Jason Reeves - Bio.doc by tongxiamy

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									Throughout history, there have been countless albums written about love. Passion and heartbreak still
serve as timeless muses across the spectrums of both pop and rock. On his second full-length album
and long-awaited major label debut, The Lovesick, Jason Reeves offers a fresh perspective on
everybody’s favorite subject from the stance of those who aren’t in love but want to be. With lilting pop
harmonies and heartfelt, honest lyrics, Reeves examines the world’s need for connection on personal
and universal levels.

Due out spring 2011, The Lovesick preserves the singer-songwriter’s knack for storytelling, while
expanding his sonic palette. Reeves still revels in folk, rock, and pop, much like he did on 2007’s
Magnificent Adventures of Heartache and Other Frightening Tales, but he continues challenging himself
as well. Reeves saw success with that first offering: It debuted at #2 on iTunes' Folk chart and was
lauded as one of iTunes' Top Indie albums of the year. At that point, he caught the attention of
songwriter Kara DioGuardi who instantly fell in love with his voice, songwriting, and spirit. She signed
him to Warner Bros. Records, which re-released the album in 2008.

An in-demand songwriter, Reeves has co-written chart-topping hits like “Bubbly” and “Realize” from
Colbie Caillat’s platinum-selling debut, Coco, as well as tracks for everyone from Tyrone Wells, Angel
Taylor and Lenka; the latter of which had one of 2009’s most-synched songs around the world with a
Reeves composition, “The Show”. Reeves has also won over live audiences in the United States, England,
and Japan. However, there’s nothing quite like hearing him on The Lovesick.

About the album’s central theme, Reeves explains, “I met this girl who blew my mind, but it didn’t work
out. However, I didn’t give up, and I kept searching for love. ‘The Lovesick’ are people who want love but
don’t have it. They still believe and are fighting for it, but they’re in between those who have given up
and those who are there. Essentially, it’s being sick with the desire for love.” It's that universal feeling
that permeates each song on the album, making it so accessible—and worth the wait.

In order to capture this feeling, Reeves retreated to a tiny Nashville studio with producer Adam Smith in
late 2009. Collaborating with Jordan Lawhead, Danelle Leverett [the JaneDear Girls], and Makana
Rowan, Reeves incorporated flourishes of epic pop production into his traditionally stripped-down
approach. Beginning with an acoustic guitar, he’d find the melodies, and then expand the songs in the
studio with piano, synths, and more. As a result, there’s a sense of sonic wonder coursing through the
airy soundscapes of “Simple Song” and “Always Want More,” which see Reeves crooning over
syncopated beats, hopeful piano, and careening textures.

“I meshed folk and modern pop,” says Reeves. “All of the songs began on an acoustic guitar. The only
difference was in the recording. It was incredibly freeing. I experimented and had fun in the studio.
When anything can happen, you'll do things you would've never otherwise done. I'm still being myself.
This is just a new side.”

Fans become introduced to this “new side” with "Helium Hearts." The song hit iTunes in the Fall of 2010,
and it encompasses both Reeves' message and stylistic evolution. "Helium Hearts" soars on the strength
of calming acoustic guitars, vibrant keyboards, and a hook that ascends to the heavens and back.

"It's the perfect introduction, and it's the first song on the record for that reason,” he says. “If the record
is a day, this track is its sunrise. ‘Helium Hearts’ encapsulates that feeling of floating away with the one
you love. You’re literally leaving the world when you first fall for someone. You feel like you escaped
reality even when you're walking around with that person.”

Reeves follows that trip through love across the album’s 11 songs—from the melodic morning of
“Helium Hearts” to the final twilight send-off of “Truth.” First radio single “Sticks and Stones” illuminates
another side of the album’s journey. A keyboard hum gives way to driving hip-hop-style bounce as
Reeves makes a declaration for personal resilience. The song hits iTunes in February and radio in April,
and represents the next major musical step in Reeves' journey.

"This song represents the experimental side of this album,” adds Reeves. “It’s a defiant song. It’s
supposed to empower people to avoid being dragged down by the wrong one. It’s that simple statement
that you won’t be broken.”

Reeves enlisted the help of a couple friends to add another dimension to two standout songs. Kara
DioGuardi lends her unmistakable pipes to the powerful “No One Ever Taught Us.” The two play off each
other effortlessly, creating a calculated rhythmic conversation that’s engaging from start to finish.
Reeves enthuses, “It’s a really intense song, and I needed a strong voice like hers. She was perfect for it,
and it makes the track.”

After collaborating with Reeves on her first two albums, Colbie Caillat returns the favor on “No Lies.”
Reeves says: “I love how excited Colbie got when she heard the new music, and I’m really lucky she
wanted to be involved. Her part is gorgeous.”

DioGuardi and Caillat add a lot of depth, but the brilliance of The Lovesick comes directly from Reeves. "I
want to fully explore life through songs, and this album is just another step towards that. It’s a
whirlwind. The Lovesick captures real life on songs placed next to each other forming a broken-up story.
It’s the fingerprints of a beautiful real-life event between two human beings. I’m singing a story of a
moment in my life. It's as real as I could make it. It's life."

In the end, we’re all Lovesick to a degree, and that’s why Reeves’s music will resonate. He concludes,
“When I write, I'm not afraid to say exactly what I'm feeling. Each word is completely honest, literal, and
real. I'm not trying to be cool, and I'm not trying to write a hit song to impress somebody. I just hope the
music makes people feel.”

There’s no doubt that listeners will feel every note of The Lovesick for a long time to come.
For further information, contact Warner Bros. Records Publicity:

   TJ Tauriello / TJ.Tauriello@wbr.com / 818-953-3311

								
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