workshops	
  and	
  Presentations	
  
	
  
•      On	
  October	
  20,	
  Maureen	
  moderated	
  a	
  panel	
  of	
  college	
  presidents	
  and	
  staff	
  as	
  part	
  
       of	
  “Evidence	
  of	
  Success:	
  Institutions	
  of	
  Higher	
  Education	
  Engaging	
  Communities,”	
  an	
  
       event	
  sponsored	
  by	
  the	
  Corporation	
  for	
  National	
  and	
  Community	
  Service	
  and	
  
       Housing	
  and	
  Urban	
  Development	
  in	
  Washington,	
  DC.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  October	
  27,	
  Maureen	
  and	
  Amanda	
  Wittman	
  attended	
  Eastern	
  Region	
  Campus	
  
       Compact	
  Conference	
  in	
  New	
  York	
  City.	
  Maureen	
  also	
  moderated	
  a	
  panel	
  of	
  college	
  
       presidents.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  October	
  28,	
  Maureen	
  attended	
  the	
  New	
  York	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  10th	
  Anniversary	
  
       celebration,	
  in	
  New	
  York	
  City.	
  At	
  the	
  event,	
  Maureen	
  spoke	
  about	
  the	
  national	
  
       context	
  of	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  
	
  
•      Maureen	
  attended	
  the	
  Independent	
  Sector	
  Annual	
  Conference	
  October	
  30	
  –	
  
       November	
  1	
  in	
  Chicago,	
  IL.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  November	
  10,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  hosted	
  a	
  meeting	
  of	
  all	
  Connect2Complete	
  
       grantees	
  and	
  theory	
  of	
  change	
  consultants	
  in	
  Boston,	
  MA.	
  	
  
	
  
•      From	
  November	
  29	
  though	
  December	
  1,	
  Amy	
  Smitter	
  organized	
  a	
  presentation	
  from	
  
       Michigan	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  on	
  College	
  Positive	
  Volunteerism	
  for	
  Lumina	
  Foundation,	
  
       College	
  Access	
  Networks	
  and	
  National	
  Youth	
  Serving	
  organizations	
  in	
  Indianapolis,	
  
       IN.	
  
	
  
•      On	
  November	
  29,	
  Amy	
  Smitter	
  facilitated	
  a	
  discussion	
  with	
  the	
  Indiana	
  Campus	
  
       Compact	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors	
  with	
  Executive	
  Director	
  Maggie	
  Stevens	
  in	
  Indianapolis.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  December	
  13,	
  Maureen	
  participated	
  in	
  a	
  community	
  service	
  director	
  meeting	
  
       with	
  Rhode	
  Island	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  to	
  give	
  brief	
  remarks	
  and	
  meet	
  with	
  their	
  state’s	
  
       board	
  chair.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  December	
  15,	
  Maureen	
  and	
  Amanda	
  attended	
  the	
  Anchor	
  Institutions	
  Task	
  Force	
  
       Meeting	
  in	
  Philadelphia,	
  PA	
  where	
  Maureen	
  also	
  moderated	
  a	
  panel	
  of	
  presidents.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  January	
  11,	
  Maureen	
  and	
  Julie	
  Plaut	
  of	
  Minnesota	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  attended	
  
       “For	
  Democracy’s	
  Future:	
  	
  Education	
  Reclaims	
  Our	
  Civic	
  Mission”	
  at	
  the	
  White	
  House	
  
       in	
  Washington,	
  DC.	
  This	
  also	
  marked	
  the	
  release	
  A	
  Crucible	
  Moment:	
  College	
  
       Learning	
  and	
  Democracy’s	
  Future.	
  	
  This	
  was	
  commissioned	
  by	
  the	
  Department	
  of	
  
       Education	
  and	
  emphasizes	
  that	
  civic	
  education	
  and	
  engagement	
  will	
  contribute	
  to	
  
       increasing	
  student	
  retention	
  and	
  developing	
  the	
  skills	
  critical	
  for	
  professional	
  
       success	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  democratic	
  vitality.	
  
	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                          19
•      Campus	
  Compact	
  held	
  the	
  Winter	
  2012	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  Network	
  Gathering	
  at	
  the	
  
       University	
  of	
  North	
  Carolina	
  in	
  Chapel	
  Hill,	
  NC	
  January	
  20-­‐22.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  January	
  25,	
  Jim	
  Dworkin	
  presented	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  Thomas	
  Ehrlich	
  Civically	
  
       Engaged	
  Faculty	
  Award	
  to	
  Dr.	
  Sherril	
  Gelmon	
  from	
  Portland	
  State	
  University	
  at	
  the	
  
       AAC&U	
  annual	
  meeting	
  in	
  Washington,	
  DC.	
  Amanda	
  Wittman	
  also	
  moderated	
  a	
  
       panel	
  of	
  the	
  four	
  finalists	
  at	
  the	
  event	
  and	
  she	
  also	
  attended	
  her	
  initial	
  meeting	
  as	
  a	
  
       board	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  AAC&U	
  publication	
  Diversity	
  &	
  Democracy.	
  
	
  
•      January	
  29-­‐30,	
  Maureen	
  and	
  Amy	
  Smitter	
  attended	
  the	
  Michigan	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
       Service	
  Learning	
  and	
  Civic	
  Engagement	
  Institute	
  in	
  Lansing,	
  MI.	
  Maureen	
  spoke	
  
       about	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  role	
  and	
  presented	
  a	
  lifetime	
  achievement	
  award	
  to	
  2010	
  
       Thomas	
  Ehrlich	
  Award	
  Winner,	
  Barry	
  Checkoway	
  of	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Michigan.	
  Amy	
  
       presented	
  on	
  Raising	
  Money	
  for	
  Civic	
  Engagement.	
  	
  
	
  
•      On	
  February	
  14,	
  Mark	
  Esté	
  attended	
  the	
  Friends	
  of	
  National	
  Service	
  Reception	
  in	
  
       Washington,	
  DC	
  where	
  President	
  Eduardo	
  Padrón	
  of	
  Miami	
  Dade	
  College	
  was	
  
       honored	
  with	
  the	
  Citizen	
  Service	
  Award.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  nominated	
  Dr.	
  Padrón	
  
       and	
  he	
  is	
  the	
  first	
  college	
  president	
  to	
  win	
  the	
  award	
  that	
  is	
  sponsored	
  by	
  Voices	
  for	
  
       National	
  Service.	
  
	
  
•      On	
  February	
  14-­‐15,	
  Maureen	
  attended	
  North	
  Carolina	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  10th	
  
       Anniversary	
  in	
  Chapel	
  Hill.	
  At	
  the	
  reception,	
  she	
  introduced	
  Caryn	
  McTighe	
  Musil	
  
       from	
  AAC&U	
  as	
  the	
  keynote	
  speaker,	
  offered	
  a	
  welcome	
  from	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  and	
  
       presented	
  awards	
  to	
  North	
  Carolina’s	
  2011	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows.	
  
	
  
•      Maureen	
  attended	
  the	
  Wisconsin	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  President’s	
  Meeting	
  on	
  February	
  
       22	
  in	
  Madison.	
  Maureen	
  spoke	
  to	
  the	
  presidents	
  about	
  the	
  national	
  role	
  of	
  Campus	
  
       Compact.	
  
	
  
•      On	
  February	
  23-­‐25,	
  Maureen	
  and	
  Amanda	
  attended	
  the	
  annual	
  meeting	
  of	
  The	
  
       Research	
  University	
  Civic	
  Engagement	
  Network	
  (TRUCEN)	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  
       Wisconsin	
  in	
  Madison.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  is	
  the	
  secretariat	
  of	
  TRUCEN	
  and	
  34	
  people	
  
       attended	
  representing	
  24	
  of	
  TRUCEN’s	
  34	
  member	
  institutions.	
  Topics	
  of	
  the	
  two-­‐
       day	
  meeting	
  focused	
  on	
  graduate	
  students	
  in	
  engaged	
  scholarship,	
  and	
  international	
  
       service-­‐learning	
  projects	
  at	
  Tier	
  One	
  research	
  universities.	
  	
  
	
  
       	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                          20
                    Board of Directors 2011-2012

Dr. Wilson G. Bradshaw – Vice Chair      Mr. David L. Giunta – Treasurer
President                                President and CEO
Florida Gulf Coast University            Natixis Global Associates
10501 FGCU Blvd. S.                      399 Boylston St.
Fort Myers, FL 33965                     Boston, MA 02116
PHONE: (239) 590-1055                    PHONE: (617) 449-2503
FAX: (239) 590-1059                      FAX: (617) 369-9755
bradshaw@fgcu.edu                        david.giunta@ga.natixis.com
Assistant: Barbara Krell                 Assistant: Jessica Doane

Dr. Warrick L. Carter                    Dr. James T. Harris III – Vice Chair
President                                President
Columbia College, Chicago                Widener University
600 S. Michigan, Room 505                Office of the President
Chicago, IL 60605                        One University Place
PHONE: (312) 369-7202                    Chester, PA 19013
FAX: (312) 369-8069                      PHONE: (610) 499-4101
wcarter@colum.edu                        FAX: (610) 499-4196
Assistant: Yvonne Sode                   jtharris@widener.edu
                                         Assistant: Janis Sendek

Dr. Anthony J. DiGiorgio                 Dr. Jane Karas – Vice Chair
President                                President
Winthrop University                      Flathead Valley Community College
114 Tillman Hall                         Office of the President
701 Oakland Ave.                         777 Grandview Drive
Rock Hill, SC 29733                      Kalispell, MT 58801
PHONE: (803) 323-2225                    PHONE: (406) 756-3800
FAX: (803) 323-3001                      FAX: (406) 756-3815
DiGiorgioA@winthrop.edu                  jkaras@fvcc.edu
Assistant: Betty Triplett                Assistant: Monica Settles

Dr. James B. Dworkin – Chair/Secretary   Dr. Mary Lyons
Chancellor                               President
Purdue University North Central          University of San Diego
Schwarz Hall, Room 137                   5998 Alcalá Park
1401 South U.S. Highway 421              San Diego, CA 92110-2492
Westville, IN 46391                      PHONE: (619) 260-4520
PHONE: (219) 785-5331                    FAX: (619) 260-6833
FAX: (219) 785-5355                      mlyons@sandiego.edu
jdworkin@pnc.edu                         Assistant: Elaine Atencio
Assistant: Deb Nielsen




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                           21
Dr. Sally Mason                         PHONE: (201) 307-7686
President                               FAX: (201) 624-7934 or
University of Iowa                      (201) 624-7424
President's Office                      bmilano@kpmg.com
101 Jessup Hall                         Assistant: Joanne Berry
Iowa City, IA 52242
PHONE: (319) 335-8076                   Mr. John Sirek
FAX: (319) 335-0807                     Civics Program Director
sally-mason@uiowa.edu                   McCormick Foundation
Assistant: Dawn Pressler                205 North Michigan Ave.
                                        Suite 4300
Mr. Bernard Milano                      Chicago, IL 60601
President                               PHONE: (312) 445-5061
KPMG Foundation                         FAX: (312) 445-5161
3 Chestnut Ridge Road                   jsirek@McCormickFoundation.org
Montvale, NJ 07645                      Assistant: Natalie Perez
PHONE: (201) 307-7686
FAX: (201) 624-7934 or (201) 624-7424
bmilano@kpmg.com
Assistant: Joanne Berry

Mr. John Sirek
Civics Program Director
McCormick Foundation
205 North Michigan Ave.
Suite 4300
Chicago, IL 60601
PHONE (312) 445-5061
FAX: (312) 445-5161
jsirek@McCormickFoundation.org
Assistant: Natialie Perez




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                    22
                                     National Campus Compact Board of Directors
 Board	
  Member	
  &	
  Affiliation	
              State	
     State	
  Compact	
     Term	
  Ends	
     #	
  Term	
  
 Wilson	
  Bradshaw	
  –	
  Vice	
  Chair	
  
                                                      FL	
             Yes	
             6/2012	
             1	
  
 Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
 Warrick	
  L.	
  Carter	
  
                                                      IL	
             Yes	
             6/2013	
             2	
  
 Columbia	
  College	
  Chicago	
  
 Anthony	
  DiGiorgio	
  
                                                      SC	
             Yes	
             6/2013	
             1	
  
 Winthrop	
  University	
  
 James	
  Dworkin	
  –	
  Chair,	
  Secretary	
  
                                                      IN	
             Yes	
             6/2014	
             2	
  
 Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  
 David	
  Giunta	
  –	
  Treasurer	
  
                                                     MA	
              Yes	
             6/2014	
             2	
  
 Natixis	
  Global	
  Associates	
  
 James	
  Harris	
  –	
  Vice	
  Chair	
  
                                                      PA	
             Yes	
             6/2014	
             2	
  
 Widener	
  University	
  

 Jane	
  Karas	
  –	
  Vice	
  Chair	
  	
  
 	
  
                                                     MT	
              Yes	
             6/2012	
             2	
  
 Flathead	
  Valley	
  Community	
  College	
  

 Mary	
  Lyons	
  	
  
                                                     CA	
              Yes	
            12/2013	
             1	
  
 University	
  of	
  San	
  Diego	
  
 Sally	
  Mason	
  
                                                      IA	
             Yes	
            12/2013	
             1	
  
 University	
  of	
  Iowa	
  
 Bernard	
  Milano	
  
                                                      NJ	
             Yes	
             6/2013	
             1	
  
 KPMG	
  Foundation	
  
 John	
  Sirek	
  	
  
                                                      IL	
             Yes	
             6/2013	
             2	
  
 McCormick	
  Foundation	
  


National Board Terms of Service are three years from either July-to-June or January-to-
December. Board members may not serve more than two consecutive terms.




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                     23
Board	
  Committees	
  2011-­‐2012	
  
	
  
EXECUTIVE	
  COMMITTEE	
  
	
  
The	
  Executive	
  Committee	
  consists	
  of	
  the	
  Chairman	
  of	
  the	
  Board,	
  the	
  vice-­‐chair(s)	
  	
  
and	
  the	
  President	
  of	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  This	
  committee	
  will	
  meet	
  between	
  scheduled	
  	
  
board	
  meetings	
  and	
  serves	
  as	
  the	
  chief	
  administrative	
  authority	
  of	
  the	
  Compact.	
  	
  
	
  
Chair/Secretary:	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  
Vice-­‐Chair:	
  Jane	
  Karas,	
  Flathead	
  Valley	
  Community	
  College	
  
Vice-­‐Chair:	
  Jim	
  Harris,	
  Widener	
  University	
  
Vice-­‐Chair:	
  Wilson	
  Bradshaw,	
  Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
Treasurer:	
  David	
  Giunta,	
  Natixis	
  Global	
  Associates	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  
President:	
  Maureen	
  Curley,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
	
  
NOMINATING	
  COMMITTEE	
  
	
  
The	
  Nominating	
  Committee	
  proposes	
  a	
  slate	
  of	
  candidates	
  and	
  officers	
  for	
  election	
  to	
  
the	
  board	
  of	
  directors.	
  The	
  bylaws	
  mandate	
  that	
  this	
  committee	
  have	
  three	
  members.	
  
	
  
Chair:	
  Jane	
  Karas,	
  Flathead	
  Valley	
  Community	
  College	
  
Wilson	
  Bradshaw,	
  Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
Mary	
  Lyons,	
  University	
  of	
  San	
  Diego	
  
Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  (ex-­‐officio)	
  
Gina	
  Wekke,	
  Oklahoma	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
Maureen	
  Curley,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
	
  
FINANCE,	
  INVESTMENT,	
  AND	
  AUDIT	
  COMMITTEE	
  	
  
	
  	
  
Reviews	
  the	
  budget	
  and	
  makes	
  recommendations	
  to	
  the	
  national	
  board	
  regarding	
  
approval.	
  Makes	
  suggestions	
  and	
  reviews	
  investment	
  of	
  reserve	
  funds.	
  Selects	
  and	
  
oversees	
  the	
  auditing	
  company;	
  reviews	
  the	
  audit	
  and	
  reports	
  to	
  the	
  entire	
  board	
  for	
  
approval.	
  
	
  
Chair:	
  David	
  Giunta,	
  Natixis	
  Global	
  Associates	
  	
  
Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  (ex-­‐officio)	
  
Debby	
  Scire,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  for	
  New	
  Hampshire	
  
Bruce	
  Hain,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  	
  
	
  



CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                             24
HUMAN	
  RESOURCES	
  COMMITTEE	
  
	
  
Committee	
  to	
  annually	
  review	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  personnel	
  policies	
  to	
  assure	
  
compliance	
  with	
  state	
  and	
  federal	
  law;	
  also	
  resolves	
  personnel	
  disputes	
  not	
  able	
  to	
  be	
  
resolved	
  by	
  management.	
  	
  
	
  
Chair:	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  
Char	
  Gray,	
  Pennsylvania	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
Maureen	
  Curley,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
	
  
FUND	
  DEVELOPMENT	
  COMMITTEE	
  
	
  
Works	
  with	
  national	
  executive	
  staff	
  to	
  institutionalize	
  the	
  process	
  of	
  fund	
  development.	
  
Recommends	
  philanthropy	
  and	
  fund	
  development	
  policies	
  to	
  the	
  board	
  for	
  action.	
  It	
  will	
  
identify	
  trends	
  and	
  implications	
  and	
  engage	
  the	
  board	
  in	
  strategic	
  dialogue	
  and	
  
decision-­‐making	
  regarding	
  philanthropy	
  and	
  fund	
  development.	
  
	
  
David	
  Giunta,	
  Natixis	
  Global	
  Associates	
  
Bernard	
  Milano,	
  KPMG	
  Foundation	
  
John	
  Sirek,	
  McCormick	
  Foundation	
  
Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  (ex-­‐officio)	
  
Amy	
  Smitter,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
	
  
AD-­‐HOC	
  COMMITTEE:	
  PRESIDENTS	
  LEADERSHIP	
  SUMMIT	
  2012	
  
	
  
Chair:	
  Jim	
  Harris,	
  Widener	
  University	
  
Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  (ex-­‐officio)	
  
John	
  Sirek,	
  McCormick	
  Foundation	
  
Barbara	
  Canyes,	
  Massachusetts	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
Maureen	
  Curley,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
Amanda	
  Wittman,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
Terah	
  Crews,	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                          25
                                                              	
  

Board	
  Elections	
  
	
  
New	
  Board	
  Member	
  Candidates	
  
	
  
Dennis	
  Ahlburg	
                                  TX	
  
Trinity	
  University	
  
	
  
Helen	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
                               NH	
   	
        	
        	
  
Keene	
  State	
  College	
  
	
  
Marie	
  Foster	
  Gnage	
                           WV	
  
West	
  Virginia	
  University-­‐Parkersburg	
  
	
  
Richard	
  Guarasci	
                                NY	
  
Wagner	
  College	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  
Board	
  Members	
  Seeking	
  Re-­‐Election	
  to	
  Second	
  Term	
  
	
  
Wilson	
  Bradshaw	
                                 FL	
   	
        	
        	
  
Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
	
  
Slate	
  of	
  Officers	
  
	
  
Chair:	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  
Vice-­‐Chair:	
  Wilson	
  Bradshaw,	
  Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  
Vice-­‐Chair:	
  Jim	
  Harris,	
  Widener	
  University	
  
Secretary:	
  Jim	
  Dworkin,	
  Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  
Treasurer:	
  David	
  Giunta,	
  Natixis	
  Global	
  Associates	
  
	
  
	
  
Board	
  Members	
  Ending	
  Their	
  Terms	
  
	
  
Jane	
  Karas,	
  Flathead	
  Valley	
  Community	
  College	
  
                                                             	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                  26
	
  

Biographies	
  of	
  Board	
  Candidates	
  
	
  
Dennis	
  A.	
  Ahlburg	
  
Trinity	
  University	
  
	
  
Dennis	
  A.	
  Ahlburg,	
  Ph.D.,	
  became	
  the	
  18th	
  president	
  of	
  Trinity	
  University	
  in	
  January	
  
2010.	
  He	
  was	
  chosen	
  for	
  the	
  position	
  by	
  the	
  University's	
  Board	
  of	
  Trustees	
  in	
  September	
  
2009.	
  Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  brings	
  to	
  Trinity	
  an	
  impressive	
  background	
  as	
  an	
  internationally	
  
respected	
  authority	
  on	
  the	
  impact	
  of	
  population	
  growth	
  on	
  development	
  and	
  the	
  
economics	
  of	
  higher	
  education.	
  
	
  
Before	
  coming	
  to	
  Trinity,	
  Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  served	
  as	
  the	
  dean	
  of	
  the	
  Leeds	
  School	
  of	
  Business	
  
at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Colorado	
  at	
  Boulder	
  since	
  August	
  2005.	
  Under	
  his	
  leadership,	
  the	
  
Leeds	
  School	
  significantly	
  expanded	
  and	
  renovated	
  the	
  business	
  school	
  facilities,	
  
strengthened	
  the	
  undergraduate	
  program,	
  increased	
  its	
  resource	
  base,	
  and	
  put	
  into	
  
place	
  a	
  strategic	
  plan	
  to	
  enhance	
  the	
  school's	
  curriculum,	
  diversity	
  and	
  outreach.	
  
	
  
Prior	
  to	
  his	
  appointment	
  at	
  the	
  Leeds	
  School,	
  Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  enjoyed	
  a	
  25-­‐year	
  career	
  as	
  a	
  
professor	
  of	
  human	
  resources	
  and	
  academic	
  administrator	
  at	
  the	
  Carlson	
  School	
  of	
  
Management	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Minnesota,	
  where	
  he	
  was	
  senior	
  associate	
  dean,	
  Land	
  
Grant	
  Professor	
  of	
  Human	
  Resources	
  and	
  the	
  Fesler-­‐Lampert	
  Chair	
  in	
  Urban	
  and	
  
Regional	
  Affairs.	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  brings	
  to	
  Trinity	
  a	
  distinguished	
  record	
  of	
  research	
  and	
  teaching	
  and	
  an	
  
impressive	
  career	
  as	
  a	
  transformational	
  academic	
  administrator.	
  The	
  author	
  of	
  more	
  
than	
  100	
  academic	
  articles	
  and	
  books	
  and	
  the	
  recipient	
  of	
  more	
  than	
  30	
  research	
  grants,	
  
Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  also	
  has	
  received	
  many	
  honors	
  and	
  awards	
  including	
  designation	
  as	
  an	
  
"expert	
  of	
  international	
  standing"	
  by	
  the	
  Australian	
  Research	
  Council	
  in	
  2004	
  and	
  a	
  
Fulbright	
  Fellowship	
  in	
  1975.	
  He	
  has	
  consulted	
  extensively	
  with	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  prominent	
  
organizations	
  including	
  the	
  United	
  Nations,	
  the	
  World	
  Health	
  Organization,	
  the	
  World	
  
Bank,	
  and	
  the	
  governments	
  of	
  Great	
  Britain	
  and	
  Australia.	
  His	
  global	
  research	
  on	
  a	
  range	
  
of	
  economic	
  issues	
  and	
  his	
  international	
  perspective	
  underscores	
  the	
  University's	
  efforts	
  
to	
  internationalize	
  the	
  Trinity	
  experience.	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  is	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  following	
  boards:	
  The	
  World	
  Affairs	
  Council,	
  the	
  
Executive	
  Committee	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  San	
  Antonio	
  and	
  Bexar	
  County,	
  Southwest	
  
Research	
  Institute,	
  the	
  San	
  Antonio	
  Greater	
  Chamber	
  of	
  Commerce,	
  and	
  the	
  Associated	
  
Colleges	
  of	
  the	
  South.	
  He	
  also	
  serves	
  on	
  the	
  steering	
  committee	
  for	
  SA2020,	
  the	
  
Brainpower	
  Initiative	
  Task	
  Force,	
  and	
  the	
  Executive	
  Committees	
  of	
  Centro	
  Partnership	
  
and	
  ICUT	
  (Independent	
  Schools	
  and	
  Universities	
  of	
  Texas).	
  Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  member	
  
of	
  the	
  Higher	
  Education	
  Working	
  Group	
  of	
  the	
  Council	
  of	
  Foreign	
  Relations	
  and	
  Forum	
  
for	
  the	
  Future	
  of	
  Higher	
  Education.	
  
	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               27
A	
  native	
  of	
  Australia,	
  Dr.	
  Ahlburg	
  received	
  his	
  bachelor's	
  in	
  economics	
  with	
  first	
  class	
  
honors	
  from	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Sydney,	
  a	
  master's	
  in	
  economics	
  from	
  the	
  Australian	
  
National	
  University	
  and	
  a	
  Ph.D.	
  in	
  economics	
  from	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Pennsylvania.	
  He	
  is	
  
married	
  to	
  Penelope	
  Harley,	
  an	
  attorney	
  specializing	
  in	
  alternative	
  dispute	
  resolution	
  
and	
  restorative	
  justice.	
  They	
  are	
  parents	
  to	
  five-­‐year-­‐old	
  Benjamin.	
  
	
  
Helen	
  F.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  
Keene	
  State	
  College	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Helen	
  F.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  became	
  the	
  ninth	
  president	
  of	
  Keene	
  State	
  College	
  on	
  July	
  1,	
  
2005.	
  She	
  also	
  holds	
  an	
  appointment	
  as	
  professor	
  in	
  education	
  and	
  management.	
  
Previously,	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  served	
  as	
  provost	
  at	
  Rowan	
  University.	
  
	
  
With	
  over	
  30	
  years	
  of	
  experience	
  in	
  higher	
  education,	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  is	
  a	
  nationally-­‐
known	
  scholar,	
  educator,	
  and	
  administrator.	
  Her	
  accomplishments	
  as	
  Rowan	
  Provost	
  
include	
  reorganization	
  of	
  the	
  graduate	
  school,	
  office	
  of	
  sponsored	
  research	
  and	
  grants,	
  
and	
  the	
  summer	
  school,	
  honors,	
  and	
  international	
  education	
  programs.	
  She	
  also	
  worked	
  
with	
  key	
  legislators	
  to	
  raise	
  $5	
  million	
  in	
  support	
  of	
  capital	
  projects	
  at	
  Rowan’s	
  Camden	
  
Campus.	
  Prior	
  to	
  arriving	
  at	
  Rowan,	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  served	
  as	
  the	
  dean	
  of	
  professional	
  
studies	
  at	
  SUNY	
  Cortland	
  and	
  associate	
  vice	
  chancellor	
  for	
  faculty	
  affairs	
  and	
  director	
  of	
  
articulation	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  System	
  of	
  Maryland.	
  Among	
  her	
  other	
  leadership	
  
positions,	
  she	
  has	
  served	
  as	
  chair	
  of	
  the	
  biology	
  department	
  at	
  Cheyney	
  University	
  of	
  
Pennsylvania	
  and	
  president	
  and	
  board	
  member	
  of	
  both	
  the	
  Maryland	
  Association	
  of	
  
Higher	
  Education	
  and	
  the	
  international	
  Society	
  for	
  College	
  and	
  University	
  Planning.	
  She	
  
earned	
  tenure	
  as	
  an	
  associate	
  professor	
  of	
  biology	
  at	
  Cheyney	
  University	
  and	
  was	
  
granted	
  professor	
  rank	
  at	
  Towson	
  State	
  University	
  and	
  Rowan	
  University.	
  
	
  
As	
  president	
  of	
  Keene	
  State	
  College,	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  has	
  guided	
  the	
  college	
  through	
  major	
  
institutional	
  transformation.	
  During	
  her	
  first	
  year,	
  she	
  led	
  the	
  campus	
  community	
  in	
  the	
  
development	
  of	
  a	
  strategic	
  plan	
  aimed	
  at	
  building	
  upon	
  the	
  college's	
  strengths	
  and	
  
traditions	
  to	
  advance	
  a	
  new	
  vision	
  of	
  academic	
  excellence.	
  Within	
  five	
  years	
  of	
  joining	
  
the	
  campus	
  community,	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  has	
  worked	
  closely	
  with	
  the	
  University	
  System	
  of	
  
New	
  Hampshire	
  Board	
  of	
  Trustees	
  and	
  Keene	
  State	
  faculty,	
  staff	
  and	
  students	
  to:	
  
	
  
        develop	
  a	
  residential	
  college-­‐wide	
  honors	
  program,	
  
        introduce	
  a	
  4-­‐credit	
  curriculum,	
  
        endow	
  two	
  academic	
  chairs,	
  
        hire	
  the	
  college’s	
  first	
  provost	
  and	
  first	
  vice	
  president	
  for	
  advancement,	
  
        make	
  critical	
  advancements	
  toward	
  campus	
  environmental	
  sustainability,	
  create	
  
          a	
  service-­‐learning	
  initiative,	
  
        adopt	
  a	
  comprehensive	
  academic	
  plan	
  that	
  provides	
  a	
  dynamic	
  and	
  unifying	
  
          vision	
  for	
  academic	
  excellence,	
  
        design	
  and	
  construct	
  the	
  first	
  ever	
  Alumni	
  Center,	
  
        and	
  launch	
  a	
  new	
  integrative	
  studies	
  program	
  to	
  replace	
  general	
  education	
  
          requirements.	
  
	
  
CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                             28
Under	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee’s	
  leadership,	
  Keene	
  State	
  College	
  has	
  come	
  to	
  be	
  known	
  
throughout	
  New	
  Hampshire	
  and	
  the	
  New	
  England	
  Region	
  for	
  the	
  strength	
  of	
  its	
  
academic	
  program,	
  as	
  a	
  leader	
  in	
  innovation,	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  powerful	
  force	
  for	
  economic	
  
development.	
  
	
  
In	
  2009,	
  Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  led	
  the	
  college	
  through	
  celebration	
  of	
  its	
  centennial	
  and	
  initiated	
  
discussion	
  about	
  the	
  college's	
  vision	
  for	
  the	
  next	
  century.	
  In	
  The	
  College	
  at	
  its	
  
Centennial:	
  A	
  Time	
  to	
  Soar,	
  President	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  identified	
  three	
  institutional	
  priorities	
  as	
  
the	
  college	
  enters	
  its	
  second	
  century:	
  catalyzing	
  economic	
  development,	
  preparing	
  
students	
  for	
  global	
  citizenship,	
  and	
  developing	
  a	
  new	
  model	
  for	
  fiscal	
  sustainability.	
  
Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  sits	
  on	
  numerous	
  national,	
  state	
  and	
  local	
  boards	
  and	
  councils.	
  Her	
  
engagement	
  includes	
  service	
  as:	
  
	
  
• chairperson	
  for	
  the	
  New	
  Hampshire	
  Postsecondary	
  Education	
  Commission,	
  
• vice	
  chairperson	
  for	
  the	
  Association	
  of	
  American	
  Colleges	
  and	
  Universities,	
  
• treasurer	
  for	
  the	
  New	
  Hampshire	
  College	
  and	
  University	
  Council,	
  
• member	
  of	
  the	
  New	
  Hampshire	
  Charitable	
  Foundation	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors,	
  Campus	
  
       Compact	
  of	
  New	
  Hampshire	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors,	
  and	
  the	
  National	
  Council	
  on	
  
       Accreditation	
  of	
  Teacher	
  Education	
  (NCATE)	
  Appeals	
  Board	
  
	
  
She	
  also	
  serves	
  as	
  a	
  member	
  and	
  mentor	
  on	
  the	
  steering	
  committee	
  for	
  the	
  American	
  
Association	
  of	
  State	
  Colleges	
  and	
  University's	
  Millennium	
  Leadership	
  Institute	
  and	
  a	
  
member	
  of	
  their	
  Commission	
  on	
  Presidential	
  Leadership	
  and	
  Global	
  Competitiveness.	
  
Dr.	
  Giles-­‐Gee	
  holds	
  the	
  B.A.,	
  M.S.,	
  and	
  Ph.D.	
  from	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Pennsylvania,	
  and	
  an	
  
M.S.	
  from	
  Rutgers	
  University.	
  She	
  has	
  published	
  extensively	
  and	
  presented	
  widely	
  and	
  
has	
  been	
  recognized	
  for	
  leadership	
  by	
  Who’s	
  Who	
  and	
  many	
  educational	
  and	
  
professional	
  organizations.Bank,	
  the	
  South	
  Carolina	
  representative	
  to	
  the	
  American	
  
Association	
  of	
  State	
  College	
  and	
  Universities	
  State	
  Leadership	
  Council,	
  and	
  as	
  a	
  member	
  
of	
  the	
  board	
  of	
  the	
  Charlotte	
  Regional	
  Partnership	
  for	
  Economic	
  Development.	
  He	
  
currently	
  also	
  serves	
  on	
  the	
  board	
  of	
  York	
  County	
  Regional	
  Chamber	
  of	
  Commerce	
  and	
  
the	
  Rock	
  Hill	
  Economic	
  Development	
  Corporation,	
  and	
  is	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  numerous	
  
professional	
  organizations.	
  
	
  
	
  
Marie	
  Foster	
  Gnage	
  
West	
  Virginia	
  University	
  at	
  Parkersburg	
  
	
  
Marie	
  Foster	
  Gnage	
  became	
  the	
  sixth	
  president	
  of	
  West	
  Virginia	
  University	
  at	
  
Parkersburg	
  in	
  July	
  of	
  2004.	
  Prior	
  to	
  assuming	
  the	
  presidency	
  at	
  WVU	
  Parkersburg,	
  she	
  
served	
  as	
  Senior	
  Vice	
  President	
  for	
  Academic	
  Affairs	
  at	
  Raritan	
  Valley	
  Community	
  
College	
  in	
  North	
  Branch	
  New	
  Jersey;	
  Assistant	
  Vice	
  Chancellor	
  for	
  Education	
  Services	
  at	
  
Pima	
  Community	
  College	
  in	
  Tucson,	
  Arizona;	
  Vice	
  President	
  for	
  Instruction	
  at	
  Central	
  
Florida	
  Community	
  College	
  in	
  Ocala,	
  Florida;	
  Dean	
  of	
  Academic	
  Affairs	
  and	
  Department	
  
Head	
  of	
  English/ESL	
  at	
  Broward	
  Community	
  College,	
  North	
  Campus	
  in	
  Coconut	
  Creek	
  
Florida.	
  She	
  was	
  an	
  ACE	
  Fellow	
  through	
  the	
  American	
  Council	
  on	
  Education	
  Fellows	
  
program	
  with	
  Winthrop	
  University,	
  Rock	
  Hill,	
  South	
  Carolina	
  serving	
  as	
  the	
  host	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                              29
institution.	
  She	
  also	
  served	
  as	
  Assistant	
  Professor	
  of	
  English	
  at	
  Florida	
  A&M	
  University	
  in	
  
Tallahassee,	
  and	
  Regional	
  Vice	
  President	
  for	
  West	
  Virginia	
  University.	
  
	
  
President	
  Gnage	
  was	
  recently	
  appointed	
  to	
  the	
  AACC's	
  21st	
  Century	
  Commission	
  on	
  the	
  
Future	
  of	
  Community	
  Colleges,	
  and	
  the	
  West	
  Virginia	
  Sesquicentennial	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  
Civil	
  War	
  Commission.	
  She	
  currently	
  serves	
  as	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Association	
  of	
  
Community	
  Colleges	
  (AACC)	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors;	
  the	
  American	
  Council	
  on	
  Education	
  
(ACE)	
  Network	
  Executive	
  Board;	
  The	
  Mid-­‐Ohio	
  Valley	
  Chamber	
  of	
  Commerce	
  Board;	
  the	
  
Region	
  IV	
  Workforce	
  Investment	
  Board;	
  the	
  Black	
  Diamond	
  Girl	
  Scout	
  Board;	
  the	
  
Economic	
  Roundtable	
  of	
  Ohio	
  Valley	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors;	
  The	
  Huntington	
  National	
  Bank	
  
West	
  Virginia	
  Advisory	
  Board;	
  The	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  the	
  Mid-­‐Ohio	
  Valley	
  Board	
  of	
  
Governors;	
  and	
  the	
  West	
  Virginia	
  Humanities	
  Council.	
  She	
  has	
  served	
  on	
  the	
  faculty	
  for	
  
the	
  ACE	
  Fellows	
  Seminars,	
  the	
  AACC	
  Future	
  Leaders	
  Institute;	
  and	
  the	
  AACC	
  Presidents	
  
Academy	
  Executive	
  Committee.	
  	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Gnage	
  has	
  several	
  publications	
  including	
  “Voice,	
  Mind,	
  Self:	
  Mother	
  and	
  Daughter	
  
Relationships	
  in	
  Amy	
  Tan’s	
  Fiction,”	
  in	
  Women	
  of	
  Color,	
  UP	
  Press	
  (Fall	
  1996),	
  A	
  Bio-­‐
bibliography	
  of	
  Southern	
  Black	
  Creative	
  Writers,	
  1829	
  –	
  1953,	
  Greenwood	
  Press,	
  Inc.,	
  
(1988),	
  and	
  “Reconfiguring	
  Self:	
  A	
  Matter	
  of	
  Place	
  in	
  Selected	
  Novels	
  by	
  Paul	
  Marshall,”	
  
in	
  Middle	
  Passages	
  and	
  the	
  Healing	
  Place	
  of	
  History:	
  Migration	
  and	
  Identity	
  in	
  Black	
  
Women’s	
  Literature,	
  The	
  Ohio	
  University	
  Press	
  (2006).	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Gnage	
  holds	
  a	
  bachelor's	
  degree	
  in	
  English	
  from	
  Alcorn	
  A&M	
  College,	
  Lorman,	
  
Mississippi;	
  a	
  master's	
  degree	
  in	
  English	
  from	
  University	
  of	
  Southwestern	
  Louisiana,	
  and	
  
doctoral	
  degree	
  in	
  English	
  (American	
  Literature)	
  from	
  The	
  Florida	
  State	
  University.	
  Dr.	
  
Gnage	
  was	
  presented	
  with	
  the	
  Empowerment	
  Inspiration	
  Award	
  given	
  by	
  the	
  West	
  
Virginia	
  Minority	
  Business	
  Development	
  Center	
  to	
  individuals	
  for	
  their	
  significant	
  
achievements/accomplishments,	
  inspiring	
  others	
  by	
  example	
  and	
  guidance,	
  and	
  
continuing	
  to	
  excel	
  in	
  personal	
  and	
  professional	
  goals	
  and	
  objectives,	
  the	
  Women	
  of	
  
Excellence	
  Award	
  for	
  Trail	
  Blazing	
  awarded	
  by	
  Altrusa	
  International,	
  Inc.	
  to	
  women	
  that	
  
have	
  made	
  inroads	
  in	
  their	
  careers	
  and/or	
  community	
  that	
  have	
  never	
  been	
  done	
  
before,	
  and	
  the	
  Shirley	
  B.	
  Gordon	
  Award	
  of	
  Distinction	
  presented	
  by	
  Phi	
  Theta	
  Kappa	
  
International	
  Honor	
  Society	
  of	
  the	
  Two-­‐Year	
  College	
  for	
  her	
  outstanding	
  support	
  of	
  Phi	
  
Theta	
  Kappa.	
  
	
  
	
  
Richard	
  Guarasci	
  
Wagner	
  College	
  	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Richard	
  Guarasci	
  is	
  the	
  18th	
  President	
  of	
  Wagner	
  College,	
  where	
  he	
  was	
  previously	
  
the	
  Provost	
  and	
  Senior	
  Vice	
  President,	
  responsible	
  for	
  academic	
  and	
  student	
  affairs,	
  
admissions,	
  and	
  support	
  service,	
  in	
  addition	
  to	
  serving	
  as	
  the	
  chief	
  operating	
  officer.	
  He	
  
holds	
  the	
  rank	
  of	
  Professor	
  of	
  Political	
  Science	
  and	
  he	
  teaches	
  in	
  the	
  areas	
  of	
  
democracy,	
  citizenship	
  and	
  American	
  diversity.	
  
	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                            30
At	
  Wagner,	
  Dr.	
  Guarasci	
  founded	
  The	
  Wagner	
  Plan	
  for	
  the	
  Practical	
  Liberal	
  Arts,	
  the	
  
four-­‐year	
  curriculum	
  for	
  all	
  undergraduates,	
  that	
  draws	
  together	
  a	
  substantive	
  liberal	
  
arts	
  core	
  into	
  a	
  series	
  of	
  learning	
  communities	
  and	
  experiential	
  learning	
  tutorials.	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Guarasci	
  was	
  Dean	
  of	
  the	
  College	
  and	
  Professor	
  of	
  Political	
  Science	
  at	
  Hobart	
  College	
  
from	
  1992-­‐1997.	
  Previously	
  he	
  served	
  as	
  Dean	
  and	
  founding	
  Director	
  of	
  the	
  First	
  Year	
  
Program	
  at	
  St.	
  Lawrence	
  University,	
  a	
  nationally	
  celebrated	
  model	
  program	
  of	
  
democratic	
  living	
  and	
  learning	
  required	
  for	
  all	
  first	
  year	
  students	
  that	
  joined	
  first	
  year	
  
housing	
  to	
  a	
  two	
  semester	
  schedule.	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Guarasci	
  is	
  the	
  author	
  of	
  Democratic	
  Education	
  in	
  the	
  Age	
  of	
  Difference:	
  Redefining	
  
Citizenship	
  in	
  Higher	
  Education	
  (Jossey-­‐Bass,	
  1997),	
  and	
  numerous	
  other	
  publications	
  
including	
  3	
  books,	
  more	
  than	
  20	
  articles	
  and	
  more	
  than	
  50	
  conference	
  presentations.	
  He	
  
is	
  now	
  a	
  national	
  leader	
  in	
  higher	
  education	
  with	
  many	
  speaking	
  engagements	
  
throughout	
  the	
  United	
  States.	
  He	
  is	
  an	
  active	
  educational	
  consultant	
  for	
  more	
  than	
  20	
  
universities	
  and	
  colleges.	
  Time	
  Magazine	
  selected	
  him	
  as	
  a	
  National	
  Undergraduate	
  
Educator	
  and	
  he	
  received	
  awards	
  from	
  the	
  Sears	
  Foundation,	
  the	
  Glitz	
  Family	
  Prize	
  and	
  
many	
  other	
  citations	
  including	
  a	
  day	
  of	
  recognition	
  by	
  proclamation	
  of	
  the	
  City	
  Council	
  
in	
  Geneva,	
  New	
  York.	
  Recently,	
  Congressman	
  Vito	
  Fossella	
  and	
  the	
  Staten	
  Island	
  Civic	
  
Association	
  both	
  cited	
  him	
  for	
  public	
  service	
  on	
  Staten	
  Island.	
  He	
  served	
  on	
  the	
  National	
  
Board	
  of	
  Directors	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  Association	
  of	
  Colleges	
  and	
  Universities,The	
  Board	
  of	
  
Trustees	
  of	
  the	
  Independent	
  Colleges	
  Fund	
  of	
  New	
  York	
  and	
  he	
  is	
  co-­‐chair	
  of	
  New	
  York	
  
State	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  He	
  is	
  a	
  Fellow	
  of	
  the	
  Society	
  for	
  Values	
  in	
  Higher	
  Education	
  
(SVHE)	
  and	
  a	
  PEW	
  Foundation	
  Fellow	
  with	
  the	
  Washington	
  Center	
  for	
  Learning	
  in	
  
building	
  natural	
  leadership	
  in	
  Learning	
  Communities.	
  He	
  is	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  faculty	
  for	
  
the	
  Asheville	
  Institute	
  and	
  an	
  Advising	
  Board	
  Member	
  for	
  the	
  Models	
  for	
  Democracy	
  
Project	
  of	
  SVHE.	
  Dr.	
  Guarasci	
  recently	
  authored	
  ‘Developing	
  the	
  Democratic	
  Arts”	
  in	
  
About	
  Campus	
  (Feb.	
  2001)	
  and	
  "On	
  Becoming	
  the	
  Good	
  College:	
  Lessons	
  Learned"	
  in	
  
Liberal	
  Education.	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Guarasci	
  holds	
  a	
  Bachelor	
  of	
  Science	
  from	
  Fordham	
  University.	
  He	
  received	
  his	
  M.A.	
  
in	
  Economics	
  and	
  Ph.D.	
  in	
  Political	
  Science	
  from	
  Indiana	
  University.	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                             31
Guest	
  Biographies	
  
	
  
Lisa	
  Keyne,	
  Ph.	
  D.	
  	
  
North	
  Carolina	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
Lisa	
  Keyne	
  is	
  the	
  Executive	
  Director	
  of	
  North	
  Carolina	
  Campus	
  Compact,	
  serving	
  as	
  the	
  
primary	
  administrator	
  for	
  the	
  organization	
  and	
  the	
  essential	
  link	
  to	
  North	
  Carolina	
  
Presidents	
  and	
  Chancellors	
  and	
  the	
  national	
  network.	
  	
  She	
  moved	
  to	
  North	
  Carolina	
  
from	
  Oregon	
  where	
  she	
  was	
  Vice	
  Provost	
  for	
  Concordia	
  University,	
  Portland,	
  OR.	
  	
  Dr.	
  
Keyne	
  began	
  her	
  work	
  in	
  higher	
  education	
  as	
  program	
  director	
  at	
  Concordia	
  University	
  
in	
  Seward,	
  NE,	
  and	
  then	
  at	
  Concordia	
  University,	
  Portland,	
  OR,	
  mentoring	
  and	
  equipping	
  
students	
  for	
  fulltime	
  church	
  work.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Keyne	
  has	
  helped	
  promote	
  community	
  engagement	
  by	
  serving	
  on	
  the	
  board	
  of	
  the	
  
Servant	
  Events	
  Committee	
  of	
  The	
  Lutheran	
  Church-­‐Missouri	
  Synod,	
  and	
  as	
  leader	
  for	
  a	
  
team	
  of	
  college	
  students	
  who	
  went	
  to	
  China	
  for	
  the	
  summer	
  to	
  teach	
  English.	
  She	
  
served	
  for	
  seven	
  years	
  as	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  faculty	
  development	
  team	
  for	
  the	
  Concordia	
  
University	
  System,	
  facilitating	
  two	
  system-­‐wide	
  faculty	
  conferences.	
  	
  At	
  Concordia	
  in	
  
Portland	
  she	
  helped	
  to	
  coordinate	
  civic	
  engagement	
  activities	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  that	
  campus’	
  
Portland	
  Initiative.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
Dr.	
  Keyne	
  serves	
  as	
  Vice	
  Chair	
  on	
  the	
  NC	
  Commission	
  on	
  Volunteerism	
  and	
  Community	
  
Service.	
  In	
  May	
  2008	
  she	
  graduated	
  from	
  Leadership	
  North	
  Carolina,	
  the	
  statewide	
  
leadership	
  program	
  that	
  seeks	
  to	
  inform,	
  develop	
  and	
  engage	
  committed	
  leaders	
  by	
  
broadening	
  their	
  understanding	
  of	
  and	
  involvement	
  in	
  issues	
  and	
  opportunities	
  facing	
  
North	
  Carolina.	
  	
  She	
  has	
  a	
  master’s	
  in	
  public	
  administration	
  from	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  
Alabama	
  in	
  Birmingham,	
  and	
  a	
  Ph.D.	
  in	
  higher	
  and	
  postsecondary	
  education	
  from	
  the	
  
University	
  of	
  Southern	
  California.	
  
	
  
	
  
Dee	
  Dee	
  Rasmussen	
  
Florida	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
Dee	
  Dee	
  Rasmussen	
  became	
  the	
  first	
  full-­‐time	
  Executive	
  Director	
  for	
  Florida	
  Campus	
  
Compact	
  (FL|CC)	
  in	
  January	
  2001.	
  	
  She	
  came	
  to	
  FL|CC	
  with	
  over	
  15	
  years	
  of	
  experience	
  
at	
  the	
  highest	
  levels	
  of	
  state	
  government,	
  serving	
  most	
  recently	
  with	
  the	
  Governor	
  and	
  
Cabinet	
  as	
  Director	
  of	
  Cabinet	
  Affairs	
  for	
  State	
  Treasurer,	
  now	
  U.S.	
  Senator,	
  Bill	
  Nelson.	
  	
  
As	
  Executive	
  Director	
  of	
  Florida	
  Campus	
  Compact,	
  DeeDee	
  directs	
  our	
  work	
  with	
  college	
  
and	
  university	
  presidents	
  in	
  Florida	
  to	
  promote	
  the	
  civic	
  purposes	
  of	
  higher	
  education	
  
by	
  advancing	
  service-­‐learning,	
  civic	
  engagement,	
  and	
  campus-­‐community	
  collaboration.	
  	
  
Under	
  her	
  leadership,	
  Florida	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  has	
  grown	
  to	
  include	
  over	
  50	
  member	
  
campuses,	
  and	
  has	
  hosted	
  numerous	
  conferences,	
  workshops,	
  and	
  events	
  throughout	
  
the	
  State	
  and	
  the	
  southern	
  region	
  of	
  the	
  country.	
  DeeDee	
  also	
  works	
  with	
  the	
  national	
  
Campus	
  Compact	
  organization	
  to	
  encourage	
  national	
  support	
  for	
  students,	
  faculty,	
  and	
  
community	
  engagement.	
  	
  	
  
	
  
CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               32
DeeDee	
  received	
  her	
  Master’s	
  degree	
  in	
  Public	
  Administration	
  and	
  a	
  Bachelor’s	
  degree	
  
in	
  Political	
  Science	
  and	
  Communications,	
  both	
  from	
  Florida	
  State	
  University.	
  DeeDee	
  is	
  
also	
  an	
  elected	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  Leon	
  County	
  School	
  Board	
  and	
  the	
  proud	
  mother	
  of	
  
three	
  children.	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                    33
	
  
	
  
	
  
National Office Organizational Chart




                                                                                                  	
  
                                                                                                  	
  
                                                                                                  	
  
	
  
President	
  –	
  Maureen	
  F.	
  Curley	
  
The	
  President	
  is	
  responsible	
  for	
  the	
  overall	
  leadership	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  the	
  
organization,	
  including	
  public	
  speaking,	
  fundraising,	
  public	
  policy,	
  strategic	
  planning,	
  
and	
  board	
  development.	
  The	
  President	
  is	
  also	
  responsible	
  for	
  identifying	
  and	
  evaluating	
  
possible	
  partnerships	
  with	
  other	
  organizations	
  that	
  have	
  the	
  potential	
  to	
  increase	
  
Campus	
  Compact’s	
  exposure,	
  visibility,	
  profile,	
  and	
  enhance	
  our	
  work.	
  The	
  President	
  is	
  
the	
  primary	
  liaison	
  to	
  the	
  national	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors	
  and	
  bears	
  fiduciary	
  responsibility	
  
for	
  the	
  organization	
  in	
  concert	
  with	
  the	
  Board.	
  	
  
	
  
Director	
  of	
  Institutional	
  Development	
  –	
  Amy	
  Smitter	
  
The	
  Director	
  of	
  Institutional	
  Development	
  is	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  senior	
  management	
  team	
  
who	
  works	
  to	
  assure	
  the	
  health	
  and	
  growth	
  of	
  the	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  network	
  resource	
  
development.	
  Central	
  to	
  the	
  job	
  is	
  the	
  integration	
  of	
  fundraising	
  opportunities	
  for	
  the	
  
entire	
  network,	
  strategic	
  planning	
  and	
  implementation	
  of	
  strategy	
  for	
  diverse	
  fund	
  
development,	
  partnership	
  development,	
  and	
  management	
  consultation	
  with	
  state	
  
offices	
  to	
  assure	
  stability	
  and	
  sustainability.	
  	
  
	
  
Director	
  of	
  Communications	
  –	
  Sue	
  Kelman	
  
Sue	
  is	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  senior	
  management	
  team	
  responsible	
  for	
  our	
  communications	
  
strategy,	
  including	
  implementing	
  effective	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  communicating	
  with	
  the	
  
media,	
  with	
  members,	
  higher	
  education	
  leaders,	
  funders	
  and	
  potential	
  funders,	
  and	
  the	
  
public.	
  She	
  also	
  handles	
  logistics	
  and	
  planning	
  for	
  national	
  meetings	
  and	
  special	
  events.	
  
Sue	
  ensures	
  that	
  all	
  print,	
  online,	
  and	
  other	
  communications	
  are	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  coordinated	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                        34
effort	
  to	
  present	
  a	
  consistent	
  brand	
  and	
  compelling	
  message	
  about	
  the	
  Compact	
  and	
  its	
  
impact.	
  She	
  also	
  oversees	
  the	
  Compact’s	
  website	
  and	
  publications,	
  including	
  book	
  
production	
  and	
  other	
  materials,	
  sales	
  and	
  inventory,	
  and	
  marketing.	
  Sue	
  also	
  has	
  
administrative	
  oversight	
  for	
  our	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  program.	
  	
  
	
  
Director	
  of	
  Academic	
  and	
  Strategic	
  Initiatives	
  –	
  Amanda	
  Wittman,	
  Ph.D.	
  	
  
Amanda	
  provides	
  high-­‐level	
  project	
  management,	
  leadership	
  and	
  oversight	
  for	
  Campus	
  
Compact’s	
  work	
  with	
  faculty,	
  consultants	
  and	
  partners.	
  Amanda	
  is	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  
senior	
  management	
  team	
  and	
  works	
  with	
  these	
  colleagues,	
  network	
  affiliate	
  staff	
  and	
  
faculty	
  to	
  embed	
  civic	
  and	
  community	
  engagement	
  within	
  teaching	
  and	
  research	
  
activities	
  at	
  Compact	
  member	
  schools.	
  Amanda	
  is	
  overseeing	
  all	
  research,	
  writing,	
  and	
  
editing	
  for	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  2012	
  white	
  paper	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  presented	
  at	
  the	
  2012	
  
Presidents	
  Leadership	
  Summit	
  in	
  Chattanooga,	
  TN.	
  Amanda	
  also	
  supervises	
  the	
  VISTA	
  
Leader.	
  	
  
	
  
Project	
  Manager,	
  Connect2Complete	
  –	
  Shana	
  Berger	
  
Shana	
  leads	
  in	
  the	
  development	
  and	
  implementation	
  of	
  the	
  Connect2Complete	
  (C2C)	
  
program,	
  a	
  36-­‐month	
  pilot	
  program	
  funded	
  by	
  The	
  Bill	
  and	
  Melinda	
  Gates	
  Foundation	
  
that	
  seeks	
  to	
  increase	
  community	
  college	
  students’	
  persistence	
  toward	
  their	
  credentials	
  
by	
  connecting	
  them	
  to	
  student	
  tutor	
  advocates.	
  C2C	
  will	
  support	
  nine	
  campuses	
  in	
  three	
  
states	
  to	
  mobilize	
  over	
  150	
  student	
  tutor	
  advocates	
  to	
  pilot	
  this	
  approach.	
  
	
  	
  
Administrative	
  and	
  Membership	
  Coordinator	
  –	
  Betty	
  Johnson	
  
The	
  Administration	
  and	
  Membership	
  Coordinator	
  works	
  with	
  the	
  President	
  and	
  CFO,	
  
providing	
  administrative	
  and	
  financial	
  support	
  in	
  managing	
  all	
  accounts	
  payable	
  
processes	
  according	
  to	
  budgets	
  and	
  policies,	
  cash	
  receipt	
  processing,	
  publication	
  
payments,	
  travel	
  reimbursement	
  processing,	
  and	
  provides	
  some	
  personnel	
  support.	
  This	
  
position	
  is	
  responsible	
  for	
  all	
  database	
  matters	
  pertaining	
  to	
  both	
  the	
  national	
  members	
  
and	
  state	
  offices.	
  Betty	
  is	
  also	
  a	
  primary	
  connection	
  with	
  national	
  members.	
  
	
  
Special	
  Assistant	
  to	
  the	
  President	
  –	
  Mark	
  Esté	
  
The	
  Special	
  Assistant	
  works	
  closely	
  with	
  the	
  President	
  to	
  provide	
  support	
  for	
  and	
  help	
  in	
  
coordinating	
  all	
  aspects	
  of	
  the	
  development	
  and	
  management	
  of	
  the	
  organization	
  
including	
  board	
  relations,	
  national	
  partnerships,	
  public	
  policy,	
  program	
  development,	
  
and	
  capacity	
  building.	
  The	
  Special	
  Assistant	
  is	
  also	
  responsible	
  for	
  researching	
  and	
  
developing	
  new	
  initiatives	
  as	
  directed	
  by	
  the	
  President.	
  The	
  Assistant	
  also	
  supervises	
  
volunteers	
  and	
  interns.	
  
	
  
VISTA	
  Leader	
  –	
  Michael	
  Boswell	
  
The	
  National	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  VISTA	
  leader	
  supports	
  state	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  VISTA	
  
projects	
  in	
  their	
  efforts	
  to	
  advocate	
  for	
  members	
  and	
  build	
  the	
  long-­‐term	
  capacity	
  of	
  an	
  
organization.	
  Michael	
  also	
  serves	
  as	
  editor	
  of	
  our	
  new	
  e-­‐newsletter	
  for	
  VISTAs	
  and	
  VISTA	
  
alumni	
  called	
  “Horizons:	
  Reaching	
  Beyond	
  the	
  Quad.”	
  
	
  
Program	
  Assistant	
  –	
  Allison	
  Squires	
  
Provides	
  research	
  and	
  administrative	
  support	
  to	
  the	
  Director	
  of	
  Institutional	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                             35
Development.	
  She	
  also	
  maintains	
  systems	
  such	
  as	
  eTapestry.	
  
	
  
	
  
Special	
  Projects	
  Intern	
  –	
  Robert	
  Cohen	
  
Robert	
  is	
  a	
  co-­‐op	
  student	
  from	
  Northeastern	
  University	
  working	
  with	
  the	
  Special	
  
Assistant	
  to	
  the	
  President	
  in	
  coordinating	
  support	
  services	
  to	
  member	
  institutions	
  
including	
  initial	
  contact	
  with	
  new	
  members	
  and	
  ongoing	
  communication	
  and	
  support	
  for	
  
faculty	
  and	
  staff	
  of	
  members.	
  	
  
	
  
Graduate	
  Assistant	
  –	
  Terah	
  Crews	
  
Terah	
  is	
  a	
  graduate	
  assistant	
  from	
  Harvard	
  University	
  helping	
  with	
  the	
  white	
  paper	
  for	
  
the	
  2012	
  Presidential	
  Leadership	
  Summit.	
  She	
  also	
  sits	
  on	
  the	
  Ad-­‐hoc	
  Committee	
  for	
  the	
  
summit.	
  
	
  
Graduate	
  Assistant	
  –	
  Julie	
  Moody	
  
Julie	
  is	
  a	
  graduate	
  assistant	
  from	
  Harvard	
  University	
  working	
  on	
  research	
  for	
  the	
  
Connect2Complete	
  Resource	
  Guide.	
  	
  
	
  
Newman	
  Project	
  Assistant	
  –	
  Cara	
  Lovell	
  
Cara	
  is	
  a	
  part-­‐time	
  temporary	
  employee	
  working	
  on	
  the	
  Newman	
  Civic	
  Fellows	
  Awards	
  
program.	
  
	
  
Chief	
  Financial	
  Officer	
  –	
  Bruce	
  Hain	
  
Bruce	
  oversees	
  all	
  financial	
  systems,	
  the	
  budgeting	
  process	
  and	
  grant,	
  government	
  and	
  
board	
  reporting.	
  Bruce	
  provides	
  advice	
  to	
  states	
  regarding	
  budgeting	
  and	
  financial	
  
matters.	
  
	
  
Consultants	
  
	
  
Maggie	
  Grove	
  is	
  a	
  consultant	
  to	
  the	
  Compact	
  for	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  student	
  
philanthropy.	
  She	
  also	
  works	
  on	
  Network	
  capacity	
  building	
  through	
  management	
  
consulting	
  services	
  to	
  state	
  directors	
  and	
  is	
  a	
  primary	
  contact	
  to	
  Campus	
  Compact’s	
  
National	
  Members.	
  	
  
	
  	
  
Amanda	
  Schafer	
  is	
  a	
  consultant	
  to	
  the	
  Compact	
  for	
  the	
  development,	
  administration,	
  
and	
  publication	
  of	
  our	
  Annual	
  Membership	
  Survey.	
  	
  
	
  
Bill	
  Rauch	
  is	
  a	
  pro-­‐bono	
  management	
  consultant	
  to	
  Maureen.	
  	
  
	
  	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                         36
                                     2011	
  –	
  2012	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  Goals	
  Dashboard	
  

1.	
             Build	
  a	
  stronger	
  and	
  larger	
  network	
  and	
  membership	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  	
  better	
  fulfill	
  
                 the	
  mission	
  of	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  
                	
  
                Together	
  with	
  the	
  network,	
  develop	
  a	
  performance	
  measurement	
  plan	
  that	
  will	
  
                assess	
  the	
  impact	
  of	
  the	
  Compact	
  
         	
  
                Work	
  to	
  stabilize/rebuild	
  four	
  states	
  offices	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  keep	
  their	
  membership	
  
                steady	
  and	
  improve	
  their	
  financial	
  situation	
  
                 	
  
                Revamp	
  the	
  orientation	
  for	
  new	
  state	
  directors	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  better	
  integrate	
  them	
  
                into	
  the	
  network	
  
                                 	
  
                Add	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  new	
  state	
  office	
  to	
  the	
  network	
  
                	
  
                Increase	
  “national”	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  membership	
  by	
  10%	
  
                            	
  
                Conduct	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  intensive	
  professional	
  development	
  session	
  for	
  state	
  affiliate	
  
                staff	
  that	
  will	
  be	
  attended	
  by	
  60%	
  of	
  the	
  state	
  offices	
  
                	
  
                Successfully	
  launch	
  the	
  Connect2Complete	
  program	
  in	
  conjunction	
  with	
  3	
  state	
  
                offices	
  
	
  
	
  
2.	
             Continue	
  to	
  diversify	
  the	
  Compact	
  funding	
  and	
  increase	
  the	
  participation	
  of	
  
                 state	
  offices	
  in	
  network	
  fundraising	
  efforts.	
  

                Increase	
  the	
  annual	
  fund	
  participation	
  by	
  10%	
  for	
  the	
  national	
  office	
  and	
  100%	
  
                for	
  the	
  3	
  participating	
  state	
  offices	
  (MA,	
  IN,	
  FL)	
  Create	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  presentation	
  
                for	
  states	
  directors	
  to	
  further	
  partnerships	
  and	
  fund	
  development	
  
                	
  
                	
   Raise	
  $40,000	
  in	
  sponsorship	
  for	
  the	
  2012	
  Presidents	
  Leadership	
  Summit	
  
                               	
  
                Secure	
  sponsors	
  for	
  Newman	
  and	
  Ehrlich	
  awards	
  at	
  $25,000	
  each	
  
                               	
  
                Secure	
  funding	
  for	
  network	
  impact	
  assessment	
  project	
  (see	
  #1)	
  
                	
  

	
  

	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                       37
	
  
3.	
      Continue	
  to	
  position	
  the	
  Compact	
  as	
  the	
  primary	
  source	
  for	
  knowledge	
  and	
  
          resources	
  regarding	
  higher	
  education	
  service-­‐learning,	
  engaged	
  scholarship	
  
          and	
  research	
  regarding	
  the	
  impact	
  of	
  civic	
  engagement	
  on	
  students,	
  
          institutions	
  and	
  community.	
  

         Prepare	
  a	
  white	
  paper	
  regarding	
  the	
  connection	
  between	
  civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  
         community	
  and	
  economic	
  development	
  for	
  the	
  PLS	
  in	
  2012.	
  	
  
	
  
         Develop	
  at	
  least	
  3	
  scholarly	
  papers	
  expressing	
  Compact	
  views	
  on	
  timely	
  issues	
  to	
  
         disseminate	
  to	
  the	
  field.	
  
         	
  
         Increase	
  the	
  participation	
  of	
  the	
  Compact	
  Engaged	
  Scholars	
  in	
  three	
  Compact	
  
         academic	
  projects.	
  	
  
         	
  
	
  
4.	
      Increase	
  the	
  visibility	
  of	
  the	
  Compact,	
  its	
  network	
  and	
  members	
  in	
  traditional	
  
          and	
  social	
  media,	
  and	
  with	
  key	
  decision	
  makers	
  and	
  opinion	
  leaders.	
  

         Increase	
  participation	
  in	
  the	
  Newman	
  Award	
  by	
  50%	
  (increase	
  of	
  17%	
  in	
  2012)	
  

         Secure	
  two	
  features	
  articles	
  in	
  medium	
  size	
  or	
  larger	
  media	
  markets	
  and/or	
  high-­‐
         level	
  higher	
  education	
  publications	
  (Inside	
  Higher	
  Education,	
  Chronicle	
  of	
  Higher	
  
         Education	
  etc.)	
  
	
  
         Place	
  at	
  least	
  two	
  op-­‐ed	
  pieces	
  or	
  letters	
  to	
  the	
  editor	
  on	
  matters	
  of	
  import	
  
         related	
  to	
  civic	
  engagement	
  in	
  higher	
  education	
  and/or	
  related	
  public	
  policy	
  
         issues	
  in	
  large	
  city	
  daily	
  or	
  national	
  newspapers.	
  

         Develop	
  new	
  reciprocal	
  partnerships	
  with	
  three	
  higher	
  education	
  associations	
  
         and	
  three	
  national	
  nonprofits	
  that	
  advance	
  our	
  mission	
  and	
  activities.	
  

         Increase	
  "fans"	
  that	
  identify	
  themselves	
  on	
  our	
  Facebook	
  account	
  by	
  at	
  least	
  25%.	
  
         Create	
  and	
  maintain	
  a	
  LinkedIn	
  presence	
  for	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  

         Increase	
  discrete	
  visitors	
  to	
  www.compact.org	
  by	
  20%	
  through	
  placements	
  on	
  
         Facebook	
  and	
  by	
  including	
  a	
  "Forward/Facebook/LinkedIn"	
  button	
  on	
  new	
  items	
  
         posted	
  to	
  the	
  website.	
  

         Increase	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  general	
  articles	
  about	
  Compact	
  in	
  all	
  newspapers	
  and	
  
         online	
  news	
  articles	
  by	
  25%




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                    38
•   	
  
                                               	
  
           	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  
                                               	
  

                    Campus	
  Compact	
  in	
  the	
  News	
  




           CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012   39
	
  
“A	
  Public	
  Mission	
  Is	
  Not	
  at	
  Odds	
  With	
  Academe's	
  Values”	
  
The	
  Chronicle	
  of	
  Higher	
  Education	
  
10/17/2011	
  
Editortorial	
  by	
  James	
  B.	
  Dworkin	
  and	
  Maureen	
  F.	
  Curley	
  
http://chronicle.com/article/A-­‐Public-­‐Mission-­‐Is-­‐Not-­‐at/129445/	
  
	
  
	
  
"Syracuse's	
  Slide"	
  (The	
  Chronicle,	
  October	
  2)	
  presents	
  one	
  view	
  of	
  the	
  impact	
  of	
  
community	
  engagement	
  on	
  an	
  institution.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  sees	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  
engagement	
  in	
  a	
  broader	
  context.	
  
	
  
The	
  public	
  purpose	
  of	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities—both	
  public	
  and	
  private—is	
  deeply	
  
rooted	
  in	
  the	
  history	
  and	
  founding	
  of	
  higher	
  education	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States,	
  and	
  has	
  
been	
  instrumental	
  in	
  the	
  establishment	
  of	
  the	
  academy	
  as	
  a	
  key	
  institution	
  which	
  
promotes	
  democracy	
  in	
  our	
  society.	
  The	
  growth	
  in	
  adapting	
  institutional	
  practices	
  of	
  
engagement	
  and	
  community	
  partnership	
  has	
  been	
  steady	
  in	
  recent	
  years	
  and	
  has	
  
profoundly	
  reshaped	
  the	
  landscape	
  of	
  higher	
  education.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  believes	
  the	
  
new	
  landscape	
  should	
  be	
  celebrated	
  and	
  encouraged.	
  
	
  
A	
  commitment	
  to	
  the	
  public	
  mission	
  of	
  higher	
  education	
  does	
  not	
  come	
  at	
  the	
  expense	
  
of	
  values	
  upon	
  which	
  the	
  academy	
  is	
  built—for	
  example,	
  academic	
  freedom	
  and	
  
rigorous	
  scholarship.	
  We	
  acknowledge	
  that	
  there	
  are	
  diverse	
  methods	
  and	
  pedagogies	
  
which	
  faculty	
  follow	
  in	
  their	
  research	
  and	
  teaching	
  practice,	
  and	
  we	
  believe	
  a	
  balance	
  of	
  
practices	
  throughout	
  the	
  academy	
  enriches	
  overall	
  rigor	
  and	
  effectiveness.	
  Campus	
  
Compact	
  argues,	
  however,	
  that	
  there	
  is	
  tremendous	
  value	
  in	
  the	
  new	
  knowledge	
  that	
  is	
  
produced	
  by	
  those	
  faculty	
  who	
  choose	
  to	
  be	
  engaged.	
  There	
  are	
  examples	
  of	
  rigorous	
  
and	
  meaningful	
  service-­‐learning	
  and	
  engaged	
  research	
  projects	
  from	
  all	
  disciplines—
anthropology	
  to	
  zoology—presented	
  at	
  national	
  and	
  international	
  conferences,	
  
published	
  in	
  peer-­‐review	
  journals,	
  and	
  included	
  in	
  promotion	
  and	
  tenure	
  files.	
  Beyond	
  
the	
  academy,	
  this	
  explosion	
  of	
  engaged	
  research	
  has	
  helped	
  communities	
  recover	
  from	
  
economic	
  depression,	
  tackle	
  underlying	
  issues	
  of	
  poverty	
  and	
  violence,	
  and	
  benefit	
  from	
  
scientific	
  knowledge	
  regarding	
  environmental	
  destruction	
  and	
  reconstruction.	
  These	
  
research	
  agendas	
  are	
  fundamental	
  to	
  ensuring	
  that	
  higher	
  education	
  remains	
  relevant,	
  
and	
  they	
  demand	
  rigorous	
  testing,	
  critical	
  thinking,	
  and	
  the	
  types	
  of	
  analysis	
  that	
  we	
  
expect	
  from	
  all	
  faculty.	
  
	
  
The	
  compact	
  encourages	
  institutions	
  of	
  higher	
  education	
  not	
  to	
  be	
  caught	
  thinking	
  that	
  
they	
  are	
  removed	
  from	
  their	
  communities.	
  We	
  all	
  have	
  a	
  responsibility	
  to	
  develop	
  
healthy	
  communities;	
  and	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities—which	
  serve	
  as	
  anchor	
  institutions	
  
in	
  their	
  communities—provide	
  economic,	
  cultural,	
  and	
  social	
  capital	
  that	
  can	
  be	
  
harnessed	
  for	
  development.	
  Importantly,	
  this	
  is	
  not	
  a	
  one-­‐way	
  street—universities	
  and	
  
colleges	
  also	
  gain	
  from	
  these	
  connections	
  through	
  research	
  partnerships,	
  access	
  to	
  living	
  
laboratories,	
  and	
  the	
  deepened	
  understanding	
  that	
  comes	
  from	
  including	
  community	
  
voices.	
  Students	
  are	
  eager	
  for	
  and	
  benefit	
  from	
  exploring	
  how	
  their	
  studies	
  relate	
  to	
  
realities	
  outside	
  the	
  classroom;	
  funders	
  want	
  proof	
  that	
  research	
  will	
  be	
  inclusive	
  and	
  
CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                            40
engaged.	
  Research	
  universities	
  have	
  a	
  responsibility	
  to	
  help	
  us	
  better	
  understand	
  our	
  
world,	
  and	
  that	
  understanding	
  is	
  enhanced	
  through	
  engagement	
  with	
  communities.	
  It	
  is	
  
apparent	
  that	
  the	
  academy	
  should	
  be	
  structurally,	
  financially,	
  and	
  culturally	
  geared	
  
toward	
  promoting	
  the	
  public	
  good.	
  
	
  
As	
  the	
  only	
  network	
  dedicated	
  to	
  the	
  promotion	
  of	
  civic	
  engagement	
  in	
  higher	
  
education,	
  Campus	
  Compact's	
  organizational	
  growth	
  reflects	
  presidential	
  and	
  
institutional	
  commitments	
  to	
  community	
  engagement	
  and	
  engaged	
  research.	
  For	
  the	
  
past	
  six	
  years,	
  the	
  compact	
  has	
  convened	
  the	
  Research	
  University	
  Civic	
  Engagement	
  
Network,	
  a	
  group	
  of	
  representatives	
  from	
  35	
  very	
  high	
  research	
  universities	
  that	
  are	
  
committed	
  to	
  advancing	
  engaged	
  scholarship	
  in	
  higher	
  education.	
  The	
  respected	
  
leadership	
  of	
  these	
  institutions	
  reflects	
  new	
  and	
  exciting	
  approaches	
  to	
  the	
  integration	
  
of	
  engaged	
  scholarship	
  in	
  research,	
  publication,	
  and	
  reward	
  systems.	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
applauds	
  all	
  of	
  our	
  1,100	
  member	
  presidents,	
  including	
  Nancy	
  Cantor	
  at	
  Syracuse	
  
University,	
  for	
  their	
  leadership	
  and	
  dedication	
  to	
  highlighting	
  the	
  role	
  of	
  community	
  
engagement	
  on	
  their	
  campuses.	
  
	
  
James	
  B.	
  Dworkin	
  
Chancellor	
  
Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  
Chair,	
  Board	
  of	
  Directors	
  
Campus	
  Compact	
  
	
  
Maureen	
  F.	
  Curley	
  
President	
  
Campus	
  Compact	
  
Boston	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                    41
“Service	
  is	
  a	
  Solution	
  in	
  Montana”	
  
Helena	
  Independet	
  Record	
  (MT)	
  
10/17/2011	
  
By	
  Jane	
  Karas	
  and	
  the	
  Executive	
  Committee	
  of	
  Montana	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  
http://helenair.com/news/opinion/service-­‐is-­‐a-­‐solution-­‐in-­‐montana/article_8c7d02e2-­‐
f886-­‐11e0-­‐a531-­‐001cc4c03286.html#ixzz1b2fVHYBY	
  
	
  
	
  
To	
  meet	
  the	
  challenges	
  of	
  reducing	
  budget	
  deficits,	
  paying	
  off	
  debt,	
  and	
  getting	
  our	
  
citizens	
  back	
  to	
  work,	
  all	
  responsible	
  solutions	
  should	
  be	
  considered.	
  As	
  our	
  state	
  works	
  
hard	
  to	
  boost	
  economic	
  recovery	
  and	
  prosperity,	
  we	
  would	
  be	
  wise	
  to	
  utilize	
  all	
  
resources	
  available	
  to	
  us.	
  	
  
	
  
One	
  such	
  resource	
  is	
  national	
  service.	
  Corporation	
  for	
  National	
  and	
  Community	
  Service	
  
programs—AmeriCorps	
  and	
  VISTA	
  (Volunteers	
  in	
  Service	
  to	
  America)—	
  help	
  our	
  
communities	
  address	
  some	
  of	
  our	
  most	
  pressing	
  challenges	
  like	
  teacher	
  and	
  nursing	
  
shortages,	
  access	
  to	
  healthcare,	
  K-­‐12	
  academic	
  success,	
  disaster	
  response,	
  
environmental	
  degradation,	
  and	
  reintegrating	
  veterans	
  into	
  civilian	
  life.	
  
	
  
The	
  20	
  presidents,	
  chancellors,	
  and	
  CEOs	
  of	
  the	
  Montana	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  are	
  
committed	
  to	
  deepening	
  the	
  ability	
  of	
  their	
  campuses	
  to	
  address	
  critical	
  community	
  
needs	
  and	
  to	
  educate	
  students	
  to	
  meet	
  their	
  civic	
  responsibilities.	
  	
  
	
  
We	
  see	
  the	
  partnership	
  between	
  higher	
  education	
  and	
  national	
  service	
  as	
  an	
  effective	
  
strategy	
  to	
  reach	
  both	
  academic	
  and	
  community	
  goals.	
  	
  
	
  
The	
  MTCC	
  programs,	
  created	
  with	
  national	
  service	
  support,	
  allow	
  the	
  state’s	
  colleges	
  
and	
  universities	
  to	
  better	
  prepare	
  students	
  for	
  meaningful	
  careers	
  and	
  address	
  
community	
  challenges	
  simultaneously.	
  	
  
	
  
This	
  year,	
  the	
  Montana	
  Campus	
  Compact	
  will	
  place	
  more	
  than	
  1,100	
  full	
  and	
  part-­‐time	
  
AmeriCorps	
  members	
  and	
  35	
  AmeriCorps*VISTA	
  members	
  in	
  twenty-­‐eight	
  urban	
  and	
  
rural	
  communities	
  across	
  Montana.	
  These	
  dedicated	
  national	
  service	
  members	
  will	
  
engage	
  an	
  additional	
  5,000	
  students	
  and	
  citizens	
  as	
  volunteers	
  in	
  community	
  and	
  
neighborhood	
  projects.	
  
	
  
National	
  service	
  is	
  a	
  tremendously	
  cost-­‐effective	
  investment	
  in	
  our	
  students	
  and	
  
communities.	
  AmeriCorps	
  and	
  VISTA	
  resources	
  help	
  our	
  faculty	
  enrich	
  the	
  academic	
  
experiences	
  for	
  many	
  college	
  students	
  who	
  are	
  able	
  to	
  apply	
  course	
  content	
  to	
  real-­‐
world	
  issues,	
  develop	
  vital	
  professional	
  skills,	
  and	
  learn	
  lessons	
  about	
  the	
  power	
  and	
  
responsibility	
  of	
  active	
  citizenship.	
  Similarly,	
  communities	
  benefit	
  from	
  the	
  energy	
  and	
  
ideas	
  generated	
  by	
  engaged	
  college	
  students.	
  	
  
	
  
In	
  this	
  way,	
  college	
  education	
  becomes	
  less	
  of	
  private	
  gain	
  for	
  a	
  few	
  individuals	
  and	
  
more	
  of	
  public	
  good	
  from	
  which	
  everyone	
  benefits.	
  
	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                           42
We	
  know	
  that	
  student	
  civic	
  engagement	
  makes	
  for	
  great	
  education.	
  
When	
  students	
  get	
  involved	
  in	
  community	
  projects	
  they	
  are	
  better	
  able	
  to	
  make	
  
connections	
  between	
  theory	
  and	
  practice,	
  learn	
  problem-­‐solving,	
  work	
  in	
  teams,	
  and	
  
acquire	
  marketable	
  job	
  skills.	
  
	
  
Their	
  experience	
  with	
  community	
  projects	
  often	
  influences	
  future	
  career	
  choices	
  and	
  
strengthens	
  the	
  potential	
  for	
  interesting	
  and	
  meaningful	
  employment.	
  
Last	
  year	
  in	
  Montana,	
  AmeriCorps	
  and	
  VISTA	
  members—and	
  the	
  thousands	
  of	
  college	
  
students	
  that	
  they	
  recruited—	
  provided	
  critical	
  flood	
  relief,	
  mentored	
  young	
  children,	
  
created	
  sustainable	
  food	
  and	
  nutrition	
  plans	
  for	
  grade	
  schools,	
  built	
  and	
  remodeled	
  low-­‐
income	
  housing,	
  developed	
  community	
  gardens,	
  fed	
  homeless	
  military	
  veterans,	
  and	
  
much	
  more.	
  	
  
	
  
In	
  addition,	
  their	
  service	
  earned	
  them	
  valuable	
  education	
  awards	
  which	
  help	
  to	
  offset	
  
the	
  costs	
  of	
  higher	
  education	
  and	
  assist	
  in	
  removing	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  barriers	
  to	
  college	
  
graduation.	
  The	
  students	
  who	
  participate	
  in	
  these	
  programs	
  are	
  more	
  likely	
  to	
  graduate	
  
than	
  other	
  students.	
  
	
  
National	
  service	
  enriches	
  our	
  state	
  in	
  many	
  ways.	
  It	
  improves	
  education.	
  It	
  helps	
  to	
  
solve	
  community	
  problems.	
  It	
  reinforces	
  our	
  commitment	
  to	
  the	
  American	
  values	
  of	
  
honor	
  and	
  public	
  service.	
  We	
  urge	
  our	
  leaders	
  in	
  Washington	
  to	
  continue	
  to	
  make	
  this	
  
important	
  investment	
  in	
  our	
  students	
  and	
  in	
  our	
  future.	
  
	
  
Waded	
  Cruzado,	
  president,	
  Montana	
  State	
  University;	
  Royce	
  Engstrom,	
  president,	
  The	
  
University	
  of	
  Montana;	
  Jane	
  Karas,	
  president,	
  Flathead	
  Valley	
  Community	
  College;	
  
Dean	
  McGovern,	
  executive	
  director,	
  Montana	
  Campus	
  Compact;	
  Luana	
  Ross,	
  president,	
  
Salish	
  Kootenai	
  College;	
  Richard	
  Storey,	
  chancellor,	
  The	
  University	
  of	
  Montana	
  Western;	
  
Tom	
  Trebon,	
  president,	
  Carroll	
  College	
  
	
  	
  

Authors	
  are	
  members	
  of	
  the	
  Executive	
  Committee	
  of	
  the	
  Montana	
  Campus	
  Compact,	
  a	
  
statewide	
  consortium	
  of	
  20	
  public,	
  private,	
  two-­‐year,	
  four-­‐year,	
  tribal,	
  and	
  community	
  
colleges	
  and	
  universities.	
  www.mtcompact.org	
  	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                        43
“12	
  Nebraska	
  colleges	
  create	
  civic	
  engagement	
  group”	
  
Lincoln	
  Journal	
  Star	
  (NE)	
  
10/25/2011	
  
By	
  The	
  Lincoln	
  Journal	
  Star	
  
http://journalstar.com/news/local/education/article_60aaf72e-­‐1f9b-­‐5193-­‐b47a-­‐
19b3f0e13467.html	
  

	
  
Twelve	
   Nebraska	
   colleges	
   and	
   universities	
   are	
   creating	
   an	
   affiliate	
   to	
   a	
   national	
  
organization	
   that	
   promotes	
   service	
   learning	
   and	
   civic	
   engagement	
   among	
   college	
  
students.	
  
The	
   founding	
   members	
   of	
   Nebraska	
   Campus	
   Compact	
   are	
   Nebraska	
   Wesleyan	
  
University,	
   the	
   University	
   of	
   Nebraska-­‐Lincoln,	
   Doane	
   College,	
   the	
   College	
   of	
   St.	
   Mary,	
  
Hastings	
   College,	
   Nebraska	
   Methodist	
   College,	
   Peru	
   State	
   College,	
   the	
   University	
   of	
  
Nebraska	
   at	
   Kearney,	
   the	
   University	
   of	
   Nebraska	
   Medical	
   Center,	
   the	
   University	
   of	
  
Nebraska	
  at	
  Omaha,	
  Wayne	
  State	
  College	
  and	
  Western	
  Nebraska	
  Community	
  College.	
  

Nebraska	
   is	
   the	
   35th	
   state	
   to	
   affiliate	
   with	
   the	
   national	
   Campus	
   Compact,	
   which	
  
integrates	
   service	
   learning	
   and	
   civic	
   engagement	
   into	
   campus	
   and	
   academic	
   life	
   and	
  
offers	
  grants	
  and	
  other	
  resources	
  to	
  its	
  members.	
  

UNL	
  is	
  the	
  host	
  for	
  the	
  Nebraska	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  A	
  council	
  comprised	
  of	
  the	
  campus	
  
CEOs	
   of	
   each	
   member	
   institution	
   governs	
   the	
   group;	
   UNL	
   Chancellor	
   Harvey	
   Perlman	
  
chairs	
   the	
   council.	
   Juan	
   Franco,	
   UNL's	
   vice	
   chancellor	
   for	
   student	
   affairs,	
   is	
   interim	
  
executive	
  director.	
  

"The	
  12	
  charter	
  institutions	
  are	
  coming	
  together	
  to	
  share	
  insights	
  and	
  ideas	
  that	
  will	
  
benefit	
  all	
  their	
  students	
  as	
  we	
  work	
  together	
  to	
  reinforce	
  and	
  further	
  the	
  concepts	
  of	
  
civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  service	
  learning,"	
  Perlman	
  said	
  in	
  a	
  news	
  release.

	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               44
“College	
  Students	
  and	
  graduates	
  volunteering	
  for	
  longer	
  terms”	
  
USA	
  Today	
  (VA)	
  
11/28/2012	
  
Natalie	
  DiBlasio	
  
http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2011-­‐11-­‐23/sharing-­‐college-­‐students-­‐
volunteering/51447910/1	
  
	
  
	
  
University	
  of	
  Florida	
  senior	
  Maria	
  Fitzgerald	
  never	
  expected	
  to	
  be	
  deployed	
  to	
  New	
  York	
  
on	
  her	
  fourth	
  day	
  of	
  volunteering	
  with	
  the	
  American	
  Red	
  Cross.	
  
	
  
But	
  after	
  Hurricane	
  Irene	
  hit	
  the	
  East	
  Coast,	
  Fitzgerald	
  and	
  another	
  full-­‐time	
  intern	
  at	
  
the	
  Red	
  Cross,	
  Molly	
  Jansen,	
  were	
  asked	
  to	
  drive	
  from	
  Florida	
  to	
  New	
  York.	
  
	
  
“We	
  were	
  just	
  told	
  to	
  pack	
  our	
  bags	
  and	
  go	
  help,"	
  Fitzgerald	
  says.	
  "We	
  ended	
  up	
  staying	
  
in	
  New	
  York	
  for	
  a	
  month."	
  
	
  
Fitzgerald	
  and	
  Jansen	
  are	
  two	
  of	
  a	
  growing	
  group	
  of	
  college	
  students	
  and	
  recent	
  
graduates	
  engaging	
  in	
  longer-­‐term	
  service	
  activities.	
  
	
  
The	
  number	
  of	
  college	
  students	
  who	
  volunteer	
  actually	
  decreased	
  from	
  2009	
  to	
  2010,	
  
but	
  the	
  total	
  number	
  of	
  volunteer	
  hours	
  increased,	
  a	
  2010	
  study	
  conducted	
  by	
  
Volunteering	
  in	
  America	
  showed.	
  
	
  
"This	
  data	
  show	
  that	
  the	
  students	
  who	
  are	
  volunteering	
  are	
  doing	
  so	
  more	
  regularly	
  or	
  
on	
  a	
  longer-­‐term	
  basis,"	
  says	
  Heather	
  Peeler,	
  chief	
  strategy	
  officer	
  for	
  the	
  Corporation	
  
for	
  National	
  and	
  Community	
  Service.	
  
	
  
Some	
  experts	
  say	
  a	
  key	
  reason	
  that	
  recent	
  graduates	
  are	
  turning	
  to	
  longer	
  volunteer	
  
opportunities	
  could	
  be	
  the	
  competitive	
  job	
  market	
  and	
  economic	
  climate.	
  
	
  
"The	
  people	
  who	
  are	
  seeking	
  these	
  volunteerism	
  opportunities	
  may	
  not	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  find	
  
employment	
  elsewhere,"	
  says	
  clinical	
  psychologist	
  Stephen	
  Goldbart,	
  one	
  of	
  the	
  
directors	
  of	
  the	
  Money,	
  Meaning	
  and	
  Choices	
  Institute.	
  "Every	
  one	
  of	
  us	
  needs	
  
someplace	
  to	
  feel	
  productive,	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  sense	
  of	
  identity	
  and	
  to	
  have	
  a	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  adult	
  
world.	
  It's	
  not	
  only	
  altruism,	
  it's	
  anxiety	
  about	
  the	
  future."	
  
	
  
But	
  Elissa	
  Kim,	
  executive	
  vice	
  president	
  of	
  recruitment	
  and	
  admissions	
  of	
  Teach	
  for	
  
America,	
  says	
  she	
  doesn't	
  believe	
  the	
  economy	
  is	
  entirely	
  behind	
  the	
  volunteerism	
  
increase.	
  She	
  notes	
  the	
  growing	
  opportunities	
  for	
  volunteering	
  and,	
  at	
  Teach	
  for	
  
America,	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  the	
  number	
  of	
  recruiters.

"I	
   don't	
   think	
   people	
   are	
   just	
   jumping	
   on	
   the	
   bandwagon	
   to	
   do	
   service	
   because	
   the	
  
economy	
   is	
   shaky,"	
   Kim	
   says.	
   "People	
   are	
   very	
   attuned	
   to	
   what	
   we	
   are	
   asking	
   for	
   and	
  


CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                        45
the	
   challenge	
   of	
   the	
   teaching	
   experience.	
   They	
   reflect	
   on	
   if	
   this	
   is	
   the	
   right	
   thing	
   for	
  
them	
  before	
  they	
  commit."	
  

Among	
  major	
  charities	
  with	
  college-­‐age	
  volunteers:	
  

            •     Applications	
   for	
   AmeriCorps	
   have	
   increased	
   from	
   360,000	
   in	
   the	
   2008-­‐09	
  
                  program	
   year	
   to	
   536,000	
   in	
   the	
   2009-­‐10	
   program	
   year,	
   says	
   Sandy	
   Scott,	
  
                  acting	
  director	
  of	
  public	
  affairs.	
  

            •     Teach	
  for	
  America	
  received	
  a	
  record	
  48,000	
  applications	
  for	
  the	
  2011	
  teacher	
  
                  corps,	
   says	
   national	
   communications	
   director	
   Carrie	
   James.	
   In	
   2009,	
   35,000	
  
                  people	
  applied;	
  in	
  2008,	
  25,000.	
  

            •     Red	
  Cross	
  volunteers	
  in	
  the	
  college	
  age	
  group,	
  19-­‐24,	
  make	
  up	
  about	
  11%	
  of	
  
                  the	
  total	
  registered	
  volunteers,	
  up	
  from	
  10%	
  last	
  year.	
  

            •     Peace	
  Corps	
  spokeswoman	
  Kristina	
  Edmunson	
  says	
  Peace	
  Corps	
  applications	
  
                  continue	
  to	
  "trend	
  up,"	
  although	
  this	
  year,	
  the	
  numbers	
  have	
  decreased	
  by	
  
                  about	
  800.	
  

People	
   gain	
   important	
   skills	
   and	
   networks	
   through	
   volunteering,	
   says	
   Peter	
   Levine,	
  
director	
  of	
  CIRCLE,	
  a	
  research	
  center	
  on	
  young	
  people's	
  civic	
  engagement.	
  

"People	
  might	
  recognize	
  this	
  more	
  in	
  the	
  recession,	
  especially	
  because	
  they	
  don't	
  have	
  a	
  
job	
  and	
  they	
  are	
  looking	
  for	
  ways	
  to	
  build	
  their	
  résumés,"	
  Levine	
  says.	
  

Maureen	
   Curley,	
   president	
   of	
   Campus	
   Compact,	
   a	
   national	
   coalition	
   of	
   university	
  
presidents	
  that	
  promotes	
  and	
  studies	
  volunteerism,	
  says	
  she	
  saw	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  college	
  
and	
  post-­‐college	
  volunteering	
  even	
  before	
  the	
  economic	
  crisis.	
  

"There	
   seems	
   to	
   be	
   a	
   real	
   longing	
   for	
   students	
   to	
   have	
   a	
   hands-­‐on	
   experience	
   and	
   to	
  
take	
  what	
  they	
  are	
  learning	
  in	
  school	
  and	
  delve	
  into	
  things	
  they	
  are	
  passionate	
  about,"	
  
Curley	
   says.	
   "There	
   has	
   been	
   a	
   dramatic	
   increase	
   in	
   service-­‐learning	
   opportunities	
   on	
  
college	
  campuses."	
  

The	
   2010	
   executive	
   report	
   for	
   Campus	
   Compact	
   shows	
   that	
   the	
   number	
   of	
   service-­‐
learning	
  courses	
  offered	
  per	
  campus	
  increased	
  from	
  an	
  average	
  of	
  43	
  in	
  2008	
  to	
  64	
  in	
  
2010."	
  

It's	
  a	
  way	
  for	
  students	
  to	
  address	
  passions	
  and	
  get	
  real	
  live	
  experience,"	
  Curley	
  says.	
  "It's	
  
attractive	
  for	
  students	
  to	
  be	
  able	
  to	
  walk	
  into	
  an	
  experience	
  like	
  that."	
  
	
  
	
  
	
  



CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                             46
“Generations	
  give	
  thanks	
  as	
  community	
  shares	
  meal	
  in	
  Immokalee”	
  
Naples	
  Daily	
  News	
  	
  (FL)	
  
11/24/2011	
  
By	
  Heather	
  Carney	
  
http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2011/nov/24/immokalee-­‐park-­‐thanksgiving-­‐meals-­‐
feed-­‐community/	
  
	
  	
  
IMMOKALEE	
  -­‐	
  Susana	
  Ramirez	
  remembers	
  coming	
  to	
  Thanksgiving	
  in	
  the	
  Park	
  with	
  her	
  
dad	
  as	
  a	
  little	
  girl.	
  
	
  
Now,	
  her	
  dad	
  is	
  too	
  sick	
  to	
  attend	
  but	
  Ramirez	
  still	
  continues	
  the	
  tradition	
  and	
  savors	
  
the	
  memories	
  —	
  new	
  and	
  old.	
  
	
  
Each	
  year,	
  she	
  walks	
  with	
  her	
  husband	
  and	
  four	
  children	
  to	
  the	
  Thanksgiving	
  feast	
  held	
  
annually	
  at	
  Immokalee's	
  Airport	
  Park.	
  
"It	
  brings	
  back	
  the	
  memories,"	
  she	
  said.	
  
	
  
Ramirez	
  said	
  it	
  brings	
  back	
  the	
  good	
  memories.	
  The	
  gathering	
  of	
  thousands	
  of	
  
Immokalee	
  community	
  members	
  —	
  some	
  neighbors,	
  some	
  friends,	
  some	
  family	
  and	
  
many	
  strangers	
  —	
  is	
  what	
  Thanksgiving	
  means	
  to	
  her	
  and	
  her	
  family.	
  
"I	
  try	
  to	
  explain	
  to	
  my	
  children	
  that	
  it’s	
  important	
  to	
  help	
  people,"	
  she	
  said.	
  "No	
  matter	
  
their	
  color	
  or	
  race."	
  
	
  
Thursday,	
  nearly	
  2,500	
  Immokalee	
  community	
  members	
  gave	
  thanks	
  for	
  a	
  free	
  
Thanksgiving	
  meal	
  provided	
  by	
  the	
  Guadalupe	
  Center	
  and	
  more	
  than	
  150	
  volunteers	
  
from	
  Southwest	
  Florida	
  churches	
  and	
  organizations.	
  It	
  was	
  the	
  29th	
  annual	
  Thanksgiving	
  
in	
  the	
  Park.	
  
	
  
Students	
  from	
  area	
  colleges	
  and	
  Immokalee	
  High	
  School,	
  along	
  with	
  other	
  volunteers,	
  
shredded	
  the	
  cooked	
  turkey,	
  sliced	
  the	
  pumpkin	
  and	
  fruit	
  pies,	
  opened	
  cans	
  of	
  sauce	
  
and	
  tackled	
  the	
  other	
  duties	
  to	
  prepare	
  the	
  meal.	
  Immokalee	
  residents	
  formed	
  two	
  
staggeringly	
  long	
  lines	
  while	
  children	
  played	
  in	
  the	
  shade	
  of	
  the	
  trees	
  and	
  patiently	
  
waited	
  for	
  the	
  food.	
  
	
  
"You	
  look	
  into	
  the	
  eyes	
  of	
  the	
  families	
  and	
  you	
  see	
  how	
  appreciative	
  they	
  are	
  ...	
  Times	
  
are	
  hard,"	
  said	
  Florida	
  Gulf	
  Coast	
  University	
  President	
  Wilson	
  Bradshaw,	
  who	
  served	
  
turkey	
  in	
  the	
  park.	
  This	
  was	
  the	
  third	
  year	
  that	
  Bradshaw	
  and	
  his	
  wife,	
  JoAnna,	
  have	
  
volunteered	
  at	
  the	
  event.	
  
	
  
Most	
  of	
  the	
  food	
  is	
  donated	
  only	
  days	
  before	
  Thanksgiving	
  Day.	
  Churches	
  serve	
  as	
  drop-­‐
off	
  points	
  for	
  about	
  200	
  cooked	
  turkeys,	
  7,000	
  tortillas,	
  840	
  pounds	
  of	
  mashed	
  
potatoes,	
  44	
  quarts	
  of	
  salsa,	
  1,100	
  pounds	
  of	
  green	
  beans	
  and	
  500	
  pies.	
  
	
  
Volunteer	
  leader	
  Kathy	
  Shannon,	
  who	
  was	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  first	
  Thanksgiving	
  in	
  the	
  Park	
  in	
  
1982,	
  said	
  over	
  the	
  years	
  the	
  Guadalupe	
  Center	
  has	
  added	
  hot	
  sauce	
  to	
  the	
  menu,	
  
gotten	
  rid	
  of	
  the	
  stuffing,	
  substituted	
  tortillas	
  for	
  rolls,	
  and	
  switched	
  from	
  sweet	
  to	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                   47
mashed	
  potatoes	
  to	
  satisfy	
  the	
  taste	
  preferences	
  and	
  culinary	
  customs	
  of	
  the	
  
Immokalee	
  population.	
  
	
  
Thirteen-­‐year-­‐old	
  Gerardo	
  Cruz	
  and	
  his	
  5-­‐year-­‐old	
  brother,	
  Oscar,	
  said	
  they	
  love	
  the	
  
turkey	
  and	
  tortillas.	
  They’ve	
  been	
  coming	
  to	
  Thanksgiving	
  in	
  the	
  Park	
  for	
  as	
  long	
  as	
  they	
  
can	
  remember.	
  
	
  
"We’re	
  just	
  here	
  cause	
  it’s	
  Thanksgiving,"	
  Oscar	
  said	
  in	
  a	
  matter-­‐of-­‐fact	
  tone.	
  
	
  
For	
  Ramirez,	
  the	
  turkey	
  is	
  still	
  her	
  favorite	
  part.	
  She	
  can	
  remember	
  eating	
  it	
  with	
  her	
  
dad.	
  She	
  looks	
  forward	
  to	
  eating	
  it	
  the	
  most.	
  This	
  marks	
  Ramirez’s	
  18th	
  year	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  
She	
  said	
  she’s	
  proud	
  to	
  have	
  this	
  day	
  as	
  one	
  of	
  her	
  annual	
  traditions.	
  
	
  
At	
  noon,	
  volunteers	
  gave	
  the	
  "go-­‐ahead"	
  and	
  the	
  line	
  quickly	
  started	
  moving	
  forward.	
  
	
  
One	
  volunteer	
  opened	
  a	
  meal	
  box	
  and	
  placed	
  in	
  the	
  turkey,	
  the	
  next	
  the	
  potatoes	
  and	
  
gravy,	
  the	
  third	
  plopped	
  in	
  the	
  green	
  beans	
  and	
  so	
  on	
  until	
  the	
  entire	
  Styrofoam	
  
container	
  was	
  steaming	
  with	
  Thanksgiving	
  food	
  and	
  then	
  placed	
  into	
  the	
  hands	
  of	
  an	
  
Immokalee	
  resident.	
  
	
  
Eleven-­‐year-­‐old	
  Milena	
  Lorenzo	
  dug	
  into	
  the	
  mashed	
  potatoes	
  first.	
  After	
  her	
  first	
  bite,	
  a	
  
smile	
  spread	
  across	
  her	
  face	
  as	
  she	
  said,	
  "Mmm,	
  so	
  good."	
  
	
  
One	
  of	
  the	
  volunteers	
  said	
  that	
  it	
  is	
  the	
  "acknowledgment	
  of	
  the	
  community,	
  even	
  
though	
  we	
  are	
  different"	
  that	
  makes	
  this	
  day	
  and	
  event	
  so	
  special.	
  
	
  
The	
  Guadalupe	
  Center	
  and	
  volunteers	
  also	
  delivered	
  more	
  than	
  150	
  meals	
  to	
  
homebound	
  families.	
  Any	
  left	
  over	
  food	
  from	
  the	
  event	
  was	
  to	
  be	
  donated	
  to	
  the	
  
Immokalee	
  soup	
  kitchen	
  or	
  given	
  to	
  families	
  in	
  attendance.	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                 48
“Diversity	
  and	
  the	
  Doctorate”	
  
BizEd	
  Magazine	
  
By	
  Bernard	
  J.	
  Milano	
  
January/February	
  2012	
  
http://www.e-­‐digitaleditions.com/issue/52321/35	
  
	
  
	
  
In	
  corporate	
  life,	
  diversity	
  is	
  usually	
  a	
  given.	
  The	
  global	
  marketplace	
  is	
  diverse,	
  so	
  the	
  
talent	
  that	
  serves	
  and	
  produces	
  for	
  it	
  must	
  be	
  as	
  well.	
  But	
  in	
  the	
  academic	
  world,	
  where	
  
business	
  students	
  learn	
  to	
  become	
  business	
  executives,	
  diversity	
  in	
  front	
  of	
  the	
  
classroom	
  is	
  still	
  an	
  unrealized	
  dream.	
  	
  
	
  
At	
  U.S.	
  business	
  schools,	
  fewer	
  than	
  4	
  percent	
  of	
  the	
  faculty	
  are	
  minorities—that	
  is,	
  
African	
  American,	
  Hispanic	
  American,	
  or	
  Native	
  American.	
  If	
  business	
  schools	
  don’t	
  have	
  
people	
  of	
  color	
  teaching	
  their	
  classes,	
  they	
  will	
  find	
  it	
  difficult	
  to	
  attract	
  minority	
  
students	
  to	
  enroll	
  in	
  their	
  courses.	
  	
  
	
  
Solid	
  research	
  suggests	
  that	
  when	
  a	
  person’s	
  identity	
  is	
  different	
  from	
  the	
  identity	
  of	
  
others	
  nearby,	
  performance	
  suffers.	
  The	
  environment	
  feels	
  uncomfortable,	
  and	
  the	
  
individual	
  wonders	
  if	
  this	
  place	
  is	
  a	
  good	
  fit.	
  If	
  there	
  are	
  no	
  minority	
  professors	
  teaching	
  
business	
  classes,	
  students	
  of	
  color	
  will	
  not	
  have	
  role	
  models	
  or	
  natural	
  and	
  
approachable	
  mentors.	
  Nor	
  will	
  the	
  majority	
  students,	
  usually	
  Caucasian,	
  have	
  a	
  chance	
  
to	
  experience	
  the	
  diversity	
  they	
  will	
  experience	
  when	
  they	
  enter	
  the	
  workplace.	
  If	
  
business	
  schools	
  want	
  to	
  succeed	
  in	
  their	
  end	
  goal	
  of	
  diversifying	
  global	
  management,	
  
they	
  will	
  have	
  to	
  start	
  by	
  diversifying	
  their	
  own	
  faculties.	
  	
  
	
  
But	
  first,	
  they’ll	
  have	
  to	
  debunk	
  many	
  myths	
  concerning	
  what	
  it	
  takes	
  to	
  become	
  a	
  
business	
  school	
  professor.	
  One	
  of	
  the	
  biggest	
  assumptions	
  is	
  that	
  it	
  costs	
  too	
  much	
  for	
  
most	
  minority	
  students	
  to	
  afford,	
  but	
  this	
  is	
  simply	
  untrue.	
  Unlike	
  undergraduate	
  and	
  
graduate	
  programs,	
  most	
  full-­‐time	
  doctoral	
  programs	
  at	
  AACSB-­‐accredited	
  universities	
  
in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  waive	
  tuition	
  and	
  fees.	
  In	
  addition,	
  almost	
  all	
  of	
  these	
  programs	
  compensate	
  
their	
  doctoral	
  students	
  for	
  research	
  and	
  teaching	
  assistantships,	
  and	
  these	
  stipends	
  can	
  
range	
  from	
  $15,000	
  to	
  nearly	
  $40,000	
  per	
  year.	
  
	
  
by	
  discipline	
  and	
  hiring	
  institution,	
  but	
  it	
  can	
  range	
  from	
  just	
  below	
  $100,000	
  to	
  well	
  
over	
  $150,000	
  for	
  a	
  nine-­‐month	
  salary.	
  Teachers	
  also	
  have	
  opportunities	
  to	
  supplement	
  
their	
  incomes	
  with	
  summer	
  research	
  and	
  teaching	
  assignments.	
  	
  
	
  
There	
  are	
  many	
  organizations	
  devoted	
  to	
  promoting	
  diversity	
  in	
  higher	
  education,	
  
including	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project.	
  When	
  it	
  was	
  founded	
  in	
  1994,	
  research	
  showed	
  that	
  qualified	
  
minorities	
  didn’t	
  even	
  consider	
  academia	
  as	
  an	
  option.	
  At	
  the	
  time,	
  there	
  were	
  only	
  294	
  
doctorally	
  qualified	
  professors	
  who	
  were	
  African	
  American,	
  Hispanic	
  American,	
  or	
  
Native	
  American	
  at	
  U.S.	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities.	
  	
  
	
  
Over	
  the	
  past	
  17	
  years,	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project	
  has	
  aimed	
  to	
  help	
  change	
  that	
  figure.	
  The	
  
organization	
  invites	
  successful	
  minority	
  men	
  and	
  women	
  to	
  an	
  annual	
  conference	
  where	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                  49
they	
  learn	
  about	
  applying	
  to	
  doctoral	
  business	
  programs.	
  Once	
  they	
  enroll	
  in	
  those	
  
programs,	
  candidates	
  become	
  members	
  of	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project’s	
  minority	
  student	
  
associations	
  that	
  meet	
  annually	
  for	
  peer	
  and	
  mentoring	
  support.	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project	
  pays	
  
all	
  of	
  their	
  expenses	
  for	
  them	
  to	
  attend	
  both	
  conference	
  and	
  association	
  meetings.	
  	
  
	
  
Since	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project	
  was	
  founded,	
  fewer	
  than	
  10	
  percent	
  of	
  its	
  students	
  have	
  dropped	
  
out,	
  and	
  99	
  percent	
  of	
  its	
  graduates	
  have	
  taken	
  careers	
  in	
  academia.	
  By	
  contrast,	
  among	
  
all	
  doctoral	
  students,	
  the	
  dropout	
  rate	
  is	
  33	
  percent,	
  and	
  only	
  70	
  percent	
  become	
  
business	
  faculty.	
  Because	
  of	
  the	
  commitment	
  and	
  focus	
  of	
  these	
  minority	
  students,	
  
today	
  there	
  are	
  1,109	
  minority	
  business	
  professors	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  Further,	
  nearly	
  400	
  
minorities	
  are	
  currently	
  enrolled	
  in	
  doctoral	
  programs	
  and	
  will	
  take	
  their	
  places	
  at	
  the	
  
front	
  of	
  classrooms	
  over	
  the	
  next	
  few	
  years.	
  	
  
	
  
Such	
  gains	
  are	
  only	
  possible	
  when	
  business	
  schools	
  commit	
  to	
  diversifying	
  their	
  student	
  
bases,	
  faculty,	
  and	
  administrations.	
  The	
  first	
  step	
  is	
  helping	
  minority	
  students	
  see	
  the	
  
great	
  potential	
  awaiting	
  them	
  if	
  they	
  pursue	
  business	
  degrees—and	
  the	
  next	
  step	
  is	
  
preparing	
  them	
  to	
  exert	
  their	
  influence	
  in	
  both	
  the	
  business	
  and	
  academic	
  worlds.	
  
	
  
	
  
Bernard	
  J.	
  Milano	
  is	
  president	
  and	
  a	
  trustee	
  of	
  the	
  KPMG	
  Foundation,	
  president	
  and	
  
trustee	
  of	
  the	
  KPMG	
  Disaster	
  Relief	
  Fund,	
  and	
  president	
  and	
  member	
  of	
  the	
  board	
  of	
  
directors	
  for	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project	
  Association.	
  He	
  is	
  based	
  in	
  Allendale,	
  New	
  Jersey.	
  More	
  
information	
  about	
  The	
  PhD	
  Project	
  can	
  be	
  found	
  at	
  www.phdproject.org.




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                           50
	
  
“Southern	
  Vermont	
  College	
  president	
  assumes	
  U.S.	
  policy	
  Post”	
  
Burlington	
  Free	
  Press	
  (VT)	
  
01/07/2012	
  
By	
  Free	
  Press	
  Staff	
  Reporter	
  
http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/article/20120107/NEWS02/120107001/-­‐
Southern-­‐Vermont-­‐College-­‐president-­‐assumes-­‐U-­‐S-­‐policy-­‐post-­‐?odyssey=nav%7Chead	
  
	
  
	
  
Karen	
  Gross,	
  president	
  of	
  Southern	
  Vermont	
  College,	
  has	
  been	
  appointed	
  senior	
  policy	
  
adviser	
  in	
  the	
  U.S.	
  Department	
  of	
  Education	
  and	
  will	
  be	
  taking	
  a	
  leave	
  of	
  absence	
  from	
  
her	
  college	
  post.	
  
	
  
Gross	
  will	
  serve	
  in	
  the	
  office	
  of	
  undersecretary	
  of	
  education	
  for	
  one	
  year	
  beginning	
  Jan.	
  
17,	
  focusing	
  on	
  issues	
  in	
  higher	
  education,	
  including	
  access,	
  affordability	
  and	
  
programmatic	
  quality.	
  During	
  her	
  absence,	
  James	
  Beckwith,	
  Southern	
  Vermont	
  College’s	
  
chief	
  operating	
  officer,	
  will	
  serve	
  as	
  acting	
  president.	
  
	
  
Gross	
  became	
  Southern	
  Vermont	
  College’s	
  eighth	
  president	
  in	
  2006	
  after	
  having	
  spent	
  
two	
  decades	
  as	
  a	
  law	
  professor	
  at	
  New	
  York	
  University,	
  specializing	
  in	
  consumer	
  finance	
  
and	
  indebtedness.	
  
	
  
Deborah	
  Wiley,	
  chairwoman	
  of	
  the	
  college	
  board,	
  called	
  Gross’	
  appointment	
  a	
  tribute	
  to	
  
both	
  Gross	
  and	
  “the	
  entire	
  SVC	
  community.”	
  
	
  
“We	
  are	
  proud	
  our	
  college	
  president	
  will	
  serve	
  the	
  nation	
  in	
  this	
  important	
  role,”	
  Wiley	
  
said.	
  
	
  
Gov.	
  Peter	
  Shumlin	
  also	
  welcomed	
  the	
  news.	
  “I	
  am	
  sure	
  President	
  Gross	
  will	
  reflect	
  well	
  
on	
  Vermont	
  and	
  make	
  a	
  great	
  contribution	
  to	
  education	
  in	
  the	
  United	
  States.”	
  
	
  
In	
  a	
  college	
  news	
  release,	
  Gross	
  said:	
  “At	
  SVC,	
  we	
  have	
  been	
  working	
  on	
  the	
  very	
  issues	
  
that	
  are	
  engaging	
  the	
  Department	
  of	
  Education	
  and	
  our	
  nation.	
  I	
  look	
  forward	
  to	
  sharing	
  
what	
  we	
  are	
  doing	
  here	
  at	
  SVC	
  with	
  a	
  larger	
  audience	
  as	
  we	
  reflect	
  on	
  how	
  to	
  improve	
  
affordable	
  college	
  access	
  and	
  completion	
  for	
  many	
  worthy	
  Americans.”	
  
	
  
Founded	
  in	
  1926	
  and	
  located	
  in	
  Bennington,	
  Southern	
  Vermont	
  College	
  bills	
  itself	
  as	
  
offering	
  “career-­‐enhancing,	
  liberal	
  arts	
  education	
  with	
  18	
  academic	
  degree	
  programs	
  for	
  
550	
  
	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                51
“MWCC	
  given	
  $2M	
  to	
  support	
  civic	
  engagement”	
  
Sentinel	
  &	
  Enterprise	
  (MA)	
  
01/14/2012	
  
By	
  Katina	
  Caraganis	
  
http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/local/ci_19742549	
  
	
  
	
  
GARDNER	
  -­‐-­‐	
  Mount	
  Wachusett	
  Community	
  College	
  has	
  received	
  its	
  largest	
  single	
  
donation	
  to	
  date	
  with	
  a	
  $2	
  million	
  anonymous	
  donation	
  to	
  support	
  civic-­‐engagement	
  
initiatives	
  on	
  campus.	
  
	
  
The	
  goal	
  of	
  the	
  donation	
  is	
  to	
  "ensure	
  that	
  future	
  generations	
  will	
  continue	
  to	
  gain	
  
awareness,	
  appreciation	
  and	
  practical	
  experience	
  for	
  volunteerism,	
  civic	
  involvement	
  
and	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  giving	
  back	
  to	
  the	
  community,"	
  according	
  to	
  a	
  release	
  issued	
  by	
  the	
  
college.	
  
	
  
Civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  community	
  involvement	
  are	
  two	
  things	
  that	
  President	
  Daniel	
  
Asquino	
  believes	
  are	
  important	
  qualities	
  for	
  future	
  generations	
  to	
  take	
  part	
  in.	
  
	
  
"It's	
  something	
  I've	
  been	
  thinking	
  about	
  over	
  the	
  years.	
  What	
  I	
  saw	
  when	
  I	
  would	
  go	
  to	
  
meetings	
  and	
  be	
  in	
  charge	
  of	
  different	
  things	
  is	
  that	
  I	
  would	
  see	
  the	
  same	
  people	
  
involved	
  over	
  and	
  over	
  again,"	
  he	
  said	
  Friday	
  morning	
  by	
  phone.	
  "I	
  didn't	
  see	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
young	
  people	
  and	
  I	
  saw	
  the	
  same	
  people	
  who	
  looked	
  a	
  lot	
  like	
  me,	
  primarily	
  old	
  white	
  
males.	
  The	
  culture	
  is	
  changing,	
  the	
  demographics	
  are	
  changing.	
  We	
  need	
  more	
  young	
  
people	
  involved.	
  We	
  need	
  more	
  women	
  involved."	
  
	
  
The	
  Center	
  for	
  Civic	
  Learning	
  and	
  Community	
  Engagement,	
  once	
  the	
  Center	
  for	
  
Democracy	
  and	
  Humanity,	
  will	
  focus	
  on	
  best	
  practices	
  in	
  the	
  area	
  of	
  civic	
  learning	
  and	
  
engagement	
  and	
  the	
  development	
  of	
  learning	
  communities	
  at	
  both	
  the	
  high	
  school	
  and	
  
college	
  level.	
  
	
  
The	
  center,	
  according	
  to	
  the	
  release,	
  will	
  also	
  help	
  to	
  support	
  "pay	
  it	
  forward"	
  awards	
  
for	
  students	
  who	
  show	
  commitment	
  to	
  areas	
  of	
  civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  community	
  
outreach.	
  
"The	
  idea	
  of	
  civic	
  engagement	
  is	
  to	
  get	
  people	
  involved	
  and	
  make	
  them	
  appreciate	
  how	
  
important	
  it	
  is,"	
  Asquino	
  said.	
  "The	
  more	
  individuals	
  that	
  are	
  involved	
  in	
  a	
  community,	
  
the	
  better	
  off	
  that	
  community	
  is."	
  
	
  
Robin	
  Duncan,	
  the	
  vice	
  president	
  of	
  marketing	
  and	
  communications	
  for	
  the	
  college,	
  said	
  
this	
  marks	
  an	
  exciting	
  time	
  for	
  the	
  college	
  in	
  terms	
  of	
  bringing	
  civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  
service-­‐learning	
  projects	
  to	
  the	
  forefront	
  of	
  people's	
  minds.	
  
	
  
"We've	
  made	
  significant	
  improvements	
  in	
  those	
  two	
  fields.	
  This	
  directly	
  relates	
  to	
  
learning.	
  Giving	
  back	
  isn't	
  just	
  about	
  taking	
  and	
  receiving	
  but	
  it's	
  about	
  giving	
  back	
  to	
  
the	
  region	
  you	
  learned	
  in,"	
  she	
  said.	
  "Mount	
  Wachusett	
  and	
  the	
  president	
  have	
  a	
  vision	
  
to	
  instill	
  in	
  students	
  that	
  they	
  have	
  a	
  purpose	
  that	
  will	
  stay	
  with	
  them	
  long	
  after	
  they	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                  52
leave	
  here."	
  
	
  
She	
  said	
  it's	
  important	
  for	
  students	
  to	
  understand	
  they	
  can	
  make	
  a	
  difference	
  in	
  
people's	
  lives.	
  
	
  
"We	
  make	
  a	
  difference	
  in	
  their	
  lives	
  and	
  they're	
  making	
  a	
  difference	
  in	
  other	
  people's	
  
lives,"	
  she	
  said.	
  "It's	
  also	
  about	
  taking	
  what	
  they	
  learn	
  in	
  the	
  classroom	
  and	
  applying	
  it	
  
to	
  the	
  real	
  world	
  or	
  to	
  a	
  greater	
  need."	
  
	
  
Over	
  the	
  past	
  10	
  years,	
  students	
  at	
  Mount	
  Wachusett	
  have	
  put	
  in	
  more	
  than	
  150,000	
  
hours	
  of	
  community	
  service	
  and	
  service-­‐learning	
  hours,	
  valued	
  at	
  $3.6	
  million	
  to	
  the	
  
community,	
  the	
  release	
  said.	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                    53
	
  
“Otorgan	
  al	
  Dr.	
  Eduardo	
  Padrón	
  el	
  Premio	
  Nacional	
  al	
  Servicio	
  Ciudadano”	
  
Univision	
  (FL)	
  
02/08/2012	
  
http://wqba.univision.com/noticias/article/2012-­‐02-­‐08/otorgan-­‐al-­‐dr-­‐eduardo-­‐
padron?refPath=/noticias/mundo/noticias/	
  
	
  
	
  
MIAMI,	
  Florida	
  –	
  El	
  próximo	
  14	
  de	
  febrero,	
  el	
  Dr.	
  Eduardo	
  J.	
  Padrón,	
  Presidente	
  del	
  
Miami	
  Dade	
  College	
  (MDC)	
  recibirá	
  el	
  Premio	
  al	
  Servicio	
  Ciudadano	
  (Citizen	
  Service	
  
Award)	
  otorgado	
  por	
  la	
  coalición	
  Voices	
  for	
  National	
  Service,	
  durante	
  una	
  recepción	
  que	
  
se	
  llevará	
  a	
  cabo	
  en	
  Washington,	
  D.C.,	
  donde	
  se	
  le	
  entregará	
  la	
  distinción,	
  al	
  igual	
  que	
  al	
  
músico	
  y	
  actor	
  Jon	
  Bon	
  Jovi.	
  La	
  recepción	
  es	
  co-­‐patrocinada	
  por	
  The	
  Corps	
  Network.	
  El	
  
Dr.	
  Padrón	
  es	
  el	
  primer	
  presidente	
  de	
  college	
  al	
  que	
  se	
  le	
  otorga	
  la	
  distinción,	
  y	
  fue	
  
nominado	
  por	
  Campus	
  Compact,	
  coalición	
  nacional	
  integrada	
  por	
  más	
  de	
  1,100	
  
presidentes	
  de	
  colleges	
  y	
  universidades	
  –	
  en	
  representación	
  de	
  más	
  de	
  6	
  millones	
  de	
  
estudiantes	
  –	
  dedicada	
  a	
  promover	
  el	
  servicio	
  comunitario,	
  la	
  participación	
  cívica	
  y	
  el	
  
aprendizaje	
  de	
  servicio	
  en	
  la	
  educación	
  universitaria.	
  
	
  
El	
  Premio	
  al	
  Servicio	
  Ciudadano	
  es	
  un	
  reconocimiento	
  al	
  apoyo	
  extraordinario	
  del	
  
servicio	
  nacional,	
  y	
  al	
  papel	
  importante	
  que	
  desempeña	
  el	
  compromiso	
  civil	
  en	
  la	
  
enseñanza	
  universitaria.	
  Entre	
  las	
  personalidades	
  a	
  las	
  que	
  se	
  le	
  ha	
  otorgado	
  
anteriormente	
  están	
  Caroline	
  Kennedy;	
  Rick	
  Stengel	
  de	
  la	
  revista	
  TIME;	
  Lisa	
  Paulson	
  de	
  
Entertainment	
  Industry	
  Foundation;	
  Jeffrey	
  Swartz	
  de	
  The	
  Timberland	
  Company;	
  Bob	
  
Nardelli	
  de	
  The	
  Home	
  Depot,	
  y	
  Jean	
  Case	
  de	
  The	
  Case	
  Foundation.	
  
	
  
El	
  Dr.	
  Padrón	
  es	
  Presidente	
  del	
  Miami	
  Dade	
  College,	
  la	
  institución	
  universitaria	
  más	
  
grande	
  del	
  país,	
  desde	
  1995.	
  Su	
  vibrante	
  liderazgo	
  se	
  extiende	
  a	
  gran	
  parte	
  de	
  las	
  
principales	
  organizaciones	
  de	
  la	
  nación.	
  Es	
  presidente	
  de	
  la	
  junta	
  del	
  prestigioso	
  
American	
  Council	
  on	
  Education	
  y	
  el	
  ex	
  presidente	
  inmediato	
  de	
  la	
  Asociación	
  de	
  
Colleges	
  y	
  Universidades	
  de	
  los	
  Estados	
  Unidos	
  (AACU).	
  Además,	
  es	
  miembro	
  de	
  las	
  
juntas	
  directivas	
  de	
  la	
  Reserva	
  Federal,	
  el	
  Consejo	
  de	
  Relaciones	
  Internacionales	
  y	
  el	
  
Foro	
  de	
  Negocios/Educación	
  Universitaria,	
  entre	
  otras	
  organizaciones	
  nacionales.	
  A	
  lo	
  
largo	
  de	
  su	
  carrera	
  ha	
  sido	
  seleccionado	
  por	
  cinco	
  presidentes	
  estadounidenses	
  para	
  
ocupar	
  cargos	
  de	
  prominencia	
  nacional.	
  Recientemente,	
  el	
  presidente	
  Barack	
  Obama	
  lo	
  
seleccionó	
  para	
  presidir	
  la	
  Iniciativa	
  de	
  la	
  Casa	
  Blanca	
  de	
  Excelencia	
  Educacional	
  para	
  los	
  
Hispanos	
  Estadounidenses	
  (White	
  House	
  Initiative	
  on	
  Educational	
  Excellence	
  for	
  
Hispanic	
  Americans).	
  Recientemente,	
  la	
  revista	
  TIMEeligió	
  al	
  Presidente	
  Padrón	
  para	
  
formar	
  parte	
  de	
  la	
  lista	
  de	
  “Los	
  10	
  Mejores	
  Presidentes	
  de	
  College”	
  de	
  la	
  nación;	
  The	
  
Washington	
  Post	
  lo	
  incluyó	
  en	
  la	
  lista	
  de	
  los	
  ocho	
  “líderes	
  de	
  colleges	
  más	
  influyentes”,	
  
y	
  la	
  revista	
  Florida	
  Trend	
  lo	
  seleccionó	
  como	
  “Floridano	
  del	
  Año”.	
  	
  
	
  	
  
Durante	
  sus	
  cuatro	
  décadas	
  de	
  carrera,	
  el	
  Presidente	
  Padrón	
  ha	
  recibido	
  importantes	
  
distinciones	
  como	
  el	
  “2011	
  Centennial	
  Academic	
  Leadership	
  Award”	
  de	
  Carnegie	
  
Corporation;	
  “Premio	
  Charles	
  Kennedy	
  a	
  la	
  Igualdad	
  2008”	
  que	
  otorga	
  la	
  Asociación	
  de	
  
Fideicomisarios	
  de	
  Community	
  College;	
  el	
  “Premio	
  Reginald	
  Wilson	
  de	
  Liderazgo	
  de	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                     54
Diversidad	
  2008”	
  del	
  American	
  Council	
  on	
  Education;	
  “Innovador	
  del	
  Año	
  2008”	
  de	
  la	
  
Liga	
  para	
  la	
  Innovación;	
  el	
  “Premio	
  Paul	
  A.	
  Elsner	
  a	
  la	
  Excelencia	
  Internacional	
  2005”	
  de	
  
Chair	
  Academy,	
  entre	
  otros.	
  
	
  
En	
  el	
  ámbito	
  internacional,	
  los	
  logros	
  del	
  Presidente	
  Padrón	
  han	
  recibido	
  
reconocimientos	
  de	
  numerosas	
  naciones	
  y	
  organizaciones	
  como	
  las	
  siguientes:	
  la	
  
República	
  de	
  Francia,	
  que	
  le	
  otorgó	
  la	
  distinción	
  de	
  Commandeur	
  de	
  la	
  Orden	
  de	
  Palmas	
  
Académicas;	
  la	
  República	
  de	
  Argentina,	
  que	
  lo	
  distinguió	
  con	
  la	
  Orden	
  de	
  San	
  Martín;	
  y	
  
el	
  Rey	
  Juan	
  Carlos	
  II	
  de	
  España,	
  que	
  le	
  otorgó	
  la	
  Orden	
  de	
  la	
  Reina	
  Isabel.	
  	
  
	
  
Voices	
  for	
  National	
  Service	
  es	
  una	
  coalición	
  diversa	
  de	
  programas	
  nacionales	
  de	
  servicio,	
  
comisiones	
  estatales	
  y	
  promotores	
  individuales	
  cuyo	
  compromiso	
  es	
  ampliar	
  las	
  
oportunidades	
  para	
  que	
  los	
  estadounidenses	
  de	
  todas	
  las	
  edades	
  puedan	
  prestar	
  
servicios	
  y	
  realizar	
  trabajo	
  voluntario	
  en	
  beneficio	
  del	
  país.	
  La	
  coalición,	
  fundada	
  en	
  el	
  
2003,	
  es	
  la	
  voz	
  respetada	
  por	
  la	
  comunidad	
  de	
  servicio	
  en	
  Washington,	
  D.C.,	
  y	
  crea	
  un	
  
sólido	
  apoyo	
  bipartidista	
  en	
  los	
  líderes	
  del	
  país	
  al	
  servicio	
  nacional	
  como	
  solución	
  
política	
  viable	
  para	
  atender	
  necesidades	
  no	
  satisfechas,	
  ampliar	
  las	
  oportunidades	
  y	
  
solidificar	
  el	
  capital	
  social.	
  Aprovechando	
  la	
  experiencia	
  y	
  conocimientos	
  combinados	
  de	
  
la	
  comunidad	
  de	
  servicio,	
  Voices	
  for	
  National	
  Service	
  desempeñó	
  un	
  papel	
  vital	
  en	
  la	
  
creación	
  y	
  desarrollo	
  de	
  la	
  Ley	
  Edward	
  M.	
  Kennedy	
  de	
  Servicio	
  a	
  los	
  Estados	
  Unidos	
  
(Edward	
  M.	
  Kennedy	
  Serve	
  America	
  Act).	
  
	
  	
  
Miami	
  Dade	
  College	
  
	
  
Miami	
  Dade	
  College	
  es	
  la	
  institución	
  universitaria	
  más	
  grande	
  de	
  la	
  nación,	
  con	
  una	
  
matrícula	
  superior	
  a	
  los	
  174,000	
  alumnos,	
  y	
  el	
  principal	
  productor	
  de	
  diplomas	
  de	
  
Asociados	
  en	
  Artes	
  y	
  Asociados	
  en	
  Ciencias	
  de	
  la	
  nación.	
  Los	
  ocho	
  campus	
  y	
  centros	
  de	
  
apoyo	
  del	
  College	
  ofrecen	
  más	
  de	
  300	
  programas	
  diferentes	
  como	
  varios	
  diplomas	
  de	
  
licenciaturas	
  en	
  Educación,	
  Administración	
  de	
  Seguridad	
  Pública,	
  Supervisión	
  y	
  
Gerencia,	
  Enfermería,	
  Estudios	
  de	
  Asistente	
  Médico,	
  Ingeniería,	
  Cine,	
  Ciencias	
  Biológicas	
  
y	
  otros.	
  Sus	
  programas	
  académicos	
  y	
  de	
  capacitación	
  de	
  la	
  fuerza	
  laboral	
  han	
  servido	
  de	
  
modelos	
  nacionales	
  de	
  excelencia.	
  El	
  MDC	
  también	
  goza	
  de	
  gran	
  prestigio	
  por	
  su	
  rica	
  
programación	
  cultural,	
  pues	
  es	
  sede	
  de	
  la	
  Feria	
  Internacional	
  del	
  Libro	
  de	
  Miami,	
  del	
  
Festival	
  Internacional	
  de	
  Cine	
  de	
  Miami,	
  la	
  Serie	
  de	
  Presentaciones	
  Escénicas	
  MDC	
  Live!,	
  
la	
  Torre	
  de	
  la	
  Libertad,	
  Monumento	
  Histórico	
  Nacional;	
  un	
  parque	
  de	
  esculturas,	
  y	
  un	
  
extenso	
  sistema	
  de	
  galerías	
  de	
  arte	
  y	
  teatros.	
  Desde	
  su	
  inauguración	
  en	
  1960,	
  el	
  MDC	
  ha	
  
prestado	
  servicios	
  a	
  casi	
  dos	
  millones	
  de	
  estudiantes.	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                              55
“College	
  joins	
  civic	
  effort”	
  
The	
  Daily	
  Journal	
  (NJ)	
  
2/9/2012	
  
By	
  Kristi	
  Funderburk	
  
http://www.thedailyjournal.com/article/20120209/NEWS01/302090044/College-­‐joins-­‐
civic-­‐effort	
  
	
  
	
  
VINELAND	
  —	
  The	
  day	
  Dr.	
  Thomas	
  Isekenegbe	
  was	
  installed	
  as	
  Cumberland	
  County	
  
College’s	
  new	
  president,	
  he	
  stated	
  his	
  goal	
  for	
  the	
  college	
  to	
  join	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  
	
  
Fifteen	
  months	
  later,	
  CCC’s	
  board	
  of	
  trustees	
  gave	
  the	
  green	
  light	
  for	
  the	
  Vineland	
  
college	
  to	
  join	
  a	
  state	
  affiliate	
  of	
  the	
  national	
  coalition	
  of	
  1,000-­‐plus	
  college	
  and	
  
university	
  presidents	
  committed	
  to	
  promoting	
  civic	
  engagement	
  and	
  community-­‐based	
  
learning.	
  
	
  
The	
  move	
  fits	
  in	
  well	
  with	
  the	
  college’s	
  strategic	
  goal	
  of	
  promoting	
  service	
  learning,	
  
Isekenegbe	
  said.	
  The	
  college	
  defines	
  service	
  learning	
  as	
  “an	
  interactive	
  teaching	
  method	
  
that	
  blends	
  meaningful	
  community	
  service	
  with	
  the	
  content,	
  objectives	
  and	
  assignments	
  
of	
  a	
  course.”	
  
	
  
“It’s	
  important	
  we	
  actually	
  get	
  our	
  students	
  in	
  the	
  community	
  in	
  which	
  they’re	
  living,”	
  
he	
  said.	
  
	
  
As	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  a	
  network,	
  the	
  college	
  can	
  seek	
  more	
  opportunities	
  in	
  grant	
  and	
  
funding	
  assistance	
  needed	
  to	
  implement	
  service	
  learning	
  programs,	
  Isekenegbe	
  said.	
  
	
  
Herman	
  J.	
  Saatkamp	
  Jr.,	
  president	
  of	
  The	
  Richard	
  Stockton	
  College	
  of	
  New	
  Jersey,	
  
discussed	
  the	
  opportunities	
  and	
  resources	
  for	
  participating	
  campuses	
  in	
  a	
  letter	
  sent	
  to	
  
CCC	
  in	
  December	
  that	
  urged	
  Isekenegbe	
  to	
  be	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  launch	
  of	
  the	
  New	
  Jersey	
  
Campus	
  Compact.	
  
	
  
“When	
  we	
  are	
  all	
  facing	
  budget	
  constraints,	
  the	
  financial	
  efficiencies	
  to	
  be	
  gained	
  by	
  
joining	
  together	
  in	
  partnership	
  seem	
  obvious,”	
  Saatkamp	
  wrote.	
  “And	
  the	
  positive	
  
effects	
  of	
  civic	
  engagement	
  on	
  each	
  of	
  our	
  communities	
  are	
  both	
  vital	
  and	
  necessary.”	
  
	
  
Kim	
  Ayres,	
  program	
  coordinator	
  for	
  the	
  college,	
  said	
  New	
  Jersey	
  joins	
  33	
  other	
  states	
  in	
  
having	
  a	
  state	
  affiliate	
  of	
  Campus	
  Compact.	
  Isekenegbe	
  tasked	
  her	
  with	
  championing	
  
service	
  learning	
  across	
  the	
  college	
  curriculum	
  in	
  a	
  way	
  that	
  advances	
  the	
  strategic	
  plan.	
  
	
  
By	
  making	
  service	
  learning	
  part	
  of	
  their	
  curriculum,	
  students	
  get	
  a	
  chance	
  to	
  apply	
  
lessons	
  from	
  the	
  classroom	
  to	
  real-­‐life	
  situations	
  while	
  the	
  college’s	
  faculty	
  and	
  staff	
  will	
  
have	
  a	
  new	
  tool	
  to	
  maximize	
  their	
  teaching	
  experience,	
  Ayres	
  said.	
  
	
  
“Service	
  learning	
  has	
  a	
  number	
  of	
  benefits	
  for	
  the	
  college,	
  the	
  students	
  and	
  the	
  
community,”	
  she	
  said.	
  “Primarily,	
  it	
  will	
  deepen	
  our	
  partnerships	
  with	
  the	
  community	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                               56
while	
  encouraging	
  our	
  students	
  to	
  be	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  solution	
  to	
  some	
  of	
  the	
  critical	
  
challenges	
  in	
  our	
  area.”




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                             57
“Teaching	
  the	
  art	
  and	
  science	
  of	
  philanthropy:	
  Students	
  learning	
  to	
  give”	
  
Deseret	
  News	
  (UT)	
  
2/13/2012	
  
By	
  Elizabeth	
  Stuart	
  
http://www.deseretnews.com/article/765550297/Teach-­‐the-­‐art-­‐and-­‐science-­‐of-­‐
philanthropy-­‐Students-­‐learning-­‐to-­‐give.html?s_cid=s10	
  
	
  
	
  
FORTH	
  WORTH,	
  Texas	
  —	
  A	
  middle-­‐class	
  student	
  with	
  a	
  tuition	
  bill	
  of	
  close	
  to	
  $130,000	
  
hanging	
  over	
  her	
  head,	
  it's	
  no	
  surprise	
  21-­‐year-­‐old	
  Kathleen	
  Mellano	
  spends	
  a	
  lot	
  of	
  
time	
  worrying	
  about	
  money.	
  In	
  addition	
  to	
  working	
  three	
  jobs,	
  the	
  bubbly	
  brunette	
  is	
  
relying	
  on	
  scholarships,	
  federal	
  loans	
  and	
  cash	
  from	
  mom	
  and	
  dad	
  to	
  pay	
  for	
  her	
  degree	
  
in	
  psychology	
  from	
  Texas	
  Christian	
  University.	
  
	
  
This	
  semester,	
  though,	
  it's	
  not	
  bills	
  that	
  are	
  weighing	
  heavily	
  on	
  Mellano's	
  mind.	
  She's	
  
been	
  charged	
  with	
  the	
  task	
  of	
  donating	
  $100,000	
  of	
  someone	
  else's	
  money	
  to	
  charity,	
  
and	
  she's	
  not	
  quite	
  sure	
  how	
  best	
  to	
  do	
  it.	
  
	
  
"I	
  thought	
  it	
  would	
  be	
  easy	
  to	
  pick	
  who	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  money	
  to,"	
  she	
  said.	
  But	
  after	
  
spending	
  15	
  anxious	
  hours	
  clicking	
  through	
  hundreds	
  of	
  charity	
  websites	
  in	
  one	
  week,	
  
she	
  concluded,	
  "It's	
  not	
  easy	
  at	
  all."	
  
Mellano	
  is	
  enrolled	
  in	
  a	
  hands-­‐on	
  course	
  designed	
  to	
  teach	
  TCU	
  students	
  the	
  art	
  and	
  
science	
  of	
  philanthropy.	
  During	
  the	
  past	
  decade	
  more	
  than	
  100	
  such	
  courses	
  have	
  
popped	
  up	
  in	
  U.S.	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities.	
  The	
  classes,	
  offered	
  at	
  state	
  and	
  Ivy	
  League	
  
schools	
  alike,	
  are	
  as	
  diverse	
  as	
  the	
  campuses	
  they	
  are	
  taught	
  on.	
  Aimed	
  at	
  both	
  
graduate	
  and	
  undergraduate	
  students,	
  they	
  are	
  presented	
  in	
  the	
  context	
  of	
  everything	
  
from	
  sociology	
  to	
  business.	
  Some	
  are	
  designed	
  to	
  help	
  students	
  prepare	
  for	
  a	
  career	
  in	
  
the	
  nonprofit	
  sector,	
  others	
  have	
  a	
  more	
  simple	
  goal	
  to	
  help	
  students	
  become	
  more	
  
aware	
  of	
  the	
  nonprofit	
  sector.	
  But	
  they	
  all	
  have	
  one	
  thing	
  in	
  common:	
  they	
  put	
  real	
  
money	
  in	
  the	
  hands	
  of	
  college	
  students	
  and,	
  with	
  it,	
  the	
  power	
  to	
  make	
  real	
  change.	
  
	
  
Ballooning	
  interest	
  in	
  philanthropy	
  as	
  an	
  academic	
  subject	
  is	
  part	
  of	
  a	
  larger	
  trend	
  
toward	
  civic	
  engagement	
  on	
  college	
  campuses.	
  The	
  number	
  of	
  colleges	
  that	
  offer	
  classes	
  
based	
  not	
  just	
  on	
  philanthropy,	
  but	
  also	
  volunteerism,	
  advocacy	
  and	
  activism	
  have	
  
steadily	
  climbed	
  in	
  recent	
  years.	
  In	
  a	
  2010	
  survey	
  of	
  1,100	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  
across	
  the	
  country,	
  more	
  than	
  50	
  percent	
  indicated	
  they	
  had	
  made	
  community	
  service	
  a	
  
requirement	
  for	
  at	
  least	
  one	
  major,	
  according	
  to	
  Campus	
  Compact,	
  a	
  national	
  coalition	
  
of	
  educators	
  that	
  promotes	
  civic	
  engagement.	
  Fourteen	
  percent	
  offered	
  students	
  the	
  
opportunity	
  to	
  major	
  or	
  minor	
  in	
  community	
  service	
  and	
  12	
  percent	
  required	
  all	
  
students	
  to	
  log	
  some	
  good	
  deeds	
  before	
  graduation.	
  
	
  
"We	
  are	
  talking	
  about	
  much	
  more	
  than	
  an	
  increase	
  in	
  philanthropy	
  and	
  volunteerism	
  
among	
  students	
  here,"	
  said	
  Sue	
  Kellman,	
  director	
  of	
  communications	
  for	
  Campus	
  
Compact.	
  "Engaging	
  with	
  the	
  community	
  through	
  service	
  learning	
  is	
  becoming	
  a	
  part	
  of	
  
the	
  fabric	
  of	
  college	
  life."	
  
	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                              58
With	
  at	
  least	
  25	
  new	
  philanthropy	
  courses	
  launched	
  within	
  the	
  last	
  year,	
  the	
  trend	
  
doesn't	
  show	
  signs	
  of	
  slowing.	
  The	
  movement	
  is	
  driven	
  in	
  part	
  by	
  private	
  foundations	
  
interested	
  in	
  training	
  up	
  tomorrow's	
  donors	
  and	
  in	
  part	
  by	
  universities'	
  desires	
  to	
  meet	
  
the	
  needs	
  of	
  an	
  especially	
  socially	
  conscious	
  generation	
  of	
  young	
  people.	
  Few	
  of	
  the	
  
students	
  who	
  enroll	
  in	
  these	
  courses	
  —	
  most	
  of	
  whom,	
  like	
  Mellano,	
  come	
  from	
  modest	
  
backgrounds	
  —	
  will	
  go	
  on	
  to	
  become	
  billionaire	
  philanthropists.	
  But	
  those	
  who	
  fund	
  the	
  
programs	
  hope	
  they	
  are	
  inspiring	
  young	
  people	
  to	
  be	
  better	
  citizens	
  with	
  a	
  better	
  
understanding	
  of	
  the	
  role	
  nonprofits	
  play	
  in	
  society.	
  Anecdotal	
  evidence,	
  at	
  least,	
  would	
  
suggest	
  they	
  are	
  succeeding.	
  
	
  
Teaching	
  the	
  art	
  of	
  giving	
  
	
  
In	
  a	
  sunny	
  classroom	
  in	
  Brigham	
  Young	
  University's	
  business	
  building	
  last	
  week,	
  a	
  
redhead	
  with	
  long	
  eyelashes	
  and	
  girlish	
  cheeks,	
  a	
  balding	
  42-­‐year-­‐old	
  in	
  a	
  crisp	
  polo	
  and	
  
a	
  dark	
  haired	
  international	
  student	
  with	
  a	
  name	
  made	
  up	
  almost	
  entirely	
  of	
  consonants	
  
gathered	
  their	
  desks	
  into	
  a	
  circle,	
  laptops	
  open.	
  By	
  semester's	
  end,	
  their	
  professor	
  
hopes	
  they'll	
  understand	
  the	
  technical	
  and	
  ethical	
  dilemmas	
  that	
  accompany	
  donating	
  
money	
  to	
  charity,	
  but	
  on	
  this	
  day,	
  they	
  simply	
  bantered	
  back	
  and	
  forth	
  about	
  email	
  
addresses.	
  The	
  redhead,	
  a	
  24-­‐year-­‐old	
  master's	
  of	
  public	
  administration	
  student	
  named	
  
Starlee	
  Dolman,	
  suggested,	
  "It	
  would	
  seem	
  more	
  professional	
  if	
  we	
  had	
  one	
  email	
  
address	
  to	
  have	
  people	
  send	
  grant	
  proposals	
  to."	
  The	
  idea	
  was	
  met	
  with	
  enthusiasm,	
  
but	
  what,	
  the	
  students	
  wondered,	
  should	
  they	
  call	
  it?	
  
	
  
It's	
  just	
  the	
  first	
  step	
  in	
  what	
  will	
  be	
  a	
  months-­‐long	
  process	
  to	
  find	
  a	
  recipient	
  for	
  a	
  
$100,000	
  grant	
  backed	
  by	
  cosmetology	
  giant	
  Paul	
  Mitchell,	
  which	
  has	
  partnered	
  with	
  
BYU	
  to	
  give	
  the	
  students	
  an	
  opportunity	
  to	
  learn	
  about	
  philanthropy.	
  First	
  they'll	
  narrow	
  
down	
  the	
  field	
  of	
  charities,	
  then	
  they'll	
  launch	
  an	
  investigation	
  into	
  the	
  nonprofits'	
  
finances	
  and	
  analyze	
  their	
  effectiveness.	
  They'll	
  perform	
  site	
  visits	
  and	
  debate	
  until	
  
they've	
  decided	
  as	
  a	
  group	
  where	
  best	
  to	
  spend	
  the	
  money.	
  
	
  
"Right	
  now	
  I'm	
  still	
  trying	
  to	
  wrap	
  my	
  mind	
  around	
  giving	
  away	
  $100,000,"	
  said	
  Warren	
  
Price,	
  42,	
  who	
  is	
  working	
  on	
  a	
  master's	
  degree	
  in	
  youth	
  and	
  family	
  recreation.	
  "The	
  
impact	
  and	
  scope	
  of	
  this	
  project	
  is	
  —	
  wow.	
  We	
  have	
  the	
  opportunity	
  as	
  college	
  students	
  
to	
  actually	
  have	
  a	
  national	
  impact."	
  
Students	
  enrolled	
  in	
  BYU's	
  philanthropy	
  class,	
  which	
  was	
  launched	
  in	
  2008,	
  act	
  as	
  
consultants	
  to	
  community	
  partners.	
  Clients,	
  like	
  Paul	
  Mitchell,	
  give	
  students	
  a	
  general	
  
outline	
  of	
  what	
  they	
  want	
  to	
  accomplish	
  with	
  their	
  money	
  and	
  students	
  advise	
  them	
  
how	
  to	
  donate	
  it	
  to	
  best	
  meet	
  those	
  goals.	
  As	
  part	
  of	
  their	
  coursework,	
  BYU	
  students	
  
recruit	
  partner	
  organizations.	
  In	
  other	
  programs,	
  like	
  TCU's,	
  though,	
  students	
  have	
  total	
  
control	
  over	
  how	
  the	
  cash	
  is	
  spent.	
  Some	
  of	
  these	
  classes	
  are	
  backed	
  by	
  private	
  
foundations	
  or	
  corporations,	
  some	
  get	
  the	
  money	
  through	
  student	
  fundraisers	
  and	
  
some	
  are	
  funded	
  by	
  the	
  university.	
  
	
  
Ron	
  Pitcock,	
  who	
  teaches	
  TCU's	
  philanthropy	
  course,	
  said	
  his	
  goal	
  is	
  to	
  inspire	
  his	
  
students	
  how	
  to	
  be	
  "thoughtful	
  and	
  active	
  philanthropists."	
  His	
  course	
  kicked	
  off	
  in	
  
2011.	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                      59
	
  
"They	
  come	
  to	
  class	
  with	
  the	
  assumption	
  that	
  they'll	
  pick	
  a	
  charity	
  they	
  feel	
  emotionally	
  
drawn	
  to,	
  write	
  a	
  check	
  and	
  be	
  done,"	
  said	
  Pitcock,	
  who	
  is	
  a	
  J.	
  Vaugh	
  and	
  Evelyn	
  H.	
  
Wilson	
  Honors	
  Fellow.	
  "This	
  class	
  shows	
  them	
  that	
  narrative	
  is	
  a	
  little	
  too	
  slick.	
  The	
  
narrative	
  of	
  giving	
  requires	
  due	
  diligence,	
  requires	
  them	
  to	
  make	
  decisions	
  that	
  are	
  
sometimes	
  very	
  painful."	
  
	
  
The	
  Once	
  Upon	
  A	
  Time	
  Foundation,	
  the	
  Texas	
  nonprofit	
  that	
  is	
  supplying	
  the	
  cash	
  for	
  
TCU's	
  philanthropy	
  class,	
  cites	
  similar	
  motivations.	
  The	
  organization,	
  which	
  sponsors	
  
programs	
  in	
  eight	
  universities	
  and	
  several	
  high	
  schools,	
  got	
  involved	
  because	
  it	
  was	
  
looking	
  for	
  ways	
  to	
  instill	
  in	
  tomorrow's	
  leaders	
  the	
  value	
  of	
  giving	
  back,	
  said	
  Sam	
  Lett,	
  
president.	
  
	
  
"From	
  an	
  investment	
  standpoint,	
  it's	
  a	
  multiplier,"	
  he	
  said.	
  "We	
  are	
  not	
  only	
  giving	
  back	
  
to	
  the	
  community,	
  but	
  also	
  teaching	
  200	
  or	
  300	
  bright,	
  top	
  students	
  about	
  the	
  joys	
  and	
  
difficulty	
  of	
  giving	
  back."	
  
	
  
The	
  next	
  generation	
  of	
  philanthropists	
  
	
  
For	
  colleges,	
  classes	
  that	
  engage	
  students	
  in	
  the	
  community,	
  like	
  these	
  new	
  
philanthropy	
  programs,	
  have	
  become	
  a	
  "recruiting	
  point,"	
  said	
  Sandy	
  Scott,	
  spokesman	
  
for	
  the	
  Corporation	
  for	
  National	
  and	
  Community	
  Service.	
  
While	
  their	
  charitable	
  donations	
  are	
  modest	
  in	
  size,	
  93	
  percent	
  of	
  Americans	
  ages	
  20	
  to	
  
35	
  gave	
  money	
  to	
  nonprofits	
  in	
  2010,	
  according	
  to	
  a	
  nationwide	
  survey	
  conducted	
  by	
  
The	
  Case	
  Foundation.	
  Researchers	
  at	
  The	
  Center	
  on	
  Philanthropy	
  at	
  Indiana	
  University	
  
recently	
  reported	
  this	
  generation	
  of	
  young	
  people	
  is	
  more	
  likely	
  than	
  any	
  other	
  to	
  cite	
  
the	
  desire	
  to	
  "make	
  the	
  world	
  a	
  better	
  place"	
  as	
  a	
  key	
  motivator	
  for	
  philanthropic	
  
giving.	
  
	
  
As	
  a	
  generation,	
  Millennials	
  may	
  be	
  more	
  socially	
  conscious	
  than	
  their	
  elders	
  were	
  at	
  
their	
  age	
  because	
  of	
  increased	
  technology,	
  Scott	
  said.	
  They	
  came	
  of	
  age	
  during	
  a	
  series	
  
of	
  catastrophic	
  events	
  —	
  tsunamis,	
  hurricanes,	
  terrorist	
  attacks,	
  earthquakes	
  —	
  and	
  it	
  
was	
  broadcast	
  to	
  them	
  in	
  real	
  time.	
  The	
  development	
  of	
  social	
  media	
  is	
  making	
  it	
  easier	
  
and	
  easier	
  to	
  plug	
  into	
  the	
  world's	
  problems.	
  
	
  
"This	
  generation	
  of	
  young	
  people	
  seems	
  to	
  view	
  community	
  service	
  and	
  philanthropy	
  as	
  
an	
  important	
  part	
  of	
  their	
  lives,"	
  Scott	
  said.	
  "When	
  they're	
  looking	
  for	
  colleges	
  and	
  
when	
  they're	
  looking	
  for	
  jobs,	
  they	
  are	
  looking	
  for	
  organizations	
  that	
  have	
  social	
  
responsibility	
  and	
  ethics."	
  
College	
  philanthropy	
  courses	
  are	
  certainly	
  popular.	
  
This	
  year,	
  TCU's	
  philanthropy	
  class	
  filled	
  up	
  less	
  than	
  one	
  minute	
  after	
  registration	
  
opened	
  up.	
  Mellano	
  said	
  students	
  had	
  been	
  whispering	
  about	
  "the	
  class	
  that	
  lets	
  you	
  
give	
  away	
  money"	
  in	
  the	
  halls	
  for	
  weeks.	
  She	
  was	
  so	
  eager	
  to	
  get	
  in,	
  she	
  readied	
  her	
  
request	
  for	
  the	
  class	
  the	
  night	
  before	
  class	
  registration	
  then	
  watched	
  the	
  clock	
  until	
  the	
  
class	
  opened.	
  
"It	
  was	
  a	
  fight	
  to	
  get	
  into	
  the	
  class,"	
  she	
  said.	
  "I'm	
  excited	
  to	
  see	
  how	
  the	
  semester	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                   60
unfolds."	
  
	
  
Because	
  TCU's	
  class	
  was	
  so	
  popular	
  during	
  its	
  inaugural	
  year,	
  the	
  Once	
  Upon	
  A	
  Time	
  
Foundation	
  decided	
  to	
  sponsor	
  classes	
  at	
  eight	
  additional	
  universities	
  this	
  year.	
  Since	
  
the	
  Sunshine	
  Lady	
  Foundation	
  started	
  doling	
  out	
  grants	
  to	
  college	
  philanthropy	
  
programs	
  in	
  2004,	
  the	
  classes	
  have	
  garnered	
  so	
  much	
  interest	
  founder	
  Doris	
  Buffett	
  
decided	
  in	
  2011	
  to	
  create	
  a	
  separate	
  foundation	
  just	
  to	
  oversee	
  them.	
  The	
  new	
  
foundation,	
  called	
  the	
  Learning	
  by	
  Giving	
  Foundation,	
  now	
  sponsors	
  close	
  to	
  30	
  
programs	
  in	
  universities	
  across	
  the	
  country.	
  
	
  
"The	
  tremendous	
  interest	
  in	
  these	
  programs	
  speaks	
  of	
  the	
  hopes	
  and	
  aspirations	
  of	
  this	
  
next	
  generation,"	
  said	
  Louise	
  Sawyer,	
  executive	
  director	
  of	
  the	
  Learning	
  by	
  Giving	
  
Foundation.	
  "They	
  have	
  great	
  ideas	
  and	
  they	
  take	
  their	
  responsibility	
  to	
  make	
  the	
  world	
  
a	
  better	
  place	
  very	
  seriously."	
  
	
  
Taking	
  a	
  course	
  in	
  philanthropy	
  may	
  further	
  heighten	
  students'	
  sense	
  of	
  social	
  
responsibility.	
  According	
  to	
  national	
  research	
  from	
  Northern	
  Kentucky	
  University,	
  taking	
  
the	
  classes	
  helps	
  students	
  to	
  become	
  more	
  aware	
  of	
  social	
  problems	
  and	
  how	
  nonprofit	
  
organizations	
  address	
  those	
  problems.	
  Close	
  to	
  half	
  of	
  students	
  surveyed	
  for	
  NKU's	
  
study	
  indicated	
  the	
  courses	
  increased	
  their	
  interest	
  in	
  donating	
  money	
  to	
  charity	
  and	
  
volunteering	
  in	
  the	
  community.	
  Forty-­‐five	
  percent	
  said	
  the	
  course	
  influenced	
  them	
  to	
  
consider	
  pursing	
  a	
  career	
  in	
  the	
  nonprofit	
  sector.	
  
	
  
"Taking	
  the	
  class	
  definitely	
  increased	
  my	
  understanding	
  of	
  the	
  importance	
  of	
  
philanthropy,"	
  said	
  Andrew	
  McDonald,	
  22,	
  who	
  took	
  TCU's	
  philanthropy	
  course	
  last	
  year	
  
before	
  graduating	
  and	
  taking	
  a	
  job	
  in	
  Houston	
  with	
  the	
  nonprofit	
  Teach	
  for	
  America.	
  
	
  
Since	
  taking	
  the	
  class,	
  Caitlin	
  Irvin,	
  23,	
  a	
  TCU	
  graduate	
  who	
  now	
  works	
  in	
  the	
  sales	
  
division	
  at	
  Google,	
  said	
  she	
  has	
  become	
  more	
  conscious	
  of	
  where	
  the	
  money	
  she	
  
donates	
  to	
  charity	
  is	
  going.	
  Raised	
  a	
  devout	
  Christian,	
  she	
  has	
  always	
  steered	
  most	
  of	
  
her	
  charitable	
  contributions	
  to	
  her	
  church.	
  She	
  now	
  checks	
  the	
  church's	
  financial	
  reports	
  
every	
  few	
  months	
  to	
  see	
  how	
  it's	
  being	
  spent.	
  
	
  
"You	
  have	
  to	
  be	
  careful	
  to	
  make	
  sure	
  you	
  are	
  really	
  giving	
  money	
  to	
  what	
  you	
  think	
  you	
  
are	
  giving	
  money	
  to,"	
  she	
  said.	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                  61
	
  
“Success	
  amid	
  crisis	
  in	
  Chester”	
  
The	
  Philadelphia	
  Inquirer	
  (PA)	
  
By	
  James	
  T.	
  Harris	
  III	
  
02/16/2012	
  
http://articles.philly.com/2012-­‐02-­‐16/news/31067474_1_school-­‐district-­‐curriculum-­‐
parents-­‐and-­‐guardians	
  
	
  
	
  
The	
  Chester	
  Upland	
  School	
  District's	
  budget	
  crisis	
  has	
  been	
  national	
  news,	
  partly	
  
because	
  of	
  underlying	
  fears	
  that	
  a	
  similar	
  fate	
  could	
  befall	
  other	
  districts	
  struggling	
  with	
  
reduced	
  local	
  tax	
  revenues	
  and	
  eviscerated	
  state	
  budgets.	
  While	
  the	
  focus	
  on	
  what	
  went	
  
wrong	
  in	
  the	
  district	
  is	
  understandable,	
  we	
  shouldn't	
  overlook	
  what's	
  working	
  in	
  
Chester.	
  
	
  
Chester	
  Upland	
  has	
  been	
  among	
  the	
  worst	
  districts	
  in	
  the	
  commonwealth	
  for	
  the	
  past	
  
two	
  decades,	
  often	
  ranking	
  last	
  among	
  Pennsylvania's	
  501	
  school	
  districts	
  in	
  student	
  
performance.	
  Last	
  year,	
  only	
  24	
  percent	
  of	
  Chester	
  High	
  School's	
  juniors	
  scored	
  as	
  
proficient	
  or	
  better	
  in	
  reading	
  on	
  statewide	
  tests,	
  and	
  only	
  16	
  percent	
  were	
  deemed	
  
proficient	
  in	
  math.	
  
	
  
Constant	
  turnover	
  in	
  the	
  district's	
  leadership	
  makes	
  matters	
  worse.	
  Chester	
  Upland	
  has	
  
had	
  nine	
  superintendents	
  over	
  the	
  past	
  decade	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  overseen	
  by	
  at	
  least	
  four	
  
different	
  state	
  secretaries	
  of	
  education.	
  
	
  
It	
  is	
  important	
  to	
  note	
  that	
  the	
  district	
  is	
  not	
  among	
  the	
  nation's	
  worst	
  because	
  the	
  area	
  
is	
  impoverished,	
  because	
  its	
  children	
  can't	
  learn,	
  because	
  its	
  parents	
  aren't	
  involved,	
  or	
  
because	
  its	
  teachers	
  don't	
  care.	
  There	
  are	
  plenty	
  of	
  talented	
  children,	
  concerned	
  
parents,	
  and	
  dedicated	
  teachers	
  in	
  the	
  district.	
  Mismanagement	
  and	
  politics	
  are	
  the	
  real	
  
culprits.	
  
	
  
That	
  has	
  been	
  proven	
  by	
  the	
  experience	
  of	
  the	
  Widener	
  Partnership	
  Charter	
  School,	
  
opened	
  by	
  Chester-­‐based	
  Widener	
  University	
  in	
  2006.	
  Emphasizing	
  holistic	
  education,	
  
the	
  charter	
  school	
  supplements	
  its	
  core	
  curriculum	
  with	
  music,	
  art,	
  drama,	
  physical	
  
education,	
  and	
  foreign-­‐language	
  instruction.	
  It	
  also	
  tends	
  to	
  students'	
  social	
  and	
  
emotional	
  development.	
  
	
  
The	
  school's	
  hallmark,	
  however,	
  is	
  its	
  partnership	
  with	
  parents	
  and	
  guardians,	
  which	
  
encourages	
  them	
  to	
  be	
  intensely	
  and	
  productively	
  engaged	
  in	
  their	
  children's	
  
educational	
  experience.	
  Also	
  crucial	
  is	
  the	
  support	
  of	
  Widener's	
  faculty	
  and	
  students.	
  
	
  
In	
  just	
  six	
  years,	
  the	
  school	
  has	
  had	
  a	
  tremendous	
  impact	
  on	
  the	
  community	
  and	
  the	
  
university.	
  Parents	
  who	
  had	
  lost	
  faith	
  in	
  the	
  city's	
  public	
  school	
  system	
  now	
  have	
  hope	
  
for	
  their	
  children's	
  future.	
  Students	
  have	
  more	
  confidence	
  in	
  themselves.	
  And	
  their	
  
scores	
  on	
  statewide	
  tests	
  meet	
  or	
  exceed	
  state	
  and	
  federal	
  standards.	
  
	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                   62
Moreover,	
  unlike	
  some	
  other	
  charters,	
  Widener	
  Partnership	
  enrolls	
  children	
  through	
  a	
  
lottery	
  system,	
  and	
  its	
  demographics	
  are	
  similar	
  to	
  the	
  district's.	
  
	
  
The	
  university	
  made	
  the	
  unusual	
  decision	
  to	
  establish	
  its	
  own	
  charter	
  school	
  only	
  after	
  a	
  
series	
  of	
  efforts	
  to	
  form	
  partnerships	
  with	
  the	
  district	
  were	
  ignored.	
  One	
  episode	
  in	
  
particular	
  illustrates	
  the	
  leadership	
  and	
  political	
  problems	
  that	
  have	
  hurt	
  the	
  school	
  
district.	
  Six	
  years	
  ago,	
  when	
  Chester	
  Upland	
  faced	
  a	
  leadership	
  change	
  that	
  left	
  it	
  
without	
  a	
  curriculum	
  for	
  the	
  following	
  year,	
  Widener	
  joined	
  local	
  teachers	
  to	
  create	
  one	
  
that	
  could	
  have	
  been	
  implemented	
  district-­‐wide.	
  But	
  the	
  new	
  superintendent	
  decided	
  
the	
  curriculum	
  was	
  unworthy	
  and	
  discarded	
  it	
  despite	
  months	
  of	
  collaborative	
  work.	
  
Today,	
  that	
  curriculum	
  is	
  being	
  used	
  by	
  Widener	
  Partnership	
  Charter	
  School.	
  
	
  
The	
  Widener	
  model	
  is	
  expensive,	
  and	
  it	
  would	
  take	
  considerable	
  effort	
  to	
  apply	
  what	
  we	
  
have	
  learned	
  across	
  the	
  district,	
  but	
  it	
  works.	
  We	
  invite	
  local,	
  state,	
  and	
  federal	
  officials	
  
to	
  visit	
  the	
  school	
  and	
  explore	
  the	
  possibilities.	
  
	
  
Simply	
  balancing	
  the	
  budget	
  will	
  not	
  address	
  the	
  real	
  problems	
  facing	
  the	
  Chester	
  
Upland	
  School	
  District.	
  We	
  need	
  a	
  solution	
  that	
  assures	
  students	
  a	
  high-­‐quality	
  
education	
  and	
  renews	
  parents'	
  faith	
  that	
  their	
  children	
  can	
  get	
  such	
  an	
  education	
  in	
  
Chester.	
  
	
  
James	
  T.	
  Harris	
  III	
  is	
  the	
  president	
  of	
  Widener	
  University.




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                63
	
  
“Renewing	
  Civic	
  Education:	
  Time	
  to	
  restore	
  American	
  higher	
  education’s	
  lost	
  mission”	
  
Harvard	
  Magazine	
  (MA)	
  
Mar/April	
  2012	
  
By	
  Ellen	
  Condliffe	
  Lagemann	
  &	
  Harry	
  R.	
  Lewis	
  
http://harvardmagazine.com/2012/03/renewing-­‐civic-­‐education	
  
	
  
	
  
Does	
  this	
  sound	
  even	
  vaguely	
  like	
  what	
  is	
  now	
  understood	
  to	
  be	
  the	
  purpose	
  of	
  higher	
  
education?	
  
	
  
               Wisdom,	
  and	
  knowledge,	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  virtue,	
  diffused	
  generally	
  among	
  the	
  body	
  of	
  
               the	
  people,	
  being	
  necessary	
  for	
  the	
  preservation	
  of	
  their	
  rights	
  and	
  liberties;	
  and	
  
               as	
  these	
  depend	
  on	
  spreading	
  the	
  opportunities	
  and	
  advantages	
  of	
  education	
  in	
  
               the	
  various	
  parts	
  of	
  the	
  country,	
  and	
  among	
  the	
  different	
  orders	
  of	
  the	
  people,	
  it	
  
               shall	
  be	
  the	
  duty	
  of	
  legislatures	
  and	
  magistrates,	
  in	
  all	
  future	
  periods	
  of	
  this	
  
               commonwealth,	
  to	
  cherish	
  the	
  interests	
  of	
  literature	
  and	
  the	
  sciences,	
  and	
  all	
  
               seminaries	
  of	
  them;	
  especially	
  the	
  university	
  at	
  Cambridge.	
  
	
  
In	
  fact,	
  this	
  mission	
  is	
  still	
  binding	
  on	
  Harvard,	
  whose	
  distinguished	
  alumnus,	
  John	
  
Adams,	
  A.B.	
  1755,	
  wrote	
  it	
  into	
  the	
  Massachusetts	
  Constitution	
  in	
  1780.	
  
	
  
When	
  was	
  the	
  last	
  time	
  anyone,	
  politician	
  or	
  university	
  president,	
  echoed	
  what	
  Noah	
  
Webster	
  said	
  in	
  1788?	
  
	
  
               It	
  is	
  an	
  object	
  of	
  vast	
  magnitude	
  that	
  systems	
  of	
  education	
  should	
  be	
  adopted	
  
               and	
  pursued	
  which	
  may	
  not	
  only	
  diffuse	
  a	
  knowledge	
  of	
  the	
  sciences	
  but	
  may	
  
               implant	
  in	
  the	
  minds	
  of	
  the	
  American	
  youth	
  the	
  principles	
  of	
  virtue	
  and	
  of	
  liberty	
  
               and	
  inspire	
  them	
  with	
  just	
  and	
  liberal	
  ideas	
  of	
  government	
  and	
  with	
  an	
  inviolable	
  
               attachment	
  to	
  their	
  own	
  country.	
  
	
  
What	
  strikes	
  us	
  about	
  these	
  passages	
  is	
  not	
  their	
  antiquity,	
  but	
  their	
  wisdom.	
  Today,	
  
many	
  Americans	
  have	
  lost	
  pride	
  in	
  their	
  government.	
  At	
  a	
  time	
  when	
  universities	
  
trumpet	
  their	
  place	
  in	
  the	
  world—and	
  within	
  Facebook—but	
  say	
  little	
  about	
  their	
  place	
  
in	
  the	
  Republic,	
  these	
  calls	
  to	
  educate	
  citizens	
  who	
  will	
  sustain	
  the	
  nation	
  have	
  new	
  and	
  
vital	
  meaning.	
  It	
  is	
  time	
  to	
  reimagine	
  higher	
  education’s	
  civic	
  mission.	
  
	
  
Higher	
  education	
  is	
  now	
  justified	
  almost	
  entirely	
  by	
  economic	
  returns	
  and	
  the	
  
concomitant	
  social	
  returns.	
  To	
  be	
  sure,	
  as	
  a	
  government	
  website	
  proclaims,	
  “Education	
  
Pays.”	
  But	
  the	
  public	
  purposes	
  of	
  education	
  go	
  beyond	
  aggregated	
  benefits	
  to	
  
individuals.	
  Colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  are	
  repositories	
  of	
  culture	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  wellsprings	
  of	
  
creativity.	
  They	
  are	
  positioned	
  not	
  only	
  to	
  foster	
  innovation,	
  which	
  is	
  essential	
  to	
  
national	
  prosperity,	
  but	
  also	
  to	
  teach	
  the	
  public	
  responsibilities	
  associated	
  with	
  
invention	
  and	
  entrepreneurship.	
  They	
  should	
  give	
  students	
  the	
  skills	
  they	
  need	
  for	
  
personal	
  success	
  as	
  well	
  as	
  the	
  values,	
  ideals,	
  and	
  civic	
  virtues	
  on	
  which	
  American	
  
democracy	
  depends.	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                    64
	
  
The	
  need	
  for	
  civic	
  education	
  is	
  urgent	
  because	
  so	
  many	
  aspects	
  of	
  our	
  civic	
  life	
  have	
  
become	
  dysfunctional.	
  “A	
  Republic,	
  if	
  you	
  can	
  keep	
  it,”	
  as	
  Benjamin	
  Franklin	
  described	
  
our	
  form	
  of	
  government,	
  will	
  not	
  persist	
  through	
  momentum	
  alone.	
  What	
  might	
  
colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  do	
  to	
  reinvigorate	
  their	
  commitments	
  to	
  their	
  public	
  mission?	
  
As	
  Harvard	
  celebrates	
  its	
  375th	
  year,	
  what	
  might	
  this	
  great	
  university	
  do	
  to	
  breathe	
  new	
  
life	
  into	
  civic	
  education?	
  
	
  
In	
  what	
  follows,	
  we	
  frame	
  the	
  problem	
  and	
  suggest	
  approaches	
  to	
  a	
  solution.	
  As	
  former	
  
Harvard	
  deans,	
  we	
  hope	
  to	
  spark	
  a	
  conversation	
  across	
  the	
  University’s	
  schools	
  and	
  
departments	
  and,	
  beyond	
  Harvard,	
  among	
  colleagues	
  at	
  other	
  institutions	
  of	
  higher	
  
education.	
  
	
  
We	
  see	
  civic	
  education	
  as	
  the	
  cultivation	
  of	
  knowledge	
  and	
  traits	
  that	
  sustain	
  
democratic	
  self-­‐governance.	
  The	
  synergistic	
  components	
  of	
  civic	
  education	
  in	
  American	
  
colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  are	
  a	
  tripod	
  of	
  intellect,	
  morality,	
  and	
  action,	
  all	
  grounded	
  in	
  a	
  
knowledge	
  base	
  of	
  American	
  history	
  and	
  constitutional	
  principles.	
  Intellect	
  means	
  the	
  
capacity	
  to	
  analyze	
  public	
  problems	
  with	
  the	
  dispassion	
  of	
  the	
  scholar—curious	
  about	
  
current	
  events	
  and	
  able	
  to	
  subject	
  them	
  to	
  rational	
  analysis.	
  Morality	
  is	
  the	
  capacity	
  to	
  
make	
  and	
  explain	
  value	
  judgments	
  about	
  concepts	
  such	
  as	
  fairness,	
  social	
  justice,	
  
freedom,	
  and	
  equality,	
  conceived	
  as	
  both	
  democratic	
  ideals	
  and	
  lived	
  commitments.	
  
Finally,	
  civic	
  education	
  instills	
  the	
  willingness	
  and	
  competence	
  to	
  take	
  effective	
  action	
  
on	
  matters	
  of	
  public	
  concern.	
  Civic	
  education	
  cannot	
  flourish	
  if	
  intellect	
  is	
  privileged	
  
over	
  morality	
  and	
  action,	
  as	
  is	
  usual	
  today.	
  The	
  time	
  has	
  come	
  for	
  universities	
  again	
  to	
  
embrace	
  all	
  sides	
  of	
  their	
  public	
  mission.	
  
	
  
The	
  Inadvertent	
  Decline	
  of	
  Civic	
  Education	
  
	
  
At	
  old	
  colleges	
  like	
  Harvard,	
  moral	
  philosophy,	
  with	
  civic	
  education	
  a	
  major	
  component,	
  
was	
  once	
  a	
  capstone	
  course	
  required	
  of	
  all	
  seniors.	
  But	
  the	
  subject	
  went	
  into	
  decline	
  
after	
  the	
  Civil	
  War,	
  as	
  science	
  became	
  ascendant	
  and	
  universities	
  gave	
  pre-­‐eminence	
  to	
  
research.	
  As	
  science	
  either	
  marginalized	
  or	
  helped	
  transform	
  other	
  subjects,	
  citizens’	
  
responsibilities	
  for	
  the	
  public	
  good	
  were	
  squeezed	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  mission	
  of	
  higher	
  
education.	
  Moral	
  philosophy	
  became	
  a	
  marginal	
  specialty	
  within	
  philosophy	
  
departments.	
  At	
  Amherst	
  College,	
  for	
  example,	
  the	
  president	
  still	
  taught	
  moral	
  
philosophy	
  to	
  all	
  seniors	
  in	
  1895;	
  by	
  1905,	
  it	
  was	
  but	
  a	
  single	
  elective	
  offering.	
  
	
  
At	
  the	
  same	
  time,	
  professionalization	
  in	
  the	
  academic	
  disciplines	
  splintered	
  formerly	
  
unified	
  interests	
  in	
  social	
  problems.	
  Sociologists	
  might	
  study	
  the	
  neighborhood	
  origins	
  
of	
  poverty,	
  while	
  economists	
  investigated	
  ways	
  to	
  measure	
  it.	
  Social	
  science	
  also	
  
became	
  increasingly	
  separate	
  from	
  social	
  work,	
  the	
  former	
  being	
  reserved	
  for	
  (usually	
  
male)	
  scholars,	
  the	
  latter	
  for	
  (usually	
  female)	
  field	
  workers.	
  In	
  the	
  academic	
  pecking	
  
order,	
  deliberately	
  amoral	
  scientific	
  fields	
  dominated	
  deliberately	
  altruistic	
  service	
  
fields.	
  In	
  a	
  university	
  of	
  specialized	
  professors,	
  nobody	
  was	
  left	
  to	
  instill	
  in	
  students	
  a	
  
sense	
  of	
  the	
  common	
  good.	
  
	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                65
As	
  knowledge	
  fragmented,	
  professional	
  expertise	
  empowered	
  the	
  professoriate.	
  Faculty	
  
members	
  came	
  to	
  identify	
  less	
  with	
  their	
  institutions	
  and	
  more	
  with	
  their	
  academic	
  
guilds.	
  Their	
  disciplinary	
  specialization	
  trumped	
  their	
  educational	
  roles.	
  Even	
  when	
  
colleges	
  like	
  Harvard	
  tried	
  to	
  push	
  back	
  by	
  fostering	
  teaching	
  centers	
  and	
  small	
  
seminars,	
  the	
  real	
  rewards	
  were	
  for	
  subject-­‐centered	
  expertise,	
  not	
  for	
  civic	
  mentoring.	
  
As	
  national	
  and	
  international	
  networks	
  of	
  academics	
  developed,	
  professors’	
  power	
  
rivaled	
  that	
  of	
  presidents	
  and	
  trustees.	
  A	
  market	
  for	
  top	
  talent	
  developed	
  as	
  professors	
  
became	
  mobile.	
  By	
  the	
  late	
  1960s,	
  American	
  higher	
  education	
  had	
  become	
  the	
  envy	
  of	
  
the	
  world,	
  preeminent	
  in	
  science	
  and	
  invention—but	
  at	
  a	
  price:	
  colleges	
  no	
  longer	
  met	
  
or	
  even	
  recognized	
  their	
  once	
  central	
  responsibility	
  for	
  the	
  moral	
  development	
  of	
  their	
  
students.	
  
	
  
Four	
  Reactions	
  to	
  the	
  Civic-­‐Education	
  Vacuum	
  
	
  
During	
  the	
  past	
  century,	
  four	
  very	
  different	
  movements	
  have	
  reasserted	
  civic	
  ideals	
  in	
  
academia.	
  
	
  
General	
  education	
  was	
  intended	
  to	
  advance	
  common	
  values	
  and	
  defend	
  liberal	
  learning	
  
in	
  the	
  face	
  of	
  demographic	
  diversification	
  and	
  academic	
  professionalization.	
  Distinct	
  
models	
  developed,	
  first	
  at	
  Columbia,	
  then	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Chicago,	
  and,	
  after	
  World	
  
War	
  II,	
  at	
  Harvard,	
  all	
  involving	
  the	
  study	
  of	
  “great	
  books”	
  or	
  synthetic	
  approaches	
  to	
  
the	
  humanities,	
  sciences,	
  and	
  social/behavioral	
  sciences.	
  
	
  
The	
  student	
  movement	
  of	
  the	
  1960s—although	
  on	
  the	
  surface	
  antagonistic	
  to	
  “general	
  
education”—expressed	
  alienation	
  widely	
  felt	
  among	
  young	
  people	
  about	
  injustice	
  and	
  
commercialization	
  in	
  American	
  society.	
  Students	
  found	
  their	
  university	
  education	
  
shallow	
  and	
  soulless.	
  Its	
  antiauthoritarian	
  agenda	
  and	
  tactics	
  notwithstanding,	
  the	
  
student	
  movement	
  sought	
  to	
  reassert	
  the	
  educational	
  importance	
  of	
  common	
  values	
  
and	
  social	
  mission.	
  
	
  
The	
  so-­‐called	
  culture	
  wars	
  began	
  with	
  publication	
  of	
  Allan	
  Bloom’s	
  The	
  Closing	
  of	
  the	
  
American	
  Mind	
  in	
  1987.	
  Bloom,	
  a	
  philosopher	
  at	
  the	
  University	
  of	
  Chicago,	
  and	
  critics	
  on	
  
the	
  right,	
  notably	
  Lynne	
  Cheney	
  (then	
  chair	
  of	
  the	
  National	
  Endowment	
  for	
  the	
  
Humanities)	
  and	
  Dinesh	
  D’Souza	
  (a	
  journalist	
  and	
  policy	
  analyst),	
  argued	
  passionately	
  
that	
  preoccupations	
  with	
  diversity	
  and	
  academic	
  fads	
  had	
  eclipsed	
  old	
  values	
  and	
  
traditions	
  of	
  learning.	
  From	
  the	
  left,	
  philosopher	
  Martha	
  Nussbaum,	
  historian	
  Lawrence	
  
Levine,	
  and	
  others	
  faulted	
  the	
  evidence	
  and	
  logic	
  of	
  these	
  defenders	
  of	
  “the	
  canon,”	
  
claiming	
  that	
  college	
  curricula	
  should	
  co-­‐evolve	
  with	
  American	
  culture.	
  Gerald	
  Graff	
  of	
  
the	
  University	
  of	
  Illinois,	
  in	
  his	
  influential	
  book	
  Beyond	
  the	
  Culture	
  Wars,	
  may	
  have	
  
carried	
  the	
  day	
  when	
  he	
  urged	
  teaching	
  the	
  conflicts	
  themselves	
  as	
  a	
  means	
  to	
  foster	
  an	
  
“informed	
  citizenry.”	
  
	
  
In	
  the	
  mid	
  1980s,	
  yet	
  another	
  movement	
  to	
  promote	
  civic	
  engagement	
  began	
  to	
  appear	
  
on	
  campuses	
  across	
  the	
  country.	
  Service	
  learning	
  flourished	
  mostly	
  as	
  an	
  extracurricular	
  
encouragement	
  to	
  civic	
  activity	
  among	
  undergraduates.	
  Organizations	
  such	
  as	
  Campus	
  
Compact,	
  which	
  supports	
  community	
  service	
  at	
  more	
  than	
  a	
  thousand	
  institutions,	
  and	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                              66
City	
  Year,	
  which	
  offers	
  volunteer	
  work	
  before	
  or	
  after	
  college,	
  have	
  helped	
  build	
  a	
  
strong	
  culture	
  of	
  youth	
  volunteerism.	
  
	
  
Each	
  of	
  these	
  movements	
  embodied	
  admirable	
  commitments	
  to	
  public	
  purposes.	
  Some,	
  
such	
  as	
  the	
  “culture	
  wars,”	
  faded	
  quickly.	
  Others	
  were	
  overwhelmed	
  by	
  the	
  very	
  forces	
  
they	
  were	
  intended	
  to	
  oppose.	
  General	
  education	
  continues	
  in	
  its	
  classic	
  form	
  at	
  
Columbia	
  and	
  St.	
  John’s,	
  but	
  elsewhere	
  devolved	
  into	
  distribution	
  requirements	
  under	
  
pressure	
  from	
  faculty	
  disciplinary	
  priorities.	
  Service	
  learning	
  helped	
  recruit	
  a	
  large	
  
number	
  of	
  undergraduates	
  into	
  volunteer	
  work,	
  but	
  professors	
  continue	
  to	
  occupy	
  a	
  
parallel	
  universe	
  largely	
  untouched	
  by	
  calls	
  to	
  service.	
  And	
  the	
  immediacy	
  of	
  service	
  
experience	
  may	
  not	
  always	
  result	
  in	
  a	
  lasting,	
  thoughtful	
  commitment	
  to	
  social	
  progress,	
  
as	
  this	
  incident,	
  reported	
  in	
  a	
  2003	
  Carnegie	
  Foundation	
  study,	
  suggests:	
  
	
  
A	
  student	
  volunteering	
  at	
  a	
  soup	
  kitchen…very	
  much	
  enjoyed	
  the	
  experience	
  and	
  felt	
  
that	
  it	
  had	
  made	
  him	
  a	
  better	
  person.	
  Without	
  thinking	
  through	
  the	
  implications	
  of	
  his	
  
statement,	
  he	
  said,	
  “I	
  hope	
  it	
  is	
  still	
  around	
  when	
  my	
  children	
  are	
  in	
  college,	
  so	
  they	
  can	
  
work	
  here,	
  too.”	
  
	
  
Finding	
  a	
  Way	
  Forward	
  
	
  
How	
  can	
  civic	
  education	
  be	
  given	
  new	
  life?	
  We	
  propose	
  no	
  course	
  syllabus;	
  we	
  pitch	
  no	
  
new	
  campus	
  civic	
  center.	
  In	
  fact,	
  universities	
  may	
  already	
  be	
  over-­‐supplied	
  with	
  ad	
  hoc	
  
gestures	
  toward	
  civic	
  enlightenment.	
  Neither	
  designated	
  courses	
  in	
  ethical	
  reasoning,	
  
nor	
  presidential	
  bromides	
  when	
  freshmen	
  arrive	
  and	
  seniors	
  graduate,	
  suffice	
  to	
  
“inspire	
  them	
  with	
  just	
  and	
  liberal	
  ideas	
  of	
  government.”	
  Indeed,	
  such	
  episodic	
  nods	
  to	
  
civics	
  may	
  only	
  foster	
  cynicism.	
  Instead	
  of	
  a	
  prescription,	
  we	
  offer	
  a	
  framework	
  for	
  
conversation	
  about	
  the	
  intertwined	
  roles	
  of	
  intellect,	
  morality,	
  and	
  action.	
  We	
  hope	
  this	
  
framework	
  will	
  be	
  useful	
  at	
  a	
  variety	
  of	
  institutions,	
  including	
  Harvard.	
  
	
  
Intellect.	
  Colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  are	
  defined	
  by	
  their	
  commitment	
  to	
  study.	
  Although	
  
extracurricular	
  and	
  residential	
  experiences	
  can	
  be	
  highly	
  valued,	
  activities	
  with	
  an	
  
academic	
  dimension	
  are	
  most	
  respected	
  in	
  academic	
  circles.	
  They	
  “count.”	
  Nor	
  can	
  
effective	
  civic	
  education	
  be	
  relegated	
  to	
  a	
  corner	
  of	
  students’	
  academic	
  experience.	
  To	
  
be	
  embraced	
  as	
  a	
  primary	
  purpose	
  of	
  the	
  college	
  experience,	
  civic	
  education	
  needs	
  to	
  
be	
  spread	
  across	
  the	
  curriculum.	
  
	
  
Natural	
  opportunities	
  arise	
  everywhere.	
  Every	
  academic,	
  professional,	
  or	
  vocational	
  
field	
  of	
  study	
  can	
  stimulate	
  reflection	
  on	
  issues	
  of	
  political	
  or	
  social	
  importance.	
  Every	
  
sociology	
  course	
  raises	
  questions	
  about	
  the	
  nature	
  of	
  civil	
  society.	
  The	
  dramatic	
  arts	
  
have	
  always	
  had	
  a	
  role	
  in	
  fostering	
  and	
  criticizing	
  national	
  ideals.	
  Every	
  class	
  in	
  biological	
  
science	
  points	
  toward	
  questions	
  of	
  human	
  welfare	
  and	
  destiny.	
  The	
  politics	
  of	
  the	
  
Roman	
  republic	
  still	
  offer	
  lessons	
  for	
  our	
  own.	
  Without	
  compromising	
  the	
  mechanisms	
  
that	
  ensure	
  scholarly	
  excellence,	
  universities	
  can	
  reward	
  professors	
  for	
  nourishing	
  the	
  
practical,	
  applied,	
  “relevant”	
  dimensions	
  of	
  their	
  subjects.	
  
	
  
Morality.	
  Outside	
  our	
  houses	
  of	
  worship,	
  the	
  subject	
  of	
  morality	
  causes	
  discomfort	
  on	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                       67
most	
  college	
  campuses.	
  Academic	
  professionalization	
  drove	
  the	
  subject	
  out	
  of	
  the	
  
portfolio	
  of	
  professors.	
  Although	
  every	
  college	
  and	
  university	
  has	
  standards	
  (academic	
  
and	
  behavioral),	
  transgressions	
  are	
  likely	
  to	
  be	
  treated	
  legalistically,	
  rather	
  than	
  as	
  
teachable	
  moments.	
  Institutional	
  leaders	
  avoid	
  discussing	
  difficult	
  matters	
  of	
  principle,	
  
where	
  values	
  come	
  into	
  conflict.	
  For	
  an	
  official	
  to	
  favor	
  one	
  side	
  of	
  an	
  issue	
  when	
  the	
  
community	
  is	
  divided	
  could,	
  it	
  is	
  said,	
  discourage	
  free	
  speech	
  on	
  the	
  other	
  side.	
  But	
  in	
  
the	
  interest	
  of	
  graduating	
  fewer	
  scoundrels	
  and	
  having	
  to	
  discipline	
  fewer	
  faculty	
  
members,	
  colleges	
  need	
  to	
  find	
  ways	
  to	
  bring	
  their	
  standards	
  (written	
  and	
  implicit)	
  to	
  
life.	
  They	
  should	
  talk	
  openly	
  and	
  repeatedly	
  about	
  what	
  kinds	
  of	
  people	
  they	
  want	
  as	
  
members	
  of	
  their	
  community—and	
  also	
  which	
  institutional	
  values	
  take	
  precedence	
  in	
  
cases	
  of	
  conflict	
  among	
  them.	
  
	
  
Action.	
  Civic	
  learning	
  is	
  about	
  the	
  effect	
  of	
  human	
  decisions	
  on	
  other	
  people	
  and	
  on	
  
society	
  at	
  large.	
  The	
  so-­‐called	
  outside	
  world	
  will	
  become	
  a	
  natural	
  laboratory	
  for	
  civic	
  
concepts	
  discussed	
  in	
  classrooms.	
  This	
  already	
  happens	
  regularly	
  in	
  professional	
  
schools—faculties	
  of	
  public	
  health,	
  medicine,	
  and	
  law	
  all	
  run	
  clinics,	
  schools	
  of	
  
education	
  offer	
  internships	
  and	
  outreach	
  programs,	
  and	
  engineering	
  and	
  business	
  
schools	
  engage	
  their	
  students	
  in	
  practica.	
  
	
  
Universities	
  are	
  themselves	
  important	
  agents	
  in	
  American	
  society.	
  University	
  leaders	
  
can	
  use	
  announcements	
  of	
  important	
  policies	
  and	
  decisions	
  as	
  vehicles	
  for	
  civic	
  
education.	
  Students	
  should	
  be	
  as	
  important	
  an	
  audience	
  as	
  alumni,	
  donors,	
  the	
  media,	
  
and	
  Washington	
  when	
  universities	
  explain	
  what	
  they	
  are	
  doing	
  and	
  why.	
  Moreover,	
  
universities	
  can	
  teach	
  by	
  commenting	
  openly	
  on	
  institutional	
  news	
  that	
  is	
  being	
  
discussed	
  anyway—even	
  when	
  it	
  is	
  embarrassing.	
  Silence	
  signals	
  that	
  a	
  university	
  can’t	
  
tell	
  right	
  from	
  wrong,	
  or	
  doesn’t	
  care	
  which	
  it	
  is	
  advancing;	
  awkward	
  spin	
  control	
  
suggests	
  that	
  academic	
  speech	
  is	
  no	
  more	
  credible	
  than	
  commercial	
  or	
  political	
  
advertising.	
  
	
  
As	
  we	
  have	
  indicated,	
  we	
  do	
  not	
  believe	
  there	
  is	
  “one	
  best	
  way”	
  forward.	
  However,	
  we	
  
offer	
  three	
  suggestions	
  to	
  begin	
  restoring	
  civic	
  education	
  as	
  a	
  central	
  purpose	
  of	
  higher	
  
education.	
  
	
  
             •	
  Integrate	
  civic	
  education	
  into	
  core	
  requirements	
  and	
  concentrations	
  or	
  majors.	
  
             In	
  every	
  field,	
  faculty	
  members	
  care	
  most	
  about	
  the	
  subjects	
  in	
  which	
  they	
  were	
  
             trained	
  and	
  are	
  expert—and	
  the	
  university’s	
  culture	
  of	
  expertise	
  is	
  far	
  too	
  
             valuable	
  to	
  compromise.	
  Professors	
  will	
  best	
  offer	
  civic	
  education	
  when	
  it	
  is	
  
             fused	
  into	
  the	
  courses	
  about	
  their	
  specializations.	
  That	
  is	
  where	
  they	
  can	
  speak	
  
             from	
  experience	
  about	
  the	
  relation	
  of	
  their	
  work	
  to	
  the	
  problems	
  of	
  the	
  world.	
  
             Senior	
  members	
  of	
  departments	
  might	
  explore	
  and	
  model	
  for	
  their	
  junior	
  
             colleagues	
  the	
  integration	
  of	
  academic	
  and	
  civic	
  teaching	
  within	
  their	
  field.	
  Like	
  
             any	
  other	
  educational	
  reform,	
  this	
  one	
  will	
  not	
  be	
  successful	
  without	
  
             adjustments	
  to	
  the	
  incentive	
  and	
  reward	
  system	
  for	
  faculty	
  in	
  order	
  to	
  recognize	
  
             their	
  contributions	
  to	
  the	
  institution’s	
  civic	
  mission.	
  
             	
  
             •	
  Long-­‐term,	
  global	
  thinking	
  as	
  a	
  university-­‐wide	
  aim.	
  It	
  is	
  not	
  enough	
  for	
  great	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                   68
           universities	
  to	
  talk	
  grandly	
  of	
  a	
  “global	
  mission.”	
  Students	
  today,	
  especially	
  
           undergraduates,	
  are	
  focused	
  on	
  next	
  steps,	
  especially	
  getting	
  a	
  job	
  and	
  paying	
  
           off	
  student	
  loans.	
  Without	
  trivializing	
  those	
  concerns,	
  universities	
  can	
  balance	
  
           them	
  with	
  frequent	
  university-­‐wide	
  and	
  department-­‐specific	
  lectures,	
  
           discussions,	
  exhibitions,	
  and	
  credit-­‐bearing	
  classes	
  that	
  teach	
  one	
  clear	
  lesson:	
  
           You	
  are	
  responsible	
  not	
  only	
  for	
  your	
  own	
  future,	
  but	
  also	
  for	
  the	
  future	
  of	
  the	
  
           world.	
  A	
  grand	
  challenge	
  to	
  higher	
  education	
  today	
  is	
  to	
  give	
  powerful,	
  personal	
  
           meaning	
  to	
  the	
  clichés	
  rephrasing	
  that	
  lesson.	
  How	
  can	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  
           translate	
  “Think	
  globally,	
  act	
  locally”	
  into	
  terms	
  that	
  will	
  move	
  every	
  graduate?	
  
           	
  
           •	
  Modeling	
  civic	
  engagement	
  throughout	
  the	
  institution.	
  Institutions	
  teach	
  
           through	
  their	
  policies	
  and	
  practices,	
  their	
  governance	
  and	
  organization—through	
  
           everything	
  they	
  do,	
  every	
  day.	
  No	
  college	
  will	
  be	
  successful	
  in	
  renewing	
  its	
  civic	
  
           mission	
  unless	
  its	
  operations	
  embody	
  its	
  values.	
  At	
  Harvard,	
  this	
  would	
  entail	
  
           scrutiny	
  of	
  accountability	
  mechanisms	
  for	
  administrative	
  centers,	
  from	
  the	
  
           governing	
  boards	
  through	
  Massachusetts	
  Hall	
  to	
  the	
  allied	
  offices.	
  Decision-­‐
           making	
  can	
  be	
  made	
  more	
  educational	
  by	
  making	
  it	
  more	
  transparent,	
  for	
  
           everything	
  from	
  endowment	
  management	
  to	
  wage	
  structures,	
  promotion	
  
           decisions,	
  and	
  disciplinary	
  procedures.	
  Discrepancies	
  between	
  and	
  among	
  
           schools	
  and	
  departments	
  that	
  suggest	
  priorities	
  at	
  odds	
  with	
  stated	
  values	
  will	
  
           teach	
  lessons	
  if	
  they	
  are	
  acknowledged,	
  and	
  either	
  explained	
  or	
  remedied.	
  
	
  
Implementing	
  these	
  recommendations	
  would	
  be	
  contentious.	
  Legal	
  liabilities	
  can	
  limit	
  
institutional	
  transparency.	
  Secrecy	
  is	
  necessary	
  sometimes,	
  if	
  not	
  nearly	
  as	
  often	
  as	
  it	
  is	
  
practiced.	
  More	
  often	
  than	
  not,	
  open	
  discussion	
  of	
  the	
  difficulties	
  would	
  be	
  
constructive.	
  The	
  arguments	
  about	
  specifics	
  would	
  expose	
  to	
  healthy	
  debate	
  latent	
  
disagreements	
  about	
  the	
  ultimate	
  purposes	
  of	
  a	
  university.	
  
	
  
Failing	
  to	
  reinvigorate	
  the	
  civic	
  mission	
  of	
  our	
  colleges	
  and	
  universities	
  carries	
  a	
  high	
  
price:	
  it	
  will	
  put	
  at	
  risk	
  the	
  well-­‐being	
  of	
  our	
  nation	
  and	
  the	
  world,	
  perhaps	
  not	
  
tomorrow	
  but	
  in	
  decades	
  to	
  come.	
  We	
  believe	
  that	
  like-­‐minded	
  people	
  among	
  us,	
  at	
  
Harvard	
  and	
  elsewhere,	
  can	
  come	
  together	
  to	
  mobilize	
  change.	
  With	
  the	
  support	
  and	
  
example	
  of	
  higher	
  education,	
  current	
  dismay	
  over	
  political	
  polarization	
  and	
  skepticism	
  
about	
  human	
  progress	
  can	
  give	
  way	
  to	
  the	
  civic	
  idealism	
  that	
  has	
  always	
  characterized	
  
the	
  American	
  experiment	
  at	
  its	
  best.	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                 69
“PNC	
  Chancellor	
  Earns	
  the	
  United	
  Way	
  Castaldi	
  Award”	
  
Valpolife.com	
  (IN)	
  
By	
  PNC	
  Public	
  Relations	
  
http://www.valpolife.com/index.php/community/education/15664-­‐pnc-­‐chancellor-­‐
earns-­‐the-­‐united-­‐way-­‐castaldi-­‐award	
  
	
  
	
  
Purdue	
  University	
  North	
  Central	
  Chancellor,	
  Dr.	
  James	
  B.	
  Dworkin,	
  has	
  been	
  presented	
  
with	
  the	
  prestigious	
  Castaldi	
  Award,	
  given	
  by	
  the	
  Indiana	
  Association	
  of	
  United	
  Ways	
  in	
  
recognition	
  of	
  his	
  commitment	
  to	
  the	
  United	
  Way.	
  
	
  
The	
  award	
  was	
  presented	
  as	
  part	
  of	
  the	
  recent	
  Volunteers	
  of	
  the	
  Year	
  Recognition	
  
Banquet	
  in	
  Indianapolis.	
  
	
  
The	
  Castaldi	
  Award	
  honors	
  Lawrence	
  Castaldi,	
  who	
  led	
  the	
  Indiana	
  Association	
  of	
  United	
  
Ways	
  for	
  its	
  first	
  three	
  years	
  and	
  served	
  on	
  its	
  board	
  until	
  his	
  death	
  in	
  1985.	
  Upon	
  his	
  
retirement	
  as	
  board	
  chairman	
  in	
  1980,	
  the	
  Association	
  presented	
  him	
  with	
  its	
  first	
  
award,	
  recognizing	
  the	
  invaluable	
  contribution	
  he	
  made	
  to	
  the	
  United	
  Way/Fund	
  
movement	
  in	
  Indiana.	
  The	
  award	
  is	
  named	
  in	
  his	
  honor	
  as	
  a	
  lasting	
  tribute	
  to	
  his	
  
undaunting	
  spirit	
  of	
  volunteerism,	
  the	
  same	
  spirit	
  that	
  the	
  Association	
  salutes	
  today	
  
through	
  the	
  Castaldi	
  Award.	
  
	
  
Dworkin	
  was	
  nominated	
  for	
  the	
  award	
  by	
  Sharon	
  Kish,	
  President	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  
Porter	
  County.	
  Dworkin	
  has	
  served	
  on	
  the	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  Porter	
  County	
  Board	
  for	
  the	
  
past	
  six	
  years	
  and	
  is	
  currently	
  Governance	
  chair.	
  In	
  addition,	
  he	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  member	
  of	
  
the	
  board	
  of	
  the	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  LaPorte	
  County	
  as	
  a	
  board	
  member	
  and	
  as	
  chair.	
  He	
  is	
  
currently	
  a	
  director	
  emeritus.	
  
	
  
"We	
  are	
  delighted	
  that	
  Dr.	
  Dworkin	
  was	
  chosen	
  for	
  this	
  prestigious	
  award,"	
  said	
  Kish	
  
upon	
  learning	
  that	
  Dworkin	
  had	
  been	
  chosen	
  to	
  receive	
  for	
  the	
  honor.	
  "He	
  is	
  so	
  
deserving.	
  His	
  dedication	
  to	
  education,	
  to	
  volunteerism,	
  to	
  business	
  development	
  and	
  
to	
  the	
  United	
  Ways	
  has	
  made	
  a	
  lasting	
  impact	
  on	
  our	
  region."	
  
	
  
In	
  her	
  nomination	
  Kish	
  noted	
  that,	
  "Jim	
  is	
  an	
  outstanding	
  public	
  servant	
  who	
  is	
  
committed	
  to	
  improving	
  the	
  quality	
  of	
  life	
  in	
  Northwest	
  Indiana	
  and	
  to	
  instilling	
  in	
  young	
  
people	
  a	
  lifelong	
  love	
  of	
  learning.	
  He	
  is	
  committed	
  to	
  excellence	
  in	
  all	
  his	
  endeavors	
  -­‐	
  in	
  
education,	
  in	
  economic	
  development,	
  and	
  to	
  the	
  growth	
  of	
  United	
  Way."	
  
	
  
She	
  also	
  cited,	
  "His	
  commitment	
  and	
  involvement	
  have	
  helped	
  both	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  
Porter	
  County	
  and	
  United	
  Way	
  of	
  LaPorte	
  County	
  grow	
  financially	
  and	
  in	
  community	
  
impact	
  initiatives.	
  He	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  champion	
  of	
  collaborative	
  efforts	
  such	
  as	
  Success	
  By	
  6,	
  
the	
  Regional	
  Volunteer	
  Center	
  and	
  the	
  211	
  initiative."	
  
	
  
The	
  Nancy	
  Dworkin	
  Born	
  Learning	
  Trail	
  at	
  PNC,	
  a	
  Success	
  By	
  6	
  initiative,	
  is	
  the	
  first	
  on	
  a	
  
college	
  campus.	
  The	
  trail	
  is	
  named	
  for	
  PNC	
  First	
  Lady	
  Nancy	
  Dworkin	
  in	
  recognition	
  of	
  
her	
  continuing	
  support	
  of	
  Success	
  By	
  6.	
  

CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                                      70
	
  
In	
  addition,	
  Dworkin	
  has	
  facilitated	
  the	
  engagement	
  of	
  PNC	
  student	
  volunteers	
  in	
  the	
  
United	
  Way	
  Regional	
  Volunteer	
  Center.	
  
	
  
"He	
  is	
  passionate	
  about	
  United	
  Way	
  and	
  has	
  been	
  a	
  leadership	
  giver	
  for	
  many	
  years,"	
  
said	
  Kish.	
  "Jim	
  always	
  is	
  recognized	
  as	
  a	
  leader	
  among	
  his	
  peers	
  for	
  his	
  integrity,	
  
dedication	
  and	
  compassion."	
  
	
  
"We	
  are	
  proud	
  that	
  Dr.	
  Dworkin	
  has	
  invested	
  his	
  time	
  and	
  energy	
  into	
  United	
  Way	
  and	
  
he	
  is	
  the	
  ideal	
  candidate	
  for	
  the	
  Castaldi	
  Award	
  because	
  he	
  embodies	
  the	
  qualities	
  of	
  
Lawrence	
  Castaldi	
  -­‐	
  idealism,	
  integrity,	
  passion	
  for	
  United	
  Way	
  -­‐	
  dedicated	
  to	
  
volunteerism	
  and	
  commitment	
  to	
  the	
  community."	
  
	
  
                                                                      	
  
	
  




CAMPUS COMPACT BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING, MARCH 2012                                                                            71

				
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