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only evidence Forensic and Medical Sexual Assault Clinicians

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only evidence Forensic and Medical Sexual Assault Clinicians Powered By Docstoc
					Contamination
 Why all the
    fuss?
                  The case
• Mr Farah Bdulkadir Jama, a tall thin teenage
  male of Somali descent.
• In July 2008, found guilty of rape and sentenced
  to imprisonment for 6 years
• Appealed successfully in late 2009.
• The Honourable FHR Vincent AO, QC
  engaged to investigate the circumstances – The
  Vincent Report tabled 29/March/2010
             Circumstances
• “M” age 48
• Over 28’s nightclub for ½ hour, found in toilet
  cubicle (locked from the inside) unconscious
  with pants up but undone.
• Subsequently examined at the Austin Hospital re
  possibility of sexual assault.
               The day before:
• Mr Jama had engaged in sexual activity with “B”, she
  was forensically examined by the same doctor at the
  same place, 28 hours prior to the examination of “M”.
  Swabs were taken and processed.
• Also, dried flaky matter in the hair was noted and
  sampled
• No charges were laid in relation to this incident.
• The doctor had showered and changed clothing
  between the two cases.
           The (only) evidence
• On one of the endocervical swabs (from M) was found
  one sperm and 15 sperm heads. The DNA was
  matched with a profile on the data base to Mr Jama
  with a likelihood ratio of 17 million.

• Now thought to have originated from the first case
  “B”. The dry flaky matter in her hair was semen –
  microscopic fragments floating and landed somewhere
  that caused either direct or indirect contamination
  (swab, slide, furniture etc)
                    Problems
•   Sample collection
•   Forensic laboratory
•   Police investigation
•   Legal / court issues
           Recommendations
• Many recommendations were made. Some
  pertaining to forensic examinations and
  specimen collection, others more pertinent to
  the laboratory, police and legal processes. Those
  relevant to our forensic medical practice are:
           Physical Facilities
1. Furnishings to be made of impermeable
   material that can be easily wiped clean
   (includes waiting areas)
2. A dedicated bench / trolley space available to
   collect and process samples
3. Lockable cupboards / drawers for storage.
4. Appropriate hand washing facilities within the
   examination room
                  Cleaning
1. Clean all surfaces after every sexual assault
   examination
2. Appropriate cleaning products available
3. Daily and weekly cleaning procedure according
   to hospital protocol, by appropriately trained
   personnel
4. Log book of cleaning
                    Access
1. Limit access to the room for essential persons
   only. Designated room ideal.
2. Log book to record all persons who enter the
   room.
3. Suspected perpetrators or other persons are not
   to be examined within the room.
                    Equipment
1.   All equipment to be stored in locked cupboard or
     drawers
2.   The health practitioner is responsible for selecting the
     correct equipment.
3.   No items are to be taken from the trolley and
     replaced back in the store.
4.   Sterile gloves – not from a box of 100
5.   Sterile packs and gowns to be available
6.   Forensic staff to be responsible for maintaining stock
7.   Layout of facilities.
                        Other
1.   Maintaining standards to national and international
     practices.
2.   Better information transfer to the laboratory
3.   Better communication between forensic practitioners,
     forensic laboratory, police and lawyers
4.   Reconfiguration of the data bases to identify possible
     links between cases
5.   Review of police training
6.   Education of legal practitioners and members of the
     judiciary in cases involving DNA evidence
  Recommendations from professor
           Hoskin
In addition to those discussed:
• All equipment to be certified DNA free and to be
  drawn from a sealled single use kit
• Warning that unauthorised access may result in that
  persons DNA being used in a criminal conviction
• Consider all staff having there DNA registered on the
  laboratory register
• Control swabs prior to examinations and after cleaning
Slides to be made at the laboratory
Swabs to be re-sheathed immediately after their
   collection
Do not cut corners
Lots of gloves
Examiner to shower and change clothes prior to a
   subsequent examination
The End!

				
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posted:10/9/2012
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