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History 201 Introduction to Historical Methods
Fall 2009 Course No. 12142
Tuesday and Thursday 1:30pm to 2:45PM BAL 2058
Professor Lorraine M. Lees BAL 8020
Phone: 683-5101 (answering machine on my desk); 683-3949 (History Office)
Email: llees@odu.edu (best way to contact me; must use ODU email account)
Office Hours:8:30 to 9:00am and 3:00pm to 3:30pm Tuesday and Thursday; and by
appointment
         All students are responsible for all information and requirements contained in
this syllabus and for any additional information distributed orally, in handouts, via
email or posted on Blackboard. All students must activate their ODU email account
and Blackboard account and check them regularly for announcements, clarifications,
suggestions, etc. University policy demands that all email communications with the
professor must be conducted through the ODU email or Blackboard accounts. Please
list the course name in the subject line. Emails from private accounts will not be
acknowledged.

Please note: This syllabus and all other course material will be posted on Blackboard
under Announcements or Course Documents; only the Dead Figure assignment, and
the Family Tree will be distributed in class.

Course Description: History 201 is a research methods class for history majors. It
focuses on building basic skills for conducting historical research and includes
guidance on locating, utilizing, and evaluating sources. The course examines the
methods and tools of historical analysis and explores the mechanics of research
presentation and historical writing to help history majors prepare for successful
completion of upper-division requirements. History 201 also provides a brief
introduction to historiography and examines ethical issues related to historical
research and writing. Written assignments are plentiful and all due dates are
absolutely firm. Regular attendance and diligence in completing assignments are
mandatory for successful completion of this class.

Office Hours: Office hours are posted above. If you experience difficulty with the
class, contact me as soon as possible. Email is also a good way to ask questions,
express concerns, etc.

Required Readings:
1. Books (available in the Bookstore)
Robert C. Williams, Historian’s Toolbox, 2nd. Ed, M.E. Sharpe 2007
ISBN 9780765620279
Marilynn S. Johnson, ed., Violence in the West, Bedford/St. Martin’s 2009
ISBN: 0312445792
Kate Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses and Dissertations 7th ed
******Students must use only the books and editions specified. No accommodations
will be made for any other editions.******
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2. Articles (on Blackboard under Course Documents or through the ODU Library
database under Journal name).
a. William Leuchtenburg, “The Historian and the Public Realm,” American Historical
Review , 97, no. 1 (February 1992): 1-18.
3. Other Material or News accounts (posted on BB)
a. Who Owns History,” PBS Think Tank

       A variety of handouts will also be posted on Blackboard.

Recommended:
   1. a dictionary and thesaurus (on-line editions available with word processing
      packages are rarely adequate). Proper spelling and grammar, and polished
      writing are essential for all written assignments;
   2. consult the ODU Library Web Page; the Research Assistance and Instruction
      sections contain valuable material that will help you in this class. When in
      doubt, consult a librarian, but your work must be your own. The “I can’t find
      it” excuse is not acceptable.

NOTE: The Chicago Manual of Style , on which Turabian is based, is available in
the reference room of the library and should be consulted for additional citation
information if needed.

Attendance and Classroom Behavior
        Attendance is an essential component of this class; students are expected to
attend class regularly, to be on time, and to participate in class discussions. Role will
be taken and excessive absences will lower a student’s final grade. The use of laptops
and tape recorders is usually not permitted; anything that is disruptive of an
atmosphere conducive to learning is not permitted. All cell phones, beepers, and other
such devices must be turned off and put away during class. Consistent lateness will
not be tolerated.

Written Assignments:
        All written assignments, unless otherwise specified, are to be typewritten and
double spaced and printed on ONE SIDE of the page (only the New York Times and
H-net assignments may be printed on both sides). Any assignment that is designed to
be handwritten must be written in INK. All papers must be secured with a paper clip
or staple; loose pages will NOT be accepted; folding over the corners does not count
as “secured.” Additional instructions may be given for each assignment. Most
assignments are explained below; a few will be in separate forms posted on
Blackboard, or distributed in class.
        1. All assignments are due IN HARD COPY and DURING CLASS ON THE
DATE INDICATED. Papers submitted outside of class will lose ten points; an
additional ten will be subtracted for every day the paper is late. No paper will be
accepted after the assignment in question has been graded and returned and the
student will earn a grade of zero for the assignment. E-mail submissions are not
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acceptable. The Family Tree and H-Net/HNN assignments can only be submitted
during the specified class or exam period; late copies of these assignments will not be
accepted.

1. New York Times microfilm assignment; the form is posted on Blackboard under
Course Documents; print it out, complete it IN INK or TYPE it and submit it on
Tuesday, September 15.
New York Times Microfilm Exercise (50 points)
ANSWERS MUST BE IN INK or in TYPE
To do well on this exercise you must act like a historian: be creative and diligent;
search out all of the answers and use your historical imagination.

DUE: Tuesday, September 15
NAME____________________________________________

        This exercise is designed to introduce you to the use of microforms. The
ODU Library holds microforms including the NEW YORK TIMES from 1851 to the
present. For this assignment you will need to consult the NEW YORK TIMES from
the years 1927, 1967 and 2007. You may not use a searchable on-line database
for this assignment; you must use the microfilm of the newspaper.

Write down your birthday here___________/__________(no year).
A. Find the issue published on your birthday in 1927

1. What was the weather like?
___________________________________________________________________

2. How much did the paper cost? Weekday or Sunday edition?
___________________________________________________________________

3. Write down the headline for a story dealing with domestic affairs.
__________________________________________________________________

4.-6. Give a brief description of the story. Why is it of interest to TIMES readers?
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________

7. Write down the headline for a story dealing with international affairs.
_____________________________________________________________________

8.- 10. Give a brief description of the story. Why is it of interest to TIMES readers?
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________

11.-12. Name two jobs listed in the help wanted sections which no longer exist today.
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________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________

13. - 14. Current laws prohibit discrimination in hiring based on gender, religion,
race, etc. Name two phrases you see in the help wanted ads in this newspaper which
you would no longer see today (cannot duplicate the answer given in 11-12).
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

15. - 19. Describe one of the advertisements in the newspaper. How does it differ
from a contemporary (modern) advertisement for a similar service/product? Explain.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

20.-21. Name two sections/features of the current New York Times (view a current
issue on the Web page and note the sections listed) that you don’t find in the 1927
issue (e.g. you find editorials, news items, want ads, etc., but don’t find......).
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
22. - 25. Give the title for an article in the 1927 edition that might give some
background to a story of interest today. What is the current issue that the article
might help one to understand better?
_____________________________________________________________________

26. - 28. What article in this issue do you find most interesting/surprising? Why?
(Be sure to give the title of the article and the author, if there is one.)
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

B. Find the issue published on your birth date in 1967.

29. How much did the paper cost? Weekday or Sunday?
_____________________________________________________________

30.-31. Write down the headline for a story dealing with domestic affairs and briefly
describe it.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

32.-33. Write down the headline for a story dealing with international affairs and
briefly describe it
.
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34. - 36. Give the title for an article in the 1967 edition that might give some
background to a story of interest today. What is the current issue that the article
might help one to understand better?
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
37. - 39. Describe one of the advertisements in the newspaper. How does it differ
from a contemporary (modern) advertisement for a similar service/product? Explain.
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

C. Consult the issue published on your birthday in 2007.
40. - 43. Write down the title of an article relating to a story that has disappeared
from the news since 2007. Why is this story no longer of immediate interest a short
two years later?
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
44-47. Write down the title of an article relating to a story that remains in the news
today. Why is this still of immediate interest?
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

48. - 50. Compare and contrast the paper in 2007 with the editions you consulted in
1927 and 1967. What are the major similarities? The major differences? Did you
prefer on edition over the other? Why?
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________


2. Williams Task Paper: Due Tuesday, September 22
In 2 typewritten pages, complete the following from Chapter 9 of Historian’s
Toolbox: read selections 9.1, 9.3, 9.5, and 9.7 and complete the “Task” specified for
each (for 9.3, you will get a better view of the map if you go to
cummingmapsociety.org and for 9.5 you may get a better image on the LC webpage
or if you Google the image.) Be sure to answer all of the questions asked in a
coherent narrative; write one paragraph for each of the four selections. Footnotes are
not required; imagination and analysis are required.

3. Bibliography Due Tuesday, September 29
In an integrated, twenty item bibliography, typed and formatted according to the
rules laid down by Turabian, list the following:
        1 book written by each of the following five historians (for a total of 5): Drew
Gilpin Faust, Odd Arne Westad, Lynn Hunt, Ronald Park Bobroff, Mark S. Dawson
        5 reviews from scholarly journals (one each) of the five books noted above;
        5 magazine articles on any subject from three different 19th century weekly or
monthly publications (meaning they must have been published between 1800 and
1899) in the ODU microforms or database collection;
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       5 films or television broadcasts

4. Dead Figure Assignment: Due Thursday, October 8
students will provide a bibliographic essay for a deceased historical figure according
to the instructions provided in a separate handout by the instructor.
Dead Historical Figure Assignment
2-3 pages (of text), typewritten and double spaced, on one side of the page only,
with footnotes and bibliography
100 points Due: Thursday, October 8

The purpose of this assignment is to acquaint you with the quest you will undertake
whenever you are searching for material for a paper topic; it is also designed to
accustom you to the use of the ODU library, internet, and proper formatting. In the
assignment, you are to pretend you are gathering material for a paper on one of the
dead historical figures listed below; you will present an account of the person’s life
and the sources you will use in narrative form, with footnotes and bibliography
(this is often called a bibliographic essay).

Assignment: choose one of the persons listed and do the following:
   1. consult a reputable reference index, such as Who’s Who or the Dictionary of
      American National Biography for basic biographic details, and the New York
      Times obituary index, located in the Reference Room of the ODU Library or
      in the Microforms Room on the second floor, for the date the obit appeared in
      the paper, ( since one of the printed volumes is missing, you may Google the
      name on line or search the paper’s database on line through Factiva and find
      the New York Times obit text that way; Google the name and the word
      obituary, as in John Smith obituary); read the deceased’s obit in the New York
      Times and using this material and the material extracted from the reputable
      reference index, begin your paper with a one or two paragraph summary of the
      information you have found on the person’s life and his/her place in history,
      with proper citations of the obit and the reference source, according to
      Turabian. If you quote material, be sure to use quote marks and footnotes; if
      you paraphrase, use footnotes as well. Do not simply repeat the material you
      have found; summarize it to give your account of the person’s life.
   2. consult the ODU Library catalog, or any online source such as World Cat or
      JSTOR to locate the following:
          a. ONE to TWO published diaries or autobiographies or memoirs or
              collections of letters or other material written by the person and at
              least one review from a scholarly journal of one of them;
          b. TWO to THREE published biographies or other works written about
              the person and at least one review from a scholarly journal of one of
              those works;
          c. ONE to TWO scholarly articles (from a scholarly journal not a popular
              magazine) written about the person;
   3. write the rest of the paper by describing the kinds of material you have located
      in each category (a, b, and c); be sure to name or refer to the material in your
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       text and provide a footnote for each source named. For a and b, indicate, from
       the review, what the sources reviewed cover and how they might be used in
       your paper. Be sure to footnote the reviews as well as the works themselves.
       Here is an example (of course you cannot use this wording in your paper):

              There are many biographies published about Joe Smith; the three most
      recent are by John Jones,1 Meg Ryan,2 and Colin Powell.3 One review4 of the
      book by Jones claimed that he knew Smith for only a limited period; I would
      use that book only for the years in question.
   4. attach a bibliography for all of the material cited, arranged alphabetically by
      author. Please note: a total of at least eight items must be in the bibliography
      (you will list the newspaper obit and the reference book even though that is
      not usually done)

List of Persons—must choose one from the list—they are in random order

Jane Addams
Barry Goldwater
Whittaker Chambers
George F. Kennan
Jack Kerouac
Frances Perkins
Abbie Hoffman
Charles Lindbergh
Eleanor Roosevelt
Nikita Khrushchev

5. Family Tree: Due Thursday, October 22.
Form and instructions on BB and also distributed in class
(the forms are family tree forms from Ancestry.com and the instructions are a list of
web pages and sites with genealogical information

6. Using Primary Documents: Richard M. Nixon meets Elvis Presley. Due on
Thursday, October 29; the documents are available via The National Security
Archive at http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/ and/or
http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/nsa/elvis/elnix.html
Instructions: Primary documents are excellent sources for historical research, but
historians, when using such evidence, must be aware of the identity of the author,
the significance of the date, and the context and purpose of the documents in
question, in order to ascertain their usefulness and validity and to write a full and
accurate account of the events they depict. Some information can be found in the
document itself (we call that internal evidence) but some must come from outside

       1
          Footnote the work here.
       2
          Footnote the work here
       3
         .Footnote the work here
       4
          Footnote the review here.
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research (we call that external evidence). For this assignment, you will read the
documents specified and write an account of the Nixon-Presley meeting (you will
frame a thesis and narrative which explains the point of the meeting, what each hoped
to gain, the impressions you derived of the people involved and the significance of
the meeting) using the documents as your evidence. As you see in Lees’s Laws, all
persons must be identified fully when you write about them; if you are not familiar
with the authors or the context of the documents, or the names and issues mentioned,
you may conduct additional research only for that purpose. General, factual,
background information (such as the position held by H. R. Haldeman or the identity
of Janis Joplin) can be found in a textbook or encyclopedia and need not be footnoted.
Anything taken from another source that is interpretative or analytical must be
footnoted (for example, if you find an author who draws some conclusions about
Nixon’s drug crusade and you include it, you would have to footnote that), but the
point of the assignment is for you to interpret and analyze this event on your own,
using the documents in question and the information you have (some of which I will
provide in class before the assignment is due) about the context of the meeting. The
paper must be four to five typewritten pages, double spaced and printed on one
side of the page with footnotes and bibliography.
Note: Footnote and bibliographic information can be found in Turabian for
manuscript and online collections (for manuscript collections see 17.6.4, pages 196-
198; for electronic sources, see 17.7.1, page 198).
Note: How much research you have to do depends on how much general knowledge
you have or how much you can find in the documents themselves. For example, as
you read the first two copies of Presley’s letter to Nixon, keep in mind your
questions: why does the meeting occur? What does each hope to gain.? Presley tells
you in the letter why he wants to meet the president; he names the dangers that exist
and the advantages he has in meeting those dangers. If you know who the SDS or the
Establishment is, then you understand what he is getting at; if you don’t, you have to
look it up so that your answer to why he wants to meet makes sense. Do you have to
have a footnote to who the SDS is? No, because to most people that is general
knowledge but you have to know what it is so you can explain his motive. But, if you
mention Presley’s own drug prevention work (and yes, that is hard to fathom) , that
would need an explanation and a footnote because it is not common knowledge. As
you assess motives, you might also want to know where Presley’s career is going at
that point—is he still a star or is he performing at supermarket openings? In the
document from Chapin to Haldeman, for example, why does Haldeman write “You
must be kidding” in the margin. That is part of your story. Why does Nixon feel the
need to appeal to the young? What is going on with him in 1970? That is the sort of
information you can find in any textbook (or that you should know if you had a US
survey course) or through a newspaper or Google search. Or ask a baby boomer.

7.Article Review: Due Thursday, November 3
       One of the skills that a historian must possess is the ability to read a
secondary source, extract its essential points and judge its merits. This exercise in
writing a review of a journal article from any 2008 or 2009 issue of The Historian is
designed to teach you that skill in regard to secondary sources. The paper must be
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footnoted and contain a bibliography and all proper rules for notes and bibliographies
must be followed. In your TWO to THREE page review do the following:
                a. put your name at the top of the page;
                b. type the review, double- spaced, with proper margins and with
                     appropriate footnotes; be sure to have an introductory and an
                     concluding paragraph;
                c. attach a works cited (bibliography) page listing the article in proper
                     bibliographic form.
Note: there are four issues of The Historian published each year: Winter, Spring,
Summer, Fall; for this assignment, read ONE article from ONE issue. In the paper
you will be reviewing the article as a work of scholarship. In the paper, identify the
title and author of the article; discuss the main thesis, the points and evidence used
by the author to prove his/her thesis; and the value of the article in understanding the
issue in question. (Note: the thesis of an article is not the same as the subject of an
article; the subject or topic is what the article is about; the thesis is what the author
argues or proves or asserts).

8. Violence in the West First Draft Due Tuesday, November 24 Final Draft Due
Thursday, December 10 Footnotes and Bibliography required; 8 to 10 double
spaced, typewritten, and numbered pages.
For the in class discussion, students will follow the instructions on the syllabus.
For the written paper assignment, students will ascertain if the documents bear
out Johnson’s thesis concerning violence in the American west. Do the
documents she provided prove her case about violence in the west, its economic
component, and the role of race and gender in the history of western violence?
In other words, does the evidence sustain her argument? In answering these
questions, students also will evaluate the documents as historical sources.
 a. Students with last names beginning with the letters A through L do the
following on the Johnson County War:
    1. Summarize Marilynn Johnson’s discussion of violence in the west; indicate the
    types of violence that occurred, the causes of these violent outbreaks and the
    groups and businesses involved.
    2. Summarize the events and issues involved in the Johnson County war.
    3. Evaluate the documents on the Johnson County War and whether or not they
    prove Johnson’s thesis about violence in the west. Do this by evaluating their
    usefulness as a source: organize the documents into groups (general accounts of
    the west or of ranching and rustling, participants’ accounts, official reports, etc)
    and answer the following:
    a.how close to the event was each document written; who was the author and
    what involvement or partiality might he or she have;
    b. why was each document written;
    c.how different or similar are the descriptions each document gave of the
    relationship between cowboys and ranchers and of the violence that occurred;
    d. what facts are common to all or most of the accounts; which events seem less
    believable because they appear only in one account;
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    e. what kind of language is used in each document and what kind of reaction is
    each intended to provoke in the reader;
    f.which of the documents do you think is more reliable and why?
    g. how accurate a history of the Johnson County War would you be able to write
    using just these documents? What else would you have to consult to have a full
    picture of the conflict? Find a least one other source in World Cat or on the web
    and describe why you think it might be useful in rounding out a picture of the
    Johnson County War.
    4. Using the framework and explanations advanced by Marilynn Johnson, decide
    which best fits the Johnson Country Range Wars (which kind of violence do you
    see; what role does race and gender play). Is there any aspect of her thesis or
    general history that you don’t see duplicated in this incident? What explains the
    fascination of history and popular culture with range wars such as this?
b. Students with last names beginning with the letters M through Z do the
following on the Ludlow massacre:
    1.Summarize Marilynn Johnson’s discussion of violence in the west; indicate the
    types of violence that occurred, the causes of these violent outbreaks and the
    groups and businesses involved.
    2 Summarize the events and issues involved in the Ludlow Massacre;.
    3. Evaluate the documents on Ludlow and whether or not they prove Johnson’s
    thesis about violence in the west. Do this by evaluating their usefulness as a
    source: organize the documents into groups (eyewitness accounts, participants’
    accounts, official reports, etc) and answer the following:
    a. how close to the event was each document written;
    b. who was the author and what involvement or partiality might he or she have;
    c. why was each document written;
    d. how different or similar are the descriptions each account gave of the Massacre;
    what facts are common to all or most of the accounts; which events seem less
    believable because they appear only in one account;
    e. what kind of language is used in each document and what kind of reaction is
    each intended to provoke in the reader;
    f. which of the documents do you think is more reliable and why?
    g. how accurate a history of the Ludlow Massacre would you be able to write
    using just these documents? What else would you have to consult to have a full
    picture of the Massacre? Find a least one other source in World Cat or on the web
    and describe why you think it might be useful in rounding out a picture of the
    Massacre.
    h. Using the framework and explanations advanced by Marilynn Johnson, decide
    which best fits the Ludlow Massacre (which kind of violence do you see; what
    role does race and gender play).. Is there any aspect of her general history that
    you don’t see duplicated in this incident? Why has history and popular culture
    neglected this incident?
Note: the papers should be written in a clear narrative style. Do not go through
the documents as though you were making a list and do not refer to them by
number; refer to them by the author’s name and/or title and integrate your
analysis into your narrative; the point of the assignment is to evaluate the
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documents and the use Johnson made of them to prove her thesis about violence
in the west. The first draft should be as finished and polished as possible, and
must conform to all instructions. If the corrections specified on the first draft by
the instructor are not made by the student in the final draft, the grade for the
final paper will be lower than the grade for the draft. The draft with the
instructor’s comments must be handed in with the final paper. No final paper
will be graded unless it is accompanied by the first draft.
Footnote and Other Instructions for Violence in the West assignment
Footnotes and Bibliography
1.For the book as a whole:
Marilynn S. Johnson is the editor of the book; the book is in a series; you need the
title of the series but you need not include the name of the series editor.
Use the appropriate form from 17.1.1 and 17.1.5 in Turabian.
After you cite the book in full the first time, use the short form for the book for all
subsequent notes, regardless of the part of the book you are citing ( see numbers 2
and 3 below)
2. For the parts of the book written by Johnson, such as the introduction, cite them
according to the instructions given in Parts of Single-Author Books (even though she
technically is the editor). This is contained in Turabian within 17.1.8, Chapters and
Other Titled Parts of Books, See the last set of examples on page 178. For the
documents, use the form for Parts of Edited Collections, contained in 17.1.8,
Chapters and Other Titles Parts of Books. See the example on the top of page 179.
Remember to use the short form for the book but to give the full information on the
document : John Jones, “Cowboy Trials,” in Johnson, Violence in the West, 27.
In other words, once you cite the full book once, you do not do that again since you
will use the short form; each new author and document, however, must be cited fully
the first time they are mentioned).

3. if you cite a document more than once, you may use a short form for that as well,
after the first full cite : Jones, “Cowboy Trials,” in Johnson, Violence in the West,
16.

 4. In the bibliography, list only the full book and editor; do not list the component
parts. The only other item in the bibliography should be the additional source you
have found.

9. Presidential Library Assignment: Due, Thursday, December 3
Virtual Presidential Library Tour and Review
Access the libraries through the National Archives at
http://www.archives.gov/presidential-libraries/index.html
Instructions: US Presidential Libraries are an important resource for scholars and
much of their material is available on line; but not all presidential libraries take the
same approach to history and research. In this assignment, you will make a “virtual”
research trip to TWO of the Presidential libraries to evaluate the materials available
for research. You will also present an overall review of each library and its
accompanying museum as a source of information on each president and his time in
                                                                                           12


office. Note: for the research portion of the assignment, be sure to use the library and
not the museum. Footnotes are not required.
In three to four double-spaced, typewritten pages do the following:
A. Identify the two Libraries and Museums
1. List the name of each Library you have chosen and its location.
2. Indicate whether the Museum is attached or located elsewhere.
B. Museum Review:
1. Name and describe one of the special, featured exhibits at each museum (either on
site or on line) and compare how each fits in with the president and the time period.
2. Evaluate and compare the overall impression each museum and its web site
convey. How do you think each museum wants their president to be viewed by the
public? Give examples that support your opinion.
3. Are any other individuals, such as the president’s wife, featured and if so, how?
C. Library Review:
1. Describe the kind of manuscript records available to researchers inside each
library (give a few examples). Are the finding aids easy to use?
2. Compare the kind of material available online (audiovisual records , oral
histories, digital documents ). Does one library provide more than the other?
D. Overall assessment
1. Did you enjoy your virtual journey? What suggestions would you make for the
improvement of each Library and Museum?

10. H-NET/HNN: Future of History, Williams, chapters 7 and 18
                 H-NET/HNN Assignment Due; Violence in the West Paper
returned
                 December 15, 12:30 to 1;30
        This Wrap Up serves as a Final Exam.
        Class will meet during Final Exam Period
        Tuesday, December 15—12:30 to 1:30
Form posted on Blackboard
Complete in INK or TYPE; please note that the assignment requires you to join an H-
Net list and monitor it throughout the semester and also to monitor the History News
Network for at least a week).
This exercise requires that you subscribe to one of the discussion lists on the H-Net
site located at http://www.h-net.org. You must monitor the site throughout the
course; you will have to fill out a brief application when you select your list; some
sites will only accept graduate students or faculty, so shop around. You will also
have to monitor the History New Network at http://www.hnn.us/ for at least one week
to complete the last part of the assignment. Answers should be recorded IN INK in
the spaces provided on this page; answers may also be typed in or typed on another
sheet and attached.

A. Discussion Network on H-Net
I. List
A. Write down the name and subject areas of the list to which you have subscribed
                                                                  13



_______________________________________________________________
                                                                                       14


B. Is the list moderated? (Are the postings controlled or edited?). Name the
moderator(s).


________________________________________________________________________

C. Briefly describe one of the debates or scholarly exchanges (other than those involving
book or article reviews) which has taken place on the list. What are the issues at stake?
What is the debate? Who is taking part in the debate (if it is possible to tell)? Are the
questions resolved? (10 points).

________________________________________________________________________
II Reviews
A. Consult two book reviews recently carried on the H-Net list of your choice. Fill in the
information below and then indicate what, according to each reviewer, are the book’s
strengths and weaknesses. At what audience is the book aimed? Is the review favorable?
unfavorable? mixed? (5 points each)

Book One___________________________________________________________

Reviewer_______________________________________________________

Date the review appeared______________________________________________


Details of

Review_________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________
Book Two___________________________________________________________

Reviewer_______________________________________________________

Date the review appeared______________________________________________


Details of

Review_________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

III. Other material
                                                                                         15


What other postings or exchanges appear on the list? Are there requests for research
help? Movie or museum reviews? 5 points
________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



IV. Provide a review of the list you have chosen. What are its specific strengths and
weaknesses? Has it been useful? Is this particular subject area still attractive to
you? Will you continue to use the list after this class? 10 points



B. HNN Review of Three articles in the Roundup section

I. Reviews

A. Click on to the above, click on to Roundup, click on to Historian’s Take and write a
brief summary of one of the recent articles listed in which an historian addresses an issue
currently under debate. (5 points )

Article_______________________________________________________________

Author_______________________________________________________________

Summary________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________
B. Click on to the above, click on to Roundup, click on to Talking About History and
write a brief summary of one of the recent articles listed. (5 points )

Article_______________________________________________________________

Author_______________________________________________________________

Summary________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________
C. Click on to the above, click on to Roundup; click on to Pop Culture and write a brief
summary of one of the recent articles listed which reviews a historically related media
presentation. (5 points)

Article_______________________________________________________________

Author_______________________________________________________________
                                                                                         16


Summary________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

 Style Guidelines (Lees’s Laws)
Note: each professor may have his or her own guidelines for individual classes. The
guidelines listed below are required by Dr. Lees for all written assignments, unless other
instructions are given.
Note: Correct spelling and proper grammar are essential in all written work. Papers must
be typewritten in a standard font (10 to 12 point) and double spaced, with proper margins.
All printed work must use only ONE SIDE of the page and must be secured with a paper
clip or staple. Additional instructions on footnoting will also be distributed.

1. Use the simple past tense and formal language (no slang or colloquial expressions).
2. Avoid the passive voice.
    e.g. The blockade was designed to force the Soviets to make concessions.
Instead, use a subject, an active verb with simple past tense and an object
    e.g. Kennedy used the blockade to force the Soviets to make concessions.
3. Avoid biased language (unless it is in a quote).
         e.g. substitute "humankind" for "mankind"; do not use the generic "he" or "she"
unless the reference indeed applies only to men or only to women.
4. Use quotes from primary sources judiciously and only when the very words written or
said are important in and of themselves; otherwise paraphrase.
5. In a research paper NEVER quote from secondary sources; paraphrase! If an
assignment calls for an analysis of a secondary source, it is acceptable to quote from that
source.
6. Do not use textbooks as sources for anything other than background and general
knowledge, unless they are specifically required as part of the assignment; they have no
standing in notes or bibliography and should not be quoted or footnoted.
7. Use block quotes very rarely.
8. Always identify people and organizations fully the first time they are mentioned; if an
abbreviation will be used subsequently, include that in brackets with the first mention.
    e.g. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles (the first time)
       Dulles or Secretary Dulles (thereafter)
       National Security Council (NSC) (the first time)
       NSC (thereafter)
Do not refer to historical figures by their first name.
9. Avoid such words or expressions as felt or at this point in time or the use of impact
as a verb.
10. Do not use headings such as Introduction or Conclusion or numbers to identify
different sections of your paper. Separate the introduction and conclusion from the text
by two double spaces.
11. Do not assign cosmic significance to your paper; stay with the issue and time period
in question. In your conclusion you may add a few sentences about subsequent events,
but do not make the mistake of claiming that your tiny topic was the decisive event that
dictated future events. History is a child with many parents.
                                                                                                       17



Honor Code
         The Honor Code applies to all work done for this class. Any violation of the
code, even one as minor as the accidental omission of quotation marks, will result in a
failing grade for the assignment in question. All work is to be done by each student on
their own; the professor reserves the right to view any collaboration as a violation of the
Honor Code. Plagiarism in any form is not acceptable . Any student violating the rules
specified below will receive a zero for the assignment in question and may be subject to
disciplinary action by the university. For more information see:
http://al.odu.edu/al/resources/undergrad.shtml.

            About Plagiarism: A Guide for College of Arts and Letters Students5

What is plagiarism?
The ODU Catalog defines plagiarism as follows: “A student will have committed
plagiarism if he or she reproduces someone else’s work without acknowledging its
source; or if a source is cited which the student has not cited or used. Examples of
plagiarism include: submitting a research paper obtained from a commercial research
service, the Internet, or from another student as if it were original work; making simple
changes to borrowed materials while leaving the organization, content, or phraseology
intact; or copying material from a source, supplying proper documentation, but leaving
out quotation marks. Plagiarism also occurs in a group project if one or more of the
members of the group does none of the group’s work and participates in none of the
group’s activities, but attempts to take credit for the work of the group.”

Hints for Avoiding Plagiarism:
* More than three words copied in sequence is plagiarism. This is ordinarily a good
yardstick to use when wondering whether or not quotes are appropriate; they are, if you
are copying more than three words in sequence that are not part of a common phrase (e.g.
“up-to-date”).
* One source is not “common knowledge.” Common knowledge does not require citation.
But something is not common knowledge if you have found just one source for the
information.
* When in doubt, cite! If you have any doubt about whether or not to cite a source, err on
the side of making the attribution.
* If your co-author sounds surprisingly eloquent, make sure the contribution is his/her
own. We often work in groups and co-author papers and projects. You should ask the
question of your co-author if you doubt the work is his/her own. In group work, you are
responsible for the project/paper in its entirety.
* Look away. When you are writing, do not have open books or papers in front of you as
you type. Read your sources, and then put what you have read into your own words.
* Writing is hard work. Paraphrasing is relatively easy, writing is hard. Learning to be a
good writer is part of what your college education is about. Staring at an empty screen
does become less daunting over time!

        5
          This information is adapted from a guide developed by Old Dominion University’s College of
Business and Public Administration.
                                                                                        18


* Just because it’s on the Internet, doesn’t mean it’s yours. The Internet is a fantastic
resource and search engines are terrific research tools. But what you find on the Internet
was written by someone. You must cite Internet web sites, and if you use a quote, use
appropriate quotation procedures.
* Paraphrasing is more than changing a verb tense or reordering a list. Essentially,
paraphrasing is used to summarize another author’s text. A paraphrased passage must be
cited.
* Use a Style Guide. Purchase a style guide and refer to it. Your instructor may suggest
one that is specific to an academic discipline. You may also ask a reference librarian for
recommendations.

The High Cost of Plagiarism
Plagiarism can ruin your reputation and cost you your professional career, along with the
respect of your peers and family. Plagiarism at Old Dominion University is an act of
academic dishonesty that has serious consequences. Note that plagiarism is specifically
covered in the ODU Honor Pledge. Refer to your course syllabus and the Student
Handbook and the Office of Student Affairs for details about sanctions and penalties for
this behavior.

Final Grades are earned according to the following point system.

A 1000-925
A- 924-890
B+ 889-860
B 859-820
B- 819-790
C+ 789-760
C 759-720
C-719-680
D+ 679-650
D 649-610
D- 609-580
F 579 and below

Points will be allocated as follows:

       Microfilm Exercise 50 points
       Williams Task Paper 50 points
       Bibliography          50 points
       Dead Figures         100 points
       Family Tree          add ten points to lowest grade
       Nixon/Elvis          100 points
       Article review       100 points
       Violence in the West First Draft 150 points
       Violence in the West Final paper 250 points
       Presidential Libraries 100 points
                                                                                          19


       H-Net/HNN 50 points

Schedule of topics and readings
       Bring Turabian with you to class every day; bring Williams as needed; read all
assignments before the class period when they are due to be discussed; a good way to
prepare the Williams chapters is to focus on the Task questions in each section.

September
1 Introduction and Overview
3 History and Historians Part One
       Readings: Williams, Toolbox, chapters 1 to 6
 Discussion Questions: what is History; what are the uses that History has been put to
throughout the centuries; what are the different approaches that have been taken to the
study of History?


8 History and Historians Part Two
        Reading: Leuchtenburg, “The Historian and the Public Realm”; “Who Owns
History” PBS Think Tank
 Discussion Questions: what is the use of history; whose history is it?
a. Specific points on Leuchtenberg:
What two forms has the emphasis on an “applied history” taken?
What sort of public roles have historians played in the 20th century?
What are the arguments used to support a public involvement by
historians? What are the arguments made in opposition?
What public experiences has the author of the article had?
Why can’t historians please policymakers? What do policymakers want historians to do?
What conclusion does the author arrive at on the question of the public involvement of
historians?
        Note: many of the experiences the author refers to concern historians’ opposition
to the war in Vietnam in general and to the invasion of Cambodia in 1970 in particular,
and to the student radicals of the 1960s, who staged protests at college campuses from
1967 to 1970 to protest the war. The most significant of these protest occurred in 1968, in
an attempt to influence the presidential nominating conventions and election of that year
and in 1970, in opposition to the war policies of President Nixon.
b. Specific points on Think Tank
What topics, people, events make up “history”?
Is one kind of history more relevant than another?
10 How to Use the Library and Locate Sources
        Reading: Turabian, chapter 3
        In-class tutorial by Dr. Lees DO NOT MISS THIS CLASS


15 New York Times microfilm assignment due in class—Tuesday, September 15
      Class discussion of NYT assignment
17 Gathering Information; Writing a paper, Question Framing
                                                                                      20


       Readings: Williams, Toolbox, chapter 8
       Turabian, Manual, chapters 1,2,4,5, 10, 11, 12 (handouts/postings).


22 Evaluating Sources
       Readings: Williams, Toolbox, chapter 9
              Williams Task Paper due in class---Tuesday, September 22
24 Citing Sources
       Readings: Turabian, Manual, chapters 15,16,17
                  Williams, Toolbox, chapter 10, selections 10.1 and 10.2
                     DO NOT MISS THIS CLASS

29 Bibliography Assignment Due in Class, Tuesday, Sepember 29
       Basis of class discussion
October
1 Plagiarism /Internet ( forms for Family Tree assignment distributed and explained)
       Readings: Williams, Toolbox, chapter 10, selections 10.3, 10.4, 10.5; chapter 19
                   Turabian, chapter 25


6 Narrative and Explanation; (and prep for Dead Figure assignment)
           Readings: Williams, Toolbox, chapters 11; Turabian, Manual, Part III
8 Dead Figure Due in class—Thursday, October 8
          Basis of class discussion


13 No Class—Fall Break
15 Interpretation and Speculation
          Williams, Toolbox chapter 12 and chapter 13
           Preview of “Murder at Harvard” at PBS webpage
               http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/murder/

20.Film: “Murder at Harvard”
22 Family Tree Assignment due in class—Thursday, October 22
       Basis of class discussion

27 Crafting a paper from Primary Documents; Prep for Nixon Assignment;
   How to review a scholarly article; Prep for Article review
29 Nixon/Elvis Assignment Due in class---Thursday, October 29
       Basis of class discussion

November
1 Relevance of History (prep for Special Collections tour and Presidential Library
assignments)
         Williams, Toolbox, chapters 14-17
3 Article Review Due in class—Thursday, November 3
                                                                                        21


         basis of class discussion


10 Articles Summary returned; background lecture for Violence in the West
12 Violence in the West, Preface, Part 1, pages vii to 31; Chronology, pages 156-159,
Questions for Consideration, numbers 1 and 2. ;Violence in the West, Part 1, 1. The
Johnson County War, pages 37-81; Questions to Consider, numbers 3 through 6


17 Violence in the West, Part 1, 2. The Colorado Coal Strike, pages 82-143; Questions to
Consider, numbers 7 through 14; Violence in the West, Epilogue, pages 145-155;
Questions to Consider, numbers 15 through 17.
19 Special Collections Tour in Library—3rd floor of library


24 Draft of Violence in the West paper Due in Class—Tuesday, November 24
26 No Class--Holiday

December
1 Draft of Violence in the West Papers returned
3 Presidential Library Assignment Due in class—Thursday, December 3
                  Basis of class discussions


8 Individual Consultations—BAL 8020
10 Final Draft of Violence in the West Paper
        DUE IN CLASS, Thursday, December 10



Final Exam Period—Tuesday, December 15—12:30 to 1:30
       Future of History, Williams, chapters 7 and 18
              H-NET/HNN Assignment Due
             Violence in the West Paper returned

PLEASE NOTE: THIS SYLLABUS IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO
WEATHER EMERGENCIES, EPIDEMICS, OR OTHER RANDOM EVENTS.

				
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